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Welcome to our Fall 2017, Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Winter 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, and oh so many more pages of Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME WINTER 2018 BOOK READINGS




November 03-06, 2017: Israeli American Conference in Washington DC
November 05-07, 2017: UCLA. American Culture and the Jewish Experience in Music. Jews and the LA Music Industry; Mark Slobin on Jewish American Music; The Afterlife of Fiddler on the Roof; Sacred Song and Music of the Past: Tradition and Innovation; 100 Years of the Jazz Singer; The Language of Yiddish Theatre; and more.
November 12-15, 2017: JFNA General Assembly in Los Angeles, CA
November 18-19, 2017: Miami Book Fair

January 29, 2018: The Band's Visit: From Stage to Screen. Streicker Center, Temple Emanu-El, NYC 7PM, Free. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
February 05, 2018: The Great Jewish American Songbook. Streicker Center, Temple Emanu-El, NYC 7PM, Free. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
February 06, 2018: Chris Matthews on Bobby Kennedy, Temple Emanu-El, NYC 7PM, Free. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
February 21, 2018: Einstein's Brain: A (Gray) Matter of Dispute. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
March 11, 2018: A Celebration of Jewish Books, 11AM – 3PM.g Faye Kellerman, Jonathan Kellerman, Eddy Portnoy, Ellen Umaznsky, Shulem Deen, Anita Diamant, ALICE HOFFMAN, Gal Beckerman, Peter Gethers, Shannon Sarna, Jeffrey Gurock, DARA HORN, Ilana Kurshan, Ruby Namdar, Marjorie Ingalis, Rachel Kadish, Sana Krasikov, FRANCINE KLAGSBRUN, MEIR SHALEV Kim Friedman, Seth Sigegel, Dr. Ruth Westheimer and so many more. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org

March 15, 2018: All About Gefilte Fish with Gabriella Gershenson. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
March 20, 2018: A Rare Conversation with Serge and Beate Klarsfeld. The Unlikely Nazi Hunters. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
March 20, 2018: (((Semitism))): Being Jewish in America in the Age of Trump by Jonathan Weisman. Barnes & Noble, UWS NYC 7:00 PM
March 21, 2018: (((SEMITISM))) Being Jewish in America in the Age of Trump. With Jonathan Weisman. 6:30 PM EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
March 26, 2018: An Evening with Chef Alon Shaya. 6:30PM $18 EmanuelStreickerNYC.org

April 09, 2017: Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright reads from her new book on Facism. B&N Union Square NYC>BR> April 10, 2018: An Evening David Grossman. 6:30 PM. $25. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org
April 16, 2018: Three Jewish Movements, Three Famed Cantors. $18. Cantors Chaim Dovid Berson, Ari Schwartz, and Mo Glazman EmanuelStreickerNYC.org






[book] Engaging Torah:
A Jewish Guide to Biblical Study
Edited by Rabbi Walter Homolka
and Rabbi Aaron Panken
Hebrew Union College Press
November 28, 2017
In this volume of essays, eminent Jewish scholars from around the world present introductions to the different parts of the Bible for the wider public.

The essays encompass a general introduction to the Torah in Jewish life, and include specific essays on each of the Five Books of Moses, as well as on the Haftarot, Neviim, and Ketuvim. The contributions provide an overview of the core content of each book as well as highlight central themes and the reception and relevance of these themes in Jewish life and culture past and present. These essays, informed by and based on the profound academic research of their authors, together provide an invaluable bridge between high-level academic insight and the study of the Bible both in synagogues and in homes.





























DECEMBER 2017 BOOKS

[book] Hasidism:
A New History
by David Biale
David Assaf, Benjamin Brown,
Uriel Gellman, Samuel Heilman,
Moshe Rosman, Gadi Sagiv,
Marcin Wodziski, with Afterword by Rabbi Arthur Green
December 2017
Princeton University Press
The first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism

This is the first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism. The book’s unique blend of intellectual, religious, and social history offers perspectives on the movement’s leaders as well as its followers, and demonstrates that, far from being a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world.

Hasidism originated in southeastern Poland, in mystical circles centered on the figure of Israel Ba'al Shem Tov, but it was only after his death in 1760 that a movement began to spread. Challenging the notion that Hasidism ceased to be a creative movement after the eighteenth century, this book argues that its first golden age was in the nineteenth century, when it conquered new territory, won a mass following, and became a mainstay of Jewish Orthodoxy. World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the Holocaust decimated eastern European Hasidism. But following World War II, the movement enjoyed a second golden age, growing exponentially. Today, it is witnessing a remarkable renaissance in Israel, the United States, and other countries around the world.

Written by an international team of scholars, Hasidism is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand this vibrant and influential modern Jewish movement.



























[book] Recharging Judaism:
How Civic Engagement is Good
for Synagogues, Jews, and America
by Judith Schindler and Judith Seldin-Cohen
2017
CCAR Press
Recharging Judaism is the essential and timely guide for every synagogue and community seeking to strengthen the bonds of Jewish communal life through advocating for social justice. This volume delves into the enriching civic engagement and acts of righteousness already undertaken by Jews and Jewish communities across the country, and further explores the positive differences we can all affect upon the future of America. There are a myriad of ways in which advocating for social justice and participating in civic engagement can create lasting change. Those inspired to affect such change will find new meaning in the texts and history of our tradition. Using real examples from both small and large congregations across the country, Recharging Judaism offers a framework to guide us through our journey of civic responsibility and social duty and into a brighter future for our country.

























[book] Somewhere Else:
A Picture Book
by Gus Gordon
December 2017
Roaring Brook Press
George has absolutely no interest in exploring the world. None at all.
He's far too busy enjoying his home life and baking delicious pastries. Or so he tells all his friends when they invite him along on their wonderful adventures.
But when George's friend Pascal digs a little deeper, the real reason George refuses to travel away from home is finally revealed





























[book] The Last Man Who Knew Everything:
The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi,
Father of the Nuclear Age
by David N. Schwartz
December 2017
Basic Books
The definitive biography of the brilliant, charismatic, and very human physicist and innovator Enrico Fermi

In 1942, a team at the University of Chicago achieved what no one had before: a nuclear chain reaction. At the forefront of this breakthrough stood Enrico Fermi. Straddling the ages of classical physics and quantum mechanics, equally at ease with theory and experiment, Fermi truly was the last man who knew everything--at least about physics. But he was also a complex figure who was a part of both the Italian Fascist Party and the Manhattan Project, and a less-than-ideal father and husband who nevertheless remained one of history's greatest mentors. Based on new archival material and exclusive interviews, The Last Man Who Knew Everything lays bare the enigmatic life of a colossus of twentieth century physics.

Fermi came to the USA in 1938, when he had to escape Mussolini's Italy because Laura – his wife - was Jewish.























[book] Chef Supreme:
Martin Ginsburg -
Created by the Justices' Spouses
In Memoriam
by Martha-Ann Alito
and other Supreme Court spouses


DURING SUNDANCE, JUSTICE RBG MENTIONED THE BOOK PUBLISHED BY HER COLLEAGUES IN MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND, WHICH SHE WAS INTERVIEWED BY NINA TOTENBERG... SO HERE IT IS...
On sale here and at the U.S. Supreme Court giftshop

Recipes published by the U.S. Supreme Court spouses in memory of famed tax Attorney Martin Ginsburg, the late husband of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

From the website of The Supreme Court Historical Society Gift Shop: "Chef Supreme is more than just another cookbook, it is a tribute. Full of recipes, photos and fond tales, this cookbook was created by the Spouses of the Justices of the Supreme Court in memory of Martin Ginsburg. It is the perfect gift for those who enjoy cooking!" v Plastic spiral binding, 126 pages.






















[book] Leave Me Alone
with the Recipes:
The Life, Art, and
Cookbook of Cipe Pineles
written and illustrated by Cipe Pineles
Edited and rediscovered by Sarah Rich,
Wendy MacNaughton, Debbie Millman
and Maria Popova
2017
Bloomsbury Books

The newly discovered illustrated recipes of wildly influential yet unsung designer Cipe Pineles, introducing her delectable work in food and art to a new generation.

Not long ago, Sarah Rich and Wendy MacNaughton discovered a painted manuscript at an antiquarian book fair that drew them in like magnets: it displayed a vibrant painting of hot pink beets and a hand-lettered recipe for borscht written in script so full of life, it was hard to believe it was more than sixty-five years old.

It was the work of one of the most influential graphic designers of the twentieth century--Cipe (pronounced “C. P.”) Pineles, the first female art director at Condé Nast, whose impact lives on in the work of Maira Kalman, Julia Rothman, and many others.

Completed in 1945, it was a keepsake of her connection to her childhood's Eastern European food--she called it Leave Me Alone with the Recipes. For Wendy and Sarah, it was a talisman of a woman they had not known was their idol: a strong, independent spirit whose rich archive--of drawings, recipes, diaries, and letters to family and friends--led them into a dazzling history of mid-century design, art, food, New York City society, and culture.

They teamed up with Maria Popova of Brain Pickings and Debbie Millman of Design Matters, along with contributors Mimi Sheraton, Steven Heller, Paula Scher, and Maira Kalman, to present Cipe Pineles's life and work as it should be presented--in glorious color. With Pineles's illustrated cookbook and a section of updated recipes as its centerpiece, this gorgeous volume will delight foodies and design devotees alike.




















[book] Between Harlem and Heaven:
Afro-Asian-American Cooking
for Big Nights, Weeknights,
and Every Day
by Alexander Smalls and
Chef JJ Johnson
2018
Flatiron Books

Between Harlem and Heaven presents a captivatingly original cuisine. Afro-Asian-American cooking is packed with unique and delicious layers of flavor. These stories and recipes lay praise to the immense influence the African Diaspora has had on global cuisine.” - Sean Brock
“This is more than just a cookbook. Alexander and JJ take us on a culinary journey through space and time that started more than 400 years ago, on the shores of West Africa. Through inspiring recipes that have survived the Middle Passage to seamlessly embrace Asian influences, this book is a testimony to the fact that food transcends borders." - Chef Pierre Thiam

When I met Chef Johnson, he was railing against the media he calls everything an African American does “soul food.” Just as Chef Smalls – a Grammy winning opera singer and restauranteur – fails against “fusion.” I agreed. Does a black eater call it soul food? No. It is just food, food people grew up with.

In two of the most renowned and historic venues in Harlem, Alexander Smalls and JJ Johnson created a unique take on the Afro-Asian-American flavor profile. Their foundation was a collective three decades of traveling the African diaspora, meeting and eating with chefs of color, and researching the wide reach of a truly global cuisine; their inspiration was how African, Asian, and African-American influences criss-crossed cuisines all around the world. They present here for the first time over 100 recipes that go beyond just one place, taking you, as noted by The New Yorker, “somewhere between Harlem and heaven.”

The Afro Asian flavor profile is a window into the intersection of the Asian diaspora and the African diaspora. An homage to this cultural culinary path and the grievances and triumphs along the way, Between Harlem and Heaven isn’t fusion, but a glimpse into a cuisine that made its way into the thick of Harlem's cultural renaissance. JJ Johnson and Alexander Smalls bring these flavors and rich cultural history into your home kitchen with recipes for...
- Grilled Watermelon Salad with Lime Mango Dressing and Cornbread Croutons,
- Feijoada with Black Beans and Spicy Lamb
- Creamy Macaroni and Cheese Casserole with Rosemary and Caramelized Shallots,
- Festive punches and flavorful easy sides, sauces, and marinades to incorporate into your everyday cooking life.

Complete with essays on the history of Minton’s Jazz Club, the melting pot that is Harlem, and the Afro-Asian flavor profile by bestselling coauthor Veronica Chambers, who just published the wildly successful Yes, Chef by Marcus Samuelsson, this cookbook brings the rich history of the Harlem food scene back to the home cook.
























[book] Here in Berlin:
A Novel
by Cristina Garcia
2017
Counterpoint
Long-listed for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence
"García, a transcendentally imaginative, piquantly satiric, and profoundly compassionate novelist, dramatizes the helter-skelter of lives ruptured by tyranny, war, and political upheavals with sharp awareness of unlikely multicultural alliances . . . With echoes of W. G. Sebald and Günter Grass, García has created an intricate, sensitive, and provocative montage revolving around the question: 'Do people remember only what they can endure, or distort memories until they can endure them?'" -Booklist (starred review)
Here in Berlin is a portrait of a city through snapshots, an excavation of the stories and ghosts of contemporary Berlin-its complex, troubled past still pulsing in the air as it was during World War II. Critically acclaimed novelist Cristina García brings the people of this famed city to life, their stories bristling with regret, desire, and longing.
An unnamed Visitor travels to Berlin with a camera looking for reckonings of her own. The city itself is a character-vibrant and postapocalyptic, flat and featureless except for its rivers, its lakes, its legions of bicyclists. Here in Berlin she encounters a people's history: the Cuban teen taken as a POW on a German submarine only to return home to a family who doesn’t believe him; the young Jewish scholar hidden in a sarcophagus until safe passage to England is found; the female lawyer haunted by a childhood of deprivation in the bombed-out suburbs of Berlin who still defends those accused of war crimes; a young nurse with a checkered past who joins the Reich at a medical facility more intent to dispense with the wounded than to heal them; and the son of a zookeeper at the Berlin Zoo, fighting to keep the animals safe from both war and an increasingly starving populace.
A meditation on war and mystery, this an exciting new work by one of our most gifted novelists, one that seeks to align the stories of the past with the stories of the future.

























[book] Dawn of the New Everything:
Encounters with Reality
and Virtual Reality
by Jaron Lanier
Fall 2017
Henry Holt

Named one of the best books of 2017 by The Economist

The father of virtual reality explains its dazzling possibilities by reflecting on his own lifelong relationship with technology.
Jaron Lanier, an interdisciplinary scientist at Microsoft, either coined or popularized the term Virtual Reality. His startup VPL created the first commercial VR products, avatars, multi-person virtual world experiences, and prototypes of surgical simulation. The surgical simulations he helped to create trained the physicians who trained the physicians who saved his wife from cancer. The virtual lives he created led to Second Life. Both his previous books, “Who Owns the Future?” and “You Are Not a Gadget” have been international bestsellers. In 2014, he was awarded the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, one of the highest cultural honors in Europe.

Bridging the gap between tech mania and the experience of being inside the human body, Dawn of the New Everything is a look at what it means to be human at a moment of unprecedented technological possibility.

Through a fascinating look back over his life in technology, Jaron Lanier, an interdisciplinary scientist and father of the term “virtual reality,” exposes VR’s ability to illuminate and amplify our understanding of our species, and gives readers a new perspective on how the brain and body connect to the world. An inventive blend of autobiography, science writing, philosophy and advice, this book tells the wild story of his personal and professional life as a scientist, from his childhood in the UFO territory of New Mexico, to the loss of his mother, the founding of the first start-up, and finally becoming a world-renowned technological guru.

Understanding virtual reality as being both a scientific and cultural adventure, Lanier demonstrates it to be a humanistic setting for technology. While his previous books offered a more critical view of social media and other manifestations of technology, in this book he argues that virtual reality can actually make our lives richer and fuller.

Google

Interested in listening to him interviewed by Maureen Dowd at the Strand bookstore. You can find the interview on C-span:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?438199-2/dawn-everything

















[book] Bullets to Bandages
by Dr. Mark Terris
2017
Xlibris
The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is a renowned fighting force. It has defended a young vulnerable country from repeated attacks. In the process, it has produced great generals and statesmen. Bullets to Bandages is set in the late 1970s, at a time when many Western armies viewed the IDF as a heroic and idealistic force.

Bullets to Bandages explores the daily life inside the Israel Defense Forces. These are true stories that center on the experiences of four Israeli soldiers--me and three close friends--and provide the reader with an intimate view of life in the Israeli army, the meaning of army friendships, and our own coming-of-age.

Life in the IDF is in many ways similar to other armies with a lot of chicken shit--annoying military nonsense. Good shoe-polishing skills are valued over combat readiness. Soldiers are chronically sleep-deprived, often standing for midnight inspections and enduring nightlong stretcher marches. And yet there is a more humane side. Everyone, regardless of rank, is addressed by his or her first name. Commanders lead by example, not by threat. Beneath the uniform, soldiers are eighteen- to twenty-one-year-old men and women, still fighting acne and constantly fantasizing about sex.

You will witness the induction experience, which transformed us from teenagers into serial numbers. Other experiences included basic training (paratrooping, artillery, and air force), with the unique traditions of each corps. We evolved from new recruits, to sergeant-major slaves, to combat medic students, and finally to commanders. Along the way, we internalized, accepted, and eventually perpetuated the IDF's traditions.

Life in the Israel Defense Forces is not always fun. The physical hardships are real, and the stress challenges your resolve and morale. As young men, we did not verbally express our feelings, which were often tainted by our raging hormones, but broadcasted them through our actions. Humor and friendship allowed us to thrive in this environment. We matured and ultimately put our hearts and souls into the Israel Defense Forces, and this is the true secret behind the IDF's success.

















[book] In Pursuit of Peace
in Israel and Palestine
by Gershon Baskin
December 2017

Vanderbilt Press

A Book recommended by both Peter Beinert and the King of Jordan

Gershon Baskin's memoir of 38 years of his pursuit of peace begins with his childhood on Long Island, New York and a bar mitzvah trip to Israel with his family. Baskin joined Young Judaea back in the States, then later lived on a kibbutz in Israel, where he announced to his parents that he had decided to make aliya, and emigrate to Israel. They persuaded him to return to study at NYU, after which he finally emigrated under the auspices of Interns for Peace. In Israel he spent a pivotal two years living with Arabs in the village of Kufr Qara.

Despite the atmosphere of fear, Baskin found he could talk with both Jews and Palestinians, and that very few others were engaged in efforts at mutual understanding. At his initiative, the Ministry of Education and the office of right-wing prime minister Menachem Begin created the Institute for Education for Jewish-Arab Coexistence with Baskin himself as director. Eight years later he founded and codirected the only joint Israeli-Palestinian public policy think-and-do tank in the world, the Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information. For decades he continued to cross borders, often with a kaffiyeh (Arab headdress) on his dashboard to protect his car in Palestinian neighborhoods. Airport passport control became Kafkaesque as Israeli agents routinely identified him as a security threat.

During the many cycles of peace negotiations, Baskin has served both as an outside agitator for peace and as an advisor on the inside of secret talks—for example, during the prime ministership of Yitzhak Rabin and during the initiative led by Secretary of State John Kerry. Baskin ends the book with his own proposal, which includes establishing a peace education program and cabinet-level Ministries of Peace in both countries, in order to foster a culture of peace.














[book] King without a Crown:
A Memoir
by Matisyahu with Paul Zollo
December 2017
De Capo Press
There has never been a musician like Matisyahu. Known for breaking onto the hip-hop/reggae scene as "that Hassidic rapper," he went on to top the charts with his number one singles "King without a Crown" and "One Day." He's released six albums (all reaching the Billboard charts) and his breakout smash Youth was a Top Five album for 38 weeks upon its release. Through all of this success, Matisyahu never lost his faith. He's seen by the young community as a spiritual advisor and guide and, more than anything, he is applauded for his confidence and bravery to wear his religion on his sleeve.

In King without a Crown, readers will learn about Matisyahu's hippie at-risk early days traveling to Phish shows and getting involved in drugs, they'll see his spiritual awakening when he was sent away to a camp in the backwoods of Oregon, they'll watch his evolution from Matt Miller to Matisyahu (complete with Hassidic garb and beliefs), as well as his recent decision to leave Orthodox Judaism behind--and they'll chart his ascension through the music industry as the creator of some of the biggest and most positive songs in the last thirty years.

























[book] The Saboteur:
The Aristocrat Who Became
France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando
by Paul Kix
Harper
December 2017
In the tradition of Agent Zigzag comes this breathtaking biography, as fast-paced and emotionally intuitive as the very best spy thrillers, which illuminates an unsung hero of the French Resistance during World War II—Robert de La Rochefoucald, an aristocrat turned anti-Nazi saboteur—and his daring exploits as a résistant trained by Britain’s Special Operations Executive.

A scion of one of the most storied families in France, Robert de La Rochefoucald was raised in magnificent chateaux and educated in Europe's finest schools. When the Nazis invaded and imprisoned his father, La Rochefoucald escaped to England and learned the dark arts of anarchy and combat—cracking safes and planting bombs and killing with his bare hands—from the officers of Special Operations Executive, the collection of British spies, beloved by Winston Churchill, who altered the war in Europe with tactics that earned it notoriety as the “Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.” With his newfound skills, La Rochefoucauld returned to France and organized Resistance cells, blew up fortified compounds and munitions factories, interfered with Germans’ war-time missions, and executed Nazi officers. Caught by the Germans, La Rochefoucald withstood months of torture without cracking, and escaped his own death, not once but twice.

The Saboteur recounts La Rochefoucauld’s enthralling adventures, from jumping from a moving truck on his way to his execution to stealing Nazi limos to dressing up in a nun’s habit—one of his many disguises and impersonations. Whatever the mission, whatever the dire circumstance, La Rochefoucauld acquitted himself nobly, with the straight-back aplomb of a man of aristocratic breeding: James Bond before Ian Fleming conjured him.

More than just a fast-paced, true thriller, The Saboteur is also a deep dive into an endlessly fascinating historical moment, telling the untold story of a network of commandos that battled evil, bravely worked to change the course of history, and inspired the creation of America’s own Central Intelligence Agency.




























JANUARY 2018 BOOKS




[book] Beyond the Baby Blues:
Anxiety and Depression
During and After Pregnancy
by Rebecca Fox Starr
Amy Wenzel (Contributor)
January 2018
Rowman & Littlefield
Most people have heard of post-partum depression.
What many people do not know is that anxiety and depression can be experienced during pregnancy, as well, and the impact can be both debilitating and devastating.
This book is a unique combination of one woman’s story of her struggle with perinatal distress and actionable advice from a professional in the field. Rebecca Fox Starr shares her personal story of marriage, motherhood, prenatal anxiety and depression, severe postpartum anxiety and depression, recovery process and hope for the future. Woven throughout the narrative, Dr. Amy Wenzel, a specialist in the field of Perinatal Mood Disorders, provides readers with clinical information and advice, addressing risk factors, warning signs, definitions and recovery options.
Stories from other women who experienced prenatal anxiety or depression are included as well. No longer do women have to suffer in silence, question their mental symptoms, or try to hide their feelings. Here, readers will see themselves in the narrative and understand that the devastating effects of prenatal and post-partum depression can be confirmed, treated, and managed, giving them hope for a brighter future.


Read a New York Times chat with the author on a related topic HERE















[book] The Immortalists
a novel
by Chloe Benjamin
January 9, 2018
Putnam
If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?
It's 1969 in New York City's Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes.

The prophecies inform their next five decades. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in '80s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son Daniel seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.

A sweeping novel of remarkable ambition and depth, The Immortalists probes the line between destiny and choice, reality and illusion, this world and the next. It is a deeply moving testament to the power of story, the nature of belief, and the unrelenting pull of familial bonds.















[book] Traitor:
A Thriller Novel
by Jonathan de Shalit
January 30, 2018
Atria
In the exhilarating tradition of I Am Pilgrim comes a sprawling, international high-stakes thriller that pits the intelligence of one man against one of the most successful spies ever to operate against American interests.

When a young Israeli walks into an American embassy and offers to betray his country for money and power, he has no idea that the CIA agent interviewing him is a Russian mole. Years later, that young man has risen in the ranks to become a trusted advisor to Israel’s Prime Minister and throughout his career, he’s been sharing everything he knows with the Kremlin. Now, however, a hint that there may be a traitor in the highest realms of power has slipped out and a top-secret team is put together to hunt for him. The chase leads the team from the streets of Tel Aviv to deep inside the Russian zone and, finally, to the United States, where a most unique spymaster is revealed. The final showdown—between the traitor and the betrayed—can only be resolved by an act of utter treachery that could have far-reaching and devastating consequences.



















[book] GREEN:
A Novel
by Sam Graham-Felsen
January 2, 2018
Random House
A coming-of-age novel about race, privilege, and the struggle to rise in America, written by a former Obama campaign staffer and propelled by an exuberant, unforgettable narrator.

Boston, 1992. David Greenfeld is one of the few white kids at the Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School. Everybody clowns him, girls ignore him, and his hippie parents won’t even buy him a pair of Nikes, let alone transfer him to a private school. Unless he tests into the city’s best public high school—which, if practice tests are any indication, isn’t likely—he’ll be friendless for the foreseeable future.

Nobody’s more surprised than Dave when Marlon Wellings sticks up for him in the school cafeteria. Mar’s a loner from the public housing project on the corner of Dave’s own gentrifying block, and he confounds Dave’s assumptions about black culture: He’s nerdy and neurotic, a Celtics obsessive whose favorite player is the gawky, white Larry Bird. Before long, Mar’s coming over to Dave’s house every afternoon to watch vintage basketball tapes and plot their hustle to Harvard. But as Dave welcomes his new best friend into his world, he realizes how little he knows about Mar’s. Cracks gradually form in their relationship, and Dave starts to become aware of the breaks he’s been given—and that Mar has not.

Infectiously funny about the highs and lows of adolescence, and sharply honest in the face of injustice, Sam Graham-Felsen’s debut is a wildly original take on the American dream.





















[book] The Ruined House:
A Novel
by Ruby Namdar
Harper
Winner of the Sapir Prize, Israel’s highest literary award

Picking up the mantle of legendary authors such as Saul Bellow and Philip Roth, an exquisite literary talent makes his debut with a nuanced and provocative tale of materialism, tradition, faith, and the search for meaning in contemporary American life.

Andrew P. Cohen, a professor of comparative culture at New York University, is at the zenith of his life. Adored by his classes and published in prestigious literary magazines, he is about to receive a coveted promotion—the crowning achievement of an enviable career. He is on excellent terms with Linda, his ex-wife, and his two grown children admire and adore him. His girlfriend, Ann Lee, a former student half his age, offers lively companionship. A man of elevated taste, education, and culture, he is a model of urbanity and success.

But the manicured surface of his world begins to crack when he is visited by a series of strange and inexplicable visions involving an ancient religious ritual that will upend his comfortable life.

Beautiful, mesmerizing, and unsettling, The Ruined House unfolds over the course of one year, as Andrew’s world unravels and he is forced to question all his beliefs. Ruby Namdar’s brilliant novel embraces the themes of the American Jewish literary canon as it captures the privilege and pedantry of New York intellectual life in the opening years of the twenty-first century.





















[book] TELL ME HOW THIS ENDS WELL
A NOVEL
By David Samuel Levinson
January 2018
Hogarth Books
In 2022, American Jews face an increasingly unsafe and anti-Semitic landscape at home. Against this backdrop, the Jacobson family gathers for Passover in Los Angeles. But their immediate problems are more personal than political, with the three adult children, Mo, Edith, and Jacob, in various states of crisis, the result, each claims, of a lifetime of mistreatment by their father, Julian. The siblings have begun to suspect that Julian is hastening their mother Roz's demise, and years of resentment boil over as they debate whether to go through with the real reason for their reunion: an ill-considered plot to end their father’s iron rule for good. That is, if they can put their bickering, grudges, festering relationships, and distrust of one another aside long enough to act.

a And God help them if their mother finds out . . .

Tell Me How This Ends Well presents a blistering and prescient vision of the near future, turning the exploits of one very funny, very troubled family into a rare and compelling exploration of the state of America, and what it could become.


















[book] The Tattooist of Auschwitz
by Heather Morris
Hot Key Books

Maybe u saw the BBC Profile? http://www.bbc.com/news/stories-42568390

Morris, a New Zealander who now resides in Australia, worked in a large public hospital in Melbourne. For several years she studied and wrote screenplays. In 2003, she was introduced to an elderly gentleman "who might just have a story worth telling". The day she met Lale Sokolov changed her life. She originally wrote Lale's story as a screenplay, but reshaped it into this debut novel

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is BASED (it is a novel based on the life) on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jews who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia. In that terrible place, Lale was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - literally scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Lale used the infinitesimal freedom of movement that this position awarded him to exchange jewels and money taken from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he had been caught, he would have been killed; many owed him their survival.

There have been many books about the Holocaust - and there will be many more. What makes this one so memorable is Lale Sokolov's incredible zest for life. He understood exactly what was in store for him and his fellow prisoners, and he was determined to survive - not just to survive but to leave the camp with his dignity and integrity intact, to live his life to the full. Terrible though this story is, it is also a story of hope and of courage. It is also - almost unbelievably - a love story. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight, and he determined not only to survive himself but to ensure that Gita did, too. His story - their story - will make you weep, but you will also find it uplifting. It shows the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.

Like many survivors, Lale and Gita told few people their story after the war. They eventually made their way to Australia, where they raised a son and had a successful life. But when Gita died, Lale felt he could no longer carry the burden of their past alone. He chose to tell his story.














[book] Fire and Fury:
Inside the Trump White House
by Michael Wolff
January 5, 2017
Henry Holt

Ever since BURN RATE and his other ventures and books, I have had issues with books by Michael Wolff. I have not read this book yet, though I have two copies. Some people have accused Wolff in the past with recreating conversations and as they say.. pushing the envelope on the truth. Perhaps he has a kernel of truth and adds flourishes to it. You can judge for yourself. Sure there are errors, like the Boehner sentences, but the overall theme appears to be correct.

From COVER: With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Michael Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time. The first nine months of Donald Trump’s term were stormy, outrageous-and absolutely mesmerizing. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself.

In this book, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office. Among the revelations:

-- What President Trump’s staff really thinks of him
-- What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama
-- Why FBI director James Comey was really fired
-- Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn’t be in the same room
-- Who is really directing the Trump administration’s strategy in the wake of Bannon’s firing
-- What the secret to communicating with Trump is
-- What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers

Never before has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury shows us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion.

