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[award]

Mazal Tov
to all the Jewish book awards finalists and winners.
Below are nominees and winners of several Awards.

The National Jewish Books Awards is sponsored and administered by the Jewish Book Council. The Awards Ceremony was held in New York City on Tuesday evening, March 6, 2007, at the Center for Jewish History. Congratulations to all the winners and nominees, and to the Jewish Book Council. Please visit their website. [NJBA_winner_logo.jpg]






Everett Family Foundation
Jewish Book of the Year Award

When Mrs. Everett introduced this book at the Awards, she told how when she runs out of bookcase space, she donates her used books to the NY Public Library system. But thee are some books that she and her late husband would never let go of. They are books by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin. I concur. In accepting this award, Rabbi Telushkin, told how many people ask if a person is "religious," by which they mean if he or she follows certain rituals. But while rituals are of prime importance and give us meaning, there are those who ignore the issue of Jewish ethics. This book explores Jewish Ethics. We can hardly wait for the forthcoming additional volumes.
A Code of Jewish Ethics, Volume 1: You Shall Be Holy is the initial volume of the first major code of Jewish ethics to be written in the English language. It is a monumental work on the vital topic of personal character and integrity by one of the premier Jewish scholars and thinkers of our time.
With the stated purpose of restoring ethics to its central role in Judaism, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin offers hundreds of examples from the Torah, the Talmud, rabbinic commentaries, and contemporary stories to illustrate how ethical teachings can affect our daily behavior. The subjects dealt with are ones we all encounter. They include judging other people fairly; knowing when forgiveness is obligatory, optional, or forbidden; balancing humility and self-esteem; avoiding speech that shames others; restraining our impulses of envy, hatred, and revenge; valuing truth but knowing when lying is permitted; understanding why God is the ultimate basis of morality; and appreciating the great benefits of Torah study. Telushkin has arranged the book in the traditional style of Jewish codes, with topical chapters and numbered paragraphs. Statements of law are almost invariably followed by anecdotes illustrating how these principles have been, or can be, practiced in daily life. The book can be read straight through to provide a solid grounding in Jewish values, consulted as a reference when facing ethical dilemmas, or studied in a group.
Vast in scope, this volume distills more than three thousand years of Jewish laws and suggestions on how to improve one's character and become more honest, decent, and just. It is a landmark work of scholarship that is sure to influence the lives of Jews for generations to come, rich with questions to ponder and discuss, but primarily a book to live by.







American Jewish Studies
Celebrate 350 Award
Winner

Emma Lazarus's most famous poem gave a voice to the Statue of Liberty, but her remarkable life has remained a mystery until now. She was a woman so far ahead of her time that we are still scrambling to catch up with her-a feminist, a Zionist, and an internationally famous Jewish American writer before thse categories even existed.
Drawing upon a cache of personal letters undiscovered until the 1980, Esther Schor brings this vital woman to life in all her complexity. Born into a wealthy Sephardic family in 1849, Lazarus published her first volume of verse at seventeen and gained entrée into New York's elite literary circles. Although she once referred to her family as "outlaw" Jews, she felt a deep attachment to Jewish history and peoplehood. Her compassion for the downtrodden Jews of Eastern Europe-refugees whose lives had little in common with her own-helped redefine the meaning of America itself.
In this groundbreaking biography, Schor argues persuasively for Lazarus's place in history as a poet, an activist, and a prophet of the world we all inhabit today-a world that she helped to invent.







American Jewish Studies
Celebrate 350 Award
Finalists







Anthologies and Collections
Winner
In this insightful book, an eclectic and distinguished group of writers explore the Jewish experience in the Americas and celebrate the legacy of Salo Wittmayer Baron (1895-1989), a preeminent scholar who revolutionized the study of Jewish history during his lengthy tenure at Columbia University.
Baron's important ideas are reflected throughout these texts, which concern strategies for the continuous identity of a dispersed people. Featured essays discuss the meaning and significance of colonial portraits of American Jews; the history of an extraordinary group of Jews in the remote Amazon; the charitable fairs organized by Jewish women to raise money for various causes in nineteenth-century America; the place of Jews in postmodern American culture; the "Jewish unconscious" of the art critic Meyer Schapiro; and Salo Baron's influence as a historian and teacher. A group of poems by Robert Pinsky accompanies the essays. Together these writings form a dynamic interplay of ideas that encourages readers to think deeply about Jewish history and identity.
The author, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, is University Professor and Professor of Performance Studies at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She is the author of Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage and coauthor of Getting Comfortable in New York: The American Jewish Home, 1880-1950.






