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SOME WINTER 2019 BOOK READINGS



December 04, 2018: Jewish Lives: Jewish Voices. Join 8 authors on their 8 books for the Yale/Penguin series for the 8 mights (but just tonight). Featuring James Atlas as the editing moderator. Join Barry W Holtz (JTS Professor) on RABBI AKIVA; Neal Gabler on BARBRA STREISAND; Anita Shapira on DAVID BEN-GURION; Jeffrey Rosen on LOUIS D. BRANDEIS; Vivian Gornick on EMMA GOLDMAN; Mark Kurlansky on HANK GREENBERG, Francine Prose on PEGGY GUGGENHEIM; and Professor Itamar Rabinovich (Ambassador, friend of Scranton) on YITZHAK RABIN at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 630PM FREE (followed by 3rd night of Hanuka candle lighting) EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
December 05, 2018: Michael Solomonov on his new Israeli Soul cookbook, in conversation with Steven Cook, his co author. 92 St Y, NYC

January 17, 2019: The Legend of Khaybar, A Jewish “Kingdom” in the Arabian Desert. Liran Yagdar (UCLA, Tel Aviv U.). In the year 628 CE, the Jewish stronghold of Khaybar fell to the prophet's forces. It ended the refuge for Medinan Jews in the Arabian Desert. What was the legend? Was it true? How did early Zionists apply it? UCLA. Royce Hall 4PM.
January 17, 2019: Former U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman (and current lobbyist for China) and former Secretary of Treasury Jacob Lew speak on The State of the (Jewish) Union. Moderated by Abigail Pogrebin. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org. NYC
January 28, 2019: Howard Schultz (Starbucks) reads from From the Ground Up: My Journey to Reimagine the Role of Global Business--a bold new message for leaders, businesses, and citizens in American society today. Barnes & Noble, NYC, Union Square.
January 29, 2019: Jill Abramson reads from Merchants of Truth. EmanuelStreickerNYC.org NYC
February 26, 2019: Isaac Mizrahi reads from IM: A MEMOIR. Barnes & Noble, NYC, 82nd & Broadway UWS.

March 14, 2019: Michael Rothberg (UCLA) on Unexpected Itineraries: Holocaust Testimonies beyond Borders. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM
April 04, 2019: Lindsey Stonebridge (Birmingham) on Hannah Arendt's Message of Ill-Tidings. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM
May 04, 2019: Sarah Phillips Casteel (Carleton) on Global Itineraries of Holocaust Memory: The Jewish Caribbean and Nazi Persecution in Literature and Art. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM
May 09, 2019: Shirli Gilbert (Southhampton) on South African Jews, the Holocaust, and Apartheid. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM



































[book] The Eyes of Isaac:
Medical and Halachic Perspectives
on Ophthalmologic Conditions
Edited by Norman Saffra, MD FACS
Foreword by Alan Kadish
2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A compilation of essays and studies from leading doctors, professors, and rabbis, The Eyes of Isaac endeavors to connect important medical and psychological issues of ophthalmology with Jewish law. Rabbis and physicians navigate the daily challenges that visual disability presents for themselves as well as for those under their care. Interspersed with personal anecdotes and stories, The Eyes of Isaac offers profound knowledge on the significant organ and diseases related to it, and how those diseases, such as glaucoma, can affect the practice of daily Jewish rituals. Included in this collection are explanations of eye diseases, considerations on how to treat them, along with the detailed process of medical surgeries in ophthalmology.




























[book] Preventing Palestine:
A Political History from Camp David to Oslo
by Seth Anziska, PhD
2018
Princeton University Press

On the fortieth anniversary of the Camp David Accords, a groundbreaking new history that shows how Egyptian-Israeli peace ensured lasting Palestinian statelessness

For seventy years Israel has existed as a state, and for forty years it has honored a peace treaty with Egypt that is widely viewed as a triumph of U.S. diplomacy in the Middle East. Yet the Palestinians-the would-be beneficiaries of a vision for a comprehensive regional settlement that led to the Camp David Accords in 1978-remain stateless to this day. How and why Palestinian statelessness persists are the central questions of Seth Anziska’s groundbreaking book, which explores the complex legacy of the agreement brokered by President Jimmy Carter.

Based on newly declassified international sources, Preventing Palestine charts the emergence of the Middle East peace process, including the establishment of a separate track to deal with the issue of Palestine. At the very start of this process, Anziska argues, Egyptian-Israeli peace came at the expense of the sovereignty of the Palestinians, whose aspirations for a homeland alongside Israel faced crippling challenges. With the introduction of the idea of restrictive autonomy, Israeli settlement expansion, and Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon, the chances for Palestinian statehood narrowed even further. The first Intifada in 1987 and the end of the Cold War brought new opportunities for a Palestinian state, but many players, refusing to see Palestinians as a nation or a people, continued to steer international diplomacy away from their cause.

Combining astute political analysis, extensive original research, and interviews with diplomats, military veterans, and communal leaders, Preventing Palestine offers a bold new interpretation of a highly charged struggle for self-determination.





























DECEMBER 2018





[book] The Hebrew Bible:
A Translation with Commentary (Vol. 3)
by Robert Alter
Norton
December 2018
A landmark event: the complete Hebrew Bible in the award-winning translation that delivers the stunning literary power of the original.

A masterpiece of deep learning and fine sensibility, Robert Alter’s translation of the Hebrew Bible, now complete, reanimates one of the formative works of our culture. Capturing its brilliantly compact poetry and finely wrought, purposeful prose, Alter renews the Old Testament as a source of literary power and spiritual inspiration. From the family frictions of Genesis and King David’s flawed humanity to the serene wisdom of Psalms and Job’s incendiary questioning of God’s ways, these magnificent works of world literature resonate with a startling immediacy. Featuring Alter’s generous commentary, which quietly alerts readers to the literary and historical dimensions of the text, this is the definitive edition of the Hebrew Bible. 3 maps.

What was the “genesis” of the project? In the mid 1990s, an editor from NORTON approached Alter for a translation and commentary. He did one, which led to another on King David based on Samuel. Which ed to his work on Prophets. And then to the Five Books of Moses. Mostly, he was disappointed with other translations in English from the past fifty years. They did not capture the Hebrew poetry and the right English words. They were more into deciphering the Hebrew than capturing the art. He sensed that the academic studies were important but limiting. With regard to the King James bible translations from 1611, they were too literal with the use of simple verbs in Alter's opinion. They translated Noah into “and the flood was forty days upon the earth” and “the ark went upon the waters.” But later translators tried to write how the ark was drifting and rudderless. But those words are more poetic but not correct. Alter tries to stay true the text but capture the Hebrew, puns, and rhythm.





























[book] Ike's Mystery Man:
The Secret Lives of Robert Cutler
by PETER SHINKLE
Steerforth
December 4, 2018
The Cold War, The Lavender Scare and the Untold Story of Eisenhower's First National Security Advisor

This page-turning narrative – based on a decade of research - takes readers from top-secret Cabinet Room meetings to exclusive social clubs, and into the pages of a powerful man's intimate diary. Ike's Mystery Man shows that Eisenhower's National Security Advisor (NSA) Robert "Bobby" Cutler (Retired General)-- working alongside Ike and also the Dulles brothers at the CIA and State Department -- shaped US Cold War strategy in far more consequential ways than has been previously understood. He was influential in atomic and nuclear strategy, and the coup in Iran. Cutler created the role of the NSC as honest broker of competing policies. This was at a time when Executive Order 10450 investigated gays and Communists in government; and a time when Ike had to make a deal with Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1952 (Cutler hated McCarthy, but helped craft the deal to allow Ike to win in 1952). Also included is J. Edgar Hoover's investigation into Cutler, and why he dropped it.

Bobby also left behind a six-volume 725-page diary which reveals that he was in love with a man half his age, NSC staffer Skip Koons. More like obsessed. Their friend Steve Benedict, who also is gay, became Ike's White House Security Officer. Cutler was secretive but one of Ike's closest most trusted advisers. He was a writer, poet, Harvard College and Harvard Law grad, 1916 student commencement speaker at Harvard, attorney (Herrick, Smith), campaign chair for Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr, Army General, bank president (Old Colony Trust), corporate counsel for Boston's mayor (Maurice Tobin), CIA-consultant, Radio Free Europe mastermind, and lifelong member of the GOP. Cutler wrote many of Ike's speeches in his campaign against Taft. He was an effective fixer who knew how to work the levers of power in DC. In addition to Bobby's diary, Ike's Mystery Man relies on thousands of personal letters, interviews, and previously classified archives to tell a gripping story that has never before been told.

Ike's Mystery Man brings a new dimension to our understanding of the inner-workings of the Eisenhower White House. It also shines a bright light on the indispensable contributions and sacrifices made by patriotic gay Americans in an era when Executive Order 10450 banned anyone suspected of "sexual perversion", i.e. homosexuality, from any government job, and gays in the government were persecuted by the likes of Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn in the Senate, and J. Edgar Hoover and Clyde Tolson at the FBI.


























[book] The Point of It All:
A Lifetime of Great Loves
and Endeavors
Writings by Charles Krauthammer
Edited by his son, Daniel Krauthammer
Crown
December 4, 2018

Created and compiled by Charles Krauthammer before his death, The Point of It All is a powerful collection of the influential columnist's most important works. Spanning the personal, the political and the philosophical, it includes never-before-published speeches and a major new essay about the effect of today's populist movements on the future of global democracy. Edited and with an introduction by the columnist's son, Daniel Krauthammer, it is the most intimate and profound book yet by the legendary writer and thinker.

In his decades of work as America's preeminent political commentator, Charles Krauthammer elevated the opinion column to a form of art. Whether writing about statecraft and foreign policy or reflecting on more esoteric topics such as baseball, spaceflight and medical ethics, Krauthammer was beloved not only for his penetrating wit and insight but also for his ability to identify the hidden moral truths that animate our politics and culture.

This new collection, which Krauthammer composed before his death in June 2018, features the columns, speeches and unpublished writings that showcase the best of his original thought and his last, enduring words on the state of American politics, the nature of liberal democracy and the course of world history.

The book also includes a deeply personal section offering insight into Krauthammer's beliefs about what mattered most to him--friendship, family and the principles he lived by –
all anchored by Daniel Krauthammer's poignant eulogy for his father.

For longtime readers and newcomers alike, The Point of It All is a timely demonstration of what it means to cut through the noise of petty politics with clarity, integrity and intellectual fortitude. It is a reminder of what made Charles Krauthammer the most celebrated American columnist and political thinker of his generation, a revealing look at the man behind the words and a lasting testament to his belief that anyone with an open and honest mind can grapple deeply with the most urgent questions in politics and in life.



See also CharlesKrauthamer.com




















[book] NOT ALL DEAD WHITE MEN
Classics and Misogyny
in the Digital Age
By Donna Zuckerberg

Harvard University Press
A disturbing exposé of how today’s Alt-Right men’s groups use ancient sources to promote a new brand of toxic masculinity online.

A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online that treats women’s empowerment as a mortal threat to men and to the integrity of Western civilization. Its proponents cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims-arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege.

Donna Zuckerberg dives deep into the virtual communities of the far right, where men lament their loss of power and privilege and strategize about how to reclaim them. She finds, mixed in with weightlifting tips and misogynistic vitriol, the words of the Stoics deployed to support an ideal vision of masculine life. On other sites, pickup artists quote Ovid’s Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women’s boundaries. By appropriating the Classics, these men lend a veneer of intellectual authority and ancient wisdom to their project of patriarchal white supremacy. In defense or retaliation, feminists have also taken up the Classics online, to counter the sanctioning of violence against women.

Not All Dead White Men reveals that some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online.



























[book] Left to the Mercy of
a Rude Stream:
The Bargain That Broke Adolf Hitler
and Saved My Mother
by Stanley A. Goldman
(Loyola Law)
Potomac Books
December 2018

Seven years after the death of his mother, Malka, Stanley A. Goldman traveled to Israel to visit her best friend during the Holocaust. The best friend’s daughter showed Goldman a pamphlet she had acquired from the Israeli Holocaust Museum that documented activities of one man’s negotiations with the Nazi’s interior minister and SS head, Heinrich Himmler, for the release of the Jewish women from the concentration camp at Ravensbrück. While looking through the pamphlet, the two discovered a picture that could have been their mothers being released from the camp. Wanting to know the details of how they were saved, Goldman set out on a long and difficult path to unravel the mystery.

After years of researching the pamphlet, Goldman learned that a German Jew named Norbert Masur made a treacherous journey from the safety of Sweden back into the war zone in order to secure the release of the Jewish women imprisoned at the Ravensbrück concentration camp. Masur not only succeeded in his mission against all odds but he contributed to the downfall of the Nazi hierarchy itself. This amazing, little-known story uncovers a piece of history about the undermining of the Nazi regime, the women of the Holocaust, and the strained but loving relationship between a survivor and her son.

























[book] Breakfast with Einstein:
The Exotic Physics of
Everyday Objects
by Chad Orzel
Benbella Books
December 2018

Your alarm goes off, and you head to the kitchen to make yourself some toast and a cup of coffee. Little do you know, as you savor the aroma of the steam rising from your cup, that your ordinary morning routine depends on some of the weirdest phenomena ever discovered.

The world of quantum physics is generally thought of as hopelessly esoteric. While classical physics gives us the laws governing why a ball rolls downhill, how a plane is able to fly, and so on, its quantum cousin gives us particles that are actually waves, “spooky” action at a distance, and Schrodinger’s unlucky cat. But, believe it or not, even the most mundane of everyday activities is profoundly influenced by the abstract and exotic world of the quantum.

In Breakfast with Einstein, Chad Orzel illuminates the strange phenomena lurking just beneath the surface of our ordinary lives by digging into the surprisingly complicated physics involved in his (and anyone’s) morning routine. Orzel, author of How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog, explores how quantum connects with everyday reality, and offers engaging, layperson-level explanations of the mind-bending ideas central to modern physics.

From the sun, alarm clocks, and the red glow of a toaster’s hot filaments (the glow that launched quantum mechanics) to the chemistry of food aroma, a typical day is rich with examples of quantum weirdness. Breakfast with Einstein reveals the hidden physics all around us, and after reading this book, your ordinary mornings will never seem quite as ordinary again.






























[book] The Little Spacecraft
by Dr. Mom
Shana Koppel (Illustrator)
StellerNova
2018

Berrie is a little spacecraft with a big dream: She wants to go to the Moon! But how will she prove to everyone else that small can be powerful, too?
Berrie is based on the real SpaceIL Space.IL spacecraft flying to the moon in early 2019.

Founded by three young entrepreneurs with a dream, SpaceIL’s mission is to land the first Israeli spacecraft on the Moon. With The Little Spacecraft, SpaceIL hopes to get the next generation of children excited about aerospace engineering and exploration.

Israel’s moon-destined spacecraft – named Beresheet – is set to launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida in the spring of 2019. It will make Israel the fourth country to land a module on the surface of the moon. The only countries who have managed this feat are the US, Russia and China.

Berrie dreams of flying to the moon, but some the other spacecraft think she is too small to achieve such big dreams. Berrie explains to her friends the special tools she is composed of that will help her accomplish the mission.

Vice president of SpaceIL, Sari Brosh Rechav, said the book is designed to motivate children who dream of space travel to consider studying STEM subjects.























[book] Katz or Cats:
or, How Jesus Became My Rival in Love
by Curt Leviant
Dzanc Books
December 4, 2018
Katz or Cats, or How Jesus Became My Rival in Love follows John, a book editor who meets an enigmatic man named Katz on his daily commute into New York. True to form, Katz has a book to pitch-not his own, but his brother’s, an identical twin also named Katz. The novel begins with another meeting on another train: brother Katz chances on a woman named Maria, who carries a pocket Bible and is missing the top digit of her ring finger.