We will have to read it to discover why...
Why did Henry Kissinger reportedly say that it is a story of Jews vs non Jews in the White House?
Does Bannon call Kushner stupid and say Ivanka expects to run for President

NOTE 3: Wolff writes that Jared Kushner and Steve Bannon were at loggerheads over the US’s Israel policy. In passages related to Middle East policy, Wolff also writes that Steve Bannon enjoyed the full trust and backing of Jewish American billionaire Sheldon Adelson. According to Wolff, Adelson defended Bannon before Trump decided to fire him last summer, holding him out as "the only person he trusted on Israel" in the Trump White House. However, Adelson’s endorsement was evidently lacking. Wolff suggests that Trump’s appointment of Kushner as the liaison in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict created tension between him and Bannon, who positioned himself as a further right-wing conservative, priding himself on staunchly supporting Israel. Bannon apparently had wanted to move the American embassy to Jerusalem on Trump’s first day in office. “Day one we’re moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem. Netanyahu’s all in. Sheldon is all in. We know where we’re heading on this.” Wolff describes Bannon’s ability to make Kushner feel inferior due to his ‘less’ ardent defense of the Jewish state. “Bannon, meanwhile, did not hesitate to ding Kushner on Israel, that peculiar right-wing litmus test. Bannon could bait Jews — globalist, cosmopolitan, Davos-Centric liberal Jews like Kushner — because the farther right you were, the more correct you were on Israel. Netanyahu was an old Kushner family friend, but when, in the fall, the Israeli prime minister came to New York to meet with Trump and Kushner, he made a point of seeking out Steve Bannon.” Wolff elaborates in blunter terms, explaining, "For Kushner, Bannon’s right-wing defense of Israel, embraced by Trump, somehow became a jujitsu piece of anti-Semitism aimed directly at him. Bannon seemed determined to make Kushner appear weak and inadequate — a cuck, in alt-right speak." Adelson is also said, according to Wolff, to have supported a Bannon-crafted campaign against Trump's National Security Adviser, H.R. McMaster, in response to his alleged hostility to Israel.




























[book] SIMON VS. THE HOMO SAPIENS AGENDA
A Young Adult YA Novel
By BECKY ALBERTALLI (PhD)
Balzer and Bray/HarperCollins

In March 2018, this is the basis of a film titled “Love Simon.”

William C. Morris Award Winner: Best Young Adult Debut of the Year * National Book Award Longlist

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier (rhymes with Beer), in suburban Atlanta, prefers to save his drama for the school musical (though he only gets the bit parts). But in Chapter 1, his secret email that he retrieves and sends using the school's library computer, is seen by Martin A.

Martin A., a funny nerdy bastard classmate who plays Fagin in the school musical, takes pics of Simon's email and tells Simon that he has the evidence and will delete it IF Simon helps to set him up with Abby. This is also known as blackmail. But Abby Suso – who just moved from DC - is the potential GF of Simon's best friend, Nick Eisner (Jewish soccer loving classmate). Simon's email was to “Blue” - the half-Jewish object of Simon's desires... And this is just Chapter ONE.

Now, change-averse Simon (a.k.a. Jacques in his emails to Blue) has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he's pushed out — without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy (Blue) he's Never met (cuz, they only trade emails, they never actually met or know who each other are).

Incredibly funny and poignant, this twenty-first-century coming-of-age, coming out story—wrapped in a geek romance—is a knockout of a debut novel by Becky Albertalli.

Note: Simon is not Jewish. But Nick is, and there a few references to his bar mitzvah party. Simon, of English German heritage thinks Jews must come from Israel. Oy. And “Blue” celebrates Hotel Hanukkah...























[book] The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary
(JPS Study Bible)
by Dr. Sarah Levy, PhD and
Mr. Steven Levy, Esq
January 2018
Jewish Publication Society
Rashi, the medieval French RAbbi SHlomo Yitzchaki (1040–1105), authored monumental commentaries on the Hebrew Bible and the Babylonian Talmud. With The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary, his commentary on the Torah—regarded as the most authoritative of all Torah commentaries—is finally accessible to the entire Jewish community.

Steven and Sarah Levy quote from the biblical text in both Hebrew and English, highlight Rashi’s comments relating to the parashah, and delve into his perceptive moral messages in the context of twenty-first-century dilemmas. Each portion features three essays with analysis and discussion questions that draw on universal human experiences, enabling families and Shabbat study groups to deepen their understanding of Rashi and the portion over the three Sabbath meals.

Readers with little or no knowledge of Hebrew, the Torah, or Jewish practice will feel comfortable diving into this discussion commentary. All Hebrew terms are defined, quoted verses contextualized, and less familiar Jewish concepts explained.














[book] From Forbidden Fruit
to Milk and Honey:
A Commentary on Food
in the Torah
by Diana Lipton, PhD
(January 18, 2018
Urim Publications
Food is at the heart of Jewish life and culture. It's the subject of many studies, popular and academic, and countless Jewish jokes. From Forbidden Fruit to Milk and Honey spotlights food in the Torah itself, where, as still today, it's used to explore themes including love and desire, compassion and commitment, social justice, memory, belonging and exclusion, control, deception, and life and death. Originally an online project to support the food rescue charity, Leket Israel, From Forbidden Fruit to Milk and Honey comprises short essays on food in the parasha by 52 internationally acclaimed scholars and Jewish educators, and a verse by verse commentary by Diana Lipton on food and eating in the Torah.

A Fest To Be Treasured – Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

Her many insights into biblical texts are well known to contemporary scholars. Her commentary on food in the Torah offers a fresh look at some familiar passages and themes. Definitely eye-opening. - Author and Professor James Kugel























[book] Modern Loss:
Candid Conversation About
Grief. Beginners Welcome.
by Rebecca Soffer
and Gabrielle Birkner
January 23, 2018
Harper Wave
Each week, we read MODERN LOVE in The New York Times. But what about MODERN LOSS?
Rebecca's mother died suddenly in a car accident. Soon after, her father passed away from a heart attack. Gabi's father and his wife were murdered. Together Gabi and Rebecca started to keep a website about mourning. The New York Times hailed it as "redefining mourning." This book is a fresh and irreverent examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices, accompanied by gorgeous two-color illustrations and wry infographics.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Let’s face it: most of us have always had a difficult time talking about death and sharing our grief. We’re awkward and uncertain; we avoid, ignore, or even deny feelings of sadness; we offer platitudes; we send sympathy bouquets whittled out of fruit.

In this wise and often funny book, they offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and—above all—empathize.

Soffer and Birkner, along with forty guest contributors including Lucy Kalanithi, singer Amanda Palmer, stylist Stacy London, Amanda Palmer, “Girl” writer Yassir Lester, WNBA all-star Chamique Holdsclaw, Kim Goldman (sister of murdered Ron Goldman), and CNN’s Brian Stelter, reveal their own stories on a wide range of topics including triggers, sex, secrets, and inheritance.

Accompanied by beautiful hand-drawn illustrations and witty "how to" cartoons, each contribution provides a unique perspective on loss as well as a remarkable life-affirming message.

Topics includes Loss & The Workplace; How to be an effective AND empathetic manager of someone who is grieving; how to manage grief when you dont have personal days and can't miss work; Loss & Your Kids; How to make dead parents and siblings “real” to your kids; Living with the fear of dying before your kids mature; How much to share with kids when a loved one dies; Cleaning through you personal effects of a loved one; finding love in the wake of loss; the trigger of yahrzeits, yizkors, anniversaries, birthdays, the holidays, and deathdays; when good things happens because a bad thing happened; the un-dead digital world, when you find a loved one's facebook page or google listing; and an open letter to the dudes the authors' dated who could not deal with their grief.

Brutally honest and inspiring, Modern Loss invites us to talk intimately and humorously about grief, helping us confront the humanity (and mortality) we all share. Beginners welcome.














[book] Eternal Life:
A Novel
by DARA HORN (Dara Horn, PhD)
January 2018
Norton
Horn is a two time recipient of the National Jewish Book Award

What would it really mean to live forever?

Rachel is a woman with a problem: she can’t die. Her recent troubles-widowhood, a failing business, an unemployed middle-aged son-are only the latest in a litany spanning dozens of countries, scores of marriages, and hundreds of children. In the 2,000 years since she made a spiritual bargain to save the life of her first son back in Roman-occupied Jerusalem, she’s tried everything to free herself, and only one other person in the world understands: a man she once loved passionately, who has been stalking her through the centuries, convinced they belong together forever.

But as the twenty-first century begins and her children and grandchildren-consumed with immortality in their own ways, from the frontiers of digital currency to genetic engineering-develop new technologies that could change her fate and theirs, Rachel knows she must find a way out.

Gripping, hilarious, and profoundly moving, Eternal Life celebrates the bonds between generations, the power of faith, the purpose of death, and the reasons for being alive.





















[book] In Days to Come:
A New Hope for Israel
by Avraham Burg
Translated by Joel Greenberg from Hebrew
January 9, 2018
Nation Books
Born in 1955, Avraham Burg witnessed firsthand many of the most dramatic and critical junctions in Israeli history. Here he chronicles the highs and lows of his country during the last five decades, beginning with the 1967 war, when, as a young boy, his mother brought him back Uzi cartridges from the Kotel, which he incorporated into the Chanukah menorah he made for his home economics class. Burg narrates the misplaced hopes of religious Zionism (informed by his conservative upbringing), Israel's obsession with military might (informed by his own experiences as a paratrooper), the country's democratic aspirations (informed by his tenure in the Knesset) and more. What he delivers, ultimately, is an analysis of the ambitions and failures of Israel and Judaism, from the unique standpoint of his generation--the children of the mythical "founders" who established the state.

In Days to Come is Burg's philosophical inquiry into what Jewish-Israeli identity means today if you are personally, ethically, and politically opposed to what your country stands for. With bravery and candor, he urges his countrymen to dare to ask the difficult questions and accept the truth of difficult answers, have the courage to move on from trauma to trust, understand that Jews do not have monopoly over suffering but a responsibility to prevent crimes against humanity, have the will to solve the conflict between Israel and Palestine by adopting new paradigms, be ready to relinquish the privileges given to the Jews and create a shared space with equal rights for every human being, lay the groundwork for a constitutional reality in which every individual--under Israeli sovereignty or responsibility--has equal rights, and build a wall of separation between synagogue and state.

In this book, Burg lays bare the seismic intellectual shifts that drove the country's political and religious journeys, offering a vision for a new comprehensive paradigm for Israel and the Middle East.






















[book] 1947:
Where Now Begins
by Elisabeth Åsbrink
Fiona Graham (Translator)
January 2018
OTHER PRESS
An award-winning writer captures a year that defined the modern world, intertwining historical events around the globe with key moments from her personal history.
The year 1947 marks a turning point in the twentieth century. Peace with Germany becomes a tool to fortify the West against the threats of the Cold War. The CIA is created, Israel is about to be born, Simone de Beauvoir experiences the love of her life, an ill George Orwell is writing his last book, and Christian Dior creates the hyper-feminine New Look as women are forced out of jobs and back into the home.
In the midst of it all, a ten-year-old Hungarian-Jewish boy resides in a refugee camp for children of parents murdered by the Nazis. This year he has to make the decision of a lifetime, one that will determine his own fate and that of his daughter yet to be born, Elisabeth.






















[book] Advice Not Given:
A Guide to Getting
Over Yourself
by Mark Epstein MD
January 2018
Penguin Press
Renowned psychiatrist and author Dr. Mark Epstein presents a how-to guide rooted in two traditions, Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, devoted to maximizing the human potential for living a better life

Our ego, and its accompanying sense of nagging self-doubt as we work to be bigger, better, smarter, and more in control, is one affliction we all share. And, while our ego claims to have our best interests at heart, in its never-ending pursuit of attention and power, it sabotages the very goals it sets to achieve. In Advice Not Given, Dr. Mark Epstein reveals how Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, two traditions that developed in entirely different times and places and, until recently, had nothing to do with each other, both identify the ego as the limiting factor in our well-being, and both come to the same conclusion: When we give the ego free reign, we suffer; but when it learns to let go, we are free.

With great insight, and in a deeply personal style, Epstein offers readers a how-to guide that refuses a quick fix, grounded in two traditions devoted to maximizing the human potential for living a better life. Using the Eightfold Path, eight areas of self-reflection that Buddhists believe necessary for enlightenment, as his scaffolding, Epstein looks back productively on his own experience and that of his patients. While the ideas of the Eightfold Path are as old as Buddhism itself, when informed by the sensibility of Western psychotherapy, they become something more: a road map for spiritual and psychological growth, a way of dealing with the intractable problem of the ego. Breaking down the wall between East and West, Epstein brings a Buddhist sensibility to therapy and a therapist's practicality to Buddhism. Speaking clearly and directly, he offers a rethinking of mindfulness that encourages people to be more watchful of their ego, an idea with a strong foothold in Buddhism but now for the first time applied in the context of psychotherapy.

Our ego is at once our biggest obstacle and our greatest hope. We can be at its mercy or we can learn to mold it. Completely unique and practical, Epstein's advice can be used by all--each in his or her own way--and will provide wise counsel in a confusing world. After all, as he says, "Our egos can use all the help they can get."






















[book] This Narrow Space:
A Pediatric Oncologist, His
Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients,
and a Hospital in Jerusalem
by Elisha Waldman, MD
(Columbia Univ Medical Center)
January 2018
Schocken Books

I hope Hadassah has a book launch party / fundraiser (albeit the book deals with their financings)

A memoir both bittersweet and inspiring by an American pediatric oncologist who spent seven years in Jerusalem taking care of Israeli and Palestinian children with one tragic thing in common—a diagnosis of pediatric cancer

In 2007, Elisha Waldman, a New York–based pediatric oncologist and palliative-care specialist in his mid-thirties, was offered his dream job: attending physician at Jerusalem’s Hadassah Medical Center.

He had gone to medical school in Israel and spent time there as a teenager; now he was going to give something back to the land he loved. But in the wake of a financial crisis at the hospital that left him feeling unsure about his future, Waldman, with considerable regret, left Hadassah in 2014 and returned to America.

This Narrow Space is his deeply affecting and poignant memoir of the seven years he spent taking care of children—Israeli Jews, Muslims, and Christians; Palestinian Arabs from the West Bank and Gaza—with one devastating thing in common: they had all been diagnosed with some form of pediatric cancer. Waldman’s years at Hadassah were filled in equal measure with a deep sense of accomplishment, with FRUSTRATION when regional politics sometimes got in the way of his patients’ care, and with tension over the fine line he would have to walk when the religious traditions of some of his patients’ families made it difficult for him to give these children the care he felt they deserved.

Navigating the baffling Israeli bureaucracy, the ever-present threat of war, and the cultural clashes that sometimes spilled over into his clinic, Waldman learned to be content with small victories: a young patient whose disease went into remission, brokenhearted parents whose final hours with their child were made meaningful and comforting.

As he sought to create both a personal and a professional life in his new home, Waldman struggled with his own questions of identity and belief, and with the intractable conflict between Israelis and Palestinians that had become a fact of his daily life. What he learned about himself, about the complex country that he was now a part of, and about the heartbreakingly brave and endearing children he cared for—whether they were from Me’ah She’arim, Ramallah, or Gaza City—will move and challenge readers everywhere.

















[book] The Stakes of History
On The Use and
Abuse of Jewish History for Life
by David N. Myers, PhD
(UCLA)
January 2018

Yale University Press

A leading scholar of Jewish history’s bracing and challenging case for the role of the historian today

Why do we study history? What is the role of the historian in the contemporary world? These questions prompted David N. Myers’s illuminating and poignant call for the relevance of historical research and writing. His inquiry identifies a number of key themes around which modern Jewish historians have wrapped their labors: liberation, consolation, and witnessing. Through these portraits, Myers revisits the chasm between history and memory, revealing the middle space occupied by modern Jewish historians as they work between the poles of empathic storytelling and the critical sifting of sources.

History, properly applied, can both destroy ideologically rooted myths that breed group hatred and create new memories that are sustaining of life. Alive in these investigations is Myers’s belief that the historian today can and should attend to questions of political and moral urgency. Historical knowledge is not a luxury to society but an essential requirement for informed civic engagement, as well as a vital tool in policy making, conflict resolution, and restorative justice.

























[book] The Culture Code:
The Secrets of Highly
Successful Groups
by Daniel Coyle
January 30, 2018
Random House
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Talent Code comes a book that unlocks the secrets of highly successful groups and provides tomorrow’s leaders with the tools to build a cohesive, motivated culture.

Where does great culture come from?
How do you build and sustain it in your group, or strengthen a culture that needs fixing?

In The Culture Code, Daniel Coyle goes inside some of the world’s most successful organizations—including Pixar, the San Antonio Spurs, and U.S. Navy’s SEAL Team Six—and reveals what makes them tick. He demystifies the culture-building process by identifying three key skills that generate cohesion and cooperation, and explains how diverse groups learn to function with a single mind. Drawing on examples that range from Internet retailer Zappos to the comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade to a daring gang of jewel thieves, Coyle offers specific strategies that trigger learning, spark collaboration, build trust, and drive positive change.

Coyle unearths helpful stories of failure that illustrate what not to do, troubleshoots common pitfalls, and shares advice about reforming a toxic culture. Combining leading-edge science, on-the-ground insights from world-class leaders, and practical ideas for action, The Culture Code offers a roadmap for creating an environment where innovation flourishes, problems get solved, and expectations are exceeded.

Coyle writes the successful groups relentlessly generate three key messages that enable success and excellence (excelling): 1) SAFETY – we are connected; 2) SHARED RISK – we are vulnerable toegther, and 3) PURPOSE – we are part of the same story.

Culture is not something you are—it’s something you do. The Culture Code puts the power in your hands. No matter the size of the group or the goal, this book can teach you the principles of cultural chemistry that transform individuals into teams that can accomplish amazing things together.

A deeper look.
SAFETY: Embrace the messenger and bad news; Preview future connection, between now and the vision of a successful future; Overdo thank-yous to reinforce connections and affirm the relationship; Eliminate bad apples and name the bad behaviors; create safe, collision RICH spaces for interaction and cohesion; make sure everyone has a voice; use the first day of the group as a defining moment so brains connect at the outset; avoid giving sandwich feedback (good, bad, good) so negative feedback is separate, and positive feedback is not tied to a negative; and embrace fun.

SHARED RISK: The leader is vulnerable and should be able to say “I screwed that up;” over over over communicate expectations; deliver negative in person; listen like a trampoline.. be attentive, add insights.. be attentive; resist the temptation to respond and add value, be silent sometimes; generate candor (Braintrust, AAR); be candor but NOT brutally honest; embrace discomfort even if you dredge up a past error; keep the performance review separate from professional development; flash mentor- pick someone to shadow and learn from for three hours.

PURPOSE: name and rank your priorities and targets; be ten times as clear about your priorities as you think you need to be; embrace and use catchphrases; measure what matters; use artifacts to reinforce what matters (trophies); focus on bar setting behaviors.


















[book] Rise and Kill First:
The Secret History of
Israel's Targeted Assassinations
by Ronen Bergman
January 2018
Random House

The page-turning, news-breaking, inside account of Israel’s state-sponsored assassination programs, from the man hailed by David Remnick as “arguably [Israel’s] best investigative reporter.”` Haaretz writes: “Ronen Bergman’s riveting history of Israel’s use of targeted killings reveals for the first time many operations carried out in the name of national security. Some may inspire the reader while others will sicken”

In March 2002 alone... 138 Israelis were killed and over 680 wounded by suicide and other Palestinian bombers in Israel. Sharon gave the order that the Shin Bet should kill the leaders of the bombers, from the recruiters to the safe houses to the bomb builders and smugglers. Actually, at a meeting after the Haifa bus terrorist attack, Sharon whispered to Dichter, “Go for it. Kill them all.” Since picking off individual bombers was ineffectual, Dichter decided to shift focus. Starting at the end of 2001, Israel would target the “ticking infrastructure” behind the attacks. The Israeli security forces did not hold back. Targeted killing operations killed 84 people in 2001, 101 in 2002, and 135 in 2003. Unlike sporadic killings abroad by Mossad, Israel’s chief intelligence agency, it wasn’t possible — or plausible — for the country to deny that it was behind the assassinations.

Ronen introduces us to “targeted preventive measures” and other terms that some may thing are state sanctioned murders... but they led to a brokered cease fire and an end to weekly murderous bombings. Most fascinating is the story of Amir in 8200, who refuses to carry out an order to murder civilians in Gaza. The Israeli philosopher who wrote the IDF Code of Ethics says he has no authority to refuse the order and a general wants his jailed and placed before a firing squad. He was quietly discharged instead. I think many readers would chanpion him for not following orders. Others will side with the military, who said liberals should not be in the unit or question their order which led to “collateral” damage of children and civilians.

The Talmud says: “If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first.” This instinct to take every measure, even the most aggressive, to defend the Jewish people is hardwired into Israel’s DNA. From the very beginning of its statehood in 1948, protecting the nation from harm has been the responsibility of its intelligence community and armed services, and there is one weapon in their vast arsenal that they have relied upon to thwart the most serious threats: Targeted assassinations have been used countless times, on enemies large and small, sometimes in response to attacks against the Israeli people and sometimes preemptively. In this page-turning, eye-opening book, journalist and military analyst Ronen Bergman offers a riveting inside account of the targeted killing programs—their successes, their failures, and the moral and political price exacted on the men and women who approved and carried out the missions.

Bergman has gained the exceedingly rare cooperation of many current and former members of the Israeli government, including Prime Ministers Shimon Peres, Ehud Barak, Ariel Sharon, and Benjamin Netanyahu, as well as high-level figures in the country’s military and intelligence services: the IDF (Israel Defense Forces), the Mossad (the world’s most feared intelligence agency), Caesarea (a “Mossad within the Mossad” that carries out attacks on the highest-value targets), and the Shin Bet (an internal security service that implemented the largest targeted assassination campaign ever, in order to stop what had once appeared to be unstoppable: suicide terrorism).

Including never-before-reported, behind-the-curtain accounts of key operations, and based on hundreds of on-the-record interviews and thousands of files to which Bergman has gotten exclusive access over his decades of reporting, Rise and Kill First brings us deep into the heart of Israel’s most secret activities. Bergman traces, from statehood to the present, the gripping events and thorny ethical questions underlying Israel’s targeted killing campaign, which has shaped the Israeli nation, the Middle East, and the entire world.























[book] Anatomy of a Genocide:
The Life and Death of
a Town Called Buczacz
by Omer Bartov
January 23, 2018
Simon & Schuster

A fascinating and cautionary examination of how genocide can take root at the local level—turning neighbors, friends, and even family members against one another—as seen through the eastern European border town of Buczacz during World War II.

For more than four hundred years, the Eastern European border town of Buczacz—today part of Ukraine—was home to a highly diverse citizenry. It was here that Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews all lived side by side in relative harmony. Then came World War II, and three years later the entire Jewish population had been murdered by German and Ukrainian police, while Ukrainian nationalists eradicated Polish residents. In truth, though, this genocide didn’t happen so quickly.

In Anatomy of a Genocide Omer Bartov explains that ethnic cleansing doesn’t occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed, the culmination of pent-up slights and grudges and indignities. The perpetrators aren’t just sociopathic soldiers. They are neighbors and friends and family. They are human beings, proud and angry and scared. They are also middle-aged men who come from elsewhere, often with their wives and children and parents, and settle into a life of bourgeois comfort peppered with bouts of mass murder: an island of normality floating on an ocean of blood.

For more than two decades Bartov, whose mother was raised in Buczacz, traveled extensively throughout the region, scouring archives and amassing thousands of documents rarely seen until now. He has also made use of hundreds of first-person testimonies by victims, perpetrators, collaborators, and rescuers. Anatomy of a Genocide profoundly changes our understanding of the social dynamics of mass killing and the nature of the Holocaust as a whole. Bartov’s book isn’t just an attempt to understand what happened in the past. It’s a warning of how it could happen again, in our own towns and cities—much more easily than we might think.
































[book] A Torah Giant:
The Intellectual Legacy of Rabbi
Dr. Irving (Yitz) Greenberg
Edited By Shmuly Yanklowitz
Introduction by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin
Foreword by Rabbi Avi Weiss
January 2018
Urim Publishings
Discover the breadth of wisdom provided by this generation’s giant of Torah: Rabbi Irving “Yitz" Greenberg. Rabbi Yitz is one of the most renowned leaders in contemporary Jewish communal life. His dedication to foster a more interconnected and vibrant Judaism has been felt across the academic and broader world. In this new work, the legacy of Rabbi Yitz is discussed at length by those who have been affected by his inclusive model of contemporary Judaism, his approachable erudition, commitment to fostering meaningful interfaith dialogue, and constant striving to make the world a more just place. These intellectual progenies divulge the lasting impact Rabbi Yitz has had on their lives and the lives of people around the globe.

























[book] Modern Loss:
Candid Conversation About Grief.
Beginners Welcome.
by Rebecca Soffer and
Gabrielle Birkner
January 2018
Harper Wave

Inspired by the website that the New York Times hailed as "redefining mourning," this book is a fresh and irreverent examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices, accompanied by gorgeous two-color illustrations and wry infographics.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Let’s face it: most of us have always had a difficult time talking about death and sharing our grief. We’re awkward and uncertain; we avoid, ignore, or even deny feelings of sadness; we offer platitudes; we send sympathy bouquets whittled out of fruit.

Enter Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner, who can help us do better. Each having lost parents as young adults, they co-founded Modern Loss, responding to a need to change the dialogue around the messy experience of grief. Now, in this wise and often funny book, they offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and—above all—empathize.

Soffer and Birkner, along with forty guest contributors including Lucy Kalanithi, singer Amanda Palmer, and CNN’s Brian Stelter, reveal their own stories on a wide range of topics including triggers, sex, secrets, and inheritance. Accompanied by beautiful hand-drawn illustrations and witty "how to" cartoons, each contribution provides a unique perspective on loss as well as a remarkable life-affirming message.

Brutally honest and inspiring, Modern Loss invites us to talk intimately and humorously about grief, helping us confront the humanity (and mortality) we all share. Beginners welcome.
































[book] Heal Us O Lord:
A Chaplain's Interface with Pain
by Rabbi Sidney Goldstein, PhD
Chaplain, Philadelphia
January 2018
Urim Publishing
Heal Us O Lord: A Chaplain's Interface With Pain is the memoir of Rabbi Sidney Goldstein, a chaplain who encounters the traumas of life as he visits with those who are in the throes of experiencing them.

The book expresses the challenges faced by chaplains in providing support during some of the most crucial and painful times of life without being enveloped by them personally. Rabbi Goldstein offers a source of encouragement and council for those whose lives might crave spirituality but do not know where to turn.

Rabbi Goldstein, Ph.D was the Director of Chaplaincy at the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA where he was instrumental in founding the National Association of Jewish Chaplains of which he is a former President. Rabbi Goldstein is the author of Suicide in Rabbinical Literature and has written articles for Hadorom published by the Rabbinical Council of America























[book] DIY Rules for a WTF World
How to Speak Up,
Get Creative,
and Change the World
By Krista Suh
Pussyhat Project
(w/ her friend Jayna Zweiman
January 2018
From the creator of the Pussyhat Project, which represents the Women's March and is the symbol of the Resistance, comes a manifesto for every woman to create her own distinct and original path to joy and success at impact.
































[book] Social Startup Success:
How the Best Nonprofits
Launch, Scale Up, and
Make a Difference
by Kathleen Kelly Janus
January 2018
De Capo

Kathleen Kelly Janus, a lecturer at the Stanford University Program on Social Entrepreneurship and the founder of the successful social enterprise Spark, set out to investigate what makes a startup succeed or fail. She surveyed more than 200 high-performing social entrepreneurs and interviewed dozens of founders. Social Startup Success shares her findings for the legions of entrepreneurs working for social good, revealing how the best organizations get over the revenue hump. How do social ventures scale to over $2 million, Janus's clear benchmark for a social enterprise's sustainability? Janus, tapping into strong connections to the Silicon Valley world where many of these ventures are started or and/or funded, reveals insights from key figures such as DonorsChoose founder Charles Best, charity:water's Scott Harrison, Reshma Saujani of Girls Who Code and many others. Social Startup Success will be social entrepreneurship's essential playbook; the first definitive guide to solving the problem of scale.

























[book] Firestarters:
How Innovators, Instigators,
and Initiators Can Inspire
You to Ignite Your Own Life
by Raoul Davis Jr
Kathy Palokoff (Joe Squared Pizza of Baltimore)
and Paul Eder
January 2018
ProMetheus

Firestarters makes a convincing case that there is a science to the success of the many innovators, instigators, and initiators that shape our world
Based on interviews with entrepreneurs and leaders in many walks of life, this self-help book gives readers the tools for finding success in their careers, businesses, organizations, and private lives. What is the difference between those bold enough to pursue their dreams and others who never get comfortable enough to ignite their lives? The doers are "Firestarters" and, because of them, the world is a much different, and often, better place.
This motivational how-to book provides insights into the crucial difference between people who make things happen and those who only think about making an impact. Based on research from many disciplines and interviews with professionals at the top of their fields, Firestarters creates a complete roadmap to achieve personal success and make an impact in the world.
The authors provide pragmatic advice on how individual readers can ignite the qualities that will lead them toward pursuing and realizing their dreams. Self-assessment exercises, checklists, and other tools will help readers apply Firestarter insights to their own lives. Also included are group exercises and discussion guides so the book can be used in business and nonprofit settings to develop the skills that help companies grow. Whether you're an individual seeking ways to realize personal ambitions or a leader trying to motivate your team, you'll benefit from the Firestarter methods featured in this inspirational book.

























[book] Ogilvy on Advertising
IN THE DIGITAL AGE
by Miles Young
January 2018
Bloomsbury

Ogilvy is no longer on the planet to udate his bible on advertising. So he replacement has.