Anthologies and Collections
Finalists







Biography and Autobiography
Winner

It was so fitting that this book won for BIOGRAPHY, since it is the story of family, as well as the collaborative effort of extended family members and borthers and sisters to recreate lives. lost.
In this rich and riveting narrative, a writer's search for the truth behind his family's tragic past in World War II becomes a remarkably original epic-part memoir, part reportage, part mystery, and part scholarly detective work-that brilliantly explores the nature of time and memory, family and history.
The Lost begins as the story of a boy who grew up in a family haunted by the disappearance of six relatives during the Holocaust-an unmentionable subject that gripped his imagination from earliest childhood. Decades later, spurred by the discovery of a cache of desperate letters written to his grandfather in 1939 and tantalized by fragmentary tales of a terrible betrayal, Daniel Mendelsohn sets out to find the remaining eyewitnesses to his relatives' fates. That quest eventually takes him to a dozen countries on four continents, and forces him to confront the wrenching discrepancies between the histories we live and the stories we tell. And it leads him, finally, back to the small Ukrainian town where his family's story began, and where the solution to a decades-old mystery awaits him.
Deftly moving between past and present, interweaving a world-wandering odyssey with childhood memories of a now-lost generation of immigrant Jews and provocative ruminations on biblical texts and Jewish history, The Lost transforms the story of one family into a profound, morally searching meditation on our fragile hold on the past. Deeply personal, grippingly suspenseful, and beautifully written, this literary tour de force illuminates all that is lost, and found, in the passage of time.







Biography and Autobiography
Finalists







Children's and Young Adult Literature
Winner

It's just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist-books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.







Children's and Young Adult Literature
Finalists

Solomon and the Ant was a Sidney Taylor Award recipient. It is a collection of 43 traditional entertaining Jewish stories. Before his recent death, scholar-storyteller Oberman collected and retold the folktales, providing brief introductions to each along with endnotes about culture and sources. His colleague Penninah Schram added a fine general introduction and contributed some of the commentary. ... In the YELLOW STAR.. Syvia is four years old in 1939, when the Germans invade Poland and start World War II. A few months later, her family is forced into the crowded Lodz ghetto, with more than a quarter of a million other Jews. At the end of the war, when Syvia is 10, only about 800 Jews remain-only 12 of them are children. Syvia remembers daily life: yellow stars, illness, starvation, freezing cold, and brutal abuse.... In A BRIEF CHAPTER IN MY IMPOSSIBLE LIFE, Simon starting her junior year in high school. Her mom's a lawyer for the ACLU, her dad's a political cartoonist, so she's grown up standing outside the organic food coop asking people to sign petitions for worthy causes. She's got a terrific younger brother and amazing friends. And she's got a secret crush on a really smart and funny guy-who spends all of his time with another girl. Then her birth mother contacts her. Simone's always known she was adopted, but she never wanted to know anything about it. She's happy with her family just as it is, thank you. She learns who her birth mother was-a 16-year-old girl named Rivka. Who is Rivka? Why has she contacted Simone? Why now?







Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice
Winner

The bible is filled with family deuds and brotherly estrangement and jealousies. When this book, FRAGMENTED FAMILIES Patterns of Estrangement and Reconciliation, by the author Ellen Sucoy, won the award, Sucoy, who had flown in from Jerusalem, said she ws now a new, emerging author at the age of 75. HeHe. She was born to a family which had a feud with relatives, which continued for over 5 decades. In this book, she clarifies the phenomenon of estrangement between family members. The book focuses on the meanings and process of alienation, its outcomes and possible paths toward resolution. The reader is encouraged to recognize that estrangement, with all its frustration and pain, may offer new opportunities for self-understanding. The task of exploring one?s family, examining its fragmented parts and clarifying one's own role as a family member is a crucial step in personal development, whether or not the effort leads to reconciliation. Fragmented Families is intended for a general readership. It will also be a relevant resource for psychologists, physicians, lawyers, social workers and clergy.







Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice
Finalists







Eastern European Studies
Ronald S. Lauder Award
Winner

In Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation's Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968, the author writes of two brothers in Warsaw who followed opposite paths. "In the elegant capital city of Warsaw, the editor Mieczyslaw Grydzewski would come with his two dachshunds to a café called Ziemianska." Thus begins the history of a generation of Polish literati born at the fin de siècle. They sat in Café Ziemianska and believed that the world moved on what they said there. Caviar and Ashes tells the story of the young avant-gardists of the early 1920s who became the radical Marxists of the late 1920s. They made the choice for Marxism before Stalinism, before socialist realism, before Marxism meant the imposition of Soviet communism in Poland. It ended tragically. Marci Shore begins with this generation's coming of age after the First World War and narrates a half-century-long journey through futurist manifestos and proletarian poetry, Stalinist terror and Nazi genocide, a journey from the literary cafés to the cells of prisons and the corridors of power. Using newly available archival materials from Poland and Russia, as well as from Ukraine and Israel, Shore explores what it meant to live Marxism as a European, an East European, and a Jewish intellectual in the twentieth century.






Eastern European Studies
Ronald S. Lauder Award
Finalists















Education and Jewish Identity
Winner

The author flew in from Jerusalem to accept her award. Thousands of young North American Jews visit Israel every year on organized, educational, heritage tours. The Israel Experience Programs present religion, homeland, and nation to participants in compelling and sometimes unsettling ways. Supported by Jewish communal institutions, these programs are encouraged for their presumed value in combating assimilation and a loss of Jewish culture. Faydra Shapiro suggests that their real success may lie elsewhere. Building Jewish Roots offers an exploration of how participants build rich and varied Jewish identities through their experiences in Israel at the long-established Livnot U'Lehibanot program. Shapiro argues that Israel Experience Programs offer something vital to participants - the power to shape and choose their own Jewish identities. Vividly written, Building Jewish Roots is a critical resource for those interested in contemporary Jewry, religion in the modern world, ethnic studies, and ethnography.







Education and Jewish Identity
Finalist

More than any other institution, the synagogue has sustained American Jewry. The Jewish future depends on it. But to thrive rather than just survive, synagogues are challenged to break free from the mold of ethnic enclave and re-emerge as a center of the sacred, where creativity, spirituality and ethics are central. In this probing and powerful exploration of the future of the American synagogue, Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman holds that we make progress not by arguing better but by speaking differently. As a think-it-yourself challenge rather than a do-it-yourself manual, Hoffman's honest and compelling analysis of synagogues provides an entirely new set of concepts to facilitate transformative conversation among synagogue boards, denominational leaders, seminarians, cantors, rabbis, executive directors, educators and all who make synagogues their passion.















FICTION
Winner

A million-dollar painting by Marc Chagall is stolen from a museum. The unlikely thief is Benjamin Ziskind, a thirty-year-old quiz-show writer. As Benjamin and his twin sister try to evade the police, they find themselves recalling their dead parents-the father who lost a leg in Vietnam, the mother who created children's books-and their stories about trust, loss, and betrayal. What is true, what is fake, what does it mean? Eighty years before the theft, these questions haunted Chagall and the enigmatic Yiddish fabulist Der Nister ("The Hidden One"), teachers at a school for Jewish orphans. Both the painting and the questions will travel through time to shape the Ziskinds' futures. With astonishing grace and simplicity, Dara Horn interweaves a real art heist, history, biography, theology, and Yiddish literature. Richly satisfying, utterly unique, her novel opens the door to "the world to come"-not life after death, but the world we create through our actions right now. Reading group guide included.