The two embark on a whirlwind affair, alternately driven together and apart by their passion for each other and Maria’s religious fervor. But the story seems to change as soon as Katz tells it, and Katz himself has a great confession to make. As the lies that bind the tale together grow to new proportion, John comes to doubt the line between truth and fiction, as well as everything he thinks he knows about the man beside him on the train.

With the lyrical joy and lighthearted wordplay that have won him critical acclaim, Curt Leviant’s latest novel explores the very fabric of storytelling and whether life, like fiction, can be in constant flux.




























[book] Victory City:
A History of New York and
New Yorkers during World War II
by John Strausbaugh
Twelve
December 4, 2018

From John Strausbaugh, author of City of Sedition and The Village, comes the definitive history of Gotham during the World War II era.

New York City during World War II wasn't just a place of servicemen, politicians, heroes, G.I. Joes and Rosie the Riveters, but also of quislings and saboteurs; of Nazi, Fascist, and Communist sympathizers; of war protesters and conscientious objectors; of gangsters and hookers and profiteers; of latchkey kids and bobby-soxers, poets and painters, atomic scientists and atomic spies.

While the war launched and leveled nations, spurred economic growth, and saw the rise and fall of global Fascism, New York City would eventually emerge as the new capital of the world. From the Gilded Age to VJ-Day, an array of fascinating New Yorkers rose to fame, from Mayor Fiorello La Guardia to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Langston Hughes to Joe Louis, to Robert Moses and Joe DiMaggio. In VICTORY CITY, John Strausbaugh returns to tell the story of New York City's war years with the same richness, depth, and nuance he brought to his previous books, City of Sedition and The Village, providing readers with a groundbreaking new look into the greatest city on earth during the most transformative -- and costliest -- war in human history.



























[book] Hermann Cohen:
An Intellectual Biography
by Frederick C. Beiser
OXford University Press
December 2018
This book is the first complete intellectual biography of Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) and the only work to cover all his major philosophical and Jewish writings. Frederick C. Beiser pays special attention to all phases of Cohen's intellectual development, its breaks and its continuities, throughout seven decades. The guiding goal behind Cohen's intellectual career, he argues, was the development of a radical rationalism, one committed to defending the rights of unending enquiry and unlimited criticism. Cohen's philosophy was therefore an attempt to defend and revive the Enlightenment belief in the authority of reason; his critical idealism an attempt to justify this belief and to establish a purely rational worldview. According to this interpretation, Cohen's thought is resolutely opposed to any form of irrationalism or mysticism because these would impose arbitrary and artificial limits on criticism and enquiry. It is therefore critical of those interpretations which see Cohen's philosophy as a species of proto-existentialism (Rosenzweig) or Jewish mysticism (Adelmann and Kohnke).

Hermann Cohen: An Intellectual Biography attempts to unify the two sides of Cohen's thought, his philosophy and his Judaism. Maintaining that Cohen's Judaism was not a limit to his radical rationalism but a consistent development of it, Beiser contends that his religion was one of reason. He concludes that most critical interpretations have failed to appreciate the philosophical depth and sophistication of his Judaism, a religion which committed the believer to the unending search for truth and the striving to achieve the cosmopolitan ideals of reason.




























[book] Advanced Love
by Ari Seth Cohen
Harry N. Abrams
December 2018
From the creator of the popular blog Advanced Style, photographer Ari Seth Cohen’s Advanced Love collects affectionate portraits of subjects who prove that love is bound by neither the constraints of age or time. The book includes 40 profiles of inspiring couples from around the world, and more than 200 photos. The profiles explore themes of love and companionship through firsthand insight from the subjects; they share their stories of falling in love, what they have learned after decades of partnership, and valuable relationship advice. Advanced Love is a touching look at the often-ignored partnerships of the senior set. Filled with couples who have built their lives together, it’s an indispensable trove of wisdom on love and the lessons they have learned along the way.




























JANUARY 2019



[book] Antisemitism:
Here and Now
by Deborah E. Lipstadt
(Emory)
JANUARY 29, 2019
Schocken

The award-winning author of The Eichmann Trial and Denial: Holocaust History on Trial gives us a penetrating and provocative analysis of the hate that will not die, focusing on its current, virulent incarnations on both the political right and left: from white supremacist demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia, to mainstream enablers of antisemitism such as Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn, to a gay pride march in Chicago that expelled a group of women for carrying a Star of David banner.

Over the last decade there has been a noticeable uptick in antisemitic rhetoric and incidents by left-wing groups targeting Jewish students and Jewish organizations on American college campuses. And the reemergence of the white nationalist movement in America, complete with Nazi slogans and imagery, has been reminiscent of the horrific fascist displays of the 1930s. Throughout Europe, Jews have been attacked by terrorists, and some have been murdered.

Where is all this hatred coming from? Is there any significant difference between left-wing and right-wing antisemitism? What role has the anti-Zionist movement played? And what can be done to combat the latest manifestations of an ancient hatred? In a series of letters to an imagined college student and imagined colleague, both of whom are perplexed by this resurgence, acclaimed historian Deborah Lipstadt gives us her own superbly reasoned, brilliantly argued, and certain to be controversial responses to these troubling questions.





























[book] Lonely But Not Alone:
A Spiritual Autobiography
by Nathan Lopes Cardozo
JANUARY 2019
Urim Publications
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.



























[book] THE FLAME:
POEMS NOTEBOOKS
LYRICS DRAWINGS
by LEONARD COHEN
October 2018

In a January 6, 2019 review of this book in The New York Times Book Review, a reviwer criticized this book as one that perhaps a publisher compiled after Cohen's death, using materials that Cohen would not have wanted published. However, the reviewer was quite irritating and appeared envious, since he did not consider Cohen a real poet and merely had some good songs. I threw the review away and cursed him.

And now the book cover blurbs:
The final collection of the seminal musician and poet, which he was determined to complete before his death.

Just weeks before his death in late 2016, Leonard Cohen told The New Yorker that he was ready for the end to come. He just wanted enough time to put his last book in order. Fortunately, that time was granted. The Flame is Cohen’s eloquent farewell, a valedictory collection of lyrics, poems, notebook sketches, and self-portraits that maps his singular creative journey. As noted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s citation, “For six decades, Leonard Cohen revealed his soul to the world through poetry and song-his deep and timeless humanity touching our very core.”

In addition to new poems about war, desire, regrets, lamb chops, and hummingbirds, and lyrics from his last three albums, including the chart-topping “You Want It Darker,” The Flame includes carefully selected excerpts from Cohen’s voluminous notebooks, which he kept faithfully over the years. Readers will find in these pages the subjects that have always preoccupied Cohen: the dimensions of love, the secret code of existence, and the hope for transcendence in a broken world.

In the words of Cohen’s longtime manager and friend, Robert Kory, The Flame “reveals to all the intensity of his inner fire” to the end.



I was selling holy trinkets
I was dressing kind of sharp
Had a pussy in the kitchen
And a panther in the yard
In the prison of the gifted
I was friendly with the guard
So I never had to witness
What happens to the heart

I should have seen it coming
You could say I wrote the chart
Just to look at her was trouble
It was trouble from the start
Sure we played a stunning couple
But I never liked the part
It ain’t pretty, it ain’t subtle
What happens to the heart


June 24, 2016

Flying Over Iceland
over Reykjavik, the “smokey bay”
where W.H. Auden went
to discover the background
of all our songs,
where I myself was received
by the Mayor and the President
(600 miles an hour
30,000 feet
599 miles an hour
my old street number on Belmont Ave)
where I, a second-rater
by any estimation,
was honoured by the noblest
and handsomest people of the West
served with lobster
and strong drink,
and I never cared about eyes
but the eyes of the waitress
were so alarmingly mauve
that I fell into a trance
and ate the forbidden shellfish


I Pray for Courage
I pray for courage
Now I’m old
To greet the sickness
And the cold

I pray for courage
In the night
To bear the burden
Make it light

I pray for courage
In the time
When suffering comes and
Starts to climb

I pray for courage
At the end
To see death coming
As a friend






















[book] Armies of Sand:
The Past, Present, and Future
of Arab Military Effectiveness
by Kenneth M. Pollack
JANUARY 2019
Oxford University Press
Since the Second World War, Arab armed forces have consistently punched below their weight. They have lost many wars that by all rights they should have won, and in their best performances only ever achieved quite modest accomplishments. Over time, soldiers, scholars, and military experts have offered various explanations for this pattern. Reliance on Soviet military methods, the poor civil-military relations of the Arab world, the underdevelopment of the Arab states, and patterns of behavior derived from the wider Arab culture, have all been suggested as the ultimate source of Arab military difficulties.

Armies of Sand, Kenneth Pollack's powerful and riveting history of Arab armies from the end of World War Two to the present, assesses these differing explanations and isolates the most important causes. Over the course of the book, he examines the combat performance of fifteen Arab armies and air forces in virtually every Middle Eastern war, from the Jordanians and Syrians in 1948 to Hizballah in 2006 and the Iraqis and ISIS in 2014-2017. He then compares these experiences to the performance of the Argentine, Chadian, Chinese, Cuban, North Korean, and South Vietnamese armed forces in their own combat operations during the twentieth century. The book ultimately concludes that reliance on Soviet doctrine was more of a help than a hindrance to the Arabs. In contrast, politicization and underdevelopment were both important factors limiting Arab military effectiveness, but patterns of behavior derived from the dominant Arab culture was the most important factor of all. Pollack closes with a discussion of the rapid changes occurring across the Arab world--political, economic, and cultural--as well as the rapid evolution in warmaking as a result of the information revolution. He suggests that because both Arab society and warfare are changing, the problems that have bedeviled Arab armed forces in the past could dissipate or even vanish in the future, with potentially dramatic consequences for the Middle East military balance. Sweeping in its historical coverage and highly accessible, this will be the go-to reference for anyone interested in the history of warfare in the Middle East since 1945.



























I PERSONALLY am not a fan of Holocaust fiction and leveraging a popular victim of the Shoah. But you might be:

[book] ANNELIES
A NOVEL
by DAVID GILLHAM
JANUARY 2019
VIKING

A powerful and deeply humane new novel that asks the question:
What if Anne Frank survived the Holocaust?

The year is 1945, and Anne (Annelies Marie Frank) Frank is sixteen years old. Having survived the concentration camps, but lost her mother and sister, she reunites with her father, Pim, in newly liberated Amsterdam. But it’s not as easy to fit the pieces of their life back together. Anne is adrift, haunted by the ghosts of the horrors they experienced, while Pim is fixated on returning to normalcy. They represent two paths of post trauma. Anne's beloved diary has been lost, and her dreams of becoming a writer seem distant and pointless now.

As Anne struggles to overcome the brutality of memory and build a new life for herself, she grapples with heartbreak, grief, and ultimately the freedom of forgiveness. A story of trauma and redemption, Annelies honors Anne Frank’s legacy as not only a symbol of hope and perseverance, but also a complex young woman of great ambition and heart.

Anne Frank is a cultural icon whose diary painted a vivid picture of the Holocaust and made her an image of humanity in one of history’s darkest moments. But she was also a person—a precocious young girl with a rich inner life and tremendous skill as a writer. In this masterful new novel, David R. Gillham explores with breathtaking empathy the woman—and the writer—she might have become.




























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.






























[book] Team Human
by Douglas Rushkoff
CUNY/Queens
JANUARY 22, 2019
Norton
Team Human is a manifesto-a fiery distillation of preeminent digital theorist Douglas Rushkoff’s most urgent thoughts on civilization and human nature. In one hundred lean and incisive statements, he argues that we are essentially social creatures, and that we achieve our greatest aspirations when we work together-not as individuals. Yet today society is threatened by a vast antihuman infrastructure that undermines our ability to connect. Money, once a means of exchange, is now a means of exploitation; education, conceived as way to elevate the working class, has become another assembly line; and the internet has only further divided us into increasingly atomized and radicalized groups.

Team Human delivers a call to arms. If we are to resist and survive these destructive forces, we must recognize that being human is a team sport. In Rushkoff’s own words: “Being social may be the whole point.” Harnessing wide-ranging research on human evolution, biology, and psychology, Rushkoff shows that when we work together we realize greater happiness, productivity, and peace. If we can find the others who understand this fundamental truth and reassert our humanity-together-we can make the world a better place to be human.



























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale Univ Press
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.




























[book] Hitler's Pawn:
The Boy Assassin and
the Holocaust
by Stephen Koch
JANUARY 8, 2019
Counterpoint

A remarkable story of a forgotten seventeen-year-old Jew who was blamed by the Nazis for the anti-Semitic violence and terror known as the Kristallnacht, the pogrom still seen as an initiating event of the Holocaust

After learning about Nazi persecution of his family, Herschel Grynszpan (pronounced "Greenspan"), an impoverished seventeen-year-old Jew living in Paris, bought a small handgun and on November 7, 1938, went to the German embassy and shot the first German diplomat he saw. When the man died two days later, Hitler and Goebbels made the shooting their pretext for the great state-sponsored wave of anti-Semitic terror known as Kristallnacht, still seen by many as an initiating event of the Holocaust.

Overnight, Grynszpan, a bright but naive teenager-and a perfect political nobody-was front-page news and a pawn in a global power struggle. When France fell, the Nazis captured Grynszpan after a wild chase and flew him to Berlin. The boy became a privileged prisoner of the Gestapo while Hitler and Goebbels plotted a massive show trial to blame "the Jews" for starting World War II. A prisoner and alone, Grynszpan grasped Hitler’s intentions and waged a battle of wits to sabotage the trial, knowing that even if he succeeded, he would certainly be murdered. The battle of wits was close, but Grynszpan finally won. Based on the newest research, Hitler’s Pawn is the richest telling of Grynszpan’s story to date.


























[book] I Love Kosher:
Beautiful Recipes from My Kitchen
by Kim Kushner
Weldon Owen
January 2019
Kosher Salt & Black Pepper: Essential Recipes for Your Kosher Kitchen

Kosher food made cool, calm, and sexy—the essentials for cooking and entertaining with style. Author Kim Kushner shares 100+ essential recipes, techniques, tools, and tricks for preparing delicious kosher meals with ease.

This inspiring cookbook offers simple, straightforward, go-to kosher recipes—ranging from quick dinners to slow-simmered main dishes, party fare, and freezer-to-table specialities—for every meal and any occasion, with busy families in mind. Whether preparing a simple dinner for two, a full-family feast, or party menu for ten, Kim’s strategy is to draw on this essential collection of recipes, tips, and tricks to guarantee stellar results, please any crowd, and have fun along the way.

The author’s fantastic sensibility with flavor—and flair for entertaining—comes through the well-curated selection of dishes, which are organized by course and cooking time. Kim also includes her tried-and-true culinary essentials like fridge, freezer, and pantry staples, must-have tools and equipment, and signature homemade dressings and marinades for mix-and-match cooking ease. A special chapter on boards features step-by-step directions and images for how to compose a variety of visually compelling and bountiful boards for easy, elegant serving such as a crudité board with dips, a wine and cheese board, and a breakfast smorgasboard.

Sample Chapters
Board Entertaining
Appetizers & Drinks
Ready-to-go Dishes
Brunch
Quick Stovetop Mains (under 1 hour)
One Pot/Sheet Pan (1–2 hours)
Hot, Slow & Simmered (4–6 hours)
Freezer-to-Table Mains
Dishes for a Crowd
Sides
Desserts





















[book] Prince of the Press:
How One Collector Built History’s
Most Enduring and Remarkable Jewish
by Joshua Teplitsky
JANUARY 22, 2019
Yale Univ Press
The story of one of the largest collections of Jewish books, and the man who used his collection to cultivate power, prestige, and political influence

David Oppenheim (1664–1736), chief rabbi of Prague in the early eighteenth century, built an unparalleled collection of Jewish books, all of which have survived and are housed in the Bodleian Library of Oxford. His remarkable collection testifies to the myriad connections Jews maintained with each other across political borders. Oppenheim’s world reached the great courts of European nobility, and his family ties brought him into networks of power, prestige, and opportunity that extended from Amsterdam to the Ottoman Empire. His impressive library functioned as a unique source of personal authority that gained him fame throughout Jewish society and beyond. His story brings together culture, commerce, and politics, all filtered through this extraordinary collection. Based on the careful reconstruction of an archive that is still visited by scholars today, Joshua Teplitsky’s book offers a window into the social life of books in early modern Europe.

