From Miles Young, worldwide non-executive chairman of Ogilvy & Mather, comes a sequel to David Ogilvy's bestselling advertising handbook featuring essential strategies for the digital age.

In this must-have sequel to the bestselling Ogilvy On Advertising, Ogilvy chairman Miles Young provides top insider secrets and strategies for successful advertising in the Digital Revolution. As comprehensive as its predecessor was for print and TV, this indispensable handbook dives deep into the digital ecosystem, discusses how to best collect and utilize data-the currency of the digital age-to convert sales specifically on screen (phone, tablet, smart watch, computer, etc.), breaks down when and how to market to millennials, highlights the top five current industry giants, suggests best practices from brand response to social media, and offers 13 trend predictions for the future.

This essential guide is for any professional in advertising, public relations, or marketing seeking to remain innovative and competitive in today's ever-expanding technological marketplace.


















[book] GAZA:
An Inquest into Its Martyrdom
by Norman G. Finkelstein (Author)
January 9 2018
University of California Press

Alice Walker likes it. Professor Zayas likes it. People who blame Israel for all the world's problems like this book, also.
The Gaza Strip is among the most densely populated places in the world. More than two-thirds of its inhabitants consider themselves as refugees. Half the area's population is aged under 18, and are cildren or grandchildren of people who consider themselves as refugees. Finkelstein writes that since 2004, the State of Israel has attacked the mostly defenseless population of Gaza eight times, leaving thousands homeless or dead. Finkelstein considers Gaza for martyrdom. Although attacks by Israel were provoked by assaults by Hamas and others, Finkelstein indicts Israel for violating international law. He also writes that Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and the United Nations fail Gaza's citizens.
























[book] The Family With Two Front Doors
by Anna Ciddor
January 2018
Kar Ben
Ages 8 and up
Based on Ciddor's grandmother's childhood in Lublin in the 1920s. The family, which includes nine children lives in two houses joined together. A charming tale, similar in style to the “All-of-a-Kind Family” and “Little House” series in its gentleness, family-centeredness, and air of kindness. No hints of what is to come in Europe in the following decades deflate this light soufflé of a book.




















[book] All Three Stooges
by Erica S. Perl
January 2018
Knopf
Ages 10 and up
An unforgettable coming-of-age story about comedy, loss, and friendship for fans of Jennifer L. Holm and Gary D. Schmidt.

Spoiler alert: This book is not about the Three Stooges. It's about Noah and Dash, two seventh graders who are best friends and comedy junkies. That is, they were best friends, until Dash's father died suddenly and Dash shut Noah out. Which Noah deserved, according to Noa, the girl who, annoyingly, shares both his name and his bar mitzvah day.

Now Noah's confusion, frustration, and determination to get through to Dash are threatening to destroy more than just their friendship. But what choice does he have? As Noah sees it, sometimes you need to risk losing everything, even your sense of humor, to prove that gone doesn't have to mean "gone for good."

Equal parts funny, honest, and deeply affecting, All Three Stooges is a book that will stay with readers long after the laughter subsides.



















FEBRUARY 2018 BOOKS




[book] Jewish Law as a Journey:
Finding Meaning in Daily
Jewish Practice
by Rabbi David Silverstein
Sgan (Assistant) Rosh Yeshiva at Yeshivat Orayta
February 2018
Menorah Books

The 21st Century has seen a dramatic increase in the number of books published on practical halakha. As a result, Halakhic observance has never been more accessible. But how does increased commitment to halakhic detail accomplish its goal of personal and ethical refinement?

Halakhic practices are meant to be spiritual entry points for divine encounters. Commitment to Jewish ritual should mold one's character and help facilitate a life guided by divine ideals. In fact, adherence to Jewish law without a parallel understanding of the meaning behind the law runs the risk of transforming halakha into a formulaic set of rules without any larger spiritual vision.

Jewish Law as a Journey is a valuable companion to published works of practical halakha. It explores virtues and ideals foundational to daily halakhic practice. Moreover, it offers a systematic exploration of the mitzvot one encounters in a given day and the transformative religious messages that underlie them.
























[book] IS THIS GUY FOR REAL?
The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman
A Graphic Book
By Box Brown
February 2018
First Second Books

Comedian and performer Andy Kaufman’s resume was impressive-a popular role on the beloved sitcom Taxi, a high-profile stand-up career, and a surprisingly successful stint in professional wrestling. Although he was by all accounts a sensitive and thoughtful person, he’s ironically best remembered for his various contemptible personas, which were so committed and so convincing that all but his closest family and friends were completely taken in.

Why would someone so gentle-natured and sensitive build an entire career seeking the hatred of his audience? What drives a performer to solicit that reaction? With the same nuance and sympathy with which he approached Andre the Giant in his 2014 biography, graphic novelist Box Brown takes on the complex and often hilarious life of Andy Kaufman.
























[book] The Penis Book:
A Doctor's Complete Guide
to the Penis-From Size to
Function and Everything in Between
by Aaron Spitz MD
February 2018 (for Valentines Day)
Rodale

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever wanted to know about the penis but were afraid to ask? Dr. Aaron Spitz has that answer-and many more.
Let Dr. Spitz? who served as assistant clinical professor at UC Irvine's Department of Urology for 15 years and who is a regularly featured guest on The Doctors?become your best friend as he fearlessly guides you through the hairiest and the scariest questions in The Penis Book. An unflinching, comprehensive guide to everything from sexually transmitted infections to the science of blood flow, The Penis Book prominently features an easy-to-follow holistic five-step plan for optimum penis health, including plant-based eating recommendations, information on some penis-healthy foods, and suggested exercises for penis well-being.
Useful to men and women alike, The Penis Book is a one-stop-shop for the care and maintenance of the penis in your life.

“A man’s guide to understanding his own intimate machinery, this book is raucous, honest, scientifically accurate, and a must-read. Only Dr. Aaron Spitz could combine his unique brand of humor with a thorough knowledge of urology. I am sure this enlightening book will find its way to many night tables both here and abroad.”
-Larry I. Lipshultz, M.D., Professor of Urology, Chief of Division of Male Reproductive Medicine and Surgery, Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine

“The Penis Book tells the facts and exposes the fiction about the penis, its anatomy and function, in a casual, comfortable manner understandable by all. At a time where the internet makes so many men feel they must be lacking, this little book tells the big story of what can be done to help when there is an issue with the penis, what shouldn’t be done as it might do harm, and what safe and effective treatments are currently available for sexual health concerns. As a sexual medicine physician for almost 40 years, I applaud Aaron Spitz for writing such a readable book to educate men (and their partners) everywhere so that an enjoyable sex life can be maintained.”
-Irwin Goldstein, MD, Director of Sexual Medicine, Alvarado Hospital, Clinical Professor of Surgery at the University of California at San Diego, and Director of San Diego Sexual Medicine




















[book] Sadness Is a White Bird:
A Novel
by Moriel Rothman-Zecher
Atria Books February 2018
“Nuanced, sharp, and beautifully written, Sadness Is a White Bird manages, with seeming effortlessness, to find something fresh and surprising and poignant in the classic coming-of-age, love-triangle narrative, something starker, more heartbreaking: something new.” —Michael Chabon

“Unflinching in its honesty, unyielding in its moral complexity.” —Pulitzer Prize–winning author Geraldine Brooks

In this lyrical and searing debut novel written by a rising literary star (Middlebury grad who majored in Arabic) and MacDowell Fellow, a young man is preparing to serve in the Israeli army while also trying to reconcile his close relationship to two Palestinian siblings with his deeply ingrained loyalties to family and country.

The story begins in an Israeli military jail, where—four days after his nineteenth birthday—Jonathan stares up at the fluorescent lights of his cell, and recalls the series of events that led him there.

Two years earlier: Moving back to Israel after several years in Pennsylvania, Jonathan is ready to fight to preserve and defend the Jewish state, which his grandfather—a Salonican Jew whose community was wiped out by the Nazis—helped establish. But he is also conflicted about the possibility of having to monitor the occupied Palestinian territories, a concern that grows deeper and more urgent when he meets Nimreen and Laith—the twin daughter and son of his mother’s friend.

From that winter morning on, the three become inseparable: wandering the streets on weekends, piling onto buses toward new discoveries, laughing uncontrollably. They share joints on the beach, trading snippets of poems, intimate secrets, family histories, resentments, and dreams. But with his draft date rapidly approaching, Jonathan wrestles with the question of what it means to be proud of your heritage and loyal to your people, while also feeling love for those outside of your own tribal family. And then that fateful day arrives, the one that lands Jonathan in prison and changes his relationship with the twins forever.

Powerful, important, and timely, Sadness Is a White Bird explores one man’s attempts to find a place for himself, discovering in the process a beautiful, against-the-odds love that flickers like a candle in the darkness of a never-ending conflict.















[book] Karl Barth,
the Jews,
and Judaism
by George Hunsinger
(Princeton Theological)
Eerdmans
February 2018
How Jewish was Karl Barth? This provocative question by David Novak opens Karl Barth, the Jews, and Judaism—a volume that brings together nine eminent Jewish and Christian theologians reflecting on a crucial aspect of Barth’s thought and legacy. These scholarly essays not only make a noteworthy contribution to Barth studies but also demonstrate creative possibilities for building positive Jewish-Christian relations without theological compromise.

Contributors & Topics
David Novak on the extent to which Barth thought like a Jew
Eberhard Busch on three Jewish-Christian milestones in Barth’s life
George Hunsinger on Christian philo-Semitism and supersessionism
Peter Ochs on Barthian elements in Jewish-Christian dialogue
Victoria J. Barnett on Barth and post-WWII interfaith encounters
Thomas F. Torrance on Israel’s divine calling in world history
C. E. B. Cranfield on Pauline texts pertinent to Jewish-Christian relations
Hans Küng on moving from anti-Semitism to theological dialogue
Ellen T. Charry on addressing theological roots of enmity




























[book] Young China:
How the Restless Generation
Will Change Their Country and the World
by Zak Dychtwald
February 2018
The author, in his twenties, is fluent in Chinese. A graduate of Columbia University and – I assume – a son of authors and futurists (Age Wave) Ken Dychtwald, PhD and Maddy Dychtwald, Dychtwald flew to China after graduation and set about learning Chinese and teaching English. He resided in the metropolis of Chengdu in Sichuan province, and traveled widely (and cheaply), whether on a train for over 30 hour to Harbin for the freezing cold ice fest, or to Inner Mongolia to climb a mountain and sleep in a yert. Along the way he befriended many young Chinese and thought hard on their dreams, ambitions, brand consumerism and affiliations, and outlooks. From laborers to the students who spend 80 hours a week preparing for exams in libraries so that they can kaoshang – or Test In to a coveted competitive program. And so he has composed this examination of China's youth, the Jiu Ling Hou (???), or those born after 1990.

Publisher: A close up look at the Chinese generation born after 1990 exploring through personal encounters how young Chinese feel about everything from money and sex, to their government, the West, and China’s shifting role in the world--not to mention their love affair with food, karaoke, and travel. Set primarily in the Eastern 2nd tier city of Suzhou and the budding Western metropolis of Chengdu, the book charts the touchstone issues this young generation faces. From single-child pressure, to test taking madness and the frenzy to buy an apartment as a prerequisite to marriage, from one-night-stands to an evolving understanding of family, Young China offers a fascinating portrait of the generation who will define what it means to be Chinese in the modern era.

Zak Dychtwald was twenty when he first landed in China. He spent years deeply immersed in the culture, learning the language and hanging out with his peers, in apartment shares, couch surfing arrangements and hostels, on long train rides and over endless restaurant meals.



























[book] THE COMMON GOOD
By Robert B. Reich
(UC Berkeley, Common Cause, former US Sec. Of Labor)
February 2018
Knopf

From the best-selling author of Saving Capitalism and The Work of Nations, a passionate, clear-eyed manifesto on why we must restore the idea of the common good to the center of our economics and politics.

With the warmth and lucidity that have made him one of our most important public voices, Robert B. Reich makes the case for a generous, inclusive understanding of the American project, centering on the moral obligations of citizenship.

When Reich was 14, he heard President John F. Kennedy ask Americans to work for the common good. It inspired a generation for many years. At 21, Reich went to work for Robert F. Kennedy as a grunt on his signature machine. But it was for the common good. Fifty years later, America is more inclusive, and life is more convenient. But Americans, though they volunteer and help out, talk less about the common good, and more about selfies and self-aggrandizement. From the Greatest Generation we moved to the Me Generation to Greed is Good to You're On Your Own. Rich and Poor, GOP and Democrats all have the same anxieties in many cases. Trump is NOT the CAUSE, but the CONSEQUENCE. Reich says you do not have to be born in America, White, or Christian to feel bound together You just have to adhere to the common American principles. It is a book on what we owe each other as members of the common society. In Chapter 2, Reich writes about and criticizes the growth in adherence to and veneration of the ideas of Ayn Rand and Robert Nozick, and their ideas that the common good is tyranny and enslavement.

Rooting his argument in everyday reality and common sense, Reich demonstrates the existence of a common good, and argues that it is this that defines a society or a nation. Societies and nations undergo virtuous cycles that reinforce and build the common good, as well as vicious cycles that undermine it. Over the course of the past five decades, Reich contends, America has been in a slowly accelerating vicious cycle--one that can and must be reversed. But first we need to weigh what really matters, and how we as a country should relate to honor, shame, patriotism, truth, and the meaning of leadership.

It opens with a chapter entitled SHKRELI. It tells the story of Albanian American Martin Shkreli, a genius, who screwed the ill by raising his company's drug price for AIDS and toxoplasmosis from $13.50 a pill to $750 a dose, or 5000% to make an outrageous profit. In 2017, on unrelated charges, he was convicted on 3 of 7 counts of fraud. He, according to Reich, is what went wrong with America: Personal Enrichment, no matter the national consequences. Reich wants a society that gives awards, like Oscars and Kennedy Center Honors to a thousand people a year who promote the common good.

Powerful, urgent, and utterly vital, this is a heartfelt missive from one of our foremost political thinkers: a fundamental statement about the purpose of society and a cri de coeur to save America's soul.


























[book] What the Night Sings
by Vesper Stamper
February 2018
For fans of The Book Thief and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas comes a lushly illustrated novel about a teen Holocaust survivor, who must come to terms with who she is and how to rebuild her life.

After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone. Without her Papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and onto living her life. In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else. With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.

"A tour de force. This powerful story of love, loss, and survival is not to be missed." -- Kristin Hannah, #1 New York Times Bestselling author of The Nightingale

"What the Night Sings is a book from the heart, of the heart, and to the heart. Vesper Stamper's Gerta will stay with you long after you turn the last page. Her story is one of hope and redemption and life -- a blessing to the world." -- Deborah Heiligman, award-winning author of Charles and Emma and Vincent and Theo


















[book] Roller Coaster Grandma
Paperback
by Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer
and Pierre Lehu
Edited by Ann D. Koffsky
Illustrated by Mark Simmons
February 2018
Ages 8 – 12
Apples & Honey Press

This graphic novel for ages 8-12 depicts the ups and downs of Dr. Ruth's life from her escape from the Nazis at age 10 aboard a Kindertransport, to her training as a sniper with the Hagganah in Israel, through her immigration to the US where she started as a maid, became a college professor, and eventually a television star. Using a trip to an amusement park with her grandchildren as its framework, the story subtly demonstrates lessons of grit, resilience, and strength that readers can apply to their own lives.































[book] BUILT
The Hidden Stories
Behind our Structures
by Roma Agrawal
February 2018
Bloomsbury
Imagine you woke up one morning, and everything created by engineers had disappeared.What would you see?
No cars, no houses; no phones, bridges or roads. No tunnelsunder tidal rivers, no soaring skyscrapers. The impact that engineering has hadon the human experience is undeniable, but it is also often invisible.
In BUILT, structural engineer Roma Agrawal takes a unique look at how construction has evolved from the mud huts of our ancestors to skyscrapers of steel that reach hundreds of metres into the sky. She unearths how engineers have tunnelled through kilometres of solid mountains; how they've bridged across the widest and deepest of rivers, and tamed Nature's precious - and elusive -water resources. She tells vivid tales of the visionaries who created the groundbreaking materials used in the Pantheon's record-holding concrete dome, and the frame of the record-breaking Eiffel Tower. Through the lens of an engineer, Roma examines tragedies like the collapse of the Quebec Bridge, highlighting the precarious task of ensuring people's safety they hold at every step.
With colourful stories of her life-long fascination with buildings- and her own hand-drawn illustrations - Roma reveals the extraordinary secret livesof structures.






























[book] That's What She Said:
What Men Need to Know
(and Women Need to Tell Them)
About Working Together
by Joanne Lipman
February 2018
William Morrow


First things first: There will be no man shaming in That’s What She Said. A recent Harvard study found that corporate “diversity training” has actually made the gender gap worse—in part because it makes men feel demonized. Women, meanwhile, have been told closing the gender gap is up to them: they need to speak up, to be more confident, to demand to be paid what they’re worth. They discuss these issues amongst themselves all the time. What they don’t do is talk to men about it.

It’s time to end that disconnect. More people in leadership roles are genuinely trying to transform the way we work together, because there's abundant evidence that companies with more women in senior leadership perform better by virtually every measure. Yet despite good intentions, men often lack the tools they need, leading to fumbles, missteps, frustration and misunderstanding that continue to inflict real and lasting damage on women's careers.
That's What She Said solves for that dilemma. Filled with illuminating anecdotes, data from the most recent studies, and stories from Joanne Lipman’s own journey to the top of a male-dominated industry, it shows how we can win by reaching across the gender divide. What can the Enron scandal teach us about the way men and women communicate professionally? How does brain chemistry help explain men’s fear of women’s emotions at work? Why did Kimberly Clark have an all-male team of executives in charge of their Kotex tampon line? What can we learn from Iceland’s campaign to “feminize” an entire nation? That’s What She Said shows why empowering women as true equals is an essential goal for women and men—and offers a roadmap for getting there.

That’s What She Said solves for: The respect gap; Unconscious bias; Interruptions; The pay and promotion gap; Being heard; The motherhood penalty; “Bropropriation” and “mansplaining”; and more.

























[book] The Château:
The CHATEAU
A Novel
by Paul Goldberg
February 2018
Picador USA

We have proverb in Florida...You know why it's good to be on the beach?"
Bill smiles, but says nothing. He wants the guy to keep talking.
"Because on beach you are surrounded by idiots on only three sides."
"And on the remaining side you have what?" asks Bill.
"Sharks..."


Paul Goldberg, the acclaimed author of The Yid, takes us behind the scenes of a Florida condo board election, delivering a wild spin on Miami Beach, petty crime, Jewish identity, and life in Trump's America.

It is January 2017 and Bill has hit rock bottom. Yesterday, he was William M. Katzenelenbogen, successful science reporter at The Washington Post. But things have taken a turn. Fired from his job, aimless, with exactly $1,219.37 in his checking account, he learns that his college roommate, a plastic surgeon known far and wide as the “Butt God of Miami Beach,” has fallen to his death under salacious circumstances. With nothing to lose, Bill boards a flight for Florida’s Gold Coast, ready to begin his own investigation-a last ditch attempt to revive his career.

There’s just one catch: Bill’s father, Melsor.

Melsor Yakovlevich Katzenelenbogen-poet, literary scholar, political dissident, small-time-crook-is angling for control of the condo board at the Château Sedan Neuve, a crumbling high-rise in Hollywood, Florida, populated mostly by Russian Jewish immigrants. The current board is filled with fraudsters levying “special assessments” on residents, and Melsor will use any means necessary to win the board election. And who better to help him than his estranged son?

As he did in The Yid, Paul Goldberg has taken something we think we know and turned it on its ear. Featuring a colorful cast of characters, The Château guarantees that you will never look at condo boards, crime, kleptocracy, vodka, Fascism, or Florida the same way again.

























[book] A History of Judaism
by Martin Goodman
(Oxford University, Professor of Jewish Studies)
February 2018
Princeton University Press
A sweeping history of Judaism over more than three millennia

Judaism is one of the oldest religions in the world, and it has preserved its distinctive identity despite the extraordinarily diverse forms and beliefs it has embodied over the course of more than three millennia. A History of Judaism provides the first truly comprehensive look in one volume at how this great religion came to be, how it has evolved from one age to the next, and how its various strains, sects, and traditions have related to each other.

In this magisterial and elegantly written book, Martin Goodman takes readers from Judaism's origins in the polytheistic world of the second and first millennia BCE to the temple cult at the time of Jesus. He tells the stories of the rabbis, mystics, and messiahs of the medieval and early modern periods and guides us through the many varieties of Judaism today. Goodman's compelling narrative spans the globe, from the Middle East, Europe, and America to North Africa, China, and India. He explains the institutions and ideas on which all forms of Judaism are based, and masterfully weaves together the different threads of doctrinal and philosophical debate that run throughout its history.

A History of Judaism is a spellbinding chronicle of a vibrant and multifaceted religious tradition that has shaped the spiritual heritage of humankind like no other.

"In this remarkable book, Martin Goodman compresses the entire history of Judaism--from Josephus to Jewish Renewal--into a thoroughly readable synthesis, paying special attention to Jewish diversity and drawing on up-to-date scholarship. Henceforward, all students of Judaism should begin here."--Jonathan D. Sarna, author of When General Grant Expelled the Jews
















[book] The Mystery of the Kibbutz:
Egalitarian Principles in a
Capitalist World
by Ran Abramitzky
February 2018
Princeton University Press
How the kibbutz movement thrived despite its inherent economic contradictions and why it eventually declined

The kibbutz is a social experiment in collective living that challenges traditional economic theory. By sharing all income and resources equally among its members, the kibbutz system created strong incentives to free ride or-as in the case of the most educated and skilled-to depart for the city. Yet for much of the twentieth century kibbutzim thrived, and kibbutz life was perceived as idyllic both by members and the outside world. In The Mystery of the Kibbutz, Ran Abramitzky blends economic perspectives with personal insights to examine how kibbutzim successfully maintained equal sharing for so long despite their inherent incentive problems.

Weaving the story of his own family’s experiences as kibbutz members with extensive economic and historical data, Abramitzky sheds light on the idealism and historic circumstances that helped kibbutzim overcome their economic contradictions. He illuminates how the design of kibbutzim met the challenges of thriving as enclaves in a capitalist world and evaluates kibbutzim’s success at sustaining economic equality. By drawing on extensive historical data and the stories of his pioneering grandmother who founded a kibbutz, his uncle who remained in a kibbutz his entire adult life, and his mother who was raised in and left the kibbutz, Abramitzky brings to life the rise and fall of the kibbutz movement.

The lessons that The Mystery of the Kibbutz draws from this unique social experiment extend far beyond the kibbutz gates, serving as a guide to societies that strive to foster economic and social equality.
















[book] THE FUTURE
A GUIDE TO THE JEWISH MESSIAH,
ISRAEL, AND THE END OF DAYS
by Rabbi Lawrence Hajioff
(Stern College, Birthright Israel)
February 2018
Mosaic Publications

The world is on edge. We read every day of radical regimes threatening the world. Anti-Semitism is on the rise and Israel is under the constant threat of annihilation from its neighbors.
Yet, every day, scientists are discovering cures for diseases that have long plagued mankind. Technology has opened up the world like never before. Poverty, disease and illiteracy are in the decline.
Which is it? Is the world on the path to inevitable destruction, or are we progressing to something very new and great?
In this fascinating work, Rabbi Lawrence Hajioff delves into these questions using Jewish sources that span thousands of years exploring such topics as:

The Four Exiles of Jewish history
The King Mashiach and his mission
Israel and Jerusalem at the End of Days
The War of Gog and Magog
The purpose of the World to Come
Resurrection of the Dead
Find answers, clarity, and inspiration in
























[book] Illuminating Jewish Thought:
Explorations of Free Will,
the Afterlife, and
the Messianic Era
by Rabbi Netanel Wiederblank
(in Hebrew and English, Bilingual Edition)
(Yeshiva University)
Winter 2018
Maggid
is more important to me to explain a [philosophical] principle than any other thing that I teach. (Rambam, Mishna Berachot, 9:7) Illuminating Jewish Thought is a contemporary, multi-volume series that surveys the theological foundations of Jewish faith. With the approach and scope of a master educator for undergraduate and rabbinical students at Yeshiva University, Rabbi Wiederblank brings together a wide array of Jewish texts ranging from philosophical to Kabbalistic, ancient to modern, in a clear and accessible source book.

In this volume, the author shows the richness of the Jewish scholastic tradition relating to three fundamental yet esoteric topics: free will, the afterlife, and the messianic era. Primary sources are presented in their original language with modern English translation, enabling readers to analyze the texts independently, while the author illuminates and contextualizes these complex concepts. Altogether, Illuminating Jewish Thought reveals the bedrock on which lies the nexus of Jewish belief and practice.























[book] We Are Jewish Faces
by Debra B Darvick
February 2018
Apples & Honey Press

Kindergarten – Grade 3

We are brothers, sisters, grandparents, friends. We are smiling, laughing, crying, cheering. We are all ages, colors, lifestyles, and abilities. We are the face of Jewish life today.

Debra Darvick’s delightful picture book mirrors today’s emerging Jewish reality; a Jewish face is dark-haired and dark-eyed and blonde and blue-eyed. A Jewish face belongs to a Chinese adoptee and to a newborn from Guatamala. It is the face of an African American convert and that of a festively dressed bride from India. We Are Jewish Faces sings the long overdue song of Jewish diversity with passion, honesty, and celebration. We Are Jewish Faces affirms identity, embraces diversity, and celebrates Jewish life, all in one remarkable little book.
Ms. Darvick is also the author of This Jewish Life: Stories of Discovery, Connection, and Joy and I Love Jewish Faces, which inspired the reimagining of We Are Jewish Faces for this generation of readers and for Apples & Honey Press. When not writing or hiking her beloved red rock trails, Ms. Darvick is passionate about encouraging less texting and more talking. Learn more at pictureaconversation.com. She lives in Southeast Michigan.
























[book] LIGHT
by Jane Breskin Zalben
February 2018
Apples & Honey Press

Kindergarten – Grade 3

In the beginning, there was emptiness,
like a blank canvas.
Then, in a swirl of motion, the world was created.


It was going to be finished with a special kind of light, stored in a huge jar. But the light was so powerful it shattered the jar into millions of pieces. People were created to find the sparks of light and bring them back together so that the world would be perfect.

According to an old Kabbalah legend, when God made the world, “he wanted to paint everything with a special kind of light so the world would shine with goodness.” Too powerful to be stored in a jar, the light burst forth, shattering into shards all over the globe. To make the world whole and peaceful again, God created people to help search for and find each broken piece of light. This rendition of an old midrash creation story is filled with a beautiful and simple message of hope. A peaceful coexistence is still possible for a world that is torn apart by war, hunger and blind hatred, if people look for the spark of light in everyone and everything. Special and inspiring for all cultures.

Jane Breskin Zalben is the author-artist for many books, including Saturday Night at the Beastro, which she created with her husband, Steven. She lives in Long Island, New York.





















[book] French Toast Sundays
by Gloria Spielman
Inbal Gigi Bousidan (Illustrator)
February 2018
Apples & Honey Press

Preschool – Grade 2

When Mina s beloved Grandma passes away, nothing feels right anymore.

People come to visit.
Mina just hides up in the big old oak tree.
But the stories she hears about Grandma bring her slowly back down until at last Mina feels ready to smile again.

PW:Mina is inconsolable when her beloved grandmother dies, and as people gather in her home to observe Jewish mourning rituals (explained in a brief afterword), she retreats to her favorite branch in the big oak tree next to her home and refuses to come down. But as she overhears family and friends telling stories about Grandma, she realizes that there are wonderful revelations in store for everyone: Grandma’s own children never knew their mother rode a motorcycle “all the way to Brighton Beach,” and Mina finally learns why Grandma always turned down her invitations to join her on the tree branch. Soon, Mina returns to the fold to share her own Grandma “secret”—her mysterious recipe for the perfect French toast they cooked together every Sunday morning (it starts with tying the apron “Not too tight. Not too loose. Just right”). Spielman (Marcel Marceau: Master of Mime) and Bousidan strike a mood of reassuring calm and contemplation: the writer with her measured, direct prose, and the illustrator with crisp lines, soft colors, distilled details, and liberal white space





















An award winning film from Sony Picture Classics based on this novel is now in theaters in December 2017:
[book] Call Me by Your Name:
A Novel
by André Aciman
Paperback film tie-in edition, October 2017
Originally published in 2007
Picador
The novel upon which the film, directed by Luca Guadagnino, starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, and adapted by James Ivory, is based. Andre Aciman's “Call Me by Your Name” is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between a brilliant, sensitive adolescent Jewish boy (Elio) and a Jewish grad student guest (Oliver), 24, at his parents’ cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each Summer, Elio's father invites an accomplished PhD student in Classics to spend the Summer in Italy at their house. Oliver and Elio are each unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer, unrelenting currents of obsession, fascination, competition, and desire intensify their passion and test the charged volcanic ground between them. Elio reads and plays music, dates, and spends languid summer days and nights. Oliver works on his dissertation on Heraclitus. (As you will recall from high school Greek, Heraclitus wrote that no man steps in the same river twice, that life is fleeting, and that 'the path up and down are one and the same' so that opposites attract). Recklessly, the two verge toward the one thing both fear they may never truly find again: total intimacy. Oliver likes to say “later”, it is like a ping pong game between the two of them, never knowing one's true thoughts and desires. Elio hides his discreet Jewishness, at times, and it can be considered a metaphor for his hiding of his desires. It is an instant classic. Set in 1983, it is a winner of a Lambda Literary Award for Fiction, and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, as well as a Publishers Weekly and The Washington Post Best Book of the Year

André Aciman is the noted CUNY professor, expert in Marcel Proust, and am award winning novelist as well as the author of Out of Egypt, about his Egyptian Jewish family's life in and flight from Gamal Abdul Nasser's Egypt.