FICTION
Finalists


In ACCIDENTS by Yael Hedaya, she tells the story of Shira Klein, Yonatan Luria and his daughter, Dana. It is winter -- winter at work, winter among friends, winter at home, and winter of the heart. Yonatan is a marginal writer, a fifty-year-old widower left to raise his child alone. When he meets Shira, a bestselling author paralyzed by stage fright, the thaw begins as man, woman, and girl enter a halting romance, alternately tender and belligerent, generous and withdrawn...
In DISOBEDIANCE, Ronit Krushka, thirty-two and single, lives on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Orthodox Judaism is a suffocating culture she fled long ago. When she learns that her estranged father, the pre-eminent rabbi of the London Orthodox Jewish community in which she was raised, has died, she leaves behind her Friday night takeout, her troublesome romance, and her boisterous circle of friends and returns home for the first time in years. Driven by wit and beautifully rendered detail, Disobedience pulls back the curtain on a devout and closed world. Set at the crossroads of tradition and modernity, of personal desires and the demands of God, Disobedience is about the importance of moving on and what we lose when we do -- and it is about the tendency toward disobedience that we all have....
In GOLDEN COUNTRY by Jennifer Gilmore, she captures the exuberance of the American dream while exposing its underbelly -- disillusionment, greed, and the disaffection bred by success. As Gilmore's charmingly flawed characters witness and shape history, they come to embody America's greatness, as well as its greatest imperfections. Spanning the first half of the twentieth century, Golden Country vividly brings to life the intertwining stories of three immigrants seeking their fortunes -- the handsome and ambitious Seymour, a salesman-turned-gangster-turned-Broadway-producer; the gentle and pragmatic Joseph, a door-to-door salesman who is driven to invent a cleanser effective enough to wipe away the shame of his brother's mob connections; and the irresistible Frances Gold, who grows up in Brooklyn, stars in Seymour's first show, and marries the man who invents television. Their three families, though inex-tricably connected for years, are brought together for the first time by the engagement of Seymour's son and Joseph's daughter. David and Miriam's marriage must endure the inheritance of not only their parents' wealth but also the burdens of their past.










History
Gerrard and Ella Berman Award
Winner

Professor David Cesarani flew in frlom London to accept his award.. He spoke of how after WWII there were those that wrote that Eichmann was a monster psychotic, while Arendt wrote he was a banal bureaucrat. But the truth is different. IN this monumental and groundbreaking biography-the first one in more than forty years-of Adolf Eichmann, Germany's architect of the Final Solution, he argues that Eichmann learned to kill. He was in charge of the logistical apparatus of mass deportation and extinction, Eichmann was at the center of the Nazi genocide against the Jews. He was personally responsible for transporting over two million Jews to their deaths in Auschwitz-Birkenau and other death camps. The book reveals that the depiction of Eichmann as a loser who drifted into the ranks of the SS is a fabrication that conceals Eichmann's considerable abilities and his early political development. Drawing on recently unearthed documents, David Cesarani shows how Eichmann became the Reich's "expert" on Jewish matters and reveals his initially cordial working relationship with Zionist Jews in Germany, despite his intense anti-Semitism. Cesarani explains how the massive ethnic cleansing Eichmann conducted in Poland in 1939-40 was the crucial bridge to his later role in the mass deportation of the Jews. And Cesarani argues controversially that Eichmann was not necessarily predisposed to mass murder, exploring the remarkable, largely unknown period in Eichmann's early career when he first learned how to become an administrator of genocide.
This challenging work deepens our understanding of Adolf Eichmann and offers fresh insights both into the operation of the Final Solution and the making of its most notorious perpetrator.







History
Gerrard and Ella Berman Award
Finalists










Holocaust Studies
Winner

The Jewish Enemy: Nazi Propaganda during World War II and the Holocaust explains how the extent of atrocities has overshadowed the calculus Nazis used to justify their deeds. According to German wartime media, it was German citizens who were targeted for extinction by a vast international conspiracy. Leading the assault was an insidious, belligerent Jewish clique, so crafty and powerful that it managed to manipulate the actions of Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. Hitler portrayed the Holocaust as a defensive act, a necessary move to destroy the Jews before they destroyed Germany. Joseph Goebbels, Minister of Propaganda, and Otto Dietrich's Press Office translated this fanatical vision into a coherent cautionary narrative, which the Nazi propaganda machine disseminated into the recesses of everyday life. Calling on impressive archival research, Jeffrey Herf recreates the wall posters that Germans saw while waiting for the streetcar, the radio speeches they heard at home or on the street, the headlines that blared from newsstands. The Jewish Enemy is the first extensive study of how anti-Semitism pervaded and shaped Nazi propaganda during World War II and the Holocaust, and how it pulled together the diverse elements of a delusionary Nazi worldview. Here we find an original and haunting exposition of the ways in which Hitler legitimized war and genocide to his own people, as necessary to destroy an allegedly omnipotent Jewish foe. In an era when both anti-Semitism and conspiracy theories continue to influence world politics, Herf offers a timely reminder of their dangers along with a fresh interpretation of the paranoia underlying the ideology of the Third Reich.