[book] Lawyers Without Rights:
The Fate of Jewish Lawyers in Berlin after 1933
by Simone Lawig-Winters
Edited by Bill Choyke
JANUARY 2, 2019
ABA Press
Lawyers Without Rights captures the story of the occupational bans on Jewish lawyers and jurists in Berlin, the capital city and home to 3,400 attorneys. Of those, 43 percent were of Jewish origin, the largest group of any city in Germany in 1933. This story was first told in German two decades ago and updated in 2007. The book includes more than 1,600 bios of lawyers in Berlin who could no longer practice law after 1938 because of their Jewish ancestry, and notes the fate of 1,404 of them.

With original Forewords by The Honorable Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court; Benjamin B. Ferencz, sole surviving Nuremberg prosecutor; and philanthropist Ronald Abramson



























[book] BABEL
Around the World in
Twenty Languages
by Gaston Dorren
Atlantic Monthly Press

English is the world language, except that most of the world doesn’t speak it-only one in five people does. Dorren calculates that to speak fluently with half of the world’s 7.4 billion people in their mother tongues, you would need to know no fewer than twenty languages. He sets out to explore these top twenty world languages, which range from the familiar (French, Spanish) to the surprising (Malay, Swahili, Bengali). Babel whisks the reader on a delightful journey to every continent of the world, tracing how these world languages rose to greatness while others fell away and showing how speakers today handle the foibles of their mother tongues. Whether showcasing tongue-tying phonetics or elegant but complicated writing scripts, and mind-bending quirks of grammar, Babel vividly illustrates that mother tongues are like nations: each has its own customs and beliefs that seem as self-evident to those born into it as they are surprising to the outside world.

Among many other things, Babel will teach you why modern Turks can’t read books that are a mere 75 years old, what it means in practice for Russian and English to be relatives, and how Japanese developed separate “dialects” for men and women. Dorren lets you in on his personal trials and triumphs while studying Vietnamese in Hanoi, debunks ten widespread myths about the Chinese character script, and discovers that today’s Babel is inhabited most graciously by multilingual Africans. Witty, fascinating and utterly compelling, Babel will change the way you look at and listen to the world and how it speaks.


































[book] Holy Lands
a novel
by Amanda Sthers
JANUARY 22, 2019
Bloomsbury

A witty epistolary novel, both heartwarming and heart-wrenching, about a dysfunctional family--led by a Jewish pig farmer in Israel--struggling to love and accept each other.

As comic as it is deeply moving, Holy Lands chronicles several months in the lives of an estranged family of colorful eccentrics. Harry Rosenmerck is an aging Jewish cardiologist who has left his thriving medical practice in New York--to raise pigs in Israel. His ex-wife, Monique, ruminates about their once happy marriage even as she quietly battles an aggressive illness. Their son, David, an earnest and successful playwright, has vowed to reconnect with his father since coming out. Annabelle, their daughter, finds herself unmoored in Paris in the aftermath of a breakup.

Harry eschews technology, so his family, spread out around the world, must communicate with him via snail mail. Even as they grapple with challenges, their correspondence sparkles with levity. They snipe at each other, volleying quips across the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and Europe, and find joy in unexpected sources.

Holy Lands captures the humor and poignancy of an adult family striving to remain connected across time, geography, and radically different perspectives on life.


























[book] ETERNAL LIFE
A NOVEL
BY DARA HORN
JANUARY 8, 2019
Norton Paperback
What would it really mean to live forever? Rachel’s current troubles-a middle-aged son mining digital currency in her basement, a scientist granddaughter trying to peek into her genes-are only the latest in a litany spanning dozens of countries, scores of marriages, hundreds of children, and 2,000 years, going back to Roman-occupied Jerusalem. Only one person shares her immortality: an illicit lover who pursues her through the ages. But when her children develop technologies that could change her fate, Rachel must find a way out. From ancient religion to the scientific frontier, Dara Horn pits our efforts to make life last against the deeper challenge of making life worth living.



























[book] Inheritance:
A Memoir of Genealogy,
Paternity, and Love
by Dani Shapiro
January 2019
Knopf

The acclaimed and beloved author of Hourglass now gives us a new memoir about identity, paternity, and family secrets--a real-time exploration of the staggering discovery she recently made about her father, and her struggle to piece together the hidden story of her own life.

What makes us who we are?
What combination of memory, history, biology, experience, and that ineffable thing called the soul defines us?

In the spring of 2016, through a genealogy website to which she had whimsically submitted her DNA for analysis, Dani Shapiro received the stunning news that she wasn't 99 percent Jewish. WHAT? Well, it turns out that her biological father was different than the father who raised her. Her father was not her biological father. She woke up one morning and her entire history – the life she had lived – CRUMBLED beneath her.

Was this the reason she, a platinum blonde of whom Jared Kushner's grandmother once remarked that they could have used to get bread in the ghetto, felt out of place with her dark haired Jewish family and community?

Inheritance is a book about secrets--secrets within families, kept out of shame or self-protectiveness; secrets we keep from one another in the name of love. It is the story of a woman's urgent quest to unlock the story of her own (biological) identity, a story that has been scrupulously hidden from her for more than fifty years, years she had spent writing brilliantly, and compulsively, on themes of identity and family history.

Her parents were no longer living, so her investigation was not as easy as asking her mother.

It is a book about the extraordinary moment we live in--a moment in which science and technology have outpaced not only medical ethics but also the capacities of the human heart to contend with the consequences of what we discover.

Timely and unforgettable, Dani Shapiro's memoir is a gripping, gut-wrenching exploration of genealogy, paternity, and love.













[book] Bookends:
Collected Intros and Outros
by Michael Chabon
January 21, 2019
Harper Perennial
A somewhat self absorbed collection of introductions (intros) and afterwords (outros) by Chabon that he would have written for some of his favorites works or that he wrote for some.


































[book] The Lost Puzzler:
The Tarakan Chronicles
by Eyal Kless
January 2019
Harper

A brilliantly written, page-turning, post-dystopian debut from Eyal Kless, about a society hoping to salvage the technology of a lost generation, a mysterious missing boy who can open doors no one else can, and a scribe who must piece together the past to determine humanity’s future.

More than a hundred years have passed since the Catastrophe brought humanity to the brink of extinction. Those who survived are changed. The Wildeners have reverted to the old ways—but with new Gods—while others place their faith in the technology that once powered their lost civilization.

In the mysterious City of Towers, the center of the destroyed Tarakan empire, a lowly scribe of the Guild of Historians is charged with a dangerous assignment. He must venture into the wilds beyond the glass and steel towers to discover the fate of a child who mysteriously disappeared more than a decade before. Born of a rare breed of marked people, the child, Rafik—known as “The Key”—was one of a special few with the power to restore this lost civilization to glory once again.

In a world riven by fear and violence, where tattooed mutants, manic truckers, warring guilds and greedy mercenaries battle for survival, this one boy may have singlehandedly destroyed humanity’s only chance for salvation—unless the scribe can figure out what happened to him.





















[book] Taste and See:
Discovering God among Butchers,
Bakers, and Fresh Food Makers
by Margaret Feinberg
January 22, 2019
Zondervan Christian pubishing

God is a foodie who wants to transform your supper into sacrament. One of America's most beloved teachers and writers, Margaret Feinberg, goes on a remarkable journey to unearth God's perspective on food.

She writes that since the opening of creation, God, the Master Chef, seeds the world with pomegranates and passionfruit, beans and greens and tangerines. When the Israelites wander in the desert for forty years, God, the Pastry Chef, delivers the sweet bread of heaven. After arriving in the Promised Land, God reveals himself as Barbecue Master, delighting in meat sacrifices. Like his Foodie Father, Jesus throws the disciples an unforgettable two-course farewell supper to be repeated until his return.

This groundbreaking book provides a culinary exploration of Scripture. You'll descend 400 feet below ground into the frosty white caverns of a salt mine, fish on the Sea of Galilee, bake fresh matzo at Yale University, ferry to a remote island in Croatia to harvest olives, spend time with a Texas butcher known as "the meat apostle," and wander a California farm with one of the world's premier fig farmers.

With each visit, Margaret asks, "How do you read these Scriptures, not as theologians, but in light of what you do every day?" Their answers will forever change the way you read the Bible - and approach every meal.Taste and See is a delicious read that includes dozens of recipes for those who, like Margaret, believe some of life's richest moments are spent savoring a meal with those you love. Perhaps God's foodie focus is meant to do more than satisfy our bellies. It's meant to heal our souls, as we learn to taste and see the goodness of God together. After all, food is God's love made edible.




























[book] Death March Escape:
The Remarkable Story of a Man
Who Twice Escaped the Nazi Holocaust
by Jack J Hersch
January 19, 2019
Frontline Books

In June 1944, the Nazis locked eighteen-year-old Dave Hersch into a railroad boxcar and shipped him from his hometown of Dej, Hungary, to Mauthausen Concentration Camp, the harshest, cruellest camp in the Reich. After ten months in the granite mines of Mauthausen’s nearby sub-camp, Gusen, he weighed less than 80lbs, nothing but skin and bones.

Somehow surviving the relentless horrors of these two brutal camps, as Allied forces drew near Dave was forced to join a death march to Gunskirchen Concentration Camp, over thirty miles away. Soon after the start of the march, and more dead than alive, Dave summoned a burst of energy he did not know he had and escaped. Quickly recaptured, he managed to avoid being killed by the guards. Put on another death march a few days later, he achieved the impossible: he escaped again.

Dave often told his story of survival and escape, and his son, Jack, thought he knew it well. But years after his father’s death, he came across a photograph of his father on, of all places, the Mauthausen Memorial’s website. It was an image he had never seen before – and it propelled him on an intensely personal journey of discovery.

Using only his father’s words for guidance, Jack takes us along as he flies to Europe to learn the secrets behind the photograph, secrets his father never told of his time in the camps. Beginning in the verdant hills of his father’s Hungarian hometown, we travel with Jack to the foreboding rock mines of Mauthausen and Gusen concentration camps, to the dust-choked roads and intersections of the death marches, and, finally, to the makeshift hiding places of his father’s rescuers. We accompany Jack’s every step as he describes the unimaginable: what his father must have seen and felt while struggling to survive in the most abominable places on earth.

In a warm and emotionally engaging story, Jack digs deeply into both his father’s life and his own, revisiting – and reflecting on – his father’s time at the hands of the Nazis during the last year of the Second World War, when more than mere survival was at stake – the fate of humanity itself hung in the balance.

















[book] First the Jews:
Combating the World’s
Longest-Running Hate Campaign
by Rabbi Evan Moffic
January 15, 2019
ABINGDON PRESS

ALL JEWS MUST DIE. Robert Bowers screamed these words as he walked into a Temple and murdered 11 people. Where does this hate come from? Why is it rising again in America? What do we need to do to stop it?

Prepare to be stunned, shocked, and illuminated as Rabbi Evan Moffic answers these questions.

He reveals why the world's oldest hatred--once thought to be over after the Holocaust--keeps coming back to life. This book gives the clearest and most concise explanation of where antisemitism comes from, why it continues, and how to stop its resurgence today.

Interwoven is Moffic's personal story as a rabbi who led his community in responding to antisemitic attacks and working with Christian leaders to stand up to them.

He answers the age-old charge that Jews killed Jesus and that Jews still dominate the media and Hollywood. In the end, you will discover the path to moving beyond old ways of thinking...you will enter into the redemptive story of overcoming the extremism and hatred spreading across our world today.



























[book] UNJUST
Social Justice and the
Unmaking of America
by Noah Rothman
January 29, 2019
Gateway Editions

According to the author, an editor at COMMENTARY MAGAZINE... there are just two problems with “social justice”: it’s not social and it’s not just. Rather, he writes, it is a toxic ideology that encourages division, anger, and vengeance.

In this penetrating work, Noah Rothman feels that the real motives behind the social justice movement is not about justice; and it is a threat to be taken seriously.

He rails against identity politics. American political parties were once defined by their ideals. That idealism, however, is now imperiled by an obsession with the demographic categories of race, sex, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, which supposedly constitute a person’s “identity.” As interest groups defined by identity alone command the comprehensive allegiance of their members, ordinary politics gives way to “Identitarian” warfare, each group looking for payback and convinced that if it is to rise, another group must fall.

He believes that identity politics is an ethos, social justice is programmatic. Social justice is the program that translates identity politics into actionable political change. And white nationalists are identity politics first, they’re Identitarians, it’s their founding ideology, and [in that way] they are not distinct from the people that they think are out to kill them and the people out to kill them are not distinct from them. They’re reflections of one another in a fun house mirror. As for the Jews, they have NO ALLIES on either side. Both hate Jews, but the alt-right is just more honest about their hate.

In a society governed by “social justice,” the most coveted status is victimhood, which people will go to absurd lengths to attain. But the real victims in such a regime are blind justice—the standard of impartiality that we once took for granted—and free speech. These hallmarks of American liberty, already gravely compromised in universities, corporations, and the media, are under attack in our legal and political systems.





















[book] Desert in the Promised Land
(Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture)
by Yael Zerubavel
(Rutgers)
2019
Stanford University Press

At once an ecological phenomenon and a cultural construction, the desert has varied associations within Zionist and Israeli culture. In the Judaic textual tradition, it evokes exile and punishment, yet is also a site for origin myths, the divine presence, and sanctity. Secular Zionism developed its own spin on the duality of the desert as the romantic site of Jews' biblical roots that inspired the Hebrew culture, and as the barren land outside the Jewish settlements in Palestine, featuring them as an oasis of order and technological progress within a symbolic desert. Yael Zerubavel tells the story of the desert from the early twentieth century to the present, shedding light on romantic-mythical associations, settlement and security concerns, environmental sympathies, and the commodifying tourist gaze. Drawing on literary narratives, educational texts, newspaper articles, tourist materials, films, popular songs, posters, photographs, and cartoons, Zerubavel reveals the complexities and contradictions that mark Israeli society's semiotics of space in relation to the Middle East, and the central role of the "besieged island" trope in Israeli culture and politics.





















[book] From the Ground Up:
A Journey to Reimagine
the Promise of America
by Howard Schultz
(Starbuck's former CEO and Chairman)
January 29, 2019
Random House

we can be snarky and say that Schultz's announcement to run for POTUS in the week of his book release was a promotional stunt to promote the book, but why be snarky?

From the longtime CEO and chairman of Starbucks, a bold, dramatic work about the new responsibilities that leaders, businesses, and citizens share in American society today—as viewed through the intimate lens of one man’s life and work.

What do we owe one another?
How do we channel our drive, ingenuity, even our pain, into something more meaningful than individual success?
And what is our duty in the places where we live, work, and play?

These questions are at the heart of the American journey. They are also ones that Howard Schultz has grappled with personally since growing up in the Brooklyn housing projects and while building Starbucks from eleven stores into one of the world’s most iconic brands.

In From the Ground Up, Schultz looks for answers in two interwoven narratives. One story shows how his conflicted boyhood—including experiences he has never before revealed—motivated Schultz to become the first in his family to graduate from college, then to build the kind of company his father, a working-class laborer, never had a chance to work for: a business that tries to balance profit and human dignity.

A parallel story offers a behind-the-scenes look at Schultz’s unconventional efforts to challenge old notions about the role of business in society. From health insurance and free college tuition for part-time baristas to controversial initiatives about race and refugees, Schultz and his team tackled societal issues with the same creativity and rigor they applied to changing how the world consumes coffee.