NOTE: For readers who already saw the film... note that the novel ends 20 years after where the film does. So buy and read the book to find out what happens.

NOTE: The idea for the novel came in 2005, when André Aciman’s plans to take his wife and three sons to a Mediterranean villa collapsed. Angry, Aciman, now 66, decided to instead, write a love story set on the Italian Riviera in the mid-1980s. Three months later he had “Call Me By Your Name” ready for editing.

NOTE: Does the Hanukkah scene in the novel relate on a deeper level to Oliver's study on a Greek philosopher from 500 BCE? We will need to ask Professor Aciman if we meet him

NOTE: A paragraph from the novel: “He had, it took me a while to realize, four personalities depending on what bathing suit he was wearing. Knowing which to expect gave me the illusion of a slight advantage. Red: bold, set in his ways, very grown-up, almost gruff and ill-tempered — stay away. Yellow: sprightly, buoyant, funny, not without barbs — don't give in too easily; might turn to red in no time. Green, which he seldom wore: acquiescent, eager to learn, eager to speak, sunny — why wasn't he always like this? Blue: the afternoon he stepped into my room from the balcony, the day he massaged my shoulder, or when he picked up my glass and placed it right next to mine.”



SEE ALSO:
[book] Deceit, Desire,
and the Novel:
Self and Other in Literary Structure
by René Girard
1976
Johns Hopkins University Press



























MARCH 2018 BOOKS



[book] (((Semitism))):
Being Jewish in America
in the Age of Trump
by Jonathan Weisman
(New York Times, Washington Bureau Dep Editor)
March 20, 2018
St. Martin's Press

Bernard-Henri Lévy: "It would be wonderful if anti-Semitism was a European specialty and stopped at the border with the United States. Alas, this is not the case. Jonathan Weisman’s new book (((Semitism))) shows why..."

Michael Eric Dyson: "With eloquence and poignancy Weisman shows how hatred can slowly and quietly chew away at the moral fabric of society. We now live in an age where more than ever bigotry and oppression no longer need to hide in fear of reproach. The floodgates have opened. This is much more than a personal response to the bigotry he experienced because of his Jewishness; Weisman has written a manifesto that outlines the dangers of marginalizing and demonizing all minority groups. This powerful book is for all of us."

I tell every one who tells me how excited they are by Trump and having Kushner as his top advisor... that... just WAIT... wait... it will all come back to bite Jews.. when Jews get blamed...

Weisman, husband of writer Jennifer Steinhauer, has written this short, literary, powerful contemplation on how JEWS ARE VIEWED in America since the election of Donald J. Trump, and how we can move forward to fight anti-Semitism.

Anti-Semitism has always been present in American culture, but with the rise of the Alt Right and an uptick of threats to Jewish communities since Trump took office, New York Times editor Jonathan Weisman has produced a book that could not be more important or timely.

When Weisman was attacked on Twitter by a wave of neo-Nazis and anti-Semites, – they placed his name in triple parentheses... which means “JEW”... akin to making a twitter I.d. Wear a yellow star --- witnessing tropes such as the Jew as a leftist anarchist; as a rapacious, Wall Street profiteer; and as a money-bags financier orchestrating war for Israel, he stopped to wonder: How has the Jewish experience changed, especially under a leader like Donald Trump?

In (((Semitism))), Weisman explores the disconnect between his own sense of Jewish identity and the expectations of his detractors and supporters.

He delves into the rise of the Alt Right, their roots in older anti-Semitic organizations, the odd ancientness of their grievances-cloaked as they are in contemporary, techy hipsterism-and their aims-to spread hate in a palatable way through a political structure that has so suddenly become tolerant of their views.

Weisman concludes with what we should do next, realizing that vicious as it is, anti-Semitism must be seen through the lens of more pressing threats. He proposes a unification of American Judaism around the defense of self and of others even more vulnerable: the undocumented immigrants, refugees, Muslim Americans, and black activists who have been directly targeted, not just by the tolerated Alt Right, but by the Trump White House itself.

As for his prescription... I doubt that American Jews will unify around this, except for the Reform and Masorti movements... most members of the Modern Orthodox movement who are my neighbors are quite happy with Trump, and ignore the alt right.



















[book] The Rock, the Road,
and the Rabbi:
My Journey into the Heart
of the Scriptural Faith
and the Land Where It All Began
by Kathie Lee Gifford
with contribution by Rabbi Jason Sobel
March 2018
Thomas Nelson Christian Publications

Kathie Lee Gifford writes about her faith with a leader in the Messianic faith

As a lifetime student of scripture, Kathie Lee Gifford has been traveling to Israel since she was 17 years old. She even missed her high school graduation so she could attend the first Jerusalem Conference on Biblical Prophecy in 1971.

In a continuation of that love for this astounding land of faith, The Rock, the Road, and the Rabbi is an examination of a decades-long desire to know more and understand more than the typical “Sunday School” teaching so prevalent in our churches today.

With a father who was Jewish, Kathie Lee has always felt what she calls, “a deep resonance in my very being for the Jewish people and Land of the Covenant—Israel.”

But it wasn’t until she started studying the original texts in Hebrew and Greek and actually hiking the land herself with teachers who taught the messianic rabbinical way, that she finally began to find what her soul had been longing for.

Something profound happens when one follows along the ancient paths in the actual places that Jesus taught, healed, lived, died, was resurrected and ascended into Heaven. He is indeed the Rock, the Rabbi whom we follow on the Road, and when we are introduced to the mysteries of the Word by teachers who are actually trained in the ancient rabbinical way, radical transformation begins to renew our hearts and minds.

As Kathie Lee shares her transformative experience, readers will also be introduced to her teachers on the journey, Ray Vander Laan, Rod Van Solkema, and Rabbi Jason Sobel, a Messianic Jewish Rabbi who has been opening hearts and minds around the world with his historical analysis and eye-opening revelations. The book will include pictures of the actual sites, and stories both old and new of what happened there.

At the end of each chapter Rabbi Sobel takes the reader even deeper into understanding Hebrew culture, language, and the means of connection that opens up an understanding of faith and heritage like never before.

























MOVE OVER ZAHAV… (Just kidding)

[book] SHAYA
An Odyssey of Food,
My Journey Back to Israel
by (Chef) Alon Shaya
March 2018
KNOPF

An exciting debut cookbook that confirms the arrival of a new guru chef . . . A moving, deeply personal journey of survival and discovery that tells of the evolution of a cuisine and of the transformative power and magic of food and cooking. From the two-time James Beard Award-winning chef whose celebrated New Orleans restaurants have been hailed as the country's most innovative and best by Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Saveur, GQ, and Esquire.

"Alon's journey is as gripping and as seductive as his cooking . . . Lovely stories, terrific food." --Yotam Ottolenghi, author of Jerusalem: A Cookbook

Alon Shaya's is no ordinary cookbook. It is a memoir of a culinary sensibility that begins in Israel and wends its way from the U.S.A. (Philadelphia) to Italy (Milan and Bergamo), back to Israel (Jerusalem) and comes together in the American South, in the heart of New Orleans. It's a book that tells of how food saved the author's life and how, through a circuitous path of (cooking) twists and (life-affirming) turns the author's celebrated cuisine--food of his native Israel with a creole New Orleans kick came to be, along with his award-winning New Orleans restaurants: Shaya, Domenica, and Pizza Domenica, ranked by Esquire, Bon Appétit, and others as the best new restaurants in the United States.

Many successful and celebrity chefs tend to have troubled early lives that are resurrected and rebalanced through food, cooking and culinary careers. I am thinking of Michael Solomonov's Zahav and Anthony Bourdain's works. Alon Shaya is no different and his anticipated cookbook is a story of not only recipes, but the path that led him to success in New Orleans, LA. But, as he writes, it is not only recipes and a personal narrative in this book, but the story of the magnetic and “gumbo” quality of Israel; its varied cultures and faiths; and his Israeli, Romanian, Bulgarian strands of heritage that have been his muse.

This book is not structured by meal, by holiday, by season, or by foodtype. It opens with notes... enlightening notes on which salts to use and how the recipes vary by your salt brand, notes on oils, butter, breadcrumbs, yogurt, knives, and more. Section One follows: Echoes Of Israel; and it begins with “(1) My Grandmother's Pepper and Eggplants.” It tells the story of her influences on him and has five recipes for items such as Lutenitsa (peppers and eggplants); Watermelon and Feta Salad with Harissa; and Bulgarian Lamb Kebabs. At age five, he moved from Israel to Philadelphia to join his father, and then to Narberth, as his parents separated. His English was accented by Elmo and Cookie Monster. A month-long visit from his mother's Bulgarian-Israeli parents brought with them the smells of affection of family unity. His safta (grandmother), a pharmacist before escaping to Israel in 1948, would care for him, and he would cook with her and learn to use the C-clamp kitchen grinder. (His grandmother's Jewish penicillin was Tomato and Rice soup.) In (2) Show-and-Tell Borekas, the four recipes recall a story of second grade show-and-tell, bullying, and a failed cooking demonstration. In (3) Solo Hamantashen, six recipes remind him of his first solo cooking adventure and a sense of independence at the age of nine. Recipes includes ones for Peach and Mascarpone Hamantashen; Israeli Salad; Schmaltzy Potatoes; Bulgarian Leek Patties; Labneh; and Yemenite (marinaded) Stewed Chicken. In (4) Fishing With My Father, Chef Shaya recounts the dates with his Romanian/Hungarian born father, bowling or fishing, that were redeemed when the cooked the fish they caught. Recipes include those for pan-fried fish; turkey sandwiches that are so much better than those of his youth; Hungarian Paprikash; and Tarragon Dumplings.

In Section Two: Rebellion and Redemption, Chef Shaya recalls his first job at thirteen, at a butcher shop. He told them he was 16. Recipes include those for Kibbeh Nayeh; Malawach; Spicy Scallop Rolls; Yogurt Pound Cade with Cardamon-Lemon Syrup; and Blueberry Rugelach. Many recall his teenaged job at a bakery, which was heavenly compared to his homelife: a life of weed, vandalism, shoplifting, drug dealers, and chasing trouble. An arrest led to community service in a hospital.. which led to working in its kitchen.. which leads to a recipe for Shakshuka... which in turns leads to the story of Home Ec's class and knife skills... and later to CIA, where he finds that although he had Israeli parents, a religious mother, and a Jewish community... he knew little of Jewish food (See his Kugel in Crisis recipe, in Chapter 9. Trayf and Tribulation: he suggested that the Jewish Culture Club roast a whole pig as a fun activity).

Anyway.. I don't want to give away spoilers of his life stories, so, to wrap up, Section Two's chapters include (10) Vegas or Bust; (11) Steak for My Saba (Grandfather), featuring a Cast-Iron Ribeye and Vegetable “Pot Roast;” (12) Boss Man, featuring Five-Onion Soup, and Chicken Milanese (like his mother's shnitzel, using yellow curry powder and watercress or arugula); and (13) Safta's Last Lutenista. In Section Three: Finding Home In The South, recipes include ones for Roasted Speckled Trout, Crab Cakes with preserved Lemon Aioli, Israeli Couscous, Red Beans and Rice, Buttermilk Biscuits (in Chapter 16: Manischewitz for Willie Mae), Za'atar Fried Chicken, Date Pancakes with Rose Tahini, Smoked Chicken with Harissa, Schmaltzy Cornbread with Gribenes, and Banana Bread with Carob Molasses Butter. In Section Four, Chef Shaya ventures to Italy in “An Italian Sojourn.” Here he shares stories and recipes for Slow-Roasted Lamb Shoulder, Spiced Couscous, Tortelli d'Erbetta, Fresh Pasta, Blackberry Torta della Nonna, Chocolate Hazelnut Semifreddo, Pizza Enzo, Pita, Sea Bass Cartoccio, Piemontese style Bagna Cauda (hot bath/dip), Chocolate Espresso Cookies, and more. In Section Five: Homecoming, readers are greeted with Sous Vide Turkey, Brussels Sprout Salad, Smoked Goat Tacos, Curried Sweet Potato and Leek Pie, Charoset, (reluctantly) Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Tahini Chicken Salad, Moroccan Carrot Salad, Matbucha (in Chapter 26: An Israeli Restaurant in New Orleans), Muhammmara, Avocado Toast with Smoked Whitefish, and more.






















[book] Feasting:
A New Take on Jewish Cooking
by Amanda Ruben
March 2018
Hardie Grant

Feasting offers modern inspiration on classic Jewish cooking. Serial restaurateur Amanda Ruben of cult Melbourne foodie hotspots 'Cooper and Milla's' and 'Miss Ruben' offers up a range of delicious Jewish staples and new recipes to enjoy. Recipes include classic chicken soup; roast cauliflower with dukkah, crushed hazelnuts and date yogurt; and grilled figs with tomatoes, burrata and vincotto dressing and mouth-watering challah bread and butter pudding. A chapter on Jewish holiday food includes delicious recipes to celebrate over with friends and family. Feasting is the ideal gift or self-purchase for anyone wanting to bring more variety to their family meals.

























[book] DISARMED
Unconventional Lessons from
the World's Only One-Armed
Special Forces Sharpshooter
by Izzy Ezagui
March 2018
PROMETHEUS BOOKS
The inspiring story of a young American who volunteered to fight in the Israel Defense Forces, lost his arm in combat, and then returned to the battlefield.
On January 8, 2009, Izzy Ezagui--a 19-year-old American who had enlisted in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF)--lost his arm in a mortar attack on the border of the Gaza Strip. In this stirring memoir, full of chutzpah and dark humor, Izzy recounts his tortuous trek through rehabilitation to re-enlistment as a squad commander in the IDF. He became the only one-armed Special Forces sharpshooter.
This isn't a typical war chronicle. Izzy eschews macho bluster, steering clear of the usual hero tropes of most war memoirists. He wrote this book for his fellow millennials. Not necessarily those with military ambitions, but for everyone facing life's daily battles. His message is simple: if a self-described "nerd" and "one-armed basket case" like him can accomplish what he set his mind to, then anyone can become a hero in his or her own life.
Growing up in a religious household in Miami, his early life, plagued by self-doubt, family drama, and girl troubles, culminated in a life-changing terrorist attack he and his family barely escaped when he was thirteen. His search for direction eventually led him to that explosion on the Gaza border, changing his life forever.
In the midst of disaster, he discovered a deep well at his core, from which he could draw strength. Through his motivational speeches across the world, he encourages people to seek their own power, and to face whatever adversity life throws at them.
Combining refreshing candor with self-deprecating wit, Izzy's story will provoke readers to live up to their aspirations despite seemingly impossible odds.


























[book] Dying for a Paycheck:
How Modern Management Harms
Employee Health and Company
Performance—and What We
Can Do About It
by Jeffrey Pfeffer
March 2018
Harper Business
In one survey, 61 percent of employees said that workplace stress had made them sick and 7 percent said they had actually been hospitalized. Job stress costs US employers more than $300 billion annually and may cause 120,000 excess deaths each year. In China, 1 million people a year may be dying from overwork. People are literally dying for a paycheck. And it needs to stop.

In this timely, provocative book, Jeffrey Pfeffer contends that many modern management commonalities such as long work hours, work-family conflict, and economic insecurity are toxic to employees—hurting engagement, increasing turnover, and destroying people’s physical and emotional health—and also inimical to company performance. He argues that human sustainability should be as important as environmental stewardship.

You don’t have to do a physically dangerous job to confront a health-destroying, possibly life-threatening, workplace. Just ask the manager in a senior finance role whose immense workload, once handled by several employees, required frequent all-nighters—leading to alcohol and drug addiction. Or the dedicated news media producer whose commitment to getting the story resulted in a sixty-pound weight gain thanks to having no down time to eat properly or exercise. Or the marketing professional prescribed antidepressants a week after joining her employer.

In Dying for a Paycheck, Jeffrey Pfeffer marshals a vast trove of evidence and numerous examples from all over the world to expose the infuriating truth about modern work life: even as organizations allow management practices that literally sicken and kill their employees, those policies do not enhance productivity or the bottom line, thereby creating a lose-lose situation.

Exploring a range of important topics including layoffs, health insurance, work-family conflict, work hours, job autonomy, and why people remain in toxic environments, Pfeffer offers guidance and practical solutions all of us—employees, employers, and the government—can use to enhance workplace wellbeing. We must wake up to the dangers and enormous costs of today’s workplace, Pfeffer argues. Dying for a Paycheck is a clarion call for a social movement focused on human sustainability. Pfeffer makes clear that the environment we work in is just as important as the one we live in, and with this urgent book, he opens our eyes and shows how we can make our workplaces healthier and better.



























[book] The Sound of Freedom
by Kathy Kacer
March 2018
Annick Press
Kathy has published over 20 books for youth, many many dealing with issues of the Shoah.

Anna and her family have only one hope left to escape certain doom. It’s 1936 and life is becoming dangerous for the Jews of Krakow. As incidents of violence and persecution increase day by day, Anna begs her father to leave Poland, but he insists it’s impossible. How could he give up his position as an acclaimed clarinetist in the Krakow Philharmonic Orchestra? When Anna and her father barely escape from a group of violent thugs, it becomes clear that the family must leave. But how? There seems to be only one possibility. Bronislaw Huberman, a world-renowned violinist, is auditioning Jewish musicians for a new orchestra in Palestine. If accepted, they and their families will receive exit visas. Anna and her grandmother boldly write to Huberman asking him to give Anna’s father an audition, but will that be enough to save them?

This poignant story is based on real events in pre-war Poland and Palestine. After saving 700 Jews and their families, Huberman went on to establish what later became the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. Against an ominous background of the impending Holocaust in Europe and the first Arab-Israeli war, The Sound of Freedom still manages to remind the reader of the goodness in the world.

























[book] Never Remember:
Searching for Stalin's
Gulags in Putin's Russia
by Masha Gessen
Photos by Misha Friedman
March 2018
Columbia Global Reports
A haunting literary and visual journey deep into Russia's past -- and present. The Gulag was a monstrous network of labor camps that held and killed millions of prisoners from the 1930s to the 1950s. More than half a century after the end of Stalinist terror, the geography of the Gulag has been barely sketched and the number of its victims remains unknown. Has the Gulag been forgotten? Writer Masha Gessen and photographer Misha Friedman set out across Russia in search of the memory of the Gulag. They journey from Moscow to Sandarmokh, a forested site of mass executions during Stalin's Great Terror; to the only Gulag camp turned into a museum, outside of the city of Perm in the Urals; and to Kolyma, where prisoners worked in deadly mines in the remote reaches of the Far East. They find that in Vladimir Putin's Russia, where Stalin is remembered as a great leader, Soviet terror has not been forgotten: it was never remembered in the first place.



























[book] HUNTING THE TRUTH
memoirs of Beate and Serge Klarsfeld
by Beate and Serge Klarsfeld
Translated from the French by Sam Taylor
March 20, 2018
FS&G
In this dual autobiography, the Klarsfelds tell the dramatic story of fifty years devoted to bringing Nazis to justice

They were born on opposite sides of the Second World War: Beate grew up in the ruins of a defeated Weimar Germany, while Serge, a Jewish boy in France, was hiding in a cupboard when his father was arrested and sent to Auschwitz. They met on the Paris Métro and fell in love, and became famous when Beate slapped the face of the West German chancellor-a former Nazi-Kurt Georg Kiesinger.

For the past half century, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld have hunted, confronted, prosecuted, and exposed Nazi war criminals all over the world, tracking down the notorious torturer Klaus Barbie in Bolivia and attempting to kidnap the former Gestapo chief Kurt Lischka on the streets of Cologne. They have been sent to prison for their beliefs and have risked their lives protesting anti-Semitism behind the Iron Curtain in South America and in the Middle East. They have been insulted and exalted, assaulted and heralded; they’ve received honors from presidents and letter bombs from neo-Nazis. They have fought relentlessly not only for the memory of all those who died in the Holocaust but also for modern-day victims of genocide and discrimination across the world. And they have done it all while raising their children and sustaining their marriage.

Now, for the first time, in Hunting the Truth, a major memoir written in their alternating voices, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld tell the thrilling story of a lifetime dedicated to combating evil.

























[book] Alive at Work:
The Neuroscience of Helping
Your People Love What They Do
by Daniel M. Cable
(London Business School)
March 27, 2018
Harvard Business School Press
We've all seen the oft-cited Gallup poll that reports that an alarming majority of the workforce is disengaged and unmotivated.

In Alive at Work, social psychologist Dan Cable argues that the reason for all the unhappiness is biological: organizations, in an effort to routinize work and establish clear-cut performance metrics, are suppressing what neuroscientists call our Seeking Systems. This is the part of our brains that craves exploration and learning, and that gives us hits of dopamine when we follow its urges.

The good news is that organizations can activate our Seeking Systems, and, as Cable explains, it doesn't take extensive overhauls to their cultures to do so. With small changes, managers and leaders can make meaningful impacts on our lives and restore our zest for work. For instance, the book reveals:

How new hires made customers happier and were less likely to quit in the future after sharing stories about themselves during on-boarding seminars
How Italian factory workers reduced their anxiety about a new process by playing with Legos
How employees at hospitals and Make-A-Wish reduced burnout by crafting their own job titles

Filled with real-life, globe-spanning examples from the author's own research and consulting, Alive at Work equips managers--and anyone looking to find more joy in their nine-to-five existence--with the guidance to maximize the curiosity and passion that lives within themselves and others.



























[book] Dying for a Paycheck:
How Modern Management Harms
Employee Health and Company
Performance—and What We
Can Do About It
by Jeffrey Pfeffer
March 20, 2018
HarperBusiness
In one survey, 61 percent of employees said that workplace stress had made them sick and 7 percent said they had actually been hospitalized. Job stress costs US employers more than $300 billion annually and may cause 120,000 excess deaths each year. In China, 1 million people a year may be dying from overwork. People are literally dying for a paycheck. And it needs to stop.

In this timely, provocative book, Jeffrey Pfeffer contends that many modern management commonalities such as long work hours, work-family conflict, and economic insecurity are toxic to employees—hurting engagement, increasing turnover, and destroying people’s physical and emotional health—and also inimical to company performance. He argues that human sustainability should be as important as environmental stewardship.

You don’t have to do a physically dangerous job to confront a health-destroying, possibly life-threatening, workplace. Just ask the manager in a senior finance role whose immense workload, once handled by several employees, required frequent all-nighters—leading to alcohol and drug addiction. Or the dedicated news media producer whose commitment to getting the story resulted in a sixty-pound weight gain thanks to having no down time to eat properly or exercise. Or the marketing professional prescribed antidepressants a week after joining her employer.

In Dying for a Paycheck, Jeffrey Pfeffer marshals a vast trove of evidence and numerous examples from all over the world to expose the infuriating truth about modern work life: even as organizations allow management practices that literally sicken and kill their employees, those policies do not enhance productivity or the bottom line, thereby creating a lose-lose situation.

Exploring a range of important topics including layoffs, health insurance, work-family conflict, work hours, job autonomy, and why people remain in toxic environments, Pfeffer offers guidance and practical solutions all of us—employees, employers, and the government—can use to enhance workplace wellbeing. We must wake up to the dangers and enormous costs of today’s workplace, Pfeffer argues. Dying for a Paycheck is a clarion call for a social movement focused on human sustainability. Pfeffer makes clear that the environment we work in is just as important as the one we live in, and with this urgent book, he opens our eyes and shows how we can make our workplaces healthier and better.














[book] Holy Ceremony
(An Ariel Kafka Mystery)
by Harri Nykanen
Translated by Kristian London
March 2018
"The clever combination of classic Jewish themes with the traditions of Nordic crime makes for a refreshing tale with wide appeal. And the subtle humor makes it even better." —Booklist

The third in the Ariel Kafka series.

There are two Jewish cops in all of Helsinki. One of them, Ariel Kafka, a lieutenant in the Violent Crime Unit, identifies himself as a policeman first, then a Finn, and lastly a Jew. Kafka is a stubborn, dedicated policeman with wry sense of humor, always willing to risk his career to get an answer. A woman's body scrawled with religious texts is found in a Helsinki apartment. It turns out she wasn't murdered: the body was stolen from the morgue. The body is stolen again, and this time is immolated in a funeral pyre in Helsinki's Central Park. Kafka finds himself investigating a series of crimes leading to the enigmatic Christian Brotherhood of the Holy Vault. But before he can solve the puzzle, more than one Brother must pay for past sins with his life.

Harri Nykänen, born in Helsinki in 1953, is a prize-winning mystery writer. This is the third in the Ariel Kafka series. It exposes the local underworld through the eyes of an eccentric Helsinki police inspector.

See also Nights of Awe



















[book] A Couple's Guide
to Happy Retirement:
15 Keys to a Lasting Relationship
by Sara Yogev, PhD (Hebrew Univ)
March 2018
Familius
A Couple s Guide to Happy Retirement is the most comprehensive book devoted entirely to relationship issues in retirement. Not a treatise on money management, this is a much-needed guide to the psychological aspects of retirement and how to make your retirement relationship happy, fruitful, loving, and successful.

Written by Dr. Sara Yogev, a psychologist specializing in work and family issues, A Couple's Guide to Happy Retirement draws from actual accounts of retired couples. This book will help you and your spouse:
- prepare emotionally for the dramatic life changes during retirement
- find new purposes to your life beyond work
- nurture your relationship and strengthen your friendship and love
- explore sexuality after retirement including how you can enjoy each other as much as you did as a younger couple
- implement strategies to successfully deal with differences around money, time together versus apart, housework, and family relationships

The updated edition also includes sections about substance abuse and technology. It is crucial that couples prepare themselves, and their marriages, psychologically for life after retirement. A Couple s Guide to Happy Retirement shows you how to do that so that you ll have the time of your lives.


























[book] THE COINCIDENCE MAKERS
a Novel
By Yoav Blum
Translated from Hebrew
by Ira Moskowitz
March 2018
St. Martin's Press
In this genre-bending novel, there is no such thing as chance and every action is carefully executed by highly trained agents. You’ll never look at coincidences the same way again.

What if the drink you just spilled, the train you just missed, or the lottery ticket you just found was not just a random occurrence? What if it’s all part of a bigger plan? What if there’s no such thing as a chance encounter? What if there are people we don’t know determining our destiny? And what if they are even planning the fate of the world?

Enter the Coincidence Makers-Guy, Emily, and Eric-three seemingly ordinary people who work for a secret organization devoted to creating and carrying out coincidences. What the rest of the world sees as random occurrences, are, in fact, carefully orchestrated events designed to spark significant changes in the lives of their targets-scientists on the brink of breakthroughs, struggling artists starved for inspiration, loves to be, or just plain people like you and me…

When an assignment of the highest level is slipped under Guy’s door one night, he knows it will be the most difficult and dangerous coincidence he’s ever had to fulfill. But not even a coincidence maker can see how this assignment is about to change all their lives and teach them the true nature of fate, free will, and the real meaning of love.

Part thriller, part mystery, part love story-Kirkus calls Yoav Blum's The Coincidence Makers “a smart, unpredictable, and heartfelt adventure story.”


















[book] Mapping the Bones
a fictional novel
by Jane Yolen
March 6, 2018
From the best-selling and award-winning author of The Devil's Arithmetic, Jane Yolen, comes her first Holocaust novel in nearly thirty years. Influenced by Dr. Mengele's sadistic experimentations, this story follows twins as they travel from the Lodz ghetto, to the partisans in the forest, to a horrific concentration camp where they lose everything but each other.

It's 1942 in Poland, and the world is coming to pieces. At least that's how it seems to Chaim and Gittel, twins whose lives feel like a fairy tale torn apart, with evil witches, forbidden forests, and dangerous ovens looming on the horizon. But in all darkness there is light, and the twins find it through Chaim's poetry and the love they have for each other. Like the bright flame of a Yahrzeit candle, his words become a beacon of memory so that the children and grandchildren of survivors will never forget the atrocities that happened during the Holocaust.

Filled with brutality and despair, this is also a story of poetry and strength, in which a brother and sister lose everything but each other. Nearly thirty years after the publication of her award-winning and bestselling The Devil's Arithmetic and Briar Rose, Yolen once again returns to World War II and captivates her readers with the authenticity and power of her words.
























[book] The Last Watchman of Old Cairo:
A Novel
by Michael David Lukas
March 2018
Spiegel and Grau
In this spellbinding novel, a young man journeys from California to Cairo to unravel centuries-old family secrets.

Joseph, a literature student at Berkeley, is the son of a Jewish mother and a Muslim father. One day, a mysterious package arrives on his doorstep, pulling him into a mesmerizing adventure to uncover the tangled history that binds the two sides of his family. For generations, the men of the al-Raqb family have served as watchmen of the storied Ibn Ezra Synagogue in Old Cairo, built at the site where the infant Moses was taken from the Nile. Joseph learns of his ancestor Ali, a Muslim orphan who nearly a thousand years earlier was entrusted as the first watchman of the synagogue and became enchanted by its legendary—perhaps magical—Ezra Scroll. The story of Joseph’s family is entwined with that of the British twin sisters Agnes and Margaret, who in 1897 depart their hallowed Cambridge halls on a mission to rescue sacred texts that have begun to disappear from the synagogue.

The Last Watchman of Old Cairo is a moving page-turner of a novel from acclaimed storyteller Michael David Lukas. This tightly woven multigenerational tale illuminates the tensions that have torn communities apart and the unlikely forces—potent magic, forbidden love—that boldly attempt to bridge that divide.