Holocaust Studies
Finalists










Illustrated Children's Book
Louis Posner Memorial Award
Winner

In Booklist, I. Cooper wrote that, "The story of the binding of Isaac is not for the fainthearted. Abraham's willingness to slay his child, Isaac, in deference to God's wishes has provoked questions for millennia. So how does an author present a story so disturbing to many adults to an audience of children? Basing the story on Midrash, Jewish tales about Old Testament stories, Caldecott Medal-winner Gerstein frames his picture book around the pure white ram that ultimately takes Isaac's place."
"The ram waits patiently in the Garden of Eden and beyond until God calls. More than once the Evil One tries to thwart him, but the ram insists, "I must save the child." He runs through swamps and jungles, leaps over lions, and finally scales the sacred mount, where he sees Isaac bound to an altar and Abraham weeping. After God intercedes with Abraham, the ram meets his fate "and his soul [flies] into God's hands." Children who don't know the story will be lost, but, of course, many will be familiar with the biblical tale. Gerstein offers an explanation about the necessity of the sacrifice through dialogue between Abraham and God, with Abraham wondering why God tested him, knowing that he would do whatever was asked. God replies, "I wanted the whole world to see your love and your trust in me so that all people might follow your example." This may temper the scene for some, even as it raises more questions for others. Of course, Gerstein can only work within the parameters of the original text. In that context, he tries hard to bring a sense of nobility to the story, embuing the ram with a fidelity that is heroic."
"The art does not shy away from the fearsomeness of the story but it, too, attempts to offer hope. The intense painting, executed in inks, oils, and colored pencil, clearly depict both the evil in the world (as personified by a particularly fierce devilish character in several guises) as well as the power of God and His word. Gerstein uses shape and color to move the action through the lower realms of swamp and earth and then elevates the scene of the sacrifice on a high mountain. Though God is not seen, hints of his hands are visible in the clouds for those who look closely. Especially moving is the double-page spread that shows the broken ram on the altar, its spirit flying into the light. A stirring visual finale, on pages touched with gold, explains how the ram's ashes and bones came to build a great Temple, and how his horns will be used to call the people of Israel home. "










Illustrated Children's Book
Louis Posner Memorial Award
Finalists

In ACROSS THE ALLEY, Abe and Willie live across the alley from each other. Willie is black and Abe is Jewish, and during the day, they don't talk. But at night they open their windows and are best friends. Willie shows Abe how to throw a real big-league slider, and Abe gives Willie his violin to try out. Then one night, Abe's grandfather catches them-will Abe and Willie have the courage to cross the alley and reveal their friendship during the day? Like the bestselling The Other Side, E. B. Lewis's striking, atmospheric watercolors bring to life a moving story of baseball and music, and how two young people try to bridge the divide of prejudice.
In Shlemazel and the Remarkable Spoon of Pohost, lazy Shlemazel is convinced he has no luck. But Moshke the tinker promises him that his luck will change if he sets to work using the "amazing, remarkable spoon of Pohost." Shlemazel gets busytilling the poretz's field, helping the miller, and baking cakes with pretty Chaya Massel. Although "luck" remains elusive, what Shlemazel does find is even better. Lively Chagall-like illustrations capture the spirit of this traditional Jewish tale, a funny and thought-provoking look at how we make our own luck.










Jewish Family Literature
In Memory of Dorothy Kripke
Winner

When the award went to Lilith's Ark: Teenage Tales of Biblical Women, the author, Rabbi Deborah Bodin Cohen, told how she wrote these stories I nrabbinical school, and then graduation, a pulpit, and family sidetracked the stories project. Now she got back to it, and won the award. It is a collection of midrash written expressly for teenage girls. Not long after the world was created, Lilith, the first woman, was expelled from the Garden of Eden. She built an ark, a magic box, in which future biblical women could hide their most prized possessions. And so, Lilith's Ark became a place for women to share their own experiences of adolescence with future generations of girls...
The women of Torah grew up at a time when gender roles were rigidly defined and girls were considered women at an early age. Still, the Torah hints that young biblical women faced challenges similar to those that teenagers encounter today: first loves, burgeoning identities, developing sexualities, and blossoming spirituality. Building on textual sources, Deborah Bodin Cohen has created a collection of midrashim about the teen years of 10 women in Genesis that will resonate with 21st-century readers.
Lilith's Ark melds text, biblical commentaries, and historic details about the ancient world with the experiences of modern girls and women and the author's own imagination. A discussion guide for each story enriches the reading experience. This is a book that will speak across time to the anxieties and aspirations of today's growing girls.