Throughout the book, Schultz introduces a cross-section of Americans transforming common struggles into shared successes. In these pages, lost youth find first jobs, aspiring college students overcome the yoke of debt, post-9/11 warriors replace lost limbs with indomitable spirit, former coal miners and opioid addicts pave fresh paths, entrepreneurs jump-start dreams, and better angels emerge from all corners of the country.

From the Ground Up is part candid memoir, part uplifting blueprint of mutual responsibility, and part proof that ordinary people can do extraordinary things. At its heart, it’s an optimistic, inspiring account of what happens when we stand up, speak out, and come together for purposes bigger than ourselves. Here is a new vision of what can be when we try our best to lead lives through the lens of humanity.












[book] Let Me Finish:
Trump, the Kushners, Bannon,
New Jersey, and the Power of In-Your-Face Politics
by Chris Christie
(former Governor of New Jersey)
January 29, 2019
Random House

Who cares if he did or did not hug Obama (shudder)
Who cares that he sunbathed on a closed beach
Christie is supposed to be in your face and blunt...
but he has little frankness in the book, except about enemies
The book is filled with plenty of boasts and self-congratulations, it is an attempt to make a comeback on TV and in political life. It is drapery... superficial.
He led the transition... but he gives the reader no insights, except into already known info on Jared. His transition plan got trashed by the Trump administration.

COVER: From the outspoken former governor, a no-holds-barred account of Chris Christie's rise to power through the bare-knuckle politics of New Jersey and his frank, startling insights about Donald Trump from inside the president's inner circle. After withdrawing from the 2016 presidential race, Chris Christie stunned the political world by becoming the first major official to endorse Donald Trump. A friend of Trump's for fifteen years, the two-term New Jersey governor understood the future president as well as anyone in the political arena--and according the Christie, he became one of Trump's most trusted advisers. Tapped with running Trump's transition team, Christie writes that he was close to being named Trump's running mate earlier that year.

But within days of Trump's surprise victory over Hillary Clinton, Christie was in for his own surprise: he was being booted out.

In Let Me Finish, Christie sets the record straight about his tenure as a corruption-fighting prosecutor and a Republican running a Democratic state, as well as what really happened on the 2016 campaign trail and inside Trump Tower. Christie takes readers inside the ego-driven battles for Trump's attention among figures like Steve Bannon, Corey Lewandowksi, Reince Priebus, Kellyanne Conway, Jeff Sessions, and Paul Manafort. He shows how the literal trashing of Christie's transition plan put the new administration in the hands of self-serving amateurs, all but guaranteeing the Trump presidency's shaky start. Christie also addresses hot-button issues from his own years in power, including what (in his opinion) really went down during New Jersey's Bridgegate. And, for the first time, Christie tells the full story of the Kushner saga: how, as a federal prosecutor, Christie put Jared Kushner's powerful father behind bars--a fact Trump's son-in-law makes Christie pay for later.













[book] The Only Woman in the Room:
A Novel
by Marie Benedict
January 8, 2019
Sourcebooks

She possessed a stunning beauty. She also possessed a stunning mind. Could the world handle both?

Her beauty almost certainly saved her from the rising Nazi party and led to marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. Underestimated in everything else, she overheard the Third Reich's plans while at her husband's side, understanding more than anyone would guess. She devised a plan to flee in disguise from their castle, and the whirlwind escape landed her in Hollywood. She became Hedy Lamarr, screen star.

But she kept a secret more shocking than her heritage or her marriage: she was a scientist. And she knew a few secrets about the enemy. She had an idea that might help the country fight the Nazis...if anyone would listen to her.

A powerful novel based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece.



























[book] The Wartime Sisters:
A Novel
by Lynda Cohen Loigman
January 22, 2019
ST. Martin's Press

For fans of Lilac Girls, the next powerful novel from the author of Goodreads Choice Awards semifinalist The Two-Family House about two sisters working in a WWII armory, each with a deep secret.

"Loigman’s strong voice and artful prose earn her a place in the company of Alice Hoffman and Anita Diamant, whose readers should flock to this wondrous new book." -Pam Jenoff, New York Times bestselling author of The Orphan’s Tale

Two estranged sisters, raised in Brooklyn and each burdened with her own shocking secret, are reunited at the Springfield Armory in the early days of WWII. While one sister lives in relative ease on the bucolic Armory campus as an officer’s wife, the other arrives as a war widow and takes a position in the Armory factories as a “soldier of production.” Resentment festers between the two, and secrets are shattered when a mysterious figure from the past reemerges in their lives.


























[book] The Lost Girls of Paris
by Pam Jenoff
January 29, 2019
PARK ROW

1946, Manhattan

One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, Grace Healey finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.

Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a network of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.

Vividly rendered and inspired by true events, New York Times bestselling author Pam Jenoff shines a light on the incredible heroics of the brave women of the war and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances.
























We mourn the passing in July 2018 of Richard Siegel, rabbinical school dropout, who authored the penultimate best-selling JPS book in 1973 that influenced hundreds of thousands of Jewish families: THE JEWISH CATALOG


[book] The (First) Jewish Catalog
Paperback reprint
by Richard Siegel
and Michael and Sharon Strassfeld
1973
JPS

The First Jewish Catalog, compiled and edited by Sharon & Michael Strassfeld, and Richard Siegel, Jewish Publication Society, First Edition, 1973. Hundreds of b/w photos and illustrations populate this innovative reference catalog that presents Jewish history, religion, rituals, communities, culture, festivals, writings, and behavior in an easily readable format. Oversize trade paperback with glossy, pictorial, stiff covers.



























[book] LAKE SUCCESS
A novel
by Gary Shteyngart
September 2018
Random House
“Barry Cohen, a man with $2.4 billion of assets under management, staggered into the Port Authorty Bus Terminal.

When his dream of the perfect marriage, the perfect son, and the perfect life implodes, a Wall Street millionaire takes a cross-country bus trip in search of his college sweetheart and ideals of youth in the long-awaited novel, his first in seven years, from the acclaimed, bestselling author of Super Sad True Love Story.

Myopic, narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his 3 year-old-son’s diagnosis of autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart, whom he hasn't seen or spoken to in years. Meanwhile, reeling from the fight that caused Barry's departure, his super-smart wife Seema—a driven first-generation American who craved a picture-perfect life, with all the accoutrements of a huge bank account—has her own demons to face. How these two imperfect characters navigate the Shteyngartian chaos of their own making is the heart of this biting, brilliant, emotionally resonant novel very much of our times.































[book] The Age of Surveillance Capitalism:
The Fight for a Human Future
at the New Frontier of Power
by Shoshana Zuboff
January 15, 2019
PublicAffairs

In 1989, I read a book by Professor Zuboff on The Future of the Smart Machines, Work and Power. I applied to HBS with the hope of taking her classes. Didn;t get in. But I still enjoy her books.

Corporations seek to predict and control consumer behavior to generate revenue. Their recommendation engines want to cross-sell. Their TV's want to know your viewing habits so they can sell information to advertisers and other companies. They want to know your locations, purchase habits, and friends, and sell this information.

Soon, purchase opportunities will be foreclosed, as technology and companies serve you choices that benefit themselves. There will be no transparency. Seupply does not address consumer demand, but addresses the needs of the sellers; the products are designed to extract data from the customers which can be sold. It is like selling a smart phone to a customer with attributes that help the seller sell ductomer data, and not designed for the benefit of the customer. The hone can be sold at a low margin, so that the collected data can be sold at a high margin. Is it a privacy paradox or a market failure? The author writes that it is a failure and eliminates trust between the buyer and seller.

Shoshana Zuboff's interdisciplinary breadth and depth enable her to come to grips with the social, political, business, and technological meaning of the changes taking place in our time. We are at a critical juncture in the confrontation between the vast power of giant high-tech companies and government, the hidden economic logic of surveillance capitalism, and the propaganda of machine supremacy that threaten to shape and control human life. Will the brazen new methods of social engineering and behavior modification threaten individual autonomy and democratic rights and introduce extreme new forms of social inequality? Or will the promise of the digital age be one of individual empowerment and democratization? The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is neither a hand-wringing narrative of danger and decline nor a digital fairy tale. Rather, it offers a deeply reasoned and evocative examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization in the twenty-first century. The stark issue at hand is whether we will be the masters of information and machines or its slaves.










[book] Team of Vipers:
My 500 Extraordinary Days
in the Trump White House
by Cliff Sims
January 2019
Thomas Dunne Books

After standing at Donald Trump’s side on Election Night, Cliff Sims joined him in the West Wing as Special Assistant to the President and Director of White House Message Strategy.

He soon found himself pulled into the President’s inner circle as a confidante, an errand boy, an advisor, a punching bag, and a friend. Sometimes all in the same conversation.

As a result, Sims gained unprecedented access to the President, sitting in on private meetings with key Congressional officials, world leaders, and top White House advisors. He saw how Trump handled the challenges of the office, and he learned from Trump himself how he saw the world.

For five hundred days, Sims also witnessed first-hand the infighting and leaking, the anger, joy, and recriminations. He had a role in some of the President’s biggest successes, and he shared the blame for some of his administration’s worst disasters. He gained key, often surprising insights into the players of the Trump West Wing, from Jared Kushner and John Kelly to Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway.

He even helped Trump craft his enemies list, knowing who was loyal and who was not.

And he took notes. Hundreds of pages of notes. In real-time.

Sims stood with the President in the eye of the storm raging around him, and now he tells the story that no one else has written-because no one else could. The story of what it was really like in the West Wing as a member of the President’s team. The story of power and palace intrigue, backstabbing and bold victories, as well as painful moral compromises, occasionally with yourself.

Team of Vipers tells the full story, as only a true insider could.
























FEBRUARY 2019 BOOKS



[book] The Art of Leaving:
A Memoir – An Intimate
by Ayelet Tsabari
FEBRUARY 19, 2019
Random House

An intimate memoir in essays by an award-winning Israeli writer who travels the world, from New York to India, searching for love, belonging, and an escape from grief following the death of her father when she was a young girl.

This searching collection opens with the death of Ayelet Tsabari’s father when she was just nine years old. His passing left her feeling rootless, devastated, and driven to question her complex identity as an Israeli of Yemeni descent in a country that suppressed and devalued her ancestors’ traditions.

In The Art of Leaving, Ayelet tells her story, from her early love of writing and words, to her rebellion during her mandatory service in the Israeli army. She travels from Israel to New York, Canada, Thailand, and India, falling in and out of love with countries, men and women, drugs and alcohol, running away from responsibilities and refusing to settle in one place. She recounts her first marriage; her struggle to define herself as a writer in a new language; her decision to become a mother; and finally her rediscovery and embrace of her family history—a history marked by generations of headstrong women who struggled to choose between their hearts and their homes. Eventually, she realizes that she must reconcile the memories of her father and the sadness of her past if she is ever going to come to terms with herself.

With fierce, emotional prose, Tsabari crafts a beautiful meditation about the lengths we will travel to try to escape our grief, the universal search to find a place where we belong, and the sense of home we eventually find within ourselves.


























[book] The Secret of Clouds
a novel
by Alyson Richman
FEBRUARY 19, 2019
Berkley
Katya, a rising ballerina, and Sasha, a Soviet Jewish graduate student, are young and in love when an unexpected tragedy befalls their native Kiev. Years later, after the couple has safely emigrated to America the consequences of this incident cause their son, Yuri, to be born with a rare health condition that isolates him from other children. Maggie, a passionate and dedicated teacher agrees to tutor Yuri at his home, even though she is haunted by her own painful childhood memories. As the two forge a deep and soulful connection, Yuri's boundless curiosity and unique wisdom inspires Maggie to make difficult changes in her own life. And she'll never realize just how strong Yuri has made her — until she needs that strength the most......

A novel that will make readers examine what it means to live life with a full heart.



























[book] Arabs and Jews in Ottoman Palestine:
Two Worlds Collide
(Perspectives on Israel Studies)
by Alan Dowty
(University of Notre Dame)
FEBRUARY 2019
Indiana University Press

When did the Arab-Israeli conflict begin? Some discussions focus on the 1967 war, some go back to the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, and others look to the beginning of the British Mandate in 1922. Alan Dowty, however, traces the earliest roots of the conflict to the Ottoman Empire in the 19th century, arguing that this historical approach highlights constant clashes between religious and ethnic groups in Palestine. He demonstrates that existing Arab residents viewed new Jewish settlers as European and shares evidence of overwhelming hostility to foreigners from European lands. He shows that Jewish settlers had tremendous incentive to minimize all obstacles to settlement, including the inconvenient hostility of the existing population. Dowty's thorough research reveals how events that occurred over 125 years ago shaped the implacable conflict that dominates the Middle East today.


























[book] Menachem Begin and the
Israel-Egypt Peace Process:
Between Ideology and Political Realism
(Perspectives on Israel Studies)
by Gerald M. Steinberg and
Ziv Rubinovitz
(Bar Ilan, and Sonoma State)
FEBRUARY 2019
Indiana University Press

Focusing on the character and personality of Menachem Begin, Gerald Steinberg and Ziv Rubinovitz offer a new look into the peace negotiations between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s. Begin's role as a peace negotiator has often been marginalized, but this sympathetic and critical portrait restores him to the center of the diplomatic process.

Beginning with the events of 1967, Steinberg and Rubinovitz look at Begin's statements on foreign policy, including relations with Egypt, and his role as Prime Minister and chief signer of the Israel-Egypt peace treaty. While Begin did not leave personal memoirs or diaries of the peace process, Steinberg and Rubinovitz have tapped into newly released Israeli archives and information housed at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and the Begin Heritage Center.

The analysis illuminates the complexities that Menachem Begin faced in navigating between ideology and political realism in the negotiations towards a peace treaty that remains a unique diplomatic achievement.


























[book] SOCIAL HOUSING IN
THE MIDDLE EAST
Architecture, Urban Development,
and Transnational Modernity
Edited by by K?vanç K?l?nç and
Mohammad Gharipour (Ed
(Morgan State Univ)
Winter 2019
Indiana University Press

Aren't the huge high rise hotels and malls keen in the Gulf States?
But what about where the people live who cannot afford the new housing? Why are refugee camps, dating to 1948, horizontal sprawls instead of subsidized high rises. When Iran took over private properties, how did it affect social housing??

As oil-rich countries in the Middle East are increasingly associated with soaring skyscrapers and modern architecture, attention is being diverted away from the pervasive struggles of social housing in those same urban settings. Social Housing in the Middle East traces the history of social housing-both gleaming postmodern projects and bare-bones urban housing structures-in an effort to provide a wider understanding of marginalized spaces and their impact on identities, communities, and class.

While architects may have envisioned utopian or futuristic experiments, these buildings were often constructed with the knowledge and skill sets of local workers, and the housing was in turn adapted to suit the modern needs of residents.

This tension between local needs and national aspirations are linked to issues of global importance, including security, migration, and refugee resettlement. The essays collected here consider how culture, faith, and politics influenced the solutions offered by social housing; they provide an insightful look at how social housing has evolved since the 19th century and how it will need to adapt to suit the 21st.



























[book] Zucked:
The Education of an Unlikely Activist
by Roger McNamee
(Yale, Tuck)
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Penguin Press

The story of how a noted tech venture capitalist, an early mentor to Mark Zuckerberg and investor in his company, woke up to the serious damage Facebook was doing to our society and set out to try to stop it.

If you had told Roger McNamee even three years ago that he would soon be devoting himself to stopping Facebook from destroying our democracy, he would have howled with laughter. He had mentored many tech leaders in his illustrious career as an investor, but few things had made him prouder, or been better for his fund's bottom line, than his early service to Mark Zuckerberg. Still a large shareholder in Facebook, he had every good reason to stay on the bright side. Until he simply couldn't.