“Michael David Lukas has given us an elegiac novel of Cairo—Old Cairo and modern Cairo—with a bit of Berkeley thrown in. His prose is deeply evocative, and a sense of mystery and profound tristesse pervade this unusual narrative, which tells the story of a young California man on a quest to understand a puzzling gift left for him by his late father, the descendant of generations of watchmen at the venerable Ben Ezra synagogue in the depths of Old Cairo. The novel is enhanced by Lukas’ impressive historical research on the Geniza and the colorful characters involved in rescuing its treasure trove of documents. But his greatest flair is in capturing the essence of that beautiful, haunted, shabby, beleaguered, yet still utterly sublime Middle Eastern city.”—Lucette Lagnado, author of The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit and The Arrogant Years


























[book] The Diamond Setter
by Moshe Sakal
Jessica Cohen (Translator)
March 2018
Other Press
Inspired by true events, this best-selling Israeli novel traces a complex web of love triangles, homoerotic tensions, and family secrets across generations and borders, illuminating diverse facets of life in the Middle East.

The uneventful life of a jeweler from Tel Aviv changes abruptly in 2011 after Fareed, a handsome young man from Damascus, crosses illegally into Israel and makes his way to the ancient port city of Jaffa in search of his roots. In his pocket is a piece of a famous blue diamond known as "Sabakh." Intending to return the diamond to its rightful owner, Fareed is soon swept up in Tel Aviv's vibrant gay scene, and a turbulent protest movement. He falls in love with both an Israeli soldier and his boyfriend--the narrator of this book--and reveals the story of his family's past: a tale of forbidden love beginning in the 1930s that connects Fareed and the jeweler.

Following Sabakh's winding path, The Diamond Setter ties present-day events to a forgotten time before the establishment of the State of Israel divided the region. Moshe Sakal's poignant mosaic of characters, locales, and cultures encourages us to see the Middle East beyond its violent conflicts.


























[book] Pogrom:
Kishinev and the Tilt of History
by Steven J. Zipperstein
(Stanford University)
March 27, 2018
Liveright Press
Separating historical fact from fantasy, an acclaimed historian retells the story of Kishinev, a riot that transformed the course of twentieth-century Jewish history.

So shattering were the aftereffects of Kishinev, the rampage that broke out in late-Tsarist Russia in April 1903, that one historian remarked that it was “nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself.” In three days of violence, 49 Jews were killed and 600 raped or wounded, while more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed. Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers throughout the Western world, and covered sensationally by America’s Hearst press, the pre-Easter attacks seized the imagination of an international public, quickly becoming the prototype for what would become known as a “pogrom,” and providing the impetus for efforts as varied as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the NAACP. Using new evidence culled from Russia, Israel, and Europe, distinguished historian Steven J. Zipperstein’s wide-ranging book brings historical insight and clarity to a much-misunderstood event that would do so much to transform twentieth-century Jewish life and beyond. 40 illustrations

“Pogrom is a splendid book that pinpoints the moment at the start of the twentieth century when exile in Europe turned deadly in a way that foretold the end of everything. It tells us the horror that occurred street by street, butchery by butchery-with gripping clarity and an admirable brevity.” - Philip Roth

“A riveting, often painful and vivid picture of a pogrom which captured attention worldwide, Zipperstein looks beyond the event itself and demonstrates how the tragedy at the heart of Russia served as a catalyst for the widest range of institutions including the NAACP. Written with the insight of an impeccable historian, his account-that will intrigue scholars as well as the widest array of readers-can be seen as a harbinger of what would come but four decades later.” - Deborah Lipstadt, author of The Eichmann Trial

“A re-examination of one of the most lavishly remembered events of Russian Jewish history that is also the most edited and misunderstood. . . . Looking for a cause of the massacre, the author points to Pavel Krushevan, an anti-Semitic local publisher whose publications were rife with blood libel. Zipperstein shows with little doubt Krushevan's hand in fomenting the riot and his role as principal ‘author’ of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a ridiculous, fabricated text that nonetheless became the most influential anti-Semitic text ever produced. The author ably illustrates the wide influence of this pogrom, with comparisons to American violence against Southern blacks, the formation of the NAACP, and, especially, Hitler's reliance on the Protocols. A thorough and fair examination of an event whose mystery seems so misplaced.” - Kirkus Reviews










[book] The Room on Rue Amélie
by Kristin Harmel
March 27, 2018
Gallery Press
For fans of Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale and Martha Hall Kelly’s Lilac Girls, this powerful novel of fate, resistance, and family—by the international bestselling author of The Sweetness of Forgetting and When We Meet Again—tells the tale of an American woman, a British RAF pilot, and a young Jewish teenager whose lives intersect in occupied Paris during the tumultuous days of World War II.

When newlywed Ruby Henderson Benoit arrives in Paris in 1939 with her French husband Marcel, she imagines strolling arm in arm along the grand boulevards, awash in the golden afternoon light. But war is looming on the horizon, and as France falls to the Nazis, her marriage begins to splinter, too.

Charlotte Dacher is eleven when the Germans roll into the French capital, their sinister swastika flags snapping in the breeze. After the Jewish restrictions take effect and Jews are ordered to wear the yellow star, Charlotte can’t imagine things getting much worse. But then the mass deportations begin, and her life is ripped forever apart.

Thomas Clarke joins the British Royal Air Force to protect his country, but when his beloved mother dies in a German bombing during the waning days of the Blitz, he wonders if he’s really making a difference. Then he finds himself in Paris, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, and he discovers a new reason to keep fighting—and an unexpected road home.

When fate brings them together, Ruby, Charlotte, and Thomas must summon the courage to defy the Nazis—and to open their own broken hearts—as they fight to survive. Rich with historical drama and emotional depth, this is an unforgettable story that will stay with you long after the final page is turned.










[book] In Search of Israel:
The History of an Idea
by Michael Brenner
(Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich)
March 2018
Princeton University Press
A major new history of the century-long debate over what a Jewish state should be

Many Zionists who advocated the creation of a Jewish state envisioned a nation like any other. Yet for Israel's founders, the state that emerged against all odds in 1948 was anything but ordinary. Born from the ashes of genocide and a long history of suffering, Israel was conceived to be unique, a model society and the heart of a prosperous new Middle East. It is this paradox, says historian Michael Brenner--the Jewish people's wish for a homeland both normal and exceptional-that shapes Israel's ongoing struggle to define itself and secure a place among nations. In Search of Israel is a major new history of this struggle from the late nineteenth century to our time.

When Theodor Herzl convened the First Zionist Congress in 1897, no single solution to the problem of "normalizing" the Jewish people emerged. Herzl proposed a secular-liberal "New Society" that would be home to Jews and non-Jews alike. East European Zionists advocated the renewal of the Hebrew language and the creation of a distinct Jewish culture. Socialists imagined a society of workers' collectives and farm settlements. The Orthodox dreamt of a society based on the laws of Jewish scripture. The stage was set for a clash of Zionist dreams and Israeli realities that continues today.

Seventy years after its founding, Israel has achieved much, but for a state widely viewed as either a paragon or a pariah, Brenner argues, the goal of becoming a state like any other remains elusive. If the Jews were the archetypal "other" in history, ironically, Israel-which so much wanted to avoid the stamp of otherness-has become the Jew among the nations.















[book] The Woman Who Fought an Empire:
Sarah Aaronsohn and Her Nili Spy Ring
by Gregory J. Wallance
March 2018
Potomac
Though she lived only to twenty-seven, Sarah Aaronsohn led a remarkable life. The Woman Who Fought an Empire tells the improbable but true odyssey of a bold young woman—the daughter of Romanian-born Jewish settlers in Palestine—who became the daring leader of a Middle East spy ring.

Following the outbreak of World War I, Sarah learned that her brother Aaron had formed Nili, an anti-Turkish spy ring, to aid the British in their war against the Ottomans. Sarah, who had witnessed the atrocities of the Armenian genocide by the Turks, believed that only the defeat of the Ottoman Empire could save the Palestinian Jews from a similar fate. Sarah joined Nili, eventually rising to become the organization’s leader. Operating behind enemy lines, she and her spies furnished vital information to British intelligence in Cairo about the Turkish military forces until she was caught and tortured by the Turks in the fall of 1917. To protect her secrets, Sarah got hold of a gun and shot herself. The Woman Who Fought an Empire, set at the birth of the modern Middle East, rebukes the Hollywood stereotype of women spies as femme fatales and is both an espionage thriller and a Joan of Arc tale.


























[book] Jewish Materialism:
The Intellectual Revolution
of the 1870s
by Eliyahu Stern
March 2018
Yale University Press
A paradigm-shifting account of the modern Jewish experience, from one of the most creative young historians of his generation

To understand the organizing framework of modern Judaism, Eliyahu Stern believes that we should look deeper and farther than the Holocaust, the establishment of the State of Israel, and the influence and affluence of American Jewry. Against the revolutionary backdrop of mid-nineteenth-century Europe, Stern unearths the path that led a group of rabbis, scientists, communal leaders, and political upstarts to reconstruct the core tenets of Judaism and join the vanguard of twentieth-century revolutionary politics.

In the face of dire poverty and rampant anti-Semitism, they mobilized Judaism for projects directed at ensuring the fair and equal distribution of resources in society. Their program drew as much from the universalism of Karl Marx and Charles Darwin as from the messianism and utopianism of biblical and Kabbalistic works. Once described as a religion consisting of rituals, reason, and rabbinics, Judaism was now also rooted in land, labor, and bodies. Exhaustively researched, this original, revisionist account challenges our standard narratives of nationalism, secularization, and de-Judaization.


































[book] Thou Shalt Innovate:
How Israeli Ingenuity
Repairs the World
by Avi Jorisch
March 2018
Gefen

Thou Shalt Innovate profiles wondrous Israeli innovations that are collectively changing the lives of billions of people around the world and explores why Israeli innovators of all faiths feel compelled to make the world better. This is the story of how Israelis are helping to feed the hungry, cure the sick, protect the defenseless, and make the desert bloom. Israel is playing a disproportionate role in helping solve some of the world s biggest challenges by tapping into the nation's soul: the spirit of tikkun olam the Jewish concept of repairing the world. Following Start-Up Nation's account of Israel's incredibly prolific start-up scene, Thou Shalt Innovate tells the story of how Israeli innovation is making the whole world a better place. Israel has extraordinary innovators who are bound together by their desire to save lives and find higher purpose. In a part of the world that has more than its share of darkness, these stories are rays of light.

Want to understand the Israel of today, the nation that leads the world in problem solving? Thou shalt read Thou Shalt Innovate! Seth M. Siegel, author, New York Times best seller Let There Be Water


























[book] We Ate Wonder Bread
by Nicole Hollander
March 2018
Fantagraphics
This is a graphic memoir about a longtime syndicated cartoonist’s (Sylvia) mid-century Chicago childhood.

This is veteran cartoonist Hollander’s first long-form work; her coming-of-age story, starring the gangsters, the glamorous, the bed bugs, the (enviable) Catholic girls, the police, the jukebox, the fortune teller, and the blue Hudson-the family car, always at the ready for frequent drives into better neighborhoods. Not only does this illustrated memoir give insight into how Hollander developed her style and wit, it’s a chronicle of a Chicago community that has since disappeared into an expressway. Full-color illustrations throughout.



























[book] Secrets and Shadows
by Roberta Silman
March 2018
Campden Hill
Berlin.
Wartime.

A city of secrets, secrets that destroyed Paul Bertram's once-idyllic marriage, secrets that have threatened to consume him, secrets that almost destroyed his very life.

When the Berlin Wall falls in 1989, Paul is finally compelled to confront his past. Seeking one last chance at redemption, he is pulled back to the city where he and his family almost perished.

But how? With whom?

In his anguish Paul turns to his former wife, Eve, and together they embark on a journey they never could have envisioned, a journey during which he is able -- at last -- to reveal the awful truths he has lived with for so long. A journey where she is able to face her own fears and flaws.

In spare, compassionate prose, Roberta Silman has created vivid, resilient characters who learn that friendship and love can also mean humiliation and betrayal, that kind intentions can lead to unimagined evil. Her portrayal of the growing tension and terror in Berlin leading up to and during the Second World War is unforgettable. She not only explores the many twists and turns of fate; she also shows how the atrocities of the Second World War can reverberate far into the future, long after actual events.

Past and present coalesce in this novel in mysterious, yet inexorable ways. As Eve and Paul face who they really were and now are, we see them accepting each other in entirely new ways. Despite the shocking denouement, both Eve and Paul realize that one of the most important aspects of being human is our ability to forgive.
























Sheleg in Lebanon:
Decision-Making in the Supreme
Command During the
Peace for the Galilee War
by Shimon Golan, PhD (Major General, res)
(in Hebrew).
March 2018
Modan/Defense Ministry, IDF History Publications
In the story of David and Goliath, we only get David's side of the story. There are many who still think that the 1982 Lebanon War was a victory. They are delusional. Maybe this book will help

As they say, it is not a war, unless Dr. Golan writes about it. 35+ years after the 1982 war, now that the primary leaders are all dead, an official history is released by the IDF. Golan recounts the decisions during the war, and the strategies and goals of the military and political leaders, and the deceptions of the real intentions. No new revelations, except some information on what Ariel Sharon did not tell his superiors.

Sadat was dead. Menachem Begin annexed the Golan Heights in an attempt to piss off Hosni Mubarak to staff the Israeli-Egyptian peace accords, and like a chess match, allow Begin to cancel Israel's requirement to leave Sharm al-Sheikh and Yamit in the Sinai. The IDF mission was to utterly destroy to PLO in Southern Lebanon, get Syria out of Southern Lebanon, and to help Bashir Gemayel get elected as Lebanon's president, even if it meant taking Beirut's suburbs. Begin's upper echelpn military leaders estimated that 300 IDF soldiers would be killed, and 600 if they had to take Beirut. And the heroes of this war could get promoted. The book, shows as earlier inquiries, that the Israeli leadership knew of the murderous intentions of Saad Haddad, and Gemayal's Phalangists.... and this led to Sabra and Shatilla. . The book shows how Sharon, expecting a damaging inquiry, created alibis during the war... they would serve as evidence to avoid political punishments. Golan's main finding is that Sharon took pains to obtain Begin's signature on approval of his plans (DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!, Cover Your Ass). Begin was dealing in trivial matters such as changing the operations former name, Oranim, to Peace for Galilee, to appeal to worldwide Christian support. (also that Sharon was frozen from promotion by Haim Laskov, just as Dayan froze out Rabin... and how many live are lost just due to personality conflicts) Also.. interesting.. is how Sharons commanders in Lebanon bypassed him and approached cabinet ministers like Mordechai Zippori to let them know the lies they were being told by the generals.





The Peres Formula:
Diary of a Confidant
“Nuskhat Peres” in Hebrew
Memoir by Shimon Peres' Confidante
by Avi Gil
Visit:
http://www.kinbooks.co.il/page_29778?bsp=24822
For nearly three decades, Avi Gil was a senior aide to Shimon Peres. Now, the discreet adviser has published a memoir in which he reveals what he saw close-up: Peres in his greatness and pettiness
The book teaches you not to trust your adviser who will tell tales after you are dead. If you liked Peres, don;t read it if the image will be tarnished if you read about sexist jokes, jealousy, etc







Yellow Bar Mitzvah:
Die sieben Pforten
vom Moloch zum Ruhm Gebundene Ausgabe
By Sun Diego
SpongeBOZZ
Dennis Sand
Though it is the bestseller in Germany in March 2018, it is actually the memoir of a top German singer and rapper from Ukraine who is not Jewish






APRIL 2018 BOOKS



[book] The Berenstain Bears
Just Grin and Bear It!:
Wisdom from Bear Country
by Mike Berenstain
April 3, 2018
Harper Collins
Preschool - 3rd Grade
Since 1962, the Berenstain Bears family has charmed generations of readers with their wholesome stories and heartfelt lessons. Now the Bear family has some wisdom to share with kids of all ages!

Each spread in this appealing 96-page paper-over-board book features a classic and often humorous scene from the beloved original storybooks. Fans young and old can travel back to Bear Country with Papa, Mama, Brother, Sister, and Honey and laugh and nod along at their words of wisdom, inspiration, and encouragement.

This book is sure to be the perfect gift for someone who just graduated or reached a life milestone—or for anyone simply looking for a little piece of sensible Bear family enlightenment.
























[book] The Soul of a Thief:
A Novel
by Steven Hartov
April 2018
Hanover Square Press
In the spring of 1944, I realized that I was not going to survive the war…

Shtefan Brandt, adjutant to a colonel of the Waffen SS, has made it through the war so far in spite of his commander’s habit of bringing his staff into combat, and a pair of secrets that are far more dangerous than the battlefield. Shtefan is a Mischling and one of the thousands of German citizens of Jewish descent who have avoided the death camps by concealing themselves in the ranks of the German army. And he is in love with Gabrielle Belmont, the colonel’s French mistress. Either of those facts could soon mean his end, were Colonel Erich Himmel to notice.

Colonel Himmel has other concerns, however. He can see the war’s end on the horizon and recognizes that he is not on the winning side, no matter what the reports from Hitler’s generals may say. So he has taken matters into his own hands, hatching a plot to escape Europe. To fund his new life, he plans to steal a fortune from the encroaching Allies. A fortune that Shtefan, in turn, plans to steal from him…

Atmospheric and intense, The Soul of a Thief captures the turbulent emotional rush of those caught behind the lines of occupied France, where one false step could spell death, and every day brings a new struggle to survive.

























[book] The Post-Widget Society:
Economic Possibilities for
Our Children
by Lawrence H. Summers
April 2018
FS&G Books
From Professors Anita and Bob Summers son, former U.S. Sec of Treasury Lawrence H. Summers, a presentation of a new paradigm for thinking about the current economic and technological revolution

We are buffeted by the sense that everything is accelerating: Digital technology is changing the way we work, shop, and socialize. And yet for all the talk about disruptive innovations, economic growth is largely stagnant. We are told that with new technologies average citizens are empowered as never before, and yet wide swaths of the population feel powerless and can no longer count on stable careers and a better life for their children. As Lawrence H. Summers shows in The Post-Widget Society, these are the paradoxes that define the economic revolution that is transforming our world.

At the heart of this revolution are two dramatic developments in Western economies: the declining significance of widgets (mass-produced goods) and the rise of design goods (products that cost a lot to design but little to produce); and the controversial prospect of secular stagnation, the long-term phenomenon of negligible economic growth and depressed employment in a dynamic market economy. Summers’s trenchant analysis of these trends reveals that they have profound implications not only for the future of jobs and widening income inequality but also for the nature of the state and the very stability of society.

A bold, pathbreaking book by one of our most important economists, The Post-Widget Society is necessary reading for every American concerned about our economic and political future.


















[book] Tombstone
Not a Western Paperback
by Francis Levy
April 19, 2018
Black Rose
Tombstone: Not a Western is a comic novel about the funerary business. It begins with its two protagonists, Robert and Marsha Bernstein, making their arrangements. Cremation versus interment are debated with a mortician at a prominent Manhattan funeral home. Wills and trusts are complicated by a financial scandal which lands Robert and Marsha at El Rancho de Campo, an all-inclusive resort in Tombstone, Arizona, catering to those whose concerns lie with the afterlife and where graveyards and golf courses collide. Comedy and spirituality go hand in hand as Robert and Marsha haplessly negotiate their way to the hereafter.




















[book] THE FRONTMAN:
A Novel
by Ron Bahar
April 3, 2018
SparkPress
Ron Bahar is an insecure, self-deprecating, seventeen-year-old Nebraskan striving to please his Israeli immigrant parents, Ophira and Ezekiel, while remaining true to his own dreams. During his senior year of high school, he begins to date longtime crush and non-Jewish girl Amy Andrews-a forbidden relationship he hides from his parents.

But that’s not the only complicated part of Ron’s life: he’s also struggling to choose between his two passions, medicine and music. As time goes on, he becomes entangled in a compelling world of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. Will he do the right thing?

A fictionalized memoir of the author’s life as a young man in Lincoln, Nebraska, The Frontman is a coming-of-age tale of love and fidelity.






















[book] Making the Arab World:
Nasser, Qutb, and the Clash That
Shaped the Middle East
by Fawaz A. A. Gerges
(London School of Economics)
April 3, 2018
Princeton University Press
How the conflict between political Islamists and secular-leaning nationalists has shaped the history of the modern Middle East

In 2013, just two years after the popular overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian military ousted the country’s first democratically elected president-Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood-and subsequently led a brutal repression of the Islamist group. These bloody events echoed an older political rift in Egypt and the Middle East: the splitting of nationalists and Islamists during the rule of Egyptian president and Arab nationalist leader Gamal Abdel Nasser. In Making the Arab World, Fawaz Gerges, one of the world’s leading authorities on the Middle East, tells how the clash between pan-Arab nationalism and pan-Islamism has shaped the history of the region from the 1920s to the present.



Gerges tells this story through an unprecedented dual biography of Nasser and another of the twentieth-century Arab world’s most influential figures-Sayyid Qutb, a leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood and the father of many branches of radical political Islam. Their deeply intertwined lives embody and dramatize the divide between Arabism and Islamism. Yet, as Gerges shows, beyond the ideological and existential rhetoric, this is a struggle over the state, its role, and its power.

Based on a decade of research, including in-depth interviews with many leading figures in the story, Making the Arab World is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the roots of the turmoil engulfing the Middle East, from civil wars to the rise of Al-Qaeda and ISIS.

“The modern history of Egypt and the Middle East has been profoundly shaped by the interaction between two deeply rooted forces--nationalism and political Islam. Focusing on two outsize personalities who personified these currents, Gamal Abdel Nasser and Sayyid Qutb, and drawing on a decade of research, including many interviews, Fawaz Gerges shows the complex, not always antagonistic, relationship between these powerful and enduring political realities."--William B. Quandt, author of Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict since 1967

























[book] BIG GUNS
A Novel
By Steve Israel
(Congressman, NY-D til 2017)
April 2018
Simon and Schuster
From Steve Israel, the congressman-turned-novelist who writes “in the full-tilt style of Carl Hiaasen” (The Washington Post), comes a comic tale about the mighty firearm industry, a small Long Island town, and Washington politics.
When Chicago’s Mayor Michael Rodriguez starts a national campaign to ban handguns from America’s cities, towns, and villages, Otis Cogsworth, the wealthy chairman and CEO of Cogsworth International Arms worries about the effects on his company. In response he and lobbyist Sunny McCarthy convince an Arkansas congressman to introduce federal legislation mandating that every American must own a firearm. Events soon escalate.

Asabogue’s Mayor Lois Leibowitz passes an ordinance to ban guns in the town—right in Otis Cogsworth’s backyard. Otis retaliates by orchestrating a recall election against Lois and Jack Steele, a rich town resident, runs against her. Even though the election is for the mayor of a village on Long Island, Steele brings in the big guns of American politics to defeat Lois: political consultants, Super PACs, and celebrities. Soon, thousands of pro-gun and anti-gun partisans descend on Asabogue, along with an assortment of heavily armed rightwing militias and the national news media. Bucolic Asabogue becomes a tinderbox. Meanwhile, Washington politicians in both parties are caught between a mighty gun lobby whose support they need for reelection and the absurdity of requiring that every American with waivers for children under age four carry a gun. What ensues is a discomfiting, hilarious indictment of the state of American politics.

Former Long Island Congressman, Steve Israel has firsthand knowledge of the cynicism and corruption at the heart of our political system. Big Guns will make you laugh, will make you angry, and will make you think as you flip the pages faster and faster to find out what happens next.


























[book] This is the Year I
Put My Financial Life in Order
by John Schwartz
April 2018
Avery

A New York Times columnist shares his financial successes and mishaps, offering an everyman’s guide to straightening out your money once and for all. He is a Jewish guy who didn't know about money, proving all those haters wrong. But now he knows.

Money management is one of our most practical survival skills—and also one we’ve convinced ourselves we’re either born with or not. In reality, financial planning can be learned, like anything else. Part financial memoir and part research-based guide to attaining lifelong security, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order is the book that everyone who has never wanted to read a preachy financial guide has been waiting for.

John Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, are pre-retirement workers of an economic class well above the poverty line—but well below the one percent. Sharing his own alternately harrowing and hilarious stories—from his brush with financial ruin and bankruptcy in his thirties to his short-lived budgeted diet of cafeteria french fries and gravy—John will walk you through his own journey to financial literacy, which he admittedly started a bit late. He covers everything from investments to retirement and insurance to wills (at fifty-eight, with three kids (but already grown) he didn’t have one!), medical directives, and more.

Whether you’re a college grad wanting to start out on the right foot or you’re approaching retirement age and still wondering what a pension is, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order will help you become your own best financial adviser.


























[book] Was Yosef on the Spectrum?:
A Contemporary Reading of the
Joseph Story in the Torah
by Samuel J. Levine
(Tuoro Law Center)
April 2018
Urim Publications
Yosef’s behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and personal development are often difficult to understand and seem to defy explanation. This book presents a coherent and cohesive reading of the well known Bible story that offers a plausible account of Yosef’s behaviors, specifically those of an individual on the autism spectrum. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder.





























[book] The Female Persuasion:
A Novel
by Meg Wolitzer
April 2018
Riverhead Books
From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Interestings, an electric, multilayered novel about ambition, power, friendship, and mentorship, and the romantic ideals we all follow deep into adulthood, not just about who we want to be with, but who we want to be.

To be admired by someone we admire - we all yearn for this: the private, electrifying pleasure of being singled out by someone of esteem. But sometimes it can also mean entry to a new kind of life, a bigger world.

Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at sixty-three, has been a central pillar of the women's movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer- madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can't quite place- feels her inner world light up. And then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life as it winds toward and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she'd always imagined.

Charming and wise, knowing and witty, Meg Wolitzer delivers a novel about power and influence, ego and loyalty, womanhood and ambition. At its heart, The Female Persuasion is about the flame we all believe is flickering inside of us, waiting to be seen and fanned by the right person at the right time. It's a story about the people who guide and the people who follow (and how those roles evolve over time), and the desire within all of us to be pulled into the light.































[book] Something Old, Something New:
Classic Recipes Revised
by Tamar Adler (Vogue)
Illustrated by Mindy Dubin
Foreword by Mimi Sheraton
April 2018
Scribner

The award-winning, Hudson, NY-based, bestselling witty author of An Everlasting Meal revives and improves classic recipes in a gorgeously illustrated cookbook. With An Everlasting Meal, Tamar Adler advocated for the pleasures of leftovers and the myriad uses of flavorful scraps, providing culinary tips for using food you might ordinarily throw away.
In her new cookbook, Something Old, Something New, Adler continues her preservative quest by rekindling classic recipes. There were times past when cooking was careful, important, economical, inspired. Other than occasional kitschy throwbacks, however, like Buttered Tomatoes on Toast, Deviled Eggs, Green Goddess Salad and Orange Blossom Merengue, or Turnip Gratin, Alligator Pear (avocado, almond, onion, tuna) Salad, Chicken a la Montmorency, or Limas and Eggplants a La Creme many dishes that first excited our palates have disappeared. Beneath their fussy garnishes, gratuitous sauces, and outmoded techniques, Adler unearthed great recipes worth reviving. In Something Old, Something New she presents over 100 she loves best. She rescues and revives them, she simplifies them... she revivifies them.

From Steak Diane to Peach Melba, Adler enlivens culinary classics with ample use of acid and herbs, simplified techniques, and contemporary ways of serving. Seasonal menus, complete with wine pairings suggested by sommelier Juliette Pope, gorgeous watercolor drawings by artist Mindy Dubin, and a foreword by influential food critic Mimi Sheraton, round out the beautiful package. Something Old, Something New is a unique culinary history, filled with delicious recipes and Adler’s smart, witty prose, a perfect present or aptly titled wedding gift; a book worth keeping.























[book] Once Upon a Chef, the Cookbook:
100 Tested, Perfected,
and Family-Approved Recipes
by Jennifer Segal
Alexandra Grablewski (Photog.)
April 2018
Chronicles Books
Once upon a time Jenn Segal went to culinary school and worked in fancy restaurants. One marriage and two kids later she created Once Upon a Chef, the popular blog that applies her tried-and-true chef skills with delicious, fresh, and approachable ingredients for family-friendly meals. Today, Jenn cooks dinner for her family every night, and in her book, she shares 100 recipes that will up your kitchen game while surprising you with their ease. With the authority of a professional chef and the practicality of a busy working mom, Jenn teaches you to improve your cooking one recipe at a time, with helpful tips on topics such as how to season correctly with salt, how to balance flavors, and how to make the most of leftovers.

There is something for every meal of the day:

• Breakfast favorites like Maple, Coconut & Blueberry Granola.
Jewish holiday fave: Sweet and Spicy Roast Chicken with Carrots, Dates and Pistachios
• Simple soups, salads, and sandwiches for ideal lunches (try the Fiery Roasted Tomato Soup paired with Smoked Gouda & Pesto Grilled Cheese Sandwiches).
• Entrées the whole family will love like Fried Chicken Tenders.
• Tasty treats for those casual get-togethers like Buttery Cajun Popcorn and Sweet, Salty & Spicy Pecans.
• Go-to sweets such as Toffee Almond Sandies and a Classic Chocolate Lover's Birthday Cake.

Flip through the pages of this book, and you'll want to make every recipe—whether it's an easy family dinner your kids will love, an indulgent dessert for someone special, or fun cocktails and appetizers for your friends. This is the book you'll turn to again and again, and with Jenn by your side in the kitchen, every meal will taste like the best night out!



























[book] Favorite Recipes from Melissa Clark's Kitchen:
Family Meals, Festive Gatherings,
and Everything In-between
by Melissa Clark
April 2018
Black Dog and Leventhal Books
100+ recipes from the New York Times food columnist and MOT

Beloved New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark selects more than 100 of her all-time favorite recipes and gathers them here in this collection of delicious, reliable, crowd-pleasing dishes for every occasion. Illustrated with 40, all-new full-color photographs throughout.

Melissa Clark has been reaching millions of readers through her New York Times column "A Good Appetite" since 2007. She is also the face of the Times cooking videos, which are filmed in her now iconic Brooklyn-based home kitchen. Her delicious, seasonal recipes are simple to make and satisfying for the whole family. They are always executed with a touch of elegance and flair.