Jewish Family Literature
In Memory of Dorothy Kripke
Finalist








Modern Jewish Thought and Experience
Dorot Foundation Award
In Memory of Joy Ungerleider Mayerson
Winner

Long the object of curiosity, admiration, and gossip, rabbis' wives have rarely been viewed seriously as American Jewish religious and communal leaders. We know a great deal about the important role played by rabbis in building American Jewish life in this country, but not much about the role that their wives played. The Rabbi's Wife redresses that imbalance by highlighting the unique contributions of rebbetzins to the development of American Jewry.
Tracing the careers of rebbetzins from the beginning of the twentieth century until the present, Shuly Rubin Schwartz chronicles the evolution of the role from a few individual rabbis' wives who emerged as leaders to a cohort who worked together on behalf of American Judaism. The Rabbi's Wife reveals the ways these women succeeded in both building crucial leadership roles for themselves and becoming an important force in shaping Jewish life in America.








Modern Jewish Thought and Experience
Dorot Foundation Award
In Memory of Joy Ungerleider Mayerson
Finalists








Scholarship
Nahum Sarna Memorial Award
Winner

This provocative volume explores the origins of the Jewish doctrine of the resurrection of the dead. Jon D. Levenson argues that, contrary to a very widespread misconception, the ancient rabbis were keenly committed to the belief that at the end of time, God would restore the deserving dead to life. In fact, Levenson points out, the rabbis saw the Hebrew Bible itself as committed to that idea.
The author meticulously traces the belief in resurrection backward from its undoubted attestations in rabbinic literature and in the Book of Daniel, showing where the belief stands in continuity with earlier Israelite culture and where it departs from that culture. Focusing on the biblical roots of resurrection, Levenson challenges the notion that it was a foreign import into Judaism, and in the process he develops a neglected continuity between Judaism and Christianity. His book will shake the thinking of scholars and lay readers alike, revising the way we understand the history of Jewish ideas about life, death, and the destiny of the Jewish people








Scholarship
Nahum Sarna Memorial Award
Finalists








Sephardic Culture
Mimi S. Frank Award
In Memory of Becky Levy
Winner

Tales from the Sephardic Dispersion begins the most important collection of Jewish folktales ever published. It is the first volume in Folktales of the Jews, the five-volume series to be released over the next several years, in the tradition of Louis Ginzberg's classic, Legends of the Jews.
The 71 tales here and the others in this series have been selected from the Israel Folktale Archives (IFA), a treasure house of Jewish lore that has remained largely unavailable to the entire world until now.
Since the creation of the State of Israel, the IFA has collected more than 20,000 tales from newly arrived immigrants, long-lost stories shared by their families from around the world. The tales come from the major ethno-linguistic communities of the Jewish world and are representative of a wide variety of subjects and motifs, especially rich in Jewish content and context.
Each of the tales is accompanied by in-depth commentary that explains the tale's cultural, historical, and literary background and its similarity to other tales in the IFA collection, and extensive scholarly notes. There is also an introduction that describes the Sephardic culture and its folk narrative tradition, a world map of the areas covered, illustrations, biographies of the collectors and narrators, tale type and motif indexes, a subject index, and a comprehensive bibliography.








Sephardic Culture
Mimi S. Frank Award
In Memory of Becky Levy
Finalists








Women's Studies
Barbara Dobkin Award
Winner

Why aren't Jewish women circumcised? This improbable question, first advanced by anti-Jewish Christian polemicists, is the point of departure for this wide-ranging exploration of gender and Jewishness in Jewish thought. With a lively command of a wide range of Jewish sources--from the Bible and the Talmud to the legal and philosophical writings of the Middle Ages to Enlightenment thinkers and modern scholars--Shaye J. D. Cohen considers the varied responses to this provocative question and in the process provides the fullest cultural history of Jewish circumcision available.








Women's Studies
Barbara Dobkin Award
Finslists










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