ZUCKED is McNamee's intimate reckoning with the catastrophic failure of the head of one of the world's most powerful companies to face up to the damage he is doing. It's a story that begins with a series of rude awakenings. First there is the author's dawning realization that the platform is being manipulated by some very bad actors. Then there is the even more unsettling realization that Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg are unable or unwilling to share his concerns, polite as they may be to his face.

And then comes the election of Donald Trump, and the emergence of one horrific piece of news after another about the malign ends to which the Facebook platform has been put. To McNamee's shock, even still Facebook's leaders duck and dissemble, viewing the matter as a public relations problem. Now thoroughly alienated, McNamee digs into the issue, and fortuitously meets up with some fellow travelers who share his concern, and help him sharpen its focus. Soon he and a dream team of Silicon Valley technologists are charging into the fray, to raise consciousness about the existential threat of Facebook, and the persuasion architecture of the attention economy more broadly -- to our public health and to our political order.

Zucked is both an enthralling personal narrative and a masterful explication of the forces that have conspired to place us all on the horns of this dilemma. This is the story of a company and its leadership, but it's also a larger tale of a business sector unmoored from normal constraints, just at a moment of political and cultural crisis, the worst possible time to be given new tools for summoning the darker angels of our nature and whipping them into a frenzy. Like Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, Roger McNamee happened to be in the right place to witness a crime, and it took him some time to make sense of what he was seeing and what we ought to do about it. The result of that effort is a wise, hard-hitting, and urgently necessary account that crystallizes the issue definitively for the rest of us.


























[book] A SEDER FOR GROVER
Board book
by Joni Kibort Sussman
Tom Leigh (Illustrator)
February 2019
Kar Ben

A Seder for Grover introduces very young readers to Passover traditions with friends from Sesame Street. Big Bird, Moishe Oofnik, and Avigail join their friend Grover to celebrate the spring holiday of Passover. Together they eat matzah, read from the Haggadah, and find the afikomen.
































[book] Gittel's Journey:
An Ellis Island Story
by Lesléa Newman
Amy June Bates
February 2019
Harry N Abrams

Gittel and her mother were supposed to immigrate to America together, but when her mother is stopped by the health inspector, Gittel must make the journey alone. Her mother writes her cousin’s address in New York on a piece of paper. However, when Gittel arrives at Ellis Island, she discovers the ink has run and the address is illegible! How will she find her family? Both a heart-wrenching and heartwarming story, Gittel’s Journey offers a fresh perspective on the immigration journey to Ellis Island. The book includes an author’s note explaining how Gittel’s story is based on the journey to America taken by Lesléa Newman’s grandmother and family friend.

**STARRED REVIEW** "Mixed-media images by Bates (The Big Umbrella), washed in yellows and browns and framed by woodblock motifs, give readers a vivid sense of the historical context while infusing the story with a timeless emotional immediacy. Newman (Ketzel, the Cat Who Composed) skillfully modulates her narration, capturing her protagonist’s feelings of excitement, loneliness, and fear. The ending, handled with both restraint and warmth, relies on one of those improbable twists of good fortune that define so many immigrant stories—and it’s based on a real event." (Publishers Weekly)


















[book] Pippa's Passover Plate
by Vivian Kirkfield
Jill Weber (Illustrator)
February 2019
Holiday House

Sundown is near, and it's almost time for the Seder to begin-- but where is Pippa's special Passover plate?

Pippa the Mouse has been working hard all day-- cleaning her house, setting the table, cooking the meal. Everything looks great-- but her special Seder plate is missing!

Searching through her tiny house turns up nothing, so Pippa ventures out to ask her neighbors if they can help. Bravely, she asks the other animals for help, but the snake, owl, and cat haven't seen her plate, either. But it's almost time for the Seder to begin, so she keeps looking-- and when she finds it, she invites all the other animals home to join her celebration.

A charming story with a happy ending, Pippa's Passover Plate pairs simple, rhyming text with bright paintings by Jill Weber, illustrator of The Story of Passover and The Story of Esther. In bravely facing her animal neighbors, this adorable little mouse finds not only her missing Seder plate-- but new friends.

Filled with rhymes and repetition, this is a perfect title to share and read aloud, just in time for your own Passover festivities.

A final spread with Pippa and her guests getting ready to hide the matzo and celebrate also shows the Passover plate with its six essential symbolic items: zeroah (a roasted bone), beitzah,(an egg), maror and charoset (bitter herbs), chazeret (mortar or paste), and karpas (a spring vegetable).


























[book] Passover Haggadah Graphic Novel
(English and Hebrew Edition)
by Jordan B. Gorfinkel
and Erez Zadok
2019
KOREN

Koren Publishers' Passover Haggadah Graphic Novel, conceived and written by acclaimed Batman comics creator and Jewish cartoonist Jordan B. Gorf Gorfinkel, and illustrated in gorgeous color by Israeli artist Erez Zadok.

The Passover Haggadah Graphic Novel integrates a brand-new, modern translation into sophisticated and super-fun sequential art that brings the epic story to life. The result of extensive historical and linguistic research, every gorgeous panel imbues the classic narrative with renewed relevance and excitement. The graphic novel pages are presented alongside the unabridged, traditional Seder service text, in Hebrew and transliteration, and accompanied by how to instructional cartoons depicting all of the rituals, as celebrated every year for the last 4000 years in Jewish homes around the world. This historic publication will appeal to family members and guests of multiple generations and diverse backgrounds.

A universal (or at least Earth based human) medium for telling heroic stories, one that bridges all cultures, faiths and languages... the sequential art form of the graphic novel lends itself to the Passover story.
































[book] The Jewish Journey Haggadah:
Connecting the Generations
by Adena Berkowitz
Photos by Shira Hecht-Koller
March 2019
GEFEN

This user-friendly family Haggadah is perfect for those of any background. Featuring the full Hebrew text, together with an easy-to-read translation and transliteration, the Haggadah adds meaningful commentary, stories, questions for discussion, fun holiday parody songs, jokes, Seder recipes, and activities to delight both adults and children. When you use this Haggadah, your guests will be so engaged that they will forget to ask When do we eat?
Why the need for a new Haggadah?

In some families, a Haggadah distributed by a leading coffee company might suffice. For others, further insight and explanation of the text is needed to make the Passover story come alive. This Haggadah has been designed to:

Foster a deeper connection to Passover to enable participants from all backgrounds, from generation to generation, to be comfortable using a Hebrew or transliterated text, together with an inclusive English translation
Provide a user-friendly format with suggestions for preparing for Passover and internalizing its messages afterwards
Show the central role played by women in the Passover story
Spark discussion and sharing of insights, teachings, anecdotes, and stories This Haggadah includes:
Full Transliteration of the Hebrew Text
Fun songs, recipes and stories will liven up your seder
Kid s corner
tidbits and points for everyone to share
Color coding for the different features.

























[book] The HIAS Haggadah:
by Rachel Grant Meyer
Hillel Smith (Illustrator)
March 2019


The HIAS Haggadah can be used as a whole for groups that want a deeper exploration of the global refugee crisis. Each part can also be used as a stand-alone addition to a family or communal Seder. The HIAS Haggadah contains material written between 2016 and 2018, as well as new material for Passover 2019. Before your Seder, spend some time reading through the entire document to familiarize yourself with which piece(s) might resonate most with your guests. Consider balancing discussion, readings, and ritual.

























[book] The Emoji Haggadah
Paperback
by Martin Bodek
2019
KTAV

Emojis are the hieroglyphics of the 21st century, so have a blast deciphering the traditional Haggadah text written in a most untraditional format - entirely in emojis! Tips for decoding are included at the end of The Emoji Haggadah, along with the full traditional Hebrew and English Haggadah text.







































[book] THE YADA YADA HAGGADAH:
A Sitcom Seder
by Dave Cowen
2019

From the writer of 2018's Amazon Best Seller, The Trump Passover Haggadah, which The Forward proclaimed, "some[what] SNL-worthy," and The Jewish Telegraphic Agency declared, "probably pretty funny," comes a new parody Haggadah for fans of the greatest Jewish-American sitcom about nothing. Enjoy your Passover acting out a "lost episode" where George forces Jerry to host Seder to impress an Israeli love interest. The clueless Elaine invites a wealthy Egyptian entrepreneur. And Kramer comes up with his next venture: “Matzo, Not So?!”, which promises unleavened matzo so good, it can't possibly be so. Dave Cowen is the author of The Trump Passover Haggadah. He has also written humor for The New Yorker and McSweeney's.








































[book] The Kveller Haggadah:
A Seder for Curious Kids
(and their Grownups)
by Elissa Strauss and Gabrielle Birkner
Grace Yagel (Illustrator)
2019

The Passover seder shouldn’t feel like a long to-do list — it’s an adventure! From the Jewish parenting site Kveller.com comes “The Kveller Haggadah,” designed to guide families through an epic journey from slavery to freedom, and to promote curiosity, even when there are no easy answers. This haggadah is both rich and accessible, kid-friendly without overlooking the dramatic tensions at the center of the Passover story. Woven through the Exodus story is an exploration of memory: how memories are made, how they’re kept, and how they connect us to one another. This beautiful and colorful text includes commentaries from Ruby Namdar, Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg, Rabbi Sari Laufer, Rabbi Shais Rishon and Rabbi Ruti Regan. It also features insights from renowned memory researchers, who help us understand how memory works and the connections between memory and food (after all, the seder plate is full of "memory foods"). The “Kveller Haggadah” is your guide to a meaningful, inspiring, quirky seder that will engage guests of all ages. For more information, visit www.kveller.com/haggadah







































[book] The Kveller Haggadah:
A Seder for Curious Kids
(and their Grownups)
by Elissa Strauss and Gabrielle Birkner
Grace Yagel (Illustrator)
2019









































[book] AN ARABIAN JOURNEY
One Man's Quest Through
the Heart of the Middle East
by Levison Wood
February 5, 2019
Atlantic Monthly Press

Following in the footsteps of famed explorers such as Lawrence of Arabia and Wilfred Thesiger, British explorer Levison Wood brings us along on his most complex expedition yet: a circumnavigation of the Arabian Peninsula.

Starting in September 2017 in a city in Northern Syria, a stone’s throw away from Turkey and amidst the deadliest war of the twenty-first century, Wood set forth on a 5,000-mile trek through the most contested region on the planet. He moved through the Middle East for six months, from ISIS-occupied Iraq through Kuwait and along the jagged coastlines of the Emirates and Oman; across a civil-war-torn Yemen and on to Saudia Arabia, Jordan, and Israel, before ending on the shores of the Mediterranean in Lebanon. Like his predecessors, Wood travelled through some of the harshest and most beautiful environments on earth, seeking to challenge our perceptions of this often-misunderstood part of the world. Through the relationships he forges along the way-and the personal histories and local mythologies that his companions share-Wood examines how the region has changed over thousands of years and reveals a side of the Middle East we don’t often see in the media.

At once a thrilling personal journey and a skillful piece of cultural reportage, Arabia is a breathtaking chronicle of an epic journey through the land at the root of all civilization.





























[book] How to Hold a Grudge:
From Resentment to Contentment-
The Power of Grudges to
Transform Your Life
by Sophie Hannah
JANUARY 2019
Scribner

The first and only comprehensive examination of the universal but widely misunderstood practice of grudge-holding that will show you how to use grudges to be your happiest, most optimistic, and most forgiving self.

Secretly, we all hold grudges, but most of us probably think we shouldn’t, and many of us deny that we do. To bear a grudge is too negative, right? Shouldn’t we just forgive and move on? Wrong, says self-appointed grudge guru Sophie Hannah, in her groundbreaking and irreverent self-help guide. Yes, it’s essential to think positively if we want to live happy lives, but even more crucial is how we get to the positive. Denying our negative emotions and experiences is likely to lead only to more pain, conflict, and stress.

What if our grudges are good for us? What if we could embrace them, and use them to help ourselves and others, instead of feeling ashamed of our inability to banish negative emotions and memories from our lives? With contributions from expert psychotherapists as well as extracts from her own extensive catalog of grudges, Sophie Hannah investigates the psychological origins of grudges and also offers not-so-obvious insights into how we should acknowledge—and embrace—them in order to improve the quality of our interpersonal relationships and senses of self. Grudges do not have to fill us with hate or make us toxic, bitter, and miserable. If we approach the practice of grudge-holding in an enlightened way, it will do the opposite—we will become more forgiving.

Practical, compassionate, and downright funny, How to Hold a Grudge reveals everything we need to know about the many different forms of grudge, the difference between a grudge and not-a-grudge (not as obvious as it seems), when we should let a grudge go, and how to honor a grudge and distill lessons from it that will turn us into better, happier people—for our own benefit and for the sake of spreading good and limiting harm in the world.



























[book] Zaitoun:
Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchen
by Yasmin Khan
Food52, Saffron
FEBRUARY 2019
Norton

A dazzling celebration of Palestinian cuisine, featuring more than 80 modern recipes, captivating stories and stunning travel photography.

"Yasmin Khan draws on her vast experience as a storyteller, cook, human rights activist, itinerant traveler and writer to create a moving, empathetic, hugely knowledgeable and utterly delicious book." -Anthony Bourdain

British cook Yasmin Khan unlocks the flavors and fragrances of modern Palestine, from the sun-kissed pomegranate stalls of Akka, on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, through evergreen oases of date plantations in the Jordan Valley, to the fading fish markets of Gaza City.

Palestinian food is winningly fresh and bright, centered around colorful mezze dishes that feature the region’s bountiful eggplants, peppers, artichokes, and green beans; slow-cooked stews of chicken and lamb flavored with Palestinian barahat spice blends; and the marriage of local olive oil with earthy za’atar, served in small bowls to accompany toasted breads. It has evolved over several millennia through the influences of Arabic, Jewish, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Bedouin cultures and civilizations that have ruled over, or lived in, the area known as ancient Palestine.

In each place she visits, Khan enters the kitchens of Palestinians of all ages and backgrounds, discovering the secrets of their cuisine and sharing heartlifting stories.


























[book] Willa & Hesper
by Amy Feltman
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Grand Central Publishing
For fans of What Belongs to You by Garth Greenwell and The Futures by Anna Pitoniak, a soul-piercing debut that explores the intertwining of past and present, queerness, and coming of age in uncertain times.

Willa's darkness enters Hesper's light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. She runs, following her fractured family back to her grandfather's hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia, looking for the origin story that he is no longer able to tell. But once in Tbilisi, cracks appear in her grandfather's history-and a massive flood is heading toward Georgia, threatening any hope for repair.

Meanwhile, heartbroken Willa is so desperate to leave New York that she joins a group trip for Jewish twentysomethings to visit Holocaust sites in Germany and Poland, hoping to override her emotional state. When it proves to be more fraught than home, she must come to terms with her past-the ancestral past, her romantic past, and the past that can lead her forward.

Told from alternating perspectives, and ending in the shadow of Trump's presidency, WILLA & HESPER is a deeply moving, cerebral, and timely debut



























[book] TOGETHER
A Memoir of a Marriage
and a Medical Mishap
by Judy Goldman
FEBRUARY 12, 2019
Nan A. Talese
A routine procedure left novelist, memoirist, and poet Judy Goldman's husband paralyzed. Together is her unforgettable account of the struggle to regain their "normal" life and a nuanced portrait of a marriage tested.

When Judy Goldman's husband of almost four decades reads a newspaper ad for an injection to alleviate back pain, the outpatient procedure sounds like the answer to his longtime backaches. But rather than restoring his tennis game, the procedure leaves him paralyzed from the waist down--a phenomenon none of the doctors the family consults can explain. Overnight, Goldman's world is turned upside down. Though she has always thought of herself as the polite, demure wife opposite her strong, brave husband, Goldman finds herself thrown into a new role as his advocate, navigating byzantine hospital policies, demanding and refusing treatments, seeking solutions to help him win back his independence.