FAVORITE RECIPES FROM MELISSA CLARK'S KITCHEN curates more than 100 dishes, hand-selected by Clark herself, from her two previously published books, In the Kitchen With A Good Appetite and Cook This Now. The book is organized by meal including Breakfast/Brunch, Lunch, Dinner Mains, Dinner Sides, Desserts, Cocktails and Snacks. In addition, it features an "Occasion Chart" that cross-references recipes into situational categories including weekday staples, perfect for 2, family meals, and company's coming, making it easy for the reader to select the perfect recipe for any occasion.

FAVORITE RECIPES FROM MELISSA CLARK'S KITCHEN will also includes 40 full-color photographs, specially shot for this publication.



























[book] CHERISH:
Food to make for the people you love
by Anne Shooter
April 3, 2018
Headline Books (London)

The recipes in Cherish are the food that Anne Shooter cooks for her family - the cookbook that her daughters wanted her to write. Full of love and generosity, the recipes are a delicious array of flavours from the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Jerusalem.

They come from Anne's Jewish background and the times her family and friends come together to eat, celebrate and feast. With the same warm, home-style cooking of Sabrina Ghayour's Persiana, Olia Hercules' Mamushka and Emma Spitzer's Fress, Anne will open up a world of bold flavours but simple ingredients. Recipes that you will want to cook over and over again.

'Every Friday, like my mum and my grandma, and her mother before her, I cook a delicious, comforting dinner for my family and friends. My recipes come from my Jewish roots, but I have written them for the modern table, drawing from the street foods of Tel Aviv to all the Jewish communities around the world to the meals my family have now made their own.

I cook these recipes whenever we have friends or family over - a weekday one-tray supper of chicken, aubergine and bulghar wheat, a Sunday lunch of lamb shanks with apricots or roasted peppers with chickpeas, quinoa & feta for a vibrant dinner

I can turn around a veritable feast of a dinner in a couple of hours because these recipes are tried and tested by generations of cooks before me, recipes I will be passing on to my daughters for their own families one day, I hope, and that you will to yours.

This is indeed a book inspired by my Jewish roots, but above all, it is a book of food to make for people you love.'























[book] Secrets of a Kosher Girl:
A 21-Day Nourishing Plan
to Lose Weight and Feel Great
(Even If You're Not Jewish)
By Beth Warren
(Nationally recognized registered dietitian-nutritionist) Foreword by a Jewish Doctor, Joel Kahn M.D.
April 10, 2018
Post Hill Press
Nationally recognized registered dietitian-nutritionist Beth Warren has been sharing her kosher expertise and practical nutrition approach to healthy living for years.

Secrets of a Kosher Girl integrates the ancient principles of a kosher diet and lifestyle with proven weight-loss strategies emphasizing whole foods, or "clean eating." This easy-to-follow 21-day diet and exercise plan results in an average loss of 6 to 11 pounds and improvements in mood, muscle mass, and energy, along with cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Beth lost weight on her proven program and shows how you can too. First, you’ll discover how to prepare your mind, body, and pantry to follow the diet successfully, and how it’s important to have the strong discipline and intuitive eating techniques inherent in a kosher diet to condition your mind.

Next, Beth explains how physical activity is not only important to health and weight loss, but how this concept has been around since biblical times. Last, Beth provides everything you need to start the program: 21 days of meal plans, recipes, and daily fitness goals, with motivational biblical quotes to inspire you along the way.

Lose weight the kosher way!























[book] Postcards from Auschwitz:
Holocaust Tourism and the
Meaning of Remembrance
by Daniel P. Reynolds
April 17, 2018
NYU Press
The uneasy link between tourism and collective memory at Holocaust museums and memorials

Each year, millions of people visit Holocaust memorials and museums, with the number of tourists steadily on the rise. What lies behind the phenomenon of "Holocaust tourism" and what role do its participants play in shaping how we remember and think about the Holocaust?

In Postcards from Auschwitz, Daniel P. Reynolds argues that tourism to former concentration camps, ghettos, and other places associated with the Nazi genocide of European Jewry has become an increasingly vital component in the evolving collective remembrance of the Holocaust. Responding to the tendency to dismiss tourism as commercial, superficial, or voyeuristic, Reynolds insists that we take a closer look at a phenomenon that has global reach, takes many forms, and serves many interests.

The book focuses on some of the most prominent sites of mass murder in Europe, and then expands outward to more recent memorial museums. Reynolds provides a historically-informed account of the different forces that have shaped Holocaust tourism since 1945, including Cold War politics, the sudden emergence of the "memory boom" beginning in the 1980s, and the awareness that eyewitnesses to the Holocaust are passing away. Based on his on-site explorations, the contributions from researchers in Holocaust studies and tourism studies, and the observations of tourists themselves, this book reveals how tourism is an important part of efforts to understand and remember the Holocaust, an event that continues to challenge ideals about humanity and our capacity to learn from the past.


































[book] The Fox Hunt:
A Refugee’s Memoir
of Coming to America
by Mohammed Al Samawi
April 10, 2018
William Morrow
A young man’s moving story of war, friendship, and hope in which he recounts his harrowing escape from a brutal civil war in Yemen with the help of a daring plan engineered on social media by a small group of interfaith activists in the West.

Born in the Old City of Sana’a, Yemen, to a pair of middle-class doctors, Mohammed Al Samawi was a devout Muslim raised to think of Christians and Jews as his enemy. But when Mohammed was twenty-three, he secretly received a copy of the Bible, and what he read cast doubt on everything he’d previously believed. After connecting with Jews and Christians on social media, and at various international interfaith conferences, Mohammed became an activist, making it his mission to promote dialogue and cooperation in Yemen.

Then came the death threats: first on Facebook, then through terrifying anonymous phone calls. To protect himself and his family, Mohammed fled to the southern port city of Aden. He had no way of knowing that Aden was about to become the heart of a north-south civil war, and the battleground for a well-funded proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia. As gunfire and grenades exploded throughout the city, Mohammed hid in the bathroom of his apartment and desperately appealed to his contacts on Facebook.

Miraculously, a handful of people he barely knew responded. Over thirteen days, four ordinary young people with zero experience in diplomacy or military exfiltration worked across six technology platforms and ten time zones to save this innocent young man trapped between deadly forces— rebel fighters from the north and Al Qaeda operatives from the south.

The story of an improbable escape as riveting as the best page-turning thrillers, The Fox Hunt reminds us that goodness and decency can triumph in the darkest circumstances.

























[book] Tahini and Turmeric:
101 Middle Eastern Classics
Made Irresistibly Vegan
by Ruth Fox and Vicky Cohen
May 29, 2018
Da Capo
Cofounders of MayIHaveThatRecipe.com share 101 inventive vegan Middle Eastern recipes.

Add a dash of Spain, a chunk of Lebanon, a splash of Israel, and a hint of America. Blend until smooth and voila! You may end up with a well-mixed identity crisis, but happily you'll get Vicky Cohen and Ruth Fox, amazingly creative and food-mad sisters raised in Barcelona by Syrian-Lebanese Jewish parents. Since moving to the United States about twenty years ago, they have successfully married comforting Middle Eastern flavors with new healthy ingredients. Their site Mayihavethatrecipe.com features their award-winning recipes, and gorgeous food photography, and receives over 110,000 page views a month.

In their debut cookbook, Cohen and Fox interpret 101 Middle Eastern dishes in an irresistible--and easy--collection of vegan recipes, creating tempting, healthy dishes that take readers and eaters beyond the conventional and recognizable Middle Eastern staples of baba ghanoush and baklava. Instead, they offer modern, lighter dishes bursting with flavor. Covering breakfast, lunch, dinner, and everything in between--and complete with tips for what cooking staples and an introduction to some newer ingredients to keep in your pantry--these recipes are perfect for the health-conscious cook who loves the flavors of the Middle East.

Written by experienced recipe developers and bloggers, the recipes are free of time-consuming or complicated techniques and are meant to be served on busy weeknights and during casual gatherings with friends. With simple tricks, like substituting spring roll wrappers or pita bread for from-scratch dough, they've made it easy to prepare delicious, exotic food without an all-day affair in the kitchen.



























[book] CAKE
by Maira Kalman and
Barbara Scott-Goodman
April 2018
Penguin Press
With great style, wit, and joy, Maira Kalman and Barbara Scott-Goodman celebrate their favorite dessert.

In Cake, renowned artist and author Maira Kalman and food writer Barbara Scott-Goodman bring us a beautifully illustrated book dedicated to their mutual love of cakes. Kalman's enchanting illustrations, in her inimitable style, and Scott-Goodman's mouthwatering recipes complement each other perfectly, making Cake a joyful whimsical celebration of a timeless dessert.

























[book] Live Work Work Work Die:
A Journey into the Savage
Heart of Silicon Valley
by Corey Pein
April 2018
Metropolitan
A scathing, sardonic exploration of Silicon Valley tech culture, laying bare the greed, hubris, and retrograde politics of an industry that aspires to radically transform society for its own benefit

At the height of the startup boom, journalist Corey Pein set out for Silicon Valley with little more than a smartphone and his wits. His goal: to learn how such an overhyped industry could possibly sustain itself as long as it has. But to truly understand the delirious reality of the tech entrepreneurs, he knew he would have to inhabit that perspective-he would have to become an entrepreneur himself. Thus Pein begins his journey-skulking through gimmicky tech conferences, pitching his over-the-top business ideas to investors, and rooming with a succession of naive upstart programmers whose entire lives are managed by their employers-who work endlessly and obediently, never thinking to question their place in the system.

In showing us this frantic world, Pein challenges the positive, feel-good self-image that the tech tycoons have crafted-as nerdy and benevolent creators of wealth and opportunity-revealing their self-justifying views and their insidious visions for the future. Vivid and incisive, Live Work Work Work Die is a troubling portrait of a self-obsessed industry bent on imposing its disturbing visions on the rest of us.

























THE NICE JEWISH GIRL... a myth?
[book] The Myth of the Nice Girl:
Achieving a Career You Love
Without Becoming a Person You Hate
by Fran Hauser
April 2018
HMH
A candid guide for ambitious women who want to succeed without losing themselves in the process

In THE MYTH OF THE NICE GIRL, Fran Hauser deconstructs the negative perception of "niceness" that many women struggle with in the business world. If women are nice, they are seen as weak and ineffective, but if they are tough, they are labeled a bitch.

Hauser proves that women don’t have to sacrifice their values or hide their authentic personalities to be successful. Sharing a wealth of personal anecdotes and time-tested strategies, she shows women how to reclaim “nice” and sidestep regressive stereotypes about what a strong leader looks like. Her accessible advice and hard-won wisdom detail how to balance being empathetic with being decisive, how to rise above the double standards that can box you in, how to cultivate authentic confidence that projects throughout a room, and much more.

THE MYTH OF THE NICE GIRL is a refreshing dose of forward-looking feminism that will resonate with smart, professional women who know what they want and are looking for real advice to take their career to the next level without losing themselves in the process.

























[book] New Power:
How Movements Build, Businesses
Thrive, and Ideas Catch
Fire in Our Hyperconnected World
by Jeremy Heimans
Henry Timms
April 2018
Doubleday
From two visionary thinkers and practitioners (one of whom is an Australian Jewish Bolshevik Harvard grad promoting an LGBT cabal, according to his twitter post) comes a big idea about how power works differently in our hyperconnected age.

Why do some leap ahead while others fall behind in today's chaotic, connected world? In New Power, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms confront the biggest stories of our age--the rise of mega-platforms like Facebook and Uber; the out-of-nowhere victories of Presidents Obama and Trump; the unexpected emergence of movements like #BlackLivesMatter--and reveal what's really behind them: the rise of "new power."

For most of human history, the rules of power were clear. To get ahead or get things done, you mastered "old power": closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. Once gained, old power is jealously guarded, and the powerful spend it carefully, like currency. Our military, schools, hospitals, and governments run on old power. But ubiquitous connectivity has made possible a new form of power, one that operates differently, like a current. "New power" is made by many; it is open, participatory, and peer-driven. Like water or electricity, it is most forceful when it surges. The challenge with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

In New Power, Heimans and Timms showcase unlikely leaders using new power techniques, like Pope Francis and Lady Gaga, and look to the cultural phenomena of our time, from the Ice Bucket Challenge to Reddit to Airbnb, uncovering the new power forces that made them huge. They point to old power institutions like Lego, NASA, and the NRA that have figured out how to blend old and new power to supercharge their work. The authors draw on their own experience, too, offering us the new power tools we need to successfully spread an idea, lead a movement, build a career, or transform an organization today. And they explore the dark side of the changes we are living through: the way ISIS has co-opted new power to monstrous ends and the rise of the alt-right's "intensity machine."

New Power illuminates dramatic shifts happening in business, politics, and our everyday lives, and helps us all to master the new art of power.

















[book] When the Wolves Bite: Two Billionaires, One Company,
and an Epic Wall Street Battle
by Scott Wapner
April 2018
PublicAffairs
The inside story of the clash of two of Wall Street's biggest, richest, toughest, most aggressive players--Carl Icahn and Bill Ackman--and Herbalife, the company caught in the middle

With their billions of dollars and their business savvy, activist investors Carl Icahn and Bill Ackman have the ability to move markets with the flick of a wrist. But what happens when they run into the one thing in business they can't control: each other?

This fast-paced book tells the story of the clash of these two titans over Herbalife, a nutritional supplement company whose business model Ackman questioned. Icahn decided to vouch for them, and the dispute became a years-long feud, complete with secret backroom deals, public accusations, billions of dollars in stock trades, and one dramatic insult war on live television. Wapner, who hosted that memorable TV show, has gained unprecedented access to all the players and unravels this remarkable war of egos, showing the extreme measures the participants were willing to take.

When the Wolves Bite is both a rollicking business story and a cautionary tale about the power that lives in the hands of a precious few.

















[book] The Excellence Dividend:
Meeting the Tech Tide with
Work That Wows and Jobs That Last
by Tom Peters
April 2018
Vintage
Thirty-five years after his iconic In Search of Excellence, bestselling author and management guru Tom Peters is back with his most urgent message yet.

For decades, he has been preaching the gospel of putting people first, and in today's rapidly changing business environment, this message is more important than ever. Gallup numbers show that fewer than one-third of employees feel engaged with their work, and one study suggests that fully half of American jobs are at risk due to technology. But Peters has a solution: a sustained commitment to excellence combined with a commitment to people. These are, he argues, the only tools for coping with and thriving amidst the tsunami of change facing business today.

In The Excellence Dividend, Peters shows that nothing beats a high-quality product or service, designed and delivered by people who are as dedicated to each other as they are to their shared goal. With his unparalleled expertise and inimitable charisma, Peters offers brilliantly simple, actionable guidelines for success that any business leader can immediately implement, punctuated by incisive quotes from some of today's leading lights in business. The Excellence Dividend is an important new book from one of today's leading visionaries in business.

















[book] The Rational Bible:
Exodus
by Dennis Prager
April 2, 2018
Regnery (Faith) Publishing
Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today’s issues, but completely consistent with rational thought.

Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won’t after reading this book.

Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book.

Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts.

The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.”

The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager’s forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life.

His primary goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.... And his secondary goal might be to get restaurants to offer free refills.

















[book] The "Talmud":
A Biography
by Barry Scott Wimpfheimer
(Northwestern University)
April 2, 2018
Princeton University Press
The Babylonian Talmud, a postbiblical Jewish text that is part scripture and part commentary, is an unlikely bestseller. Written in a hybrid of Hebrew and Aramaic, it is often ambiguous to the point of incomprehension, and its subject matter reflects a narrow scholasticism that should hardly have broad appeal. Yet the Talmud has remained in print for centuries and is more popular today than ever. Barry Scott Wimpfheimer tells the remarkable story of this ancient Jewish book and explains why it has endured for almost two millennia.

Providing a concise biography of this quintessential work of rabbinic Judaism, Wimpfheimer takes readers from the Talmud's prehistory in biblical and second-temple Judaism to its present-day use as a source of religious ideology, a model of different modes of rationality, and a totem of cultural identity. He describes the book's origins and structure, its centrality to Jewish law, its mixed reception history, and its golden renaissance in modernity. He explains why reading the Talmud can feel like being swept up in a river or lost in a maze, and why the Talmud has come to be venerated--but also excoriated and maligned-in the centuries since it first appeared.

An incomparable introduction to a work of literature that has lived a full and varied life, this accessible book shows why the Talmud is at once a received source of traditional teachings, a touchstone of cultural authority, and a powerful symbol of Jewishness for both supporters and critics.

From the Back Cover:
"Wimpfheimer brilliantly opens the door into the complex and fascinating world of textual study, allowing readers to comprehend the origins, structure, and impact of this foundational Jewish text. Erudite and accessible, this is a book for anyone who wants a deeper understanding of the centrality of the Talmud in Jewish scholarship and life."--Tova Mirvis, author of The Book of Separation: A Memoir
"Wimpfheimer provides a masterful and subtle exposition of the complex ways in which the Talmud was formed and received through the generations. His unique capacity to explore this rich history from the dual perspectives of the internal development of Talmudic interpretation and the external reactions and reception is at the root of what makes this book so exquisite."--Moshe Halbertal, coauthor of The Beginning of Politics: Power in the Biblical Book of Samuel
"Wimpfheimer brings a rare combination of talents to this book: a scholar's familiarity with the Talmud's compositional and reception history, a critic's sensitivity to the Talmud's distinctive literary texture, and a public intellectual's feel for the pulse of modernity. The book tells you what the Talmud is and has been, and why it matters as much as or indeed more than ever."--Tzvi Novick, author of What Is Good, and What God Demands















[book] Gateway to the Moon:
A Novel
by Mary Morris
April 2018
Nan A Talese
In 1492, the Jewish and Muslim populations of Spain were expelled, and Columbus set sail for America. Luis de Torres, a Spanish Jew, accompanies Columbus as his interpreter. His journey is only the beginning of a long migration, across many generations. Over the centuries, de Torres’ descendants travel from Spain and Portugal to Mexico, finally settling in the hills of New Mexico. Five hundred years later, it is in these same hills that Miguel Torres, a young amateur astronomer, finds himself trying to understand the mystery that surrounds him and the town he grew up in.
Entrada de la Luna is a place that holds a profound secret--one that its residents cannot even imagine. It is also a place that ambitious children, such as Miguel, try to leave. Poor health, broken marriages, and poverty are the norm. Luck is unusual. When Miguel sees a flyer for a babysitting job, he jumps at the opportunity, and begins work for a Jewish family new to the area. Rachel Rothstein is not the sort of parent Miguel expected. A frustrated artist, Rachel moved her family from New York in search of a fresh start, but so far New Mexico has not solved any of the problems she brought with her. Miguel loves the work, yet he is surprised to find many of the Rothstein family's customs similar to ones he’s grown up with and never understood.
Interwoven throughout the present-day narrative are the powerful stories of the ancestors of Entrada's residents, highlighting the torture, pursuit, and resistance of the Jewish people. A beautiful novel of shared history, Gateway to the Moon is a moving and memorable portrait of a family and its journey through the centuries.















[book] We Spoke Out:
Comic Books and the Holocaust
by Rafael Medoff and Neal Adams
Edited by Craig Yoe
Intro by Stan Lee (Stanley Martin Lieber)
April 2018
Yoe
Crucial comic book stories about the Holocaust and interviews with their artists and writers, with a cover drawn especially for this book by Neal Adams.

An amazing but forgotten chapter in comics history. Long before the Holocaust was taught in schools or presented in films such as Schindler's List, the youth of America was learning about the Nazi genocide from Batman, the X-Men, Captain America, and Sgt. Rock. Comics legend Neal Adams, Holocaust scholar Rafael Medoff, and comics historian Craig Yoe bring together a remarkable collection of comic book stories that introduced an entire generation to an engaging and important subject. We Spoke Out is an extraordinary journey into a compelling and essential topic.


























THIS DESERVES TO BE A FILM! DOESNT IT? The family of rabbis in Spain are forced to be Catholic.. but rise to the leadership of the church and challenge the papacy succession and lead an inquisition against Jewish relatives...
[book] Creating Conversos:
The Carvajal-Santa María Family
in Early Modern Spain
by Roger Louis Martínez-dávila
(Univ of Colorado )
April 30, 2018
University of Notre Dame Press
In Creating Conversos, Roger Louis Martínez-Dávila skillfully unravels the complex story of Jews who converted to Catholicism in Spain between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, migrated to colonial Mexico and Bolivia during the conquest of the Americas, and assumed prominent church and government positions.

Rather than acting as alienated and marginalized subjects, the conversos were able to craft new identities and strategies not just for survival but for prospering in the most adverse circumstances.

Martínez-Dávila provides an extensive, elaborately detailed case study of the Carvajal Santa María clan from its beginnings in late fourteenth-century Castile. By tracing the family ties and intermarriages of the Jewish rabbinic ha-Levi lineage of Burgos, Spain (which became the converso Santa María clan) with the Old Christian Carvajal line of Plasencia, Spain, Martínez-Dávila demonstrates the family's changing identity, and how the monolithic notions of ethnic and religious disposition were broken down by the group and negotiated anew as they transformed themselves from marginal into mainstream characters at the center of the economies of power in the world they inhabited.

They succeeded in rising to the pinnacles of power within the church hierarchy in Spain, even to the point of contesting the succession to the papacy and overseeing the Inquisitorial investigation and execution of extended family members, including Luis de Carvajal "The Younger" and most of his immediate family during the 1590s in Mexico City.

Martinez-Dávila offers a rich panorama of the many forces that shaped the emergence of modern Spain, including tax policies, rivalries among the nobility, and ecclesiastical politics. The extensive genealogical research enriches the historical reconstruction, filling in gaps and illuminating contradictions in standard contemporary narratives. His text is strengthened by many family trees that assist the reader as the threads of political and social relationships are carefully disentangled.

























[book] Rescue Board:
The Untold Story of America's
Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe
by Rebecca Erbelding
April 2018
Doubleday
America has long been criticized for refusing to give harbor to the Jews of Europe as Hitler and the Nazis closed in. Now a U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum scholar tells the extraordinary story of the War Refugee Board, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's little-known effort late in the war to save the Jews who remained.

In January 1944, a young Treasury lawyer named John Pehle accompanied his boss to a meeting with the president. For more than a decade, the Jews of Germany had sought refuge in the United States and had been stymied by Congress's harsh immigration policy. Now the State Department was refusing to authorize relief funds Pehle wanted to use to help Jews escape Nazi territory. At the meeting, Pehle made his best case--and prevailed. Within days, FDR created the War Refugee Board, empowering it to rescue the victims of Nazi persecution, and put John Pehle in charge.

Over the next twenty months, Pehle pulled together a team of D.C. pencil pushers, international relief workers, smugglers, diplomats, millionaires, and rabble-rousers to run operations across four continents and a dozen countries. Together, they tricked the Nazis, forged identity papers, maneuvered food and medicine into concentration camps, recruited spies, leaked news stories, laundered money, negotiated ransoms, and funneled millions of dollars into Europe. They bought weapons for the French Resistance and sliced red tape to allow Jewish refugees to escape to Palestine. Altogether, they saved tens of thousands of lives.

For Rescue Board, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum scholar Rebecca Erbelding undertook a decade of research and uncovered new archival materials to tell the dramatic unknown story of America's last-ditch effort to save the Jews of Europe.

























[book] Voice Lessons for Parents:
What to Say, How to Say it,
and When to Listen
by Wendy Mogel Ph.D.
April 2018
Scribner
Renowned speaker, parenting expert and New York Times bestselling author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee, Dr. Wendy Mogel offers an essential guide to the new art of talking to children, and shows how a change in voice can transform conversations and ease the relationship between parents and children.

Dr. Wendy Mogel’s New York Times bestseller, The Blessing of a Skinned Knee is the bedside bible for a generation of parents. Several years ago Mogel began giving “voice lessons” to parents who were struggling with their kids, demonstrating how a shift in tone, tempo and body language led to a surprising outcome: the children responded by cooperating with greater alacrity, and communicating with more warmth, respect and sincerity. As the parents found their voices, so did the children.

In Voice Lessons, Mogel elaborates on this novel clinical approach, revealing how each age and stage of a child’s life brings new opportunities to connect through language. Delving into sources as diverse as neuroscience, fairy tales, and anthropology, Mogel offers specific guidance for talking to children across the expanse of childhood and adolescence. She also explains the best ways to talk about your child to grandparents, partners, and exes, and to teachers, coaches, and caretakers. Throughout the book, Mogel addresses an obstacle that flummoxes even the most seasoned and confident parent: the distraction of digital devices, how they impact our connection with our families, and what we can do about it.

With the transformative power of the classics How to Talk so Kids Will Listen and Listen so Kids Will Talk and You Just Don’t Understand, Voice Lessons enlightens parents. “Children will lead you on an incredible journey,” writes Mogel, “if they trust you, if you make the time, and if you are willing to follow.”




















MAY 2018 BOOKS



[book] "Sefer Yesirah" and Its Contexts:
Other Jewish Voices
(Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion)
by Tzahi Weiss
(Open University of Israel)
May 2018
University of Pennsylvania Press
Sefer Ye?irah, or "Book of Formation," is one of the most influential Jewish compositions of late antiquity. First attested to in the tenth century C.E. and attributed by some to the patriarch Abraham himself, Sefer Ye?irah claims that the world was created by the powers of the decimal number system and the twenty two letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

This short, enigmatic treatise was considered canonical by Jewish philosophers and Kabbalists and has fascinated Western thinkers and writers as diverse as Leibnitz and Borges. Nonetheless, Sefer Yesirah is nearly impossible to contextualize mainly due to its unique style and the fact that it does not refer to, nor is it referenced by, any other source in late antiquity.

After a century and a half of modern scholarship, the most fundamental questions regarding its origins remain contested: Who wrote Sefer Ye?irah? Where and when was it written? What was its "original" version? What is the meaning of this treatise?

In "Sefer Ye?irah" and Its Contexts, Tzahi Weiss explores anew the history of Sefer Ye?irah. Through careful scrutiny of the text's evolution, he traces its origins to the seventh century C.E., to Jews who lived far from rabbinic circles and were familiar with the teachings of Syriac Christianity. In addition, he examines the reception of Sefer Ye?irah by anonymous commentators and laypeople who, as early as the twelfth century C.E., regarded Sefer Ye?irah as a mystical, mythical, or magical treatise, thus significantly differing from the common rabbinic view of the text in that period as a philosophical and scientific work.

Examined against the backdrop of this newly sketched historical context, Sefer Ye?irah provides a unique and surprising aperture to little-known Jewish intellectual traditions of late antiquity and the early Middle Ages which, despite their distance from the rabbinic canon, played a vital role in the development of medieval Jewish learning and culture.
























[book] Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor
by Yossi Klein Halevi
May 15, 2018
HARPER
You probably know the author from the award winning decades old film (Kaddish, 1985) about his relationship with his late father; his countless speaking engagements; and his many books from his home in Israel

Attempting to break the agonizing impasse between Israelis and Palestinians, the Israeli commentator and award-winning author of Like Dreamers directly addresses his Palestinian neighbors in this provocative book, empathizing with Palestinian suffering and longing for reconciliation as he explores how the conflict looks through Israeli eyes.

I call you "neighbor" because I don’t know your name, or anything personal about you. Given our circumstances, "neighbor" might be too casual a word to describe our relationship. We are intruders into each other’s dream, violators of each other’s sense of home. We are incarnations of each other’s worst historical nightmares. Neighbors?

Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor is one Israeli’s powerful attempt to reach beyond the wall that separates Israelis and Palestinians and into the hearts of "the enemy." In a series of letters, Yossi Klein Halevi explains what motivated him to leave his native New York in his twenties and move to Israel to participate in the drama of the renewal of a Jewish homeland, which he is committed to see succeed as a morally responsible, democratic state in the Middle East.

This is the first attempt by an Israeli author to directly address his Palestinian neighbors and describe how the conflict appears through Israeli eyes. Halevi untangles the ideological and emotional knot that has defined the conflict for nearly a century. In lyrical, evocative language, he unravels the complex strands of faith, pride, anger and anguish he feels as a Jew living in Israel, using history and personal experience as his guide.

Halevi’s letters speak not only to his Palestinian neighbor, but to all concerned global citizens, helping us understand the painful choices confronting Israelis and Palestinians that will ultimately help determine the fate of the region.






















[book] From Broken Glass:
My Story of Finding Hope
in Hitler's Death Camps to
Inspire a New Generation
by Steve Ross
with Brian Wallace
May 15, 2018
Hachette
Ross (Smulek Rozental) survived nine Nazi concentration and labor camps, including Dachaiu where he carried corpses to be burned. He went on to create the New England Holocaust Memorial, and this inspiring memoir.

On August 14, 2017, two days after a white-supremacist activist rammed his car into a group of anti-Fascist protestors, killing one and injuring nineteen, the New England Holocaust Memorial was vandalized for the second time in as many months. At the base of one of its fifty-four-foot glass towers lay a pile of shards. For Steve Ross, the image called to mind Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass in which German authorities and civilians ransacked Jewish-owned schools and buildings with sledgehammers.

Ross was eight years old when the Nazis invaded his Polish village, forcing his family to flee. He spent his next six years in a day-to-day struggle to survive the notorious death camps in which he was imprisoned, Auschwitz-Birkenau and Dachau among them. When he was finally liberated, he no longer knew how old he was, he was literally starving to death, and everyone in his family save for his brother had been killed.

Ross learned in his darkest experiences--by observing and enduring inconceivable cruelty as well as by receiving compassion from caring fellow prisoners--the human capacity to rise above even the bleakest circumstances. He decided to devote himself to underprivileged youth, aiming to ensure that despite the obstacles in their lives they would never experience suffering like he had. Over the course of a nearly forty-year career as a psychologist working in the Boston city schools, that was exactly what he did. At the end of his career, he spearheaded the creation of the New England Holocaust Memorial, a site millions of people including young students visit every year.