Along the way, Goldman flashes back to her memories of their life together. As she tries envision her family's future, she discovers a new, more resilient version of herself. Together is a story of the life we imagine versus the life we lead--an elegant and empathetic meditation on partnership, aging, and, of course, love.



























[book] Savage Feast:
Three Generations, Two Continents,
and a Dinner Table
(a Memoir with Recipes)
by Boris Fishman
February 26, 2019
Harper

The acclaimed author of A Replacement Life shifts between heartbreak and humor in this gorgeously told, recipe-filled memoir. A family story, an immigrant story, a love story, and an epic meal, Savage Feast explores the challenges of navigating two cultures from an unusual angle.

A revealing personal story and family memoir told through meals and recipes, Savage Feast begins with Boris’s childhood in Soviet Belarus, where good food was often worth more than money. He describes the unlikely dish that brought his parents together and how years of Holocaust hunger left his grandmother so obsessed with bread that she always kept five loaves on hand. She was the stove magician and Boris’ grandfather the master black marketer who supplied her, evading at least one firing squad on the way. These spoils kept Boris’ family—Jews who lived under threat of discrimination and violence—provided-for and protected.

Despite its abundance, food becomes even more important in America, which Boris’ family reaches after an emigration through Vienna and Rome filled with marvel, despair, and bratwurst. How to remain connected to one’s roots while shedding their trauma? The ambrosial cooking of Oksana, Boris’s grandfather’s Ukrainian home aide, begins to show him the way. His quest takes him to a farm in the Hudson River Valley, the kitchen of a Russian restaurant on the Lower East Side, a Native American reservation in South Dakota, and back to Oksana’s kitchen in Brooklyn. His relationships with women—troubled, he realizes, for reasons that go back many generations—unfold concurrently, finally bringing him, after many misadventures, to an American soulmate.

Savage Feast is Boris’ tribute to food, that secret passage to an intimate conversation about identity, belonging, family, displacement, and love.










































[book] Jewish Difference and
the Arts in Vienna:
Composing Compassion in Music
and Biblical Theater
(German Jewish Cultures)
by Caroline A Kita
(Wash U, St Louis)
February 14, 2019
Indiana University Press

During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire.
























[book] I.M.
A Memoir
by Isaac Mizrahi
February 26, 2019
Flatiron Books

Isaac Mizrahi is a designer, cabaret performer, talk-show host, a TV celebrity. Yet ever since he shot to fame in the late 1980s, the private Isaac Mizrahi has remained under wraps. Until now.

In I.M., Isaac Mizrahi offers a poignant, candid, and touching look back on his life so far. Growing up gay in a sheltered Syrian Jewish Orthodox family, Isaac had unique talents that ultimately drew him into fashion and later into celebrity circles that read like a who’s who of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: Richard Avedon, Audrey Hepburn, Anna Wintour, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Meryl Streep, and Oprah Winfrey, to name only a few.

In his elegant memoir, Isaac delves into his lifelong battles with weight, insomnia, and depression. He tells what it was like to be an out gay man in a homophobic age and to witness the ravaging effects of the AIDS epidemic. Brimming with intimate details and inimitable wit, Isaac's narrative reveals not just the glamour of his years, but the grit beneath the glitz. Rich with memorable stories from in and out of the spotlight, I.M. illuminates deep emotional truths.



























[book] The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater
(1876 – 1883)
(Jews in Eastern Europe)
by Alyssa Quint
(YIVO Institute)
Winter 2019
Indiana University Press

Alyssa Quint focuses on the early years of the modern Yiddish theater, from roughly 1876 to 1883, through the works of one of its best-known and most colorful figures, Avrom Goldfaden. Goldfaden (né GoldENfaden, 1840-1908) was one of the first playwrights to stage a commercially viable Yiddish-language theater, first in Romania and then in Russia. Goldfaden’s work was rapidly disseminated in print and his plays were performed frequently for Jewish audiences. Sholem Aleichem considered him as a forger of a new language that "breathed the European spirit into our old jargon." Quint uses Goldfaden’s theatrical works as a way to understand the social life of Jewish theater in Imperial Russia.

Through a study of his libretti, she looks at the experiences of Russian Jewish actors, male and female, to explore connections between culture as artistic production and culture in the sense of broader social structures. Quint explores how Jewish actors who played Goldfaden’s work on stage absorbed the theater into their everyday lives. Goldfaden’s theater gives a rich view into the conduct, ideology, religion, and politics of Jews during an important moment in the history of late Imperial Russia.
























[book] Brave New Work:
Are You Ready to
Reinvent Your Organization?
by Aaron Dignan
February 2019
Portfolio

Are you ready to eliminate red tape, kill bureaucracy, and do the best work of your life?

Nearly every client Aaron Dignan meets, from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, points to the same frustrations: lack of trust, bottlenecks in decision making, siloed functions and teams, meeting and email overload, tiresome budgeting, short-term thinking, and more.

Is there any hope for a solution? Haven't countless business gurus promised the answer, yet changed almost nothing about the way we work?

That's because we fail to recognize that organizations aren't machines to be predicted and controlled. They're complex human systems full of potential waiting to be released.

Dignan says you can't fix a team, department, or organization by tinkering around the edges. Over the years, he has helped his clients completely reinvent their operating systems--the fundamental principles and practices that shape their culture--with extraordinary success. And they're not alone.

Imagine a bank that abandoned traditional budgeting, only to outperform its competition for decades. An appliance manufacturer that divided itself into 2,000 autonomous teams, resulting not in chaos but rapid growth. A healthcare provider with a headquarters of just 50 people supporting over 14,000 in the field--named "best place to work" year after year. And even a team that saved $3 million per year by cancelling one monthly meeting.

Their stories may sound improbable, but in Brave New Work you'll learn exactly how they and other organizations are inventing a smarter, healthier, andmore effective way to work. Not through top-down mandates, but through a groundswell of autonomy, trust, and transparency.

Whether you lead a team of ten or ten thousand, improving your operating system is the single most powerful thing you can do. The only question is, are you ready?
























[book] Stalin's Scribe:
Literature, Ambition, and Survival:
The Life of Mikhail Sholokhov
by Brian Boeck
February 2019
Pegasus
A masterful and definitive biography of one of the most misunderstood and controversial writers in Russian literature.

Mikhail Sholokhov is arguable one of the most contentious recipients of the Nobel Prize in Literature. As a young man, Sholokhov’s epic novel, Quiet Don, became an unprecedented overnight success.

Stalin’s Scribe is the first biography of a man who was once one of the Soviet Union’s most prominent political figures. Thanks to the opening of Russia’s archives, Brian Boeck discovers that Sholokhov’s official Soviet biography is actually a tangled web of legends, half-truths, and contradictions. Boeck examines the complex connection between an author and a dictator, revealing how a Stalinist courtier became an ideological acrobat and consummate politician in order to stay in favor and remain relevant after the dictator’s death.

Stalin's Scribe is remarkable biography that both reinforces and clashes with our understanding of the Soviet system. It reveals a Sholokhov who is bold, uncompromising, and sympathetic-and reconciles him with the vindictive and mean-spirited man described in so many accounts of late Soviet history.

Shockingly, at the height of the terror, which claimed over a million lives, Sholokhov became a member of the most minuscule subset of the Soviet Union’s population-the handful of individuals whom Stalin personally intervened to save.

























[book] The Pianist from Syria:
A Memoir
by Aeham Ahmad
Emanuel Bergmann (Translator)
February 12, 2019
Atria Books

An astonishing but true account of a pianist’s escape from war-torn Syria to Germany offers a deeply personal perspective on the most devastating refugee crisis of this century.

Aeham Ahmad was born a second-generation refugee—the son of a blind violinist and carpenter who recognized Aeham's talent and taught him how to play piano and love music from an early age.

When his grandparents and father were forced to flee Israel and seek refuge from the Israeli–Palestinian conflict ravaging their home, Aeham’s family built a life in Yarmouk, an unofficial camp to more than 160,000 Palestinian refugees in Damascus. They raised a new generation in Syria while waiting for the conflict to be resolved so they could return to their homeland. Instead, another fight overtook their asylum. Their only haven was in music and in each other.

Forced to leave his family behind, Aeham sought out a safe place for them to call home and build a better life, taking solace in the indestructible bond between fathers and sons to keep moving forward. Heart-wrenching yet ultimately full of hope, and told in a raw and poignant voice, The Pianist from Syria is a gripping portrait of one man’s search for a peaceful life for his family and of a country being torn apart as the world watches in horror.




























[book] TO NIGHT OWL FROM DOGFISH
By Meg Wolitzer and Holly Goldberg Sloan
February 2019
Dial Books
Ages 10 and up

From two extraordinary authors comes a moving, exuberant, laugh-out-loud novel about friendship and family, told entirely in emails and letters.

Avery Bloom, who's bookish, intense, and afraid of many things, particularly deep water, lives in New York City. Bett Devlin, who's fearless, outgoing, and loves all animals as well as the ocean, lives in California. What they have in common is that they are both twelve years old, and are both being raised by single, gay dads.

When their dads fall in love, Bett and Avery are sent, against their will, to the same sleepaway camp. Their dads hope that they will find common ground and become friends--and possibly, one day, even sisters.

But things soon go off the rails for the girls (and for their dads too), and they find themselves on a summer adventure that neither of them could have predicted. Now that they can't imagine life without each other, will the two girls (who sometimes call themselves Night Owl and Dogfish) figure out a way to be a family?
























[book] Companions in Conflict:
Animals in Occupied Palestine
by Penny Johnson
February 2019
Melville Books

An award-winning author explores the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through a surprising lens: the animals trying to survive in occupied hotspots

In August of 2016, Israeli police officers arrested a Palestinian donkey in the Jordan Valley. The charge? Not having the correct paperwork.

It's an image as sad (and strangely common) as it is symbolic: No creature great or small is free from the absurdities of the Occupied Territories.

Companions in Conflict is a surprising investigation into the deeply intertwined lives of the region's human and animal populations: From camel beauty contests, to a heard of "illegal" Palestinain cows hunted down by Israeli soldiers; from a hyena in a wolf pack that becomes a symbol of Middle East peace, to the tragic story of the now-taxidermied inhabitants of the West Bank's only zoo--who were frightened to death by Israeli explosive devices.

Drawing on three decades of living in the region, Penny Johnson's Insightful writing reveals what these and many other animals' fates tell us about the current state of Israel and Palestine. What's more, looking forward, she introduces a new generation of environmental activists to us, who represent the region's best hope for conservation, collaboration, and justice for all creatures.





















[book] [book] Shtetl in the Sun:
Andy Sweet's South
Beach 1977-1980
by the late photographer Andy Sweet
February 2019
Letter16 Press

In the late 70s and early 80's, Miami Beach was in transition... it seems as if it transitions every 20 years.

Andy Sweet graduated from college and drove to his hometown of Miami Beach. He started to photograph the elderly Jews of Miami Beach and South Beach, in saturated vibrant colors, as they loved retirement, found joy, danced, partied, swam, prayed, loved, and sat on porches and benches. It was a brief period of time that fast evaporated as poverty, crime, dilapidation, and death came to the area. Miami Beach and Miami descended into the Miami Vice period of cocaine and drugs and murders. The Paradise was Lost. Sweet was then murdered brutally in 1982; his photos, which the family stored at art warehouse were lost in a move. Decades later, some contact sheets were found and newer digital technologies allowed the pics to be recreated. SHTETL IN THE SON, like the documentary THE LAST RESORT, brings his works to life.

From the publisher: Forget the jokes about late ‘70s South Beach being the Yiddish-speaking section of “God’s Waiting Room”; yes, upwards of 20,000 elderly Jews made up nearly half of its population in those days — all crammed into an area of barely two square miles like a modern-day shtetl, the small, tightly knit Eastern European villages that defined so much of pre-World War II Jewry. But these New York transplants and Holocaust survivors all still had plenty of living, laughing and loving to do, as strikingly portrayed in Shtetl in the Sun, which features previously unseen photographs documenting South Beach’s once-thriving and now-vanished Jewish world — a project that American photographer Andy Sweet (1953–82) began in 1977 after receiving his MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a driving passion until his tragic death.

Sweet’s photos capture this community’s daily rhythms in all their beach-strolling, cafeteria-noshing and klezmer-dancing glory. “They were strong, humorous, and beautiful images,” fellow photographer Mary Ellen Mark, who worked closely with Sweet, remarked after his passing. “He may have been younger, but I considered him every bit an equal.” The book includes a foreword by award-winning Miami arts journalist Brett Sokol and an introductory essay by National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author Lauren Groff.

"I can’t recall exactly where I first discovered Andy Sweet’s photos but it wasn’t long after moving north, probably in some bookstore in Boston. After you get some distance from a place, you realize there were some things you liked after all. And one of those things for me was the Miami Beach that is represented in Sweet’s photography. If only, back when I was out there on Ocean Drive, with my Pentax K-1000, if only I could have stumbled into Andy Sweet’s photographs."



















[book] DEATH IS HARD WORK
A NOVEL
BY KHALED KHALIFA
Translated from Arabic
February 2019
FSG

A dogged, absurd quest through the nightmare of the Syrian civil war Khaled Khalifa’s Death Is Hard Work is the new novel from the greatest chronicler of Syria’s ongoing and catastrophic civil war: a tale of three ordinary people facing down the stuff of nightmares armed with little more than simple determination.

Abdel Latif, an old man from the Aleppo region, dies peacefully in a hospital bed in Damascus. His final wish, conveyed to his youngest son, Bolbol, is to be buried in the family plot in their ancestral village of Anabiya. Though Abdel was hardly an ideal father, and though Bolbol is estranged from his siblings, this conscientious son persuades his older brother Hussein and his sister Fatima to accompany him and the body to Anabiya, which is-after all-only a two-hour drive from Damascus.

There’s only one problem: Their country is a war zone.

With the landscape of their childhood now a labyrinth of competing armies whose actions are at once arbitrary and lethal, the siblings’ decision to set aside their differences and honor their father’s request quickly balloons from a minor commitment into an epic and life-threatening quest. Syria, however, is no longer a place for heroes, and the decisions the family must make along the way-as they find themselves captured and recaptured, interrogated, imprisoned, and bombed-will prove to have enormous consequences for all of them.

































[book] IMPERFECT SOLO
a dark comedy novel of
random misfortune
By Steven Boykey Sidley
February 2019
Arcade

Meyer is filled with dread. His fading musical aspirations, his tyrannical CEO, his ex-wives, his exiting girlfriend, his aging father, his beloved and troublesome children and his confused and bewildered life all bear witness to the sky that he is convinced will soon fall on his head.

And then it does.

This is the story of a man adrift in anxiety, ill-fortune, and comic mishap, buffeted by the existential and prosaic concerns that modern life in Los Angeles inflicts. Forty years old, caught in the netherworld between the reckless optimism of youth and the resignation of age, Meyer tries to find handrails and ballast. Funny, intellectually probing, and poignant, the story follows the flailing and hapless Meyer seeking hope and redemption as his world unravels around him. Surrounded by the absurdity of a waning America, the affection of flawed but well-meaning friends and family, and the randomness of everyday life, Meyer tries gamely to stay afloat.

He must navigate love lost and found and lost, the indignities of aging, the courage to stand up to assholes and the search for the perfect sax solo. Will Meyer find his grace? Can he, or we, ever?



















[book] The Empire and the Five Kings:
America's Abdication and
the Fate of the World
by Bernard-Henri Lévy
February 2019
Henry Holt and Company

One of the West’s leading intellectuals offers a provocative look at America’s withdrawal from world leadership and the rising powers who seek to fill the vacuum left behind

The United States was once the hope of the world, a beacon of freedom and the defender of liberal democracy. Nations and peoples on all continents looked to America to stand up for the values that created the Western world, and to oppose autocracy and repression. Even when America did not live up to its ideals, it still recognized their importance, at home and abroad.

But as Bernard-Henri Lévy lays bare in this powerful and disturbing analysis of the world today, America is retreating from its traditional leadership role, and in its place have come five ambitious powers, former empires eager to assert their primacy and influence. Lévy shows how these five-Russia, China, Turkey, Iran, and Sunni radical Islamism-are taking steps to undermine the liberal values that have been a hallmark of Western civilization.

The Empire and the Five Kings is a cri de coeur that draws upon lessons from history and the eternal touchstones of human culture to reveal the stakes facing the West as America retreats from its leadership role, a process that did not begin with Donald Trump's presidency and is not likely to end with him. The crisis is one whose roots can be found as far back as antiquity and whose resolution will require the West to find a new way forward if its principles and values are to survive.



















[book] Fay Wray and Robert Riskin:
A Hollywood Memoir
by Victoria Riskin
February 26, 2019
Pantheon

A Hollywood love story, a Hollywood memoir, a (dual) Hollywood biography--the woman who stole the heart of King Kong and the man, Robert Riskin, one of the greatest screenwriters of all time, an Academy Award winner, producer, and longtime collaborator with Frank Capra on eight pictures. By their daughter, an acclaimed writer and producer.

King Kong elevated Fay Wray to the tip of the Empire State Building and the heights of cinematic immortality; she starred in more than one hundred and twenty pictures, and was directed by such masters as William Wellman, Erich von Stroheim, and Vincente Minnelli. Robert Riskin, Wray's husband, was one of Hollywood's seminal screenwriters, originator of the "screwball comedy" and the true populist voice of the "little guy" that gave Frank Capra's movies the "Capra touch"; Riskin's sophisticated stage plays and screen comedies of Hollywood's classic era became famous for their blend of humor and romance, wisecracking and idealism. Winner of the Academy Award for It Happened One Night and nominated for four other Oscars, Riskin was a producer and longtime collaborator with Capra on such pictures as The Miracle Woman, Platinum Blonde, American Madness, The Whole Town's Talking, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Lost Horizon, You Can't Take It with You, and Meet John Doe.

Their daughter, Victoria Riskin, a former president of the Writers Guild of America West, tells the story of their lives, their work, their Hollywood, their fairy-tale marriage that ended so tragically.























[book] The Lost World of the Torah:
Law as Covenant and Wisdom
in Ancient Context
by John Harvey Walton, PhD
(Hebrew Union College, Wheaton College)
February 2019
IVP

Our handling of what we call biblical law veers between controversy and neglect. On the one hand, controversy arises when Old Testament laws seem either odd beyond comprehension (not eating pork) or positively reprehensible (executing children). On the other, neglect results when we consider the law obsolete, no long carrying any normative power (tassels on clothing, making sacrifices). Even readers who do attempt to make use of the Old Testament "law" often find it either irrelevant, hopelessly laden with "thou shalt nots," or simply so confusing that they throw up their hands in despair. Despite these extremes, people continue to propose moral principles from these laws as "the biblical view" and to garner proof texts to resolve issues that arise in society. The result is that both Christians and skeptics regularly abuse the Torah, and its true message often lies unheard. Walton and Walton offer in The Lost World of the Torah a restorative vision of the ancient genre of instruction for wisdom that makes up a significant portion of the Old Testament. In the ancient Near East, order was achieved through the wisdom of those who governed society. The objective of torah was to teach the Israelites to be wise about the kind of order needed to receive the blessings of God’s favor and presence with the context of the covenant. Here readers will find fresh insight on this fundamental genre of the Old Testament canon.

























[book] A Spy in Exile:
A Thriller
by Jonathan de Shalit
Translated from Hebrew
February 5, 2019
Atria

From the author of the internationally bestselling “supremely effective, cunningly crafted” (The Providence Journal) thriller Traitor, a cerebral and suspenseful novel of high-stakes intrigue in Israel’s top intelligence agency.

After Ya’ara Stein is forced out of her job at the Mossad—the secret intelligence service of Israel—she is called upon by the Prime Minister for a classified job. Known for her aptitude, beauty, and deadliness, Stein is asked to set up a secret unit that will act independently, answerable only to the Prime Minister.

This streamlined and deadly unit, filled with bright young men and women recruited and trained by Stein, quickly faces threats both old and new. Descendants of the lethal militant Red Army Faction have returned to terrorize Europe and fears of a radical Islam splinter group force the unit to distinguish between facts and smoke screens. As Stein’s cadets struggle to crush these threats, they soon discover how easily the hunter can become the hunted.

A dazzling, tension-filled novel that sheds light on the world hidden just below the surface of our everyday lives, this thriller offers a peek into the dark behind the curtain where today’s deadliest conflicts are fought. With breathless pacing and shocking twists and turns, it proves that Jonathan de Shalit “has learned well from the likes of Mr. le Carré” (The Wall Street Journal).

























[book] Merchants of Truth:
The Business of News
and the Fight for Facts
by Jill Abramson
February 5, 2019
Simon & Schuster

The definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade. With the expert guidance of former Executive Editor of The New York Times Jill Abramson, we follow two legacy (The New York Times and The Washington Post) and two upstart (BuzzFeed and VICE) companies as they plow through a revolution in technology, economics, standards, commitment, and endurance that pits old vs. new media.

Merchants of Truth is the groundbreaking and gripping story of the precarious state of the news business told by one of our most eminent journalists.

Jill Abramson follows four companies: The New York Times, The Washington Post, BuzzFeed, and VICE Media over a decade of disruption and radical adjustment. The new digital reality nearly kills two venerable newspapers with an aging readership while creating two media behemoths with a ballooning and fickle audience of millennials. We get to know the defenders of the legacy presses as well as the outsized characters who are creating the new speed-driven media competitors. The players include Jeff Bezos and Marty Baron (The Washington Post), Arthur Sulzberger and Dean Baquet (The New York Times), Jonah Peretti (BuzzFeed), and Shane Smith (VICE) as well as their reporters and anxious readers.

Merchants of Truth raises crucial questions that concern the well-being of our society. We are facing a crisis in trust that threatens the free press. Abramson’s book points us to the future.
























































[book] Dinner for Everyone:
100 Iconic Dishes Made 3 Ways
--Easy, Vegan, or Perfect for Company
by Mark Bittman
February 12, 2019
Clarkson Potter

The first major new work from the man who taught America How to Cook Everything is truly the one book a cook needs for a perfect dinner--easy, fancy, or meatless, as the occasion requires.

Mark Bittman is revered for his simple, straightforward, and flexible approach to everyday cooking. In Dinner for Everyone, he shares 100 essential main dishes, each with easy, vegan, and all-out recipes as the mood or occasion requires. These 300 all-new recipes, accompanied by more than 100 full-color photographs, form a diverse collection that includes quick meals for busy weeknights (hearty soups, tacos, and one-pot pastas), creative plant-based fare that will please both vegans and non-vegans alike (lemon polenta with mushroom ragu, pomegranate-glazed eggplant, or cauliflower tinga tacos), and impressive dishes perfect for entertaining (handmade noodles and even your Thanksgiving centerpiece). Whatever the experience level, craving, or time constraint, home cooks will find exactly what they need to prepare all their favorites with confidence and enthusiasm. Rooted in Mark's philosophy of using efficient cooking techniques, fresh ingredients, and basic equipment--and written in his signature to-the-point style--Dinner for Everyone is a one-stop, indispensable reference for life's ultimate question: What's for dinner?


























[book] Ben Hecht:
Fighting Words, Moving Pictures
(Jewish Lives Series)
by Adina Hoffman
February 12, 2019
Yale University Press

A vibrant portrait of one of the most accomplished and prolific American screenwriters, by an award-winning biographer and essayist

He was, according to Pauline Kael, “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard called him “a genius” who “invented 80 percent of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” Besides tossing off dozens of now-classic scripts—including Scarface,Twentieth Century, and Notorious—Ben Hecht was known in his day as ace reporter, celebrated playwright, taboo-busting novelist, and the most quick-witted of provocateurs. During World War II, he also emerged as an outspoken crusader for the imperiled Jews of Europe, and later he became a fierce propagandist for pre-1948 Palestine’s Jewish terrorist underground. Whatever the outrage he stirred, this self-declared “child of the century” came to embody much that defined America—especially Jewish America—in his time.

Hecht's fame has dimmed with the decades, but Adina Hoffman’s vivid portrait brings this charismatic and contradictory figure back to life on the page. Hecht was a renaissance man of dazzling sorts, and Hoffman—critically acclaimed biographer, former film critic, and eloquent commentator on Middle Eastern culture and politics—is uniquely suited to capture him in all his modes.




















[book] Hot Protestants:
A History of Puritanism
in England and America
by Michael P. Winship
February 26, 2019
Yale University Press

An innovative and compelling study of puritanism that follows the full sweep of the movement’s history in England and America

Begun in the mid-sixteenth century by Protestant nonconformists keen to reform England’s church and society while saving their own souls, the puritan movement was a major catalyst in the great cultural changes that transformed the early modern world. Providing a uniquely broad transatlantic perspective, this groundbreaking volume traces puritanism’s tumultuous history from its initial attempts to reshape the Church of England to its establishment of godly republics in both England and America and its demise at the end of the seventeenth century.

Shedding new light on puritans whose impact was far-reaching as well as on those who left only limited traces behind them, Michael Winship delineates puritanism’s triumphs and tribulations and shows how the puritan project of creating reformed churches working closely with intolerant godly governments evolved and broke down over time in response to changing geographical, political, and religious exigencies.




















[book] Buying Gay:
How Physique Entrepreneurs
Sparked a Movement
by David K. Johnson
(Univ of South Florida)
February 26, 2019
Columbia University Press

Johnson, a consultant to the Jewish Women's Archive, and a recent speaker on the Lavender Scare of the 1950s at the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee has written a book on how post-war physique magazines fueled a movement. In 1951, a new type of publication appeared on newsstands-the physique magazine produced by and for body builders, but actually gay men. For many men growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, these magazines and their images and illustrations of nearly naked men, as well as articles, letters from readers, and advertisements, served as an initiation into gay culture. The publishers behind them were part of a wider world of “physique entrepreneurs”: men as well as women who ran photography studios, mail-order catalogs, pen-pal services, book clubs, and niche advertising for gay audiences. Such businesses have often been seen as peripheral to the gay political movement. In this book, David K. Johnson shows how gay commerce was not a byproduct but rather an important catalyst for the gay rights movement.

Offering a vivid look into the lives of physique entrepreneurs and their customers, and presenting a wealth of illustrations, Buying Gay explores the connections-and tensions-between the market and the movement. With circulation rates many times higher than the openly political “homophile” magazines, physique magazines were the largest gay media outlets of their time. This network of producers and consumers helped foster a gay community and upend censorship laws, paving the way for open expression. Physique entrepreneurs were at the center of legal struggles, especially against the U.S. Post Office, including the court victory that allowed full-frontal male nudity and open homoeroticism. Buying Gay reconceives the history of the gay rights movement and shows how consumer culture helped create community and a site for resistance.


















[book] Magic Is Dead:
My Journey into the
World's Most Secretive
Society of Magicians
by Ian Frisch
February 26, 2019
Dey

In the vein of Neil Strauss’ The Game and Joshua Foer’s Moonwalking with Einstein comes the fascinating story of one man’s colorful, mysterious, and personal journey into the world of magic, and his unlikely invitation into an underground secret society of revolutionary magicians from around the world.

Frisch knows school buses and ice cream. Now he knows magic

MAGIC IS DEAD is Ian Frisch’s head-first dive into a hidden world full of extraordinary characters and highly guarded secrets. It is a story of imagination, deception, and art that spotlights today’s most brilliant young magicians—a mysterious club known as the52, who are revolutionizing an ancient artform under the mantra Magic Is Dead.

Ian brings us with him as he not only gets to know this fascinating world, but also becomes an integral part of it. We meet the52’s founding members—Laura London, Daniel Madison, and Chris Ramsay—and explore their personal demons, professional aspirations, and what drew them to their craft. We join them at private gatherings of the most extraordinary magicians working today, follow them to magic conventions in Las Vegas and England, and discover some of the best tricks of the trade. We also encounter David Blaine; hang out with Penn Jillette; meet Dynamo, the U.K.’s most famous magician; and go behind the scenes of a Netflix magic show. Magic Is Dead is also a chronicle of magic’s rich history and how it has changed in the internet age, as the young guns embrace social media and move away from the old-school take on the craft.

As he tells the story of the52, and his role as its most unlikely member, Ian reveals his own connection with trickery and deceit and how he first learned the elements that make magic work from his poker-playing mother. He recalls their adventures in card rooms and casinos after his father’s sudden death, and shares a touching moment that he had, as a working journalist, with his childhood idol Shaquille O’Neal.

“Magic—the romanticism of the inexplicable, the awe and admiration of the unexpected—is an underlying force in how we view the world and its myriad possibilities,” Ian writes. As his journey continues, Ian not only becomes a performer and creator of magic—even fooling the late Anthony Bourdain during a chance encounter—he also cements a new brotherhood, and begins to understand his relationship with his father, fifteen years after his death. Written with psychological acuity and a keen eye for detail, Magic Is Dead is an engrossing tale full of wonder and surprise.























[book] Good Riddance
a novel
by Elinor Lipman
February 5, 2019
HMH Houghton Mifflin

The delightful new romantic comedy from Elinor Lipman, in which one woman’s trash becomes another woman’s treasure, with deliriously entertaining results.

Daphne Maritch doesn't quite know what to make of the heavily annotated high school yearbook she inherits from her mother, who held this relic dear. Too dear. The late June Winter Maritch was the teacher to whom the class of '68 had dedicated its yearbook, and in turn she went on to attend every reunion, scribbling notes and observations after each one—not always charitably—and noting who overstepped boundaries of many kinds.

In a fit of decluttering (the yearbook did not, Daphne concluded, "spark joy"), she discards it when she moves to a small New York City apartment. But when it's found in the recycling bin by a busybody neighbor/documentary filmmaker, the yearbook's mysteries—not to mention her own family's—take on a whole new urgency, and Daphne finds herself entangled in a series of events both poignant and absurd.

Good Riddance is a pitch-perfect, whip-smart new novel from an "enchanting, infinitely witty yet serious, exceptionally intelligent, wholly original, and Austen-like stylist" (Washington Post).























[book] The Dark Young Man
by Jacob Dinezon
Scott Hilton Davis,
Tina Lunson (Translator)
February 1, 2019

Tina Lunson’s excellent English translation (the first ever) vividly captures mid-nineteenth century Jewish life in Eastern Europe, revealing not only its particular culture but also its parallels to today’s Jewish experience.” —Jewish Book Council

“Dinezon’s writing is poignant and haunting; his characters are bright, intense, and unforgettable. . . . Jacob Dinezon is truly a giant in Yiddish literature.” —New York Journal of Book
Jacob Dinezon’s historical Jewish romance is set in the Russian Empire in the 1840s and weaves the bittersweet tale of Yosef, a poor but brilliant yeshiva student, who falls in love with Roza, the beautiful and charming daughter of a rich merchant. But the couple's bright horizon is clouded by the ruthless actions of Roza's brother-in-law, the Dark Young Man, who plots to protect his power in the family by destroying the young lovers. The startling outcome made The Dark Young Man a runaway bestseller when it was first published in 1877. Originally written in Yiddish and translated for the first time in English by Tina Lunson, Jacob Dinezon’s The Dark Young Man delves deeply into the personalities and politics of Jewish middle-class urban society, and describes in vivid detail the growing opposition to arranged marriages, the disparities between rich and poor, and the effects of assimilation and modernity on traditional Jewish life—all wrapped up in a realistic Jewish romance. Will Yosef and Roza's love prevail or will the Dark Young Man be triumphant? Jacob Dinezon’s The Dark Young Man possesses all the intrigue and excitement of an Alexandre Dumas novel while providing a startling fictional account of mid-nineteenth-century Jewish life, culture, and religion.
