Equal parts heartrending, brutal, and inspiring, From Broken Glass is the story of how one man survived the unimaginable and inspired a new generation to help forge a more compassionate world.
























[book] BIBI
The Turbulent Life and Times
of Benjamin Netanyahu
by Anshel Pfeffer
(Haaretz, The Economist)
May 1, 2018
Basic Books
A deeply reported biography of the controversial Israeli Prime Minister, showing that we cannot understand Israel today without first understanding the man who leads it

For many in Israel and elsewhere, Benjamin Netanyahu is anathema, an embarrassment, even a precursor to Donald Trump. But he continues to dominate Israeli public life. How can we explain his rise, his hold on Israeli politics, and his outsized role on the world's stage?

In Bibi, journalist Anshel Pfeffer reveals the formative influence of Netanyahu's grandfather and father, who bequeathed to him a brand of Zionism integrating Jewish nationalism and religious traditionalism. Pfeffer argues that we must understand Netanyahu as embodying the triumph of the underdogs in the Zionist enterprise over the secular liberals who founded the nation. As he demonstrates in this penetrating biography, Netanyahu's Israel is a hybrid of ancient phobia and high-tech hope, tribalism and globalism--just like the man himself.
























[book] My Country, My Life:
Fighting for Israel,
Searching for Peace
by Ehud Barak
May 8, 2018
St. Martin's Press
The definitive memoir of one of Israel's most influential soldier-statesmen and one-time Prime Minister, Ehud Barak, with insights into forging peace in the Middle East.

In the summer of 2000, the most decorated soldier in Israel's history-Ehud Barak-set himself a challenge as daunting as any he had faced on the battlefield: to secure a final peace with the Palestinians. He would propose two states for two peoples, with a shared capital in Jerusalem. He knew the risks of failure. But he also knew the risks of not trying: letting slip perhaps the last chance for a generation to secure genuine peace.

It was a moment of truth.

It was one of many in a life intertwined, from the start, with that of Israel. Born on a kibbutz, Barak became commander of Israel's elite special forces, then army Chief of Staff, and ultimately, Prime Minister.

My Country, My Life tells the unvarnished story of his-and his country's-first seven decades; of its major successes, but also its setbacks and misjudgments. He offers candid assessments of his fellow Israeli politicians, of the American administrations with which he worked, and of himself. Drawing on his experiences as a military and political leader, he sounds a powerful warning: Israel is at a crossroads, threatened by events beyond its borders and by divisions within. The two-state solution is more urgent than ever, not just for the Palestinians, but for the existential interests of Israel itself. Only by rediscovering the twin pillars on which it was built-military strength and moral purpose-can Israel thrive.
























[book] Rebel Talent:
Why It Pays to Break
the Rules at Work and in Life
by Francesca Gino
May 1, 2018
Dey Street
Do you want to follow a script — or write your own story?

Award-winning Harvard Business School professor Francesca Gino shows us why the most successful among us break the rules, and how rebellion brings joy and meaning into our lives.

Rebels have a bad reputation. We think of them as troublemakers, outcasts, contrarians: those colleagues, friends, and family members who complicate seemingly straightforward decisions, create chaos, and disagree when everyone else is in agreement. But in truth, rebels are also those among us who change the world for the better with their unconventional outlooks. Instead of clinging to what is safe and familiar, and falling back on routines and tradition, rebels defy the status quo. They are masters of innovation and reinvention, and they have a lot to teach us.

Francesca Gino, a behavioral scientist and professor at Harvard Business School, has spent more than a decade studying rebels at organizations around the world, from high-end boutiques in Italy’s fashion capital, to the World’s Best Restaurant, to a thriving fast food chain, to an award-winning computer animation studio. In her work, she has identified leaders and employees who exemplify “rebel talent,” and whose examples we can all learn to embrace.

Gino argues that the future belongs to the rebel — and that there’s a rebel in each of us. We live in turbulent times, when competition is fierce, reputations are easily tarnished on social media, and the world is more divided than ever before. In this cutthroat environment, cultivating rebel talent is what allows businesses to evolve and to prosper. And rebellion has an added benefit beyond the workplace: it leads to a more vital, engaged, and fulfilling life.

Whether you want to inspire others to action, build a business, or build more meaningful relationships, Rebel Talent will show you how to succeed — by breaking all the rules.






















[book] On the Road and Off
the Record with Leonard Bernstein:
My Years with the Exasperating Genius
by Charlie Harmon
Foreword by Harold "Hal" Prince
May 2018
Imagine
A celebratory, intimate, and detailed look at the public and private life of Leonard Bernstein written by his former assistant. Foreword by Broadway legend Harold Prince.

Leonard Bernstein reeked of cheap cologne and obviously hadn't showered, shaved, or slept in a while. Was he drunk to boot? He greeted his new assistant with "What are you drinking?" Yes, he was drunk.

Charlie Harmon was hired to manage the day-to-day parts of Bernstein's life. There was one additional responsibility: make sure Bernstein met the deadline for an opera commission. But things kept getting in the way: the centenary of Igor Stravinsky, intestinal parasites picked up in Mexico, teaching all summer in Los Angeles, a baker's dozen of young men, plus depression, exhaustion, insomnia, and cut-throat games of anagrams. Did the opera get written?

For four years, Charlie saw Bernstein every day, as his social director, gatekeeper, valet, music copyist, and itinerant orchestra librarian. He packed (and unpacked) Bernstein's umpteen pieces of luggage, got the Maestro to his concerts, kept him occupied changing planes in Zurich, Anchorage, Tokyo, or Madrid, and learned how to make small talk with mayors, ambassadors, a chancellor, a queen, and a Hollywood legend or two. How could anyone absorb all those people and places? Because there was music: late-night piano duets, or the Maestro's command to accompany an audition, or, by the way, the greatest orchestras in the world. Charlie did it, and this is what it was like, told for the first time.























[book] Women's Experiences in the Holocaust:
In Their Own Words
by Agnes Grunwald-Spier, Hon. Phd.
(Awarded MBE in 2016)
May 1, 2018
Amberley Publishing
This book brings to light women’s experiences in the Holocaust. It explains why women’s difficulties were different to those of men. Men were taken away and the women were left to cope with children and elderly relatives and obliged to take on new roles. Women like Andrew Sachs' mother had to deal with organising departure for a foreign country and making choices about what to take and what to abandon. The often desperate hunt for food for themselves and those in their care more often than not fell to the women, as did medical issues. They had to face pregnancies, abortions and, in some camps, medical experiments.

Many women wrote diaries, memoirs, letters and books about their experiences and these have been used extensively here. The accounts include women who fought or worked in the resistance, like Zivia Lubetkin who was part of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Dr Gisella Perl was a doctor in Auschwitz under the infamous Dr Mengele. Some young girls acted as Kashariyot, underground couriers between ghettos. Their varied experiences represent the extremities of human suffering, endeavour and courage. The author herself is a survivor, born in 1944. Her mother struggled to keep her safe in the mayhem of the Budapest Ghetto when she was a tiny baby and dealt with the threat from Russian soldiers after the liberation of Budapest in January 1945.






















[book] Jerusalem, Drawn and Quartered:
A Year Spent Living in
the Christian, Muslim, Armenian,
and Jewish Quarters of Old Jerusalem
by Sarah Tuttle-Singer
May 22, 2018
Skyhorse Pub.
From the recent recipient of a coveted Schusterman Foundation fellowship...
On a night in 1999 when Sarah Tuttle-Singer was barely 18, she was stoned by Palestinian kids just outside one of the gates to the Old City of Jerusalem. In the years that followed, she was terrified to explore the ancient city she so loved.

But, sick of living in fear, she has now chosen to live within the Old City's walls, living in each of the four quarters: Christian, Muslim, Armenian, and Jewish.

Jerusalem's Old City is the hottest piece of spiritual real estate in the world. For millennia empires have clashed and crumbled over this place. Today, the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians plays out daily in her streets, and the ancient stones run with blood. But it's also an ordinary city, where people buy vegetables, and sooth colicky babies, where pipes break, where the pious get high, and young couples sneak away to kiss in the shadows.

Sarah has thrown herself into the maelstrom of living in each quarter-where time is measured in Sabbath sunsets and morning bells and calls to prayer, in stabbing attacks and check points-keeping the holidays in each quarter, buying bread from the same bread seller, making friends with people who were once her enemies, and learning some of the secrets and sharing the stories that make Jerusalem so special, and so exquisitely ordinary.

Jerusalem, Drawn and Quartered is a book for anyone who's wondered who really lives in Israel, and how they coexist. It's a book that skillfully weaves the personal and political, the heartwarming and the heart-stopping. It's a book that only Sarah Tuttle-Singer can write. The Old City of Jerusalem may be set in stone, but it's always changing-and these pages capture that.























[book] All The Answers
by Michael Kupperman
May 15, 2018
Gallery 123
In this moving graphic memoir, Eisner Award-winning writer and artist Michael Kupperman traces the life of his reclusive father—the once-world-famous Joel Kupperman, Quiz Kid. That his father is slipping into dementia—seems to embrace it, really—means that the past he would never talk about might be erased forever.

Joel Kupperman became one of the most famous children in America during World War II as one of the young geniuses on the series Quiz Kids. With the uncanny ability to perform complex math problems in his head, Joel endeared himself to audiences across the country and became a national obsession. Following a childhood spent in the public eye, only to then fall victim to the same public’s derision, Joel deliberately spent the remainder of his life removed from the world at large.

With wit and heart, Michael Kupperman presents a fascinating account of mid-century radio and early television history, the pro-Jewish propaganda entertainment used to counteract anti-Semitism, and the early age of modern celebrity culture.

All the Answers is both a powerful father-son story and an engaging portrayal of what identity came to mean at this turning point in American history, and shows how the biggest stages in the world can overcome even the greatest of players.






















[book] Ask a Manager:
How to Navigate Clueless
Colleagues, Lunch-Stealing Bosses,
and the Rest of Your
Life at Work
by Alison Green
May 2018
Ballantine
A witty, practical guide to navigating 200 difficult professional conversations, from the host of the popular website Ask A Manager, and New York Magazine's work advice columnist.

There's a reason Alison Green has been dubbed the "Dear Abby of the work world." Ten years as a workplace advice columnist taught her that people avoid awkward conversations in the office because they can't find the right words. Here, she takes on the tough conversations you might need to have during your career and gives you the wording to do it. You'll learn what to say when:

* your coworker keeps pushing her work on you
* your new job is very different than what you agreed to
* your boss seems unhappy with your work
* your boss keeps stealing your lunch
* you catch an employee in a lie
* colleagues keep making judgmental comments about your diet
* your coworker's loud speaker phone calls are making you homicidal
* and plenty more difficult or awkward situations you might find yourself in!

With sharp, sage advice and letters from real-life readers, this guide will help you navigate the stormy seas of office politics.

























[book] The New Spanish:
Bites, Feasts, and Drinks
by Jonah Miller and Nate Adler
May 2018
Kyle Books
Adler and Miller have been friends since junior high school.
At age thirteen, they lucked into becoming apprentices at the world-class restaurant Chanterelle. Jonah went on to cook at Gramercy Tavern, Savoy, Blue Smoke, and Maialino. Nate became a manager with Stephen Starr Restaurants in Philadelphia then joined Danny Meyer's hospitality group. In 2014, the two joined forces to open Huertas Kitchen & Bar in New York's East Village, setting out to bring the city a new dining concept based on their extensive travels in Spain.

The New Spanish takes a playful approach to the cuisine of Spain, one calibrated to the way we eat today. The book aims to slip Spanish foods into your everyday kitchen vocabulary. Authors Miller and Adler know their stuff (they've traveled extensively in the old country), but they're mixing up the rules. Don't look for the same-old tapas and sangria here. Instead you'll find a seafood salad made with Clamato, golden squash christened with Marcona almonds, Basque sausages in hot dog buns, a cocktail made with red wine and Coca-cola (trust us, it's delicious), and even a blueprint for making your own vermouth from scratch. Normally heavy, stewed meat dishes, like duck with sherry and olive sauce, get a makeover to be fresher and more intensely flavorful as a result. Seasonal produce shines through.

Structured as a meal is, chapters start with Pintxos (super-simple skewered bites) and Conservas (canned and pickled foods are the unlikely jewels of Spanish cooking) then move on through Eggs, Vegetables, Rice & Grains, Meat & Poultry, Fish, and Dessert. Combining the traditional flavors and celebratory vibe of Spanish-style eating with contemporary techniques and a tongue-in-cheek attitude, The New Spanish makes the ideal introduction to the cooking of Spain-perfect for weeknight meals with family as well as get-togethers with friends.























[book] LEVANT
New Middle Eastern
Cooking from Tanoreen
by Rawia Bishara
May 2018
Kyle Books
From the Nazareth born top Brooklyn restauranteur

“Cooking to me is about history and connection, but to remain vibrant, a cuisine must also evolve.” Thus author Rawia Bishara explains her approach in this book. She believes one of the greatest assets of Middle Eastern cuisine is its inherent fluidity, its remarkable capacity to adapt and transform over time. In Levantine, she offers up more than 100 recipes that represent a new modern style. These are the very best of the dishes she has developed over the last twenty years in her New York City restaurant for the contemporary palate. Relying on a traditional pantry (including olive oil, tahini, za'atar, sumac), she applies classic flavor profiles in updated ways to dazzling effect.

The Mediterranean diet has always been a healthy one, with so many of what we now dub “superfoods” at its base. But here Rawia takes it a step further, by focusing on dishes that are naturally vegetarian or vegan and gluten-free, as well as meat dishes where vegetables take the leading role. These recipes represent the way more and more people wish to eat and cook today. Among them are Cauliflower “Steak” with Pomegranate Molasses, Roasted Beet Hummus, Sunchoke and Beef Stew, Peppers with Walnut Stuffing, and Freekah and Butternut Squash Salad.

It explores the sensational cross-cultural possibilities of culinary exchange; it sets the path for the future of Middle Eastern cooking.




















[book] Kissinger the Negotiator:
Lessons from Dealmaking at the Highest Level
by James K Sebenius
R. Nicholas Burns
Robert H. Mnookin
and a foreword by Henry Kissinger
May 2018
Harper
In this groundbreaking, definitive guide to the art of negotiation, three Harvard professors offer a comprehensive examination of one of the most successful dealmakers of all time, Henry Kissinger, and some of his most impressive achievements, including the Paris Peace Accords for which he won the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize.

Political leaders, diplomats, and business executives around the world—including every President from John F. Kennedy to Donald J. Trump—have sought the counsel of Henry Kissinger, a brilliant diplomat and political scientist whose unprecedented achievements as a negotiator have been universally acknowledged. Now, Kissinger the Negotiator provides a groundbreaking analysis of Kissinger’s overall approach to making deals and his skill in resolving conflicts—expertise that holds powerful and enduring lessons.

Based on in-depth interviews with Kissinger himself about some of his most difficult negotiations and an extensive study of his writings, James K. Sebenius of Harvard Business School, R. Nicholas Burns of the Kennedy School of Government, and Robert H. Mnookin of Harvard Law School crystallize the key elements of the former Secretary of State’s approach. Taut and instructive, Kissinger the Negotiator mines the long and fruitful career of this elder statesman and shows how his strategies not only apply to contemporary diplomatic challenges but also to other realms of negotiation, including business, public policy, and law.
Essential reading for current and future leaders, Kissinger the Negotiator is an invaluable guide to reaching agreements.


























[book] Tahini and Turmeric:
101 Middle Eastern Classics
Made Irresistibly Vegan
by Ruth Fox and Vicky Cohen
May 29, 2018
Da Capo
Cofounders of MayIHaveThatRecipe.com share 101 inventive vegan Middle Eastern recipes.

Add a dash of Spain, a chunk of Lebanon, a splash of Israel, and a hint of America. Blend until smooth and voila! You may end up with a well-mixed identity crisis, but happily you'll get Vicky Cohen and Ruth Fox, amazingly creative and food-mad sisters raised in Barcelona by Syrian-Lebanese Jewish parents. Since moving to the United States about twenty years ago, they have successfully married comforting Middle Eastern flavors with new healthy ingredients. Their site Mayihavethatrecipe.com features their award-winning recipes, and gorgeous food photography, and receives over 110,000 page views a month.

In their debut cookbook, Cohen and Fox interpret 101 Middle Eastern dishes in an irresistible--and easy--collection of vegan recipes, creating tempting, healthy dishes that take readers and eaters beyond the conventional and recognizable Middle Eastern staples of baba ghanoush and baklava. Instead, they offer modern, lighter dishes bursting with flavor. Covering breakfast, lunch, dinner, and everything in between--and complete with tips for what cooking staples and an introduction to some newer ingredients to keep in your pantry--these recipes are perfect for the health-conscious cook who loves the flavors of the Middle East.

Written by experienced recipe developers and bloggers, the recipes are free of time-consuming or complicated techniques and are meant to be served on busy weeknights and during casual gatherings with friends. With simple tricks, like substituting spring roll wrappers or pita bread for from-scratch dough, they've made it easy to prepare delicious, exotic food without an all-day affair in the kitchen.














[book] The Mighty Franks:
A Memoir
by Michael Frank
May 8, 2018
paperback edition
FS&G
Winner of the top British Jewish book award. Named one of the top 50 books of the year by the Telegraph.

A psychologically acute memoir about an unusual Hollywood family by Michael Frank, who "brings Proustian acuity and razor-sharp prose to family dramas as primal, and eccentrically insular, as they come" (The Atlantic) “My feeling for Mike is something out of the ordi - nary,” Michael Frank overhears his aunt telling his mother when he is a boy of eight. “It’s stronger than I am. I cannot explain it . . . I love him beyond life itself.” With this indelible bit of eavesdropping, we fall into the spellbinding world of The Mighty Franks.

The family is uncommonly close: Michael’s childless Auntie Hankie and Uncle Irving, glamorous Hollywood screenwriters, are doubly related- Hankie is his father’s sister, and Irving is his mother’s brother. The two families live near each other in Laurel Canyon. In this strangely intertwined world, even the author’s grandmothers-who dislike each other-share a nearby apartment.

Strangest of all is the way Auntie Hankie, with her extravagant personality, comes to bend the wider family to her will. Talented, mercurial, and lavish with her love, she divides Michael from his parents and his two younger brothers as she takes charge of his education, guiding him to the right books to read (Proust, not Zola), the right painters to admire (Matisse, not Pollock), the right architectural styles to embrace (period, not modern-or mo-derne, as she pronounces the word, with palpable disdain). She trains his mind and his eye-until that eye begins to see on its own. When this “son” Hankie longs for grows up and begins to turn away from her, her moods darken, and a series of shattering scenes compel Michael to reconstruct both himself and his family narrative as he tries to reconcile the woman he once adored with the troubled figure he discovers her to be.

In its portrayal of this fascinating, singularly polarizing figure, the boy in her thrall, and the man that boy becomes, The Mighty Franks will speak to any reader who has ever struggled to find an independent voice amid the turbulence of family life.


















[book] She Has Her Mother's Laugh:
The Powers, Perversions,
and Potential of Heredity
by Carl Zimmer
June 2018
Dutton
Award-winning, celebrated New York Times columnist and science writer Carl Zimmer presents a history of our understanding of heredity in this sweeping, resonating overview of a force that shaped human society--a force set to shape our future even more radically.

She Has Her Mother's Laugh presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s seemed to do precisely that. Gradually, people translated their old notions about heredity into a language of genes. As the technology for studying genes became cheaper, millions of people ordered genetic tests to link themselves to missing parents, to distant ancestors, to ethnic identities. . . .

But, Zimmer writes, "Each of us carries an amalgam of fragments of DNA, stitched together from some of our many ancestors. Each piece has its own ancestry, traveling a different path back through human history. A particular fragment may sometimes be cause for worry, but most of our DNA influences who we are--our appearance, our height, our penchants--in inconceivably subtle ways." Heredity isn't just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors--using a word that once referred to kingdoms and estates--but we inherit other things that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes to technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer's lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it.

Weaving historical and current scientific research, his own experience with his two daughters, and the kind of original reporting expected of one of the world's best science journalists, Zimmer ultimately unpacks urgent bioethical quandaries arising from new biomedical technologies, but also long-standing presumptions about who we really are and what we can pass on to future generations.

























[book] A Rich Brew:
How Cafés Created
Modern Jewish Culture
by Shachar M. Pinsker
(Univ of Michigan)
May 2018
NYU Press
A fascinating glimpse into the world of the coffeehouse and its role in shaping modern Jewish culture

Unlike the synagogue, the house of study, the community center, or the Jewish deli, the café is rarely considered a Jewish space. Yet, coffeehouses profoundly influenced the creation of modern Jewish culture from the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. With roots stemming from the Ottoman Empire, the coffeehouse and its drinks gained increasing popularity in Europe. The “otherness,” and the mix of the national and transnational characteristics of the coffeehouse perhaps explains why many of these cafés were owned by Jews, why Jews became their most devoted habitués, and how cafés acquired associations with Jewishness. Examining the convergence of cafés, their urban milieu, and Jewish creativity, Shachar M. Pinsker argues that cafés anchored a silk road of modern Jewish culture.

He uncovers a network of interconnected cafés that were central to the modern Jewish experience in a time of migration and urbanization, from Odessa, Warsaw, Vienna, and Berlin to New York City and Tel Aviv. A Rich Brew explores the Jewish culture created in these social spaces, drawing on a vivid collection of newspaper articles, memoirs, archival documents, photographs, caricatures, and artwork, as well as stories, novels, and poems in many languages set in cafés. Pinsker shows how Jewish modernity was born in the café, nourished, and sent out into the world by way of print, politics, literature, art, and theater. What was experienced and created in the space of the coffeehouse touched thousands who read, saw, and imbibed a modern culture that redefined what it meant to be a Jew in the world.

























[book] Born Trump:
Inside America’s First Family
by Emily Jane Fox
(Vanity Fair)
April 2018
Harper
An examination of the Trump children and what is was like to grow up Trump

As a writer at Vanity Fair covering the Trump family, Emily Jane Fox has spent the last year doing a deep dive into the lives of the President’s children. She’s developed a personal relationship with Ivanka and has cultivated sources close to Eric, Donald Jr., and Tiffany. She has scoured their Instagram accounts, combed through all their public speeches, spoken to their childhood friends, college acquaintances, business associates, close advisors, and campaign operatives. She’s become the foremost expert on the Trump kids and, now, in this exclusive account, Fox chronicles the experiences of the Trump children, individuals who possess more control than any other First Children in the history of the presidency.

Wonderfully gossipy, Born Trump examines what shaped the Trump children into who they are—a shared familial history that will inevitably form American history in the coming years. Born Trump explores what it was like to grow up Trump and what this reveals about living in Trump’s America, in turn painting an intimate portrait of the 45th President of the United States from the perspective of his most inner circle. Given their father’s need to be in the spotlight, his bellicose and litigious nature, and how often his personal life played out in public, it seems astonishing that his children remain so close to him. And yet this is part of the Trump ethos—like royalty, they stand together, encased not in palaces, but in Trump Tower.

Fox looks at the childhood privileges and traumas, the individual adolescences and early adulthoods that have been lightly chronicled in the tabloids but never detailed thoughtfully or in depth, the family business that brought them back together and the dynamics therein, the campaign that tested the family in ways the children could not have imagined, and now, the wide-open slate in front of them in Washington, D.C.

Full of surprising insights and previously untold stories, Born Trump will quench the ever increasing desire for a greater understanding of who these people are, how they were raised, and what makes them tick.




































[book] The Jewish Joke:
A Short History
with Punchlines
by Devorah Baum
2018
Pegasus
Heard the one about the Rabbi and the cow from Minsk? Look no further than this witty compendium, a fascinating and revealing celebration of the great Jewish Joke.

Comedy is full of famously funny Jews, from Groucho Marx to Sarah Silverman, from Larry David to Jerry Seinfeld. This smart and funny book includes tales from many of these much-loved comics, and will appeal to their broad audience, while revealing the history, context and wider culture of Jewish joking.

The Jewish joke is as old as Abraham, and like the Jews themselves it has wandered over the world, learned countless new languages, worked with a range of different materials, been performed in front of some pretty hostile crowds, and yet still retained its own distinctive identity. So what is it that animates the Jewish joke? Why are Jews so often thought of as ‘funny’? And how old can a joke get?

The Jewish Joke is a brilliant-and laugh-out-loud funny-riff on about what marks Jewish jokes apart from other jokes, why they are important to Jewish identity and how they work. Ranging from self-deprecation to anti-Semitism, politics to sex, Devorah Baum looks at the history of Jewish joking and asks whether the Jewish joke has a future.

With jokes from Lena Dunham to Woody Allen, as well as Freud and Marx (Groucho, mostly), Baum balances serious research with light-hearted humor and provides fascinating insight into this well-known and much loved cultural phenomenon.























[book] Another Side of Paradise:
A Novel
by Sally Koslow
May 2018
The author of the acclaimed international bestseller The Late, Lamented Molly Marx imaginatively brings to life the shocking affair of F. Scott Fitzgerald and his longtime lover, Sheilah Graham, in this dazzling novel of romance, celebrity, and Gatsby-esque self-creation in 1930s Hollywood.

In 1937 Hollywood, gossip columnist Sheilah Graham’s star is on the rise, while literary wonder boy F. Scott Fitzgerald’s career is slowly drowning in booze. But the once-famous author, desperate to make money penning scripts for the silver screen, is charismatic enough to attract the gorgeous Miss Graham, a woman who exposes the secrets of others while carefully guarding her own. Like Scott’s hero Jay Gatsby, Graham has meticulously constructed a life far removed from the poverty of her childhood in London’s slums. And like Gatsby, the onetime guttersnipe learned early how to use her charms to become a hardworking success feted and feared by both the movie studios and their luminaries.

A notorious drunk famously married to the doomed "crazy Zelda," Fitzgerald fell hard for his "Shielah" (he never learned to spell her name), a shrewd yet soft-hearted woman—both a fool for love and nobody’s fool—who would stay with him and help revive his career until his tragic death three years later. Working from diaries and other primary sources from the time, Sally Koslow revisits their scandalous love affair, bringing Graham and Scott gloriously alive in this compelling page-turner saturated with the color, glitter, magic, and passion of 1930s Hollywood and Sheilah’s dramatic transformation in London.
























JUNE 2018 BOOKS




[book] The Lost Family:
A Novel
by Jenna Blum
June 2018
Harper
The New York Times bestselling author of Those Who Save Us creates a vivid portrait of marriage, family, and the haunting grief of World War II in this emotionally charged, beautifully rendered story that spans a generation, from the 1960s to the 1980s.

In 1965 Manhattan, patrons flock to Masha’s to savor its brisket bourguignon and impeccable service and to admire its dashing owner and head chef Peter Rashkin. With his movie-star good looks and tragic past, Peter, a survivor of Auschwitz, is the most eligible bachelor in town. But Peter does not care for the parade of eligible women who come to the restaurant hoping to catch his eye. He has resigned himself to a solitary life. Running Masha’s consumes him, as does his terrible guilt over surviving the horrors of the Nazi death camp while his wife, Masha—the restaurant’s namesake—and two young daughters perished.

Then exquisitely beautiful June Bouquet, an up-and-coming young model, appears at the restaurant, piercing Peter’s guard. Though she is twenty years his junior, the two begin a passionate, whirlwind courtship. When June unexpectedly becomes pregnant, Peter proposes, believing that beginning a new family with the woman he loves will allow him to let go of the horror of the past. But over the next twenty years, the indelible sadness of those memories will overshadow Peter, June, and their daughter Elsbeth, transforming them in shocking, heartbreaking, and unexpected ways.

Jenna Blum artfully brings to the page a husband devastated by a grief he cannot name, a frustrated wife struggling to compete with a ghost she cannot banish, and a daughter sensitive to the pain of both her own family and another lost before she was born. Spanning three cinematic decades, The Lost Family is a charming, funny, and elegantly bittersweet study of the repercussions of loss and love.

























[book] To Heal the World?:
How The Jewish Left Corrupts
Judaism and Endangers Israel
by Jonathan Neumann
June 2018
St. Martin's Press

A critique of the Jewish social justice movement and its presumed theological basis in the concept of tikkun olam or “healing the world.”

A devastating critique of the presumed theological basis of the Jewish social justice movement-the concept of healing the world.

The concept that rests at the core of Jewish belief system is called tikkun olam, or healing the world. Believers in this notion claim that the Bible asks for more than piety Jews must also endeavor to make the world a better place. They must ACT. This idea has led to overwhelming Jewish participation in the social justice movement, as such actions are believed to be biblically mandated.

but according tp this British educated author,,,There's only one problem: the Bible says no such thing.

he writes that Tikkun Olam is an invention of the Jewish left, has diluted millennia of Jewish practice and belief into a vague feel-good religion of social justice.

In To Heal the World, Jonathan Neumann uses religious and political history to debunk this “pernicious idea,” and to show how the bible was twisted by Jewish liberals to support a radical left-wing agenda.

Neumann asserts that the Jewish Renewal movement aligned itself with the New Left of the 1960s, and redirected the perspective of the Jewish community towards liberalism and social justice. His goal is ro expose the key figures responsible for this effort, show that it lacks any real biblical basis, and outline the debilitating effect it has had on Judaism itself.























[book] Famous Father Girl:
A Memoir of Growing Up Bernstein
by Jamie Bernstein
June 12, 2018
Harper
The oldest daughter of revered composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein offers a rare look at her father on the centennial of his birth in a deeply intimate and broadly evocative memoir

The composer of On the Town and West Side Story, chief conductor of the New York Philharmonic, television star, humanitarian, friend of the powerful and influential, and the life of every party, Leonard Bernstein was an enormous celebrity during one of the headiest periods of American cultural life, as well as the most protean musician in twentieth century America.

But to his eldest daughter, Jamie, he was above all the man in the scratchy brown bathrobe who smelled of cigarettes; the jokester and compulsive teacher who enthused about Beethoven and the Beatles; the insomniac whose 4 a.m. composing breaks involved spooning baby food out of the jar. He taught his daughter to love the world in all its beauty and complexity. In public and private, Lenny was larger than life.

In Famous Father Girl, Bernstein mines the emotional depths of her childhood and invites us into her family’s private world. A fantastic set of characters populates the Bernsteins’ lives, including: the Kennedys, Mike Nichols, John Lennon, Richard Avedon, Stephen Sondheim, Jerome Robbins, and Betty (Lauren) Bacall.

An intoxicating tale, Famous Father Girl is an intimate meditation on a complex and sometimes troubled man, the family he raised, and the music he composed that became the soundtrack to their entwined lives. Deeply moving and often hilarious, Bernstein’s beautifully written memoir is a great American story about one of the greatest Americans of the modern age.





























[book] Siren Song:
My Life in Music
by Seymour Stein and
Gareth Murphy
June 2018
The autobiography of America’s greatest living record man: the founder of Sire Records and spotter of rock talent from the Ramones to Madonna.

Seymour Stein is America's greatest living record man. Not only has he signed and nurtured more important artists than anyone alive, now sixty years in the game, he's still the hippest label head, travelling the globe in search of the next big thing.

Since the late fifties, he's been wherever it's happening: Billboard, Tin Pan Alley, The British Invasion, CBGB, Studio 54, Danceteria, the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame, the CD crash. Along that winding path, he discovered and broke out a skyline full of stars: Madonna, The Ramones, Talking Heads, Depeche Mode, Madonna, The Smiths, The Cure, Ice-T, Lou Reed, Seal, and many others.

Brimming with hilarious scenes and character portraits, Siren Song’s wider narrative is about modernity in motion, and the slow acceptance of diversity in America – thanks largely to daring pop music. Including both the high and low points in his life, Siren Song touches on everything from his discovery of Madonna to his wife Linda Stein's violent death.

Ask anyone in the music business, Seymour Stein is a legend. Sung from the heart, Siren Song will etch his story in stone.

























[book] Little Panic:
Dispatches from an Anxious Life
by Amanda Stern
June 2018
In the vein of bestselling memoirs about mental illness like Andrew Solomon's Noonday Demon, Sarah Hepola's Blackout, and Daniel Smith's Monkey Mind comes a gorgeously immersive, immediately relatable, and brilliantly funny memoir about living life on the razor's edge of panic.

The world never made any sense to Amanda Stern--how could she trust time to keep flowing, the sun to rise, gravity to hold her feet to the ground, or even her own body to work the way it was supposed to? Deep down, she knows that there's something horribly wrong with her, some defect that her siblings and friends don't have to cope with.

Growing up in the 1970s and 80s in New York, Amanda experiences the magic and madness of life through the filter of unrelenting panic. Plagued with fear that her friends and family will be taken from her if she's not watching-that her mother will die, or forget she has children and just move away-Amanda treats every parting as her last. Shuttled between a barefoot bohemian life with her mother in Greenwich Village, and a sanitized, stricter world of affluence uptown with her father, Amanda has little she can depend on. And when Etan Patz disappears down the block from their MacDougal Street home, she can't help but believe that all her worst fears are about to come true.

Tenderly delivered and expertly structured, Amanda Stern's memoir is a document of the transformation of New York City and a deep, personal, and comedic account of the trials and errors of seeing life through a very unusual lens.
























[book] We Are Gathered
a novel
by Jamie Weisman
June 2018
HMH
One afternoon in Atlanta, Georgia. Two people heading to the altar. One hundred fifty guests. The bride, Elizabeth Gottlieb, proud graduate of the University of Virginia and of Emory University School of Law, member of Atlanta’s wealthy Jewish elite. The groom, Hank Jackson, not a member. Not a Jew. The couple of the hour, however, is beside the point, because We Are Gathered belongs to the guests.

Among them, Carla, Elizabeth’s quick-witted, ugly duckling childhood best friend turned Hollywood film scout, whose jaundiced view of the drama that is an American wedding provides a lens of humor and its corollary, deep compassion for the supporting actors who steal the show; Elizabeth’s great-aunt Rachel, a Holocaust survivor from Germany who is still navigating a no-man’s-land between cultures and identities decades after escaping from the forests of Europe; Elizabeth’s wheelchair-bound grandfather Albert, who considers his legacy as a man, both in the boardroom and the bedroom; and Annette, the mother of the bride herself, reminded now of her youthful indiscretions in love and motherhood.

Balancing razor-sharp humor with a blunt vision of the fragility of our mortal bonds, Jamie Weisman skillfully constructs a world—and family—that pulls you in and carries you along with its refreshing, jagged beauty.

























[book] Gershom Scholem:
Master of the Kabbalah
(Jewish Lives series)
by David Biale
UC Davis
June 2018
Yale University Press
A new biography of the seminal twentieth-century historian and thinker who pioneered the study of Jewish mysticism and profoundly influenced the Zionist movement

Gershom Scholem (1897–1982) was perhaps the foremost Jewish intellectual of the twentieth century. Pioneering the study of Jewish mysticism as a legitimate academic discipline, he overturned the rationalist bias of his predecessors and revealed an extraordinary world of myth and messianism. In his youth, he rebelled against the assimilationist culture of his parents and embraced Zionism as the vehicle for the renewal of Judaism in a secular age. He moved to Palestine in 1923 and took part in the creation of the Hebrew University, where he was a towering figure for nearly seventy years.

David Biale traces Scholem’s tumultuous life of political activism and cultural criticism, including his falling-out with Hannah Arendt over the Eichmann trial. Mining a rich trove of diaries, letters, and other writings, Biale shows that his subject’s inner life illuminates his most important writings. Scholem emerges as a passionately engaged man of his times—a period that encompassed the extremely significant events of the two world wars, the rise of Nazism, and the Holocaust.

























[book] SARA BERMAN'S CLOSET
By Maira and Alex Kalman
Harper Design
June 2018
Columbia Global Reports
Maira Kalman, the author of the bestsellers The Principles of Uncertainty and The Elements of Style, and Alex Kalman, the designer, curator, writer, and founder of Mmuseumm, combine their talents in this captivating family memoir, a creative blend of narrative and striking visuals that is a paean to an exceptional woman and a celebration of individuality, personal expression, and the art of living authentically.

In the early 1950s, Jewish émigré Sara Berman arrived in the Bronx with her husband and two young daughters When the children were grown, she and her husband returned to Israel, but Sara did not stay for long. In the late 1960s, at age sixty, she left her husband after thirty-eight years of marriage. One night, she packed a single suitcase and returned alone to New York City, moving intoa studio apartment in Greenwich Village near her family. In her new home, Sara began discovering new things and establishing new rituals, from watching Jeopardy each night at 7:00 to eating pizza at the Museum of Modern Art’s cafeteria every Wednesday. She also began discarding the unnecessary, according to the Kalmans: "in a burst of personal expression, she decided to wear only white."

Sara kept her belongings in an extraordinarily clean and organized closet. Filled with elegant, minimalist, heavily starched, impeccably pressed and folded all-white clothing, including socks and undergarments, as well as carefully selected objects—from a potato grater to her signature perfume, Chanel No.19—the space was sublime. Upon her death in 2004, her family decided to preserve its pristine contents, hoping to find a way to exhibit them one day.

In 2015, the Mmuseumm, a new type of museum located in a series of unexpected locations founded and curated by Sara’s grandson, Alex Kalman, recreated the space in a popular exhibit—Sara Berman's Closet—in Tribeca. The installation eventually moved to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and in June 2018, will become an outdoor monument to independence at Independence Mall in Philadelphia.

Inspired by the exhibit, this spectacular illustrated memoir, packed with family photographs, exclusive images, and Maira Kalman's distinctive paintings, is an ode to Sara’s life, freedom, and re-invention. Sara Berman’s Closet is an indelible portrait of the human experience—overcoming hardship, taking risks, experiencing joy, enduring loss. It is also a reminder of the significance of the seemingly insignificant moments in our lives—the moments we take for granted that may turn out to be the sweetest. Filled with a daughter and grandson’s wry and touching observations conveyed in Maira’s signature script, Sara Berman’s Closest is a beautiful, loving tribute to one woman’s indomitable spirit.





























[book] I Will Be Complete:
A Memoir
by Glen David Gold
June 26, 2018
Knopf
From the best-selling author of Carter Beats the Devil and Sunnyside, a big-hearted memoir told in three parts: about growing up in the wake of the destructive choices of an extremely unconventional mother.

Glen David Gold was raised rich, briefly, in southern California at the end of the go-go 1960s. But his father's fortune disappears, his parents divorce, and Glen falls out of his well-curated life and into San Francisco at the epicenter of the Me Decade: the inimitable '70s. Gold grows up with his mother, among con men and get-rich schemes. Then, one afternoon when he's twelve, she moves to New York without telling him, leaving him to fend for himself. I Will Be Complete is the story of how Gold copes, honing a keen wit and learning how to fill in the emotional gaps: "I feel love and then it's like I'm driving on black ice with no contact against the road." He leads us though his early salvation at boarding school; his dream job at an independent bookstore in Los Angeles in 1983; a punk rock riot; a romance with a femme fatale to the soundtrack of R.E.M.; and his attempts to forge a career as a writer.

Along the way, Gold becomes increasingly fascinated with his father's self-described "cheerful amorality" and estranged from his mother, who lives with her soulmate, a man who threatens to kill her. Clear-eyed and heartbreaking, Gold's story ultimately speaks to everyone who has struggled with the complexity of parental bonds by searching for--and finding--autonomy.





























[book] We Are Gathered
a Novel
by Jamie Weisman
June 2018
HMH
For readers of Maggie Shipstead and Maria Semple, a tender and funny debut that tells the story of an interfaith wedding in Atlanta — from the perspectives of its (adoring, envious, resentful, hilarious) guests

One afternoon in Atlanta, Georgia. Two people heading to the altar. One hundred fifty guests. The bride, Elizabeth Gottlieb, proud graduate of the University of Virginia and of Emory University School of Law, member of Atlanta’s wealthy Jewish elite. The groom, Hank Jackson, not a member. Not a Jew. The couple of the hour, however, is beside the point, because We Are Gathered belongs to the guests.

Among them, Carla, Elizabeth’s quick-witted, ugly duckling childhood best friend turned Hollywood film scout, whose jaundiced view of the drama that is an American wedding provides a lens of humor and its corollary, deep compassion for the supporting actors who steal the show; Elizabeth’s great-aunt Rachel, a Holocaust survivor from Germany who is still navigating a no-man’s-land between cultures and identities decades after escaping from the forests of Europe; Elizabeth’s wheelchair-bound grandfather Albert, who considers his legacy as a man, both in the boardroom and the bedroom; and Annette, the mother of the bride herself, reminded now of her youthful indiscretions in love and motherhood.

Balancing razor-sharp humor with a blunt vision of the fragility of our mortal bonds, Jamie Weisman skillfully constructs a world—and family—that pulls you in and carries you along with its refreshing, jagged beauty.


























[book] Judenmord:
Art and the Holocaust
in Post-war Germany
by Kathrin Hoffman-Curtius
June 15, 2018
Reaktion Books
In remembering the Holocaust, we have largely ignored the contributions made by German artists in the first twenty years after the end of the war. But how did artists in Germany deal with their own experiences and relate these to what they saw, heard, and read about the Holocaust, and in what ways did these experiences shape the development of their ideas? What images of the Jews did artists present to the Germans after the end of the brutal Nazi regime? And did works of art not only contribute to the culture of memory but also to the reeducation of people, and to new ways of thinking in both East and West Germany?

Stretching from the end of the war to the modern day, Judenmord is the first book to explore works of art from Germany specifically that comment on the Holocaust. It presents paintings, drawings, and etchings that not only bring to light the persecution of the Jews, but also reveal how artists reacted to injustice in a social situation where the majority stayed silent. Featuring two hundred color reproductions of an unfamiliar array of works by artists such as Lea Grundig, Otto Pankok, Ludwig Meidner, Werner Tübke, Wolf Vostell, Joseph Beuys, and Gerhard Richter, and also including artwork by former camp inmates, Judenmord is essential reading for all those interested in the history of art and the Holocaust.


























[book] PLAYING WITH MATCHES
A Novel
by Hannah Orenstein
June 2018
Touchstone
In the tradition of Good in Bed and The Assistants comes a funny and smart comedy about a young matchmaker balancing her messy personal life and the demands of her eccentric clients.

Sasha Goldberg has a lot going for her: a recent journalism degree from NYU, an apartment with her best friend Caroline, and a relationship that would be amazing if her finance-bro boyfriend Jonathan would ever look up from his BlackBerry. But when her dream career falls through, she uses her family’s darkest secret to land a job as a matchmaker for New York City’s elite at the dating service Bliss.

Despite her inexperience, Sasha throws herself into her new career, trolling for catches on Tinder, coaching her clients through rejection, and dishing out dating advice to people twice her age. She sets up a TV exec who wanted kids five years ago, a forty-year-old baseball-loving virgin, and a consultant with a rigorous five-page checklist for her ideal match.

Sasha hopes to find her clients The One, like she did. But when Jonathan betrays her, she spirals out of control—and right into the arms of a writer with a charming Southern drawl, who she had previously set up with one of her clients. He’s strictly off-limits, but with her relationship on the rocks, all bets are off.

Fresh, sweet, and laugh-out-loud funny, Playing with Matches is the addictive story about dating in today’s swipe-heavy society, and a young woman trying to find her own place in the world.





























[book] The Autobiography of Solomon Maimon:
The Complete Translation
by Solomon Maimon
but Edited and Translated by
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Abraham Socher,
and Paul Reitter
Foreword by Gideon Freudenthal
July 2018
Princeton University Press
The first complete and annotated English translation of Maimon’s influential and delightfully entertaining memoir

Solomon Maimon's autobiography has delighted readers for more than two hundred years, from Goethe, Schiller, and George Eliot to Walter Benjamin and Hannah Arendt. The American poet and critic Adam Kirsch has named it one of the most crucial Jewish books of modern times. Here is the first complete and annotated English edition of this enduring and lively work.

Born into a down-on-its-luck provincial Jewish family in 1753, Maimon quickly distinguished himself as a prodigy in learning. Even as a young child, he chafed at the constraints of his Talmudic education and rabbinical training. He recounts how he sought stimulation in the Hasidic community and among students of the Kabbalah--and offers rare and often wickedly funny accounts of both. After a series of picaresque misadventures, Maimon reached Berlin, where he became part of the city's famed Jewish Enlightenment and achieved the philosophical education he so desperately wanted, winning acclaim for being the "sharpest" of Kant's critics, as Kant himself described him.

This new edition restores text cut from the abridged 1888 translation by J. Clark Murray, which has long been the only available English edition. Paul Reitter's translation is brilliantly sensitive to the subtleties of Maimon's prose while providing a fluid rendering that contemporary readers will enjoy, and is accompanied by an introduction and notes by Yitzhak Melamed and Abraham Socher that give invaluable insights into Maimon and his extraordinary life. The book also features an afterword by Gideon Freudenthal that provides an authoritative overview of Maimon's contribution to modern philosophy.































[book] Historical Atlas of Hasidism
by Marcin Wodziski
and Waldemar Spallek
June 2018
Princeton University Press
The first cartographic reference book on one of today’s most important religious movements

Historical Atlas of Hasidism is the very first cartographic reference book on one of the modern era's most vibrant and important mystical movements. Featuring sixty-one large-format maps and a wealth of illustrations, charts, and tables, this one-of-a-kind atlas charts Hasidism's emergence and expansion; its dynasties, courts, and prayer houses; its spread to the New World; the crisis of the two world wars and the Holocaust; and Hasidism's remarkable postwar rebirth.

Historical Atlas of Hasidism demonstrates how geography has influenced not only the social organization of Hasidism but also its spiritual life, types of religious leadership, and cultural articulation. It focuses not only on Hasidic leaders but also on their thousands of followers living far from Hasidic centers. It examines Hasidism in its historical entirety, from its beginnings in the eighteenth century until today, and draws on extensive GIS-processed databases of historical and contemporary records to present the most complete picture yet of this thriving and diverse religious movement.

Historical Atlas of Hasidism is visually stunning and easy to use, a magnificent resource for anyone seeking to understand Hasidism's spatial and spiritual dimensions, or indeed anybody interested in geographies of religious movements past and present.
Provides the first cartographic interpretation of Hasidism
Features sixty-one maps and numerous illustrations
Covers Hasidism in its historical entirety, from its eighteenth-century origins to today
Charts Hasidism's emergence and expansion, courts and prayer houses, modern resurgence, and much more
Offers the first in-depth analysis of Hasidism's egalitarian--not elitist-dimensions
Draws on extensive GIS-processed databases of historical and contemporary records

























[book] Hasidism:
Key Questions
by Marcin Wodzinski
University of Wroclaw, Poland
July 2018
Oxford University Press
From the author of the Atlas of Hasidism and one of Polands\'s top professors of Jewish Studies comes a book on Hasidism that uses archival resources never before used.

Hasidism is one of the most important religious and social movements to have developed in Eastern Europe, and the most significant phenomenon in the religious, social and cultural life of the Jewish population in Eastern Europe from the eighteenth century up to the present day. Innovative and multidisciplinary in its approach, Hasidism: Key Questions discusses the most cardinal features of any social or religious movement: definition, gender, leadership, demographic size, geography, economy, and decline. This is the first attempt to respond those central questions in one book.

Recognizing the major limitations of the existing research on Hasidism, Marcin Wodzinski's Hasidism offers four important corrections. First, it offers anti-elitist corrective attempting to investigate Hasidism beyond its leaders into the masses of the rank-and-file followers. Second, it introduces new types of sources, rarely or never used in research on Hasidism, including archival documents, Jewish memorial books, petitionary notes, quantitative and visual materials. Third, it covers the whole classic period of Hasidism from its institutional maturation at the end of the eighteenth century to its major crisis and decline in wake of the First World War. Finally, instead of focusing on intellectual history, the book offers a multi-disciplinary approach with the modern methodologies of the corresponding disciplines: sociology and anthropology of religion, demography, historical geography and more.

By combining some oldest, central questions with radically new sources, perspectives, and methodologies, Hasidism: Key Questions will provide a radically new look at many central issues in historiography of Hasidism, one of the most important religious movements of modern Eastern Europe.


























[book] Daingerfield Island
a Mystery/Thriller Novel
by John Wasowicz
July 2018
Brickhouse
''Wasowicz's promising legal thriller series launch introduces savvy Washington, D.C., defense attorney Elmo Katz. Elmo is retained by Nate Harding, who the police believe was involved in the drowning of Libby Lewis, the chief of staff for the Senate Intelligence Committee, who was found floating in the Potomac River near Daingerfield Island. But Elmo doesn't know that Harding has been working with a shady CIA operative, Jack Smith, who planned to lure a lone wolf terrorist into a trap on the island with Lewis's help. Lewis was going to pass him a flash drive that ostensibly contained details to facilitate a hit on a 'flamboyant Arabian sheik,' but that daring covert operation went awry. Smith convinces Harding to offer himself up as a temporary murder suspect, to give Smith a chance to cover his tracks and to develop a new plan to catch the terrorist. Elmo must look beyond his new client s questionable representation to learn the truth about the congressional staffer's death. Wasowicz's experience as a trial attorney is put to good use in courtroom scenes, and he's equally adept with action sequences.'' --BookLife





























[book] Inappropriation:
A Novel
by Lexi Freiman
July 24, 2018
ecco books
A wildly irreverent take on the coming-of-age story that turns a search for belonging into a riotous satire of identity politics

Starting at a prestigious private Australian girls’ school, fifteen-year-old Ziggy Klein is confronted with an alienating social hierarchy that hurls her into the arms of her grade’s most radical feminists. Tormented by a burgeoning collection of dark, sexual fantasies, and a biological essentialist mother, Ziggy sets off on a journey of self-discovery that moves from the Sydney drag scene to the extremist underbelly of the Internet.

As PC culture collides with her friends’ morphing ideology and her parents’ kinky sex life, Ziggy’s understanding of gender, race, and class begins to warp. Ostracized at school, she seeks refuge in Donna Haraway’s seminal feminist text, A Cyborg Manifesto, and discovers an indisputable alternative identity. Or so she thinks. A controversial Indian guru, a transgender drag queen, and her own Holocaust-surviving grandmother propel Ziggy through a series of misidentifications, culminating in a date-rape revenge plot so confused, it just might work.

Uproariously funny, but written with extraordinary acuity about the intersections of gender, sexual politics, race, and technology, Inappropriation is literary satire at its best. With a deft finger on the pulse of the zeitgeist, Lexi Freiman debuts on the scene as a brilliant and fearless new talent.





























[book] A TERRIBLE COUNTRY
A NOVEL
BY KEITH GESSEN
(aka: Konstantin Alexandrovich Gessen)
July 10, 2018
Viking / Penguin Random House

Yes... he is related to Masha Gessen, if you were wondering...

A literary triumph about Russia, family, love, and loyalty—the first novel in ten years from a founding editor of n+1 and author of All the Sad Young Literary Men. When Andrei Kaplan’s older brother Dima insists that Andrei return to Moscow to care for their ailing grandmother, Andrei must take stock of his life in New York. His girlfriend has stopped returning his text messages. His dissertation adviser is dubious about his job prospects. It’s the summer of 2008, and his bank account is running dangerously low. Perhaps a few months in Moscow are just what he needs. So Andrei sublets his room in Brooklyn, packs up his hockey stuff, and moves into the apartment that Stalin himself had given his grandmother, a woman who has outlived her husband and most of her friends. She survived the dark days of communism and witnessed Russia’s violent capitalist transformation, during which she lost her beloved dacha. She welcomes Andrei into her home, even if she can’t always remember who he is.

Andrei learns to navigate Putin’s Moscow, still the city of his birth, but with more expensive coffee. He looks after his elderly—but surprisingly sharp!—grandmother, finds a place to play hockey, a café to send emails, and eventually some friends, including a beautiful young activist named Yulia. Over the course of the year, his grandmother’s health declines and his feelings of dislocation from both Russia and America deepen. Andrei knows he must reckon with his future and make choices that will determine his life and fate. When he becomes entangled with a group of leftists, Andrei’s politics and his allegiances are tested, and he is forced to come to terms with the Russian society he was born into and the American one he has enjoyed since he was a kid.

A wise, sensitive novel about Russia, exile, family, love, history and fate, A Terrible County asks what you owe the place you were born, and what it owes you. Writing with grace and humor, Keith Gessen gives us a brilliant and mature novel that is sure to mark him as one of the most talented novelists of his generation.





























[book] Little & Lion
by Brandy Colbert
July 2018
Little, Brown
YA, Ages 14-18
If Love, Simon was based on a YA novel, maybe this is next

A stunning novel on love, identity, loss, and redemption.

When Suzette comes home to Los Angeles from her boarding school in New England, she's isn't sure if she'll ever want to go back. L.A. is where her friends and family are (as well as her crush, Emil). And her stepbrother, Lionel, who has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, needs her emotional support.

But as she settles into her old life, Suzette finds herself falling for someone new...the same girl her brother is in love with. Suzette poders being black, Jewish, and now in wondering about her sexual identity. When Lionel's disorder spirals out of control, Suzette is forced to confront her past mistakes and find a way to help her brother before he hurts himself--or worse.
























[book] Against the Inquisition
by Marcos Aguinis
Translated by Carolina De Robertis
August 2018
AmazonCrossing

From a renowned prize-winning Argentinian author comes a historical novel based on the true story of one man’s faith, spirit, and resistance during the Spanish Inquisition in Latin America.

Born in sixteenth-century Argentina, Francisco Maldonado da Silva is nine years old when he sees his father, Don Diego, arrested one harrowing afternoon because of his beliefs. Raised in a family practicing its Jewish faith in secret under the condemning eyes of the Spanish Inquisition, Francisco embarks on a personal quest that will challenge, enlighten, and forever change him.

He completes his education in a monastery; he reads the Bible; he dreams of reparation; he dedicates his life to science, developing a humanistic approach and becoming one of the first accredited medical doctors in Latin America; and most of all, he longs to reconnect with his father in Lima, Perú, the City of Kings.

So begins Francisco’s epic journey to fight for his true faith, to embrace his past, and to draw from his father’s indomitable strength in the face of unimaginable persecution. But the arm of the Holy Inquisition is an intractable one. As it reaches for Francisco, he sheds his mask to defend his freedom. Against seemingly insurmountable odds, he will prove that while the body can be broken, the spirit fights back, endures, and survives.





















[book] The Commentators' Bible:
Genesis:
The Rubin JPS Miqra’ot Gedolot
Edited by Michael Carasik
(University of Pennsylvania)
August 2018
JPS: The Jewish Publication Society
The biblical commentaries known as Miqra’ot Gedolot have inspired and educated generations of Hebrew readers. With the publication of this edition—the final volume of the acclaimed JPS English edition of Miqra’ot Gedolot—the voices of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Nachmanides, Rashbam, Abarbanel, Kimhi, and other medieval Bible commentators come alive once more, speaking in a contemporary English translation annotated for lay readers.

Each page in The Commentators’ Bible: Genesis: The Rubin JPS Miqra’ot Gedolot contains several verses from the book of Genesis, surrounded by both the 1917 and the 1985 JPS translations and by new contemporary English translations of the major commentators. The book also includes a glossary of terms, a list of names used in the text, notes on source texts, a special topics list, and resources for further study. This large-format volume is beautifully designed for easy navigation among the many elements on each page, including explanatory notes and selected additional comments from the works of Bekhor Shor, Sforno, Gersonides, and Hizkuni, among others.























[book] The Eyes of Isaac:
Medical and Halachic Perspectives
on Ophthalmologic Conditions
Edited by Norman Saffra, MD FACS
Foreword by Alan Kadish
SEPTEMBER 2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A compilation of essays and studies from leading doctors, professors, and rabbis, The Eyes of Isaac endeavors to connect important medical and psychological issues of ophthalmology with Jewish law. Rabbis and physicians navigate the daily challenges that visual disability presents for themselves as well as for those under their care. Interspersed with personal anecdotes and stories, The Eyes of Isaac offers profound knowledge on the significant organ and diseases related to it, and how those diseases, such as glaucoma, can affect the practice of daily Jewish rituals. Included in this collection are explanations of eye diseases, considerations on how to treat them, along with the detailed process of medical surgeries in ophthalmology.
























[book] LAKE SUCCESS
A novel
by Gary Shteyngart
September 2018
Random House
“Barry Cohen, a man with $2.4 billion of assets under management, staggered into the Port Authorty Bus Terminal.

When his dream of the perfect marriage, the perfect son, and the perfect life implodes, a Wall Street millionaire takes a cross-country bus trip in search of his college sweetheart and ideals of youth in the long-awaited novel, his first in seven years, from the acclaimed, bestselling author of Super Sad True Love Story.

Myopic, narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his 3 year-old-son’s diagnosis of autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart, whom he hasn't seen or spoken to in years. Meanwhile, reeling from the fight that caused Barry's departure, his super-smart wife Seema—a driven first-generation American who craved a picture-perfect life, with all the accoutrements of a huge bank account—has her own demons to face. How these two imperfect characters navigate the Shteyngartian chaos of their own making is the heart of this biting, brilliant, emotionally resonant novel very much of our times.































[book] Living in the Presence:
A Jewish Mindfulness Guide
for Everyday Life
by Rabbi Benjamin Epstein, PsyD
September 2018
URIM
In our frantic, fast paced society, we need constant guidance to remind us that we can only find the peace of mind we sorely lack by looking inward. Judaism, like many other spiritual traditions, offers a unique path to cultivating fulfillment and presence of mind. In cultivating peace of mind, we do not aim to achieve transcendence. Rather, our goal is to enter fully into whatever is occurring in our lives and meet it with full presence. But being a better Jew and a happier person are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they are mutually interdependent. From the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep, biblical commandments provide us with guidelines that encourage us to be aware of the present moment. A Guide to Jewish Mindfulness provides concise and clear instructions on how to cultivate peace of mind in order to attain a life of greater commitment and inspiration for the present moment.


























[book] Those Who Knew
by Idra Novey
November 2018
Vintage
On an unnamed island country ten years after the collapse of a brutal regime, Lena suspects the powerful senator she was involved with back in her student activist days may be guilty of murder. She says nothing, assuming no one will believe her, given her family's shameful support of the former regime and her lack of evidence. They are the same reasons she told no one, a decade earlier, what happened with the senator while they were dating.

But now a college student is dead. And Lena is haunted.

Those Who Knew is a propulsive, suspenseful novel about what powerful men think they can get away with and the emotional cost of resigning oneself to silence. Moving between the island and New York City, this novel confirms Novey's place as one of the most inventive and prescient writers at work today.



























[book] Lonely But Not Alone:
A Spiritual Autobiography
by Nathan Lopes Cardozo
JANUARY 2019
Urim Publications
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.

























The Jewish Founding Father:
Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life
by Andrew Porwancher, Phd.
(Univ of Oklahoma School of Law)
Harvard University Press
forthcoming 2019
Jewish …? most say no. Yes, he studied in a Jewish school... but he was Christian? Wasn't he? Porwancher seeks to prove otherwise. Why? Hamilton’s mother, Rachel Faucette, was married to Jewish merchant Johann Michael Lavien (aka Levine) in St. Croix in 1745, at a time that Danish law would have required her conversion to Judaism. She left him within a decade, a lived with James Hamilton in Nevis (BWI). She bore Alexander around 1755, and having been born out of wedlock, attended a Jewish school... either out of necessity since he was not baptised or because his mother was considered Jewish...











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