[book] The Dark Young Man
by Jacob Dinezon
AND Scott Hilton Davis
Tina Lunson (Translator)
February 2019
Jewish Storyteller

Jacob Dinezon’s historical Jewish romance is set in the Russian Empire in the 1840s and weaves the bittersweet tale of Yosef, a poor but brilliant yeshiva student, who falls in love with Roza, the beautiful and charming daughter of a rich merchant. But the couple's bright horizon is clouded by the ruthless actions of Roza's brother-in-law, the Dark Young Man, who plots to protect his power in the family by destroying the young lovers. The startling outcome made The Dark Young Man a runaway bestseller when it was first published in 1877. Originally written in Yiddish and translated for the first time in English by Tina Lunson, Jacob Dinezon’s The Dark Young Man delves deeply into the personalities and politics of Jewish middle-class urban society, and describes in vivid detail the growing opposition to arranged marriages, the disparities between rich and poor, and the effects of assimilation and modernity on traditional Jewish life—all wrapped up in a realistic Jewish romance. Will Yosef and Roza's love prevail or will the Dark Young Man be triumphant? Jacob Dinezon’s The Dark Young Man possesses all the intrigue and excitement of an Alexandre Dumas novel while providing a startling fictional account of mid-nineteenth-century Jewish life, culture, and religion.
























[book] Companions in Conflict:
Animals in Occupied Palestine
by Penny Johnson
February 19, 2019
Melville House

Johnson explores the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through a lens of selected animals




























[book] In the Closet of the Vatican:
Power, Homosexuality, Hypocrisy
by Frederic Martel
Translated by Shaun Whiteside
February 2019
Bloomsbury

The New York Times bestselling account of corruption and hypocrisy at the heart of the Vatican.

In the Closet of the Vatican exposes the rot at the heart of the Vatican and the Roman Catholic Church today. This brilliant piece of investigative writing is based on four years’ authoritative research, including extensive interviews with those in power.

The celibacy of priests, the condemnation of the use of contraceptives, countless cases of sexual abuse, the resignation of Benedict XVI, misogyny among the clergy, the dramatic fall in Europe of the number of vocations to the priesthood, the plotting against Pope Francis – all these issues are clouded in mystery and secrecy.

In the Closet of the Vatican is a book that reveals these secrets and penetrates this enigma. It derives from a system founded on a clerical culture of secrecy which starts in junior seminaries and continues right up to the Vatican itself. It is based on the double lives of priests and on extreme homophobia. The resulting schizophrenia in the Church is hard to fathom. But the more a prelate is homophobic, the more likely it is that he is himself gay.

"Behind rigidity there is always something hidden, in many cases a double life." These are the words of Pope Francis himself and with them, the Pope has unlocked the Closet.

No one can claim to really understand the Catholic Church today until they have read this book. It reveals a truth that is extraordinary and disturbing.




























[book] Jewish Religious Music
in Nineteenth-Century America:
Restoring the Synagogue Soundtrack
by Judah M. Cohen
February 2019
Indiana University Press

In Jewish Religious Music in Nineteenth-Century America: Restoring the Synagogue Soundtrack, Judah M. Cohen demonstrates that Jews constructed a robust religious musical conversation in the United States during the mid- to late-19th century. While previous studies of American Jewish music history have looked to Europe as a source of innovation during this time, Cohen’s careful analysis of primary archival sources tells a different story. Far from seeing a fallow musical landscape, Cohen finds that Central European Jews in the United States spearheaded a major revision of the sounds and traditions of synagogue music during this period of rapid liturgical change.

Focusing on the influences of both individuals and texts, Cohen demonstrates how American Jewish musicians sought to balance artistry and group singing, rather than "progressing" from solo chant to choir and organ. Congregations shifted between musical genres and practices during this period in response to such factors as finances, personnel, and communal cohesiveness. Cohen concludes that the "soundtrack" of 19th-century Jewish American music heavily shapes how we look at Jewish American music and life in the first part of the 21st-century, arguing that how we see, and especially hear, history plays a key role in our understanding of the contemporary world around us. Supplemented with an interactive website that includes the primary source materials, recordings of the music discussed, and a map that highlights the movement of key individuals, Cohen’s research defines more clearly the sound of 19th-century American Jewry.





























[book] David Bergelson's Strange New World:
Untimeliness and Futurity
(Jews in Eastern Europe)
by Harriet Murav
UIUC
February 2019
Indiana University Press

David Bergelson (1884–1952) emerged as a major literary figure who wrote in Yiddish before WWI. He was one of the founders of the Kiev Kultur-Lige and his work was at the center of the Yiddish-speaking world of the time. He was well known for creating characters who often felt the painful after-effects of the past and the clumsiness of bodies stumbling through the actions of daily life as their familiar worlds crumbled around them. In this contemporary assessment of Bergelson and his fiction, Harriet Murav focuses on untimeliness, anachronism, and warped temporality as an emotional, sensory, existential, and historical background to Bergleson’s work and world. Murav grapples with the great modern theorists of time and memory, especially Henri Bergson, Sigmund Freud, and Walter Benjamin, to present Bergelson as an integral part of the philosophical and artistic experiments, political and technological changes, and cultural context of Russian and Yiddish modernism that marked his age. As a comparative and interdisciplinary study of Yiddish literature and Jewish culture, this work adds a new, ethnic dimension to understandings of the turbulent birth of modernism.
























MARCH 2019 BOOKS



[book] Kaddish.com:
A novel
by Nathan Englander
March 2019
Knopf
The Pulitzer finalist delivers his best work yet--a brilliant, streamlined comic novel, reminiscent of early Philip Roth and of his own most masterful stories, about a son's failure to say Kaddish for his father.

Larry is an atheist, an apostate from his Brooklyn-born Orthodox Jewish family. His father passes away and he flies from his Brooklyn non-Jewish neighborhood to the Orthodox enclave in Memphis. He is staying at his sister's home in Memphis, locked in for the seven days of shiva for their departed father, a father who was maybe the only one who “got” and understood Larry, who assured him that he was destined for heaven no matter what he thought about himself.

And so, in Chapter 1, Larry is stuck in a house, feeling that all the mourners who visit are judging him, staring at him (but they are). His claustrophobic feelings are amplified by his sleeping in the skinny, small bed of his nephew.

As the only son in a conservative Orthodox family, it is Larry's responsibility to recite the Kaddish prayer for his father, each day for eleven months. To the horror and dismay of Larry's widowed mother and his sisters, Larry refuses – thus imperiling the fate of his father's departed soul.
Larry is quite self-absorbed.
To appease his family, and in penance for failing to mourn his father correctly, he hatches a plan. He will hire a stranger through a website called kaddish.com to recite the daily prayer.

But then, inspired by the young man (Chemi) that he hired, Larry returns to Orthodoxy, marries, and starts a family. But what is up with this obsession with the man he hired to say kaddish? Larry, now named Shuli, living in Brooklyn as a teach... must search him out... two decades later. He flies to Israel to find Chemi

This is Nathan Englander's freshest and funniest work to date--a satire that touches, lightly and with unforgettable humor, on the conflict between religious and secular worlds, and the hypocrisies that run through both. A novel about atonement; about spiritual redemption; and about the soul-sickening temptations of the internet, which, like God, is everywhere.























[book] MARTIN BUBER:
A LIFE OF FAITH AND DISSENT
(Jewish Lives Series)
by PAUL MENDES-FLOHR
March 26, 2019
Yale University Press

The first major biography in English in over thirty years of the seminal modern Jewish thinker Martin Buber

An authority on the twentieth-century philosopher Martin Buber (1878–1965), Paul Mendes-Flohr offers the first major biography in English in thirty years of this seminal modern Jewish thinker. Organized around several key moments—such as his sudden abandonment by his mother when he was a child of three—Mendes-Flohr shows how this foundational trauma left an enduring mark on Buber’s inner life, attuning him to the fragility of human relations and the need to nurture them with what he would call a “dialogical attentiveness.”

Buber’s philosophical and theological writings, most famously I and Thou (Ich und DU – 1923), made significant contributions to religious and Jewish thought, philosophical anthropology, biblical studies, political theory, and Zionism. In this accessible new biography, Mendes-Flohr situates Buber’s life and legacy in the intellectual and cultural life of German Jewry as well as in the broader European intellectual life of the first half of the twentieth century.

Note to file: Consider the idea of I and Thou dialogue in the age of online anonymity and online conversations























[book] The Scholems:
A Story of the German-Jewish
Bourgeoisie from Emancipation to Destruction
by Jay Howard Geller
March 15, 2019

The evocative and riveting stories of four brothers-Gershom the Zionist, Werner the Communist, Reinhold the nationalist, and Erich the liberal-weave together in The Scholems, a biography of an eminent middle-class Jewish Berlin family and a social history of the Jews in Germany in the decades leading up to World War II.

Across four generations, Jay Howard Geller illuminates the transformation of traditional Jews into modern German citizens, the challenges they faced, and the ways that they shaped the German-Jewish century, beginning with Prussia's emancipation of the Jews in 1812 and ending with exclusion and disenfranchisement under the Nazis. Focusing on the renowned philosopher and Kabbalah scholar Gershom Scholem and his family, their story beautifully draws out the rise and fall of bourgeois life in the unique subculture that was Jewish Berlin. Geller portrays the family within a much larger context of economic advancement, the adoption of German culture and debates on Jewish identity, struggles for integration into society, and varying political choices during the German Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the Nazi era. What Geller discovers, and unveils for the reader, is a fascinating portal through which to view the experience of the Jewish middle class in Germany.




































[book] Alfred Stieglitz:
Taking Pictures, Making Painters
(Jewish Lives Series)
by Phyllis Rose
March 26, 2019
Yale University Press

A fascinating biography of a revolutionary American artist ripe for rediscovery as a photographer and champion of other artists

Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946) was an enormously influential artist and nurturer of artists even though his career is often overshadowed by his role as Georgia O’Keeffe’s husband. This new book from celebrated biographer Phyllis Rose reconsiders Stieglitz as a revolutionary force in the history of American art.

Born in New Jersey, Stieglitz later studied in Germany, where his father, a wool merchant and painter, insisted he would get a proper education. After returning to America, he became one of the first American photographers to achieve international fame. By the time he was sixty, he gave up photography and devoted himself to selling and promoting art. His first gallery, 291, was the first American gallery to show works by Picasso, Rodin, Matisse, and other great European modernists. His galleries were not dealerships so much as open universities, where he introduced European modern art to Americans and nurtured an appreciation of American art among American artists.


















[book] SPIES OF NO COUNTRY
Secret Lives at the
Birth of Israel
By Matti Friedman
March 2019
Algonquin

From the author of the critically acclaimed PumpkinFlowers.... THE UNSUNG Horoes of 1948... those who lived undercover... Matti Friedman’s report of the State of Israel’s first spies has all the tropes of an espionage novel, including duplicity, betrayal, disguise, clandestine meetings, the bluff, and the double bluff--but it’s all true.

The four spies at the center of this story were part of a ragtag unit known as the Arab Section, conceived during World War II by British spies and Jewish militia leaders in Palestine. Intended to gather intelligence and carry out sabotage and assassinations, the unit consisted of Jews who were native to the Arab world and could thus easily assume Arab identities. In 1948, with Israel’s existence in the balance during the War of Independence, our spies went undercover in Beirut, where they spent the next two years operating out of a kiosk, collecting intelligence, and sending messages back to Israel via a radio whose antenna was disguised as a clothesline. While performing their dangerous work these men were often unsure to whom they were reporting, and sometimes even who they’d become. Of the dozen spies in the Arab Section at the war’s outbreak, five were caught and executed. But in the end the Arab Section would emerge, improbably, as the nucleus of the Mossad, Israel’s vaunted intelligence agency.

Spies of No Country is about the slippery identities of these young spies, but it’s also about Israel’s own complicated and fascinating identity. Israel sees itself and presents itself as a Western nation, when in fact more than half the country has Middle Eastern roots and traditions, like the spies of this story. And, according to Friedman, that goes a long way toward explaining the life and politics of the country, and why it often baffles the West. For anyone interested in real-life spies and the paradoxes of the Middle East, Spies of No Country is an intimate story with global significance.






















[book] Getting Good at Getting Older:
A New Jewish Catalog
by the late Richard Siegel (Jewish Catalog)
and his widow Rabbi Laura Geller
Postoined from March 2019 to Fall 2019
Behrman House

We came of age in the '60s and '70s, through civil rights, anti-war protests, and the rise of feminism. We've raised families and had careers. We've been around the world, figuratively if not literally. We've done a lot.

And we're getting older. So we might as well get good at it.

Getting Good at Getting Older: A Jewish Catalog for a New Age is a tour for all of us "of a certain age" through the resources and skills we need to navigate the years between maturity and old age. Getting Good at Getting Older brings humor, warmth, and 4,000 years of Jewish experience to the question of how to shape this new stage of life.






















[book] The 100 Most Jewish Foods:
A Highly Debatable List
by Alana Newhouse
(EIC OF TABLET.COM)
March 19, 2019
Artisan

Tablet’s list of the 100 most Jewish foods is not about the most popular Jewish foods, or the tastiest, or even the most enduring. It’s a list of the most significant foods culturally and historically to the Jewish people, explored deeply with essays, recipes, stories, and context. Some of the dishes are no longer cooked at home, and some are not even dishes in the traditional sense (store-bought cereal and Stella D’oro cookies, for example). The entire list is up for debate, which is what makes this book so much fun. Many of the foods are delicious (such as babka and shakshuka). Others make us wonder how they’ve survived as long as they have (such as unhatched chicken eggs and jellied calves’ feet).

As expected, many Jewish (and now universal) favorites like matzo balls, pickles, cheesecake, blintzes, and chopped liver make the list. The recipes are global and represent all contingencies of the Jewish experience.

You might be surprised to learn the Jewish histories of Sweet n Low and Bazooka bubble gum.

Contributors include Ruth Reichl on Lamb, Elissa Goldstein on leftovers, Alana Newhouse on Kiddush cookies and Haminados, Gabriel Sanders, Éric Ripert on Gefilte FIsh, Joan Nathan, Michael Solomonov, BKG/Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett on Flanken, Dan Barber, Gail Simmons, Yotam Ottolenghi, Tom Colicchio, Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, Maira Kalman on Herring (and Chekhov), Action Bronson, Daphne Merkin on Beet Horseradish, Shalom Auslander, Merissa Nathan Gerson on Honey and honeycake, Marc Tracy on Hebrew National Hot Dogs, Gabriela Geselowitz on Joan Nathan's Azerbaijani Style Eggplant, David Sachs, Rosie Schaap (yes of the grape Schaap's) on Concord Grape Huice, Wayne Hoffman on Chicken, Marjorie Ingall on Bokser, Paola Gavin on Roman Artichokes, MaNishtana on Haroset, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Eve Jochnowitz on Dill, Leil Leibovits on Treyf, and Phil Rosenthal, and many many others. Presented in a gifty package, The 100 Most Jewish Foods is the perfect book to dip into, quote from, cook from, and launch a spirited debate.


















[book] THE ART OF BIBLE TRANSLATION
BY PROFESSOR ROBERT ALTER
(Berkeley)
March 19, 2019
Princeton University Press

An award-winning biblical translator reflects on the art of capturing the literary power of the Bible in English

In this brief book, award-winning biblical translator and acclaimed literary critic Robert Alter offers a personal and passionate account of what he learned about the art of Bible translation over the two decades he spent completing his own English version of the Hebrew Bible.

Alter’s literary training gave him the advantage of seeing that a translation of the Bible can convey the text’s meaning only by trying to capture the powerful and subtle literary style of the biblical Hebrew, something the modern English versions don’t do justice to. The Bible’s style, Alter writes, “is not some sort of aesthetic embellishment of the ‘message’ of Scripture but the vital medium through which the biblical vision of God, human nature, history, politics, society, and moral value is conveyed.” And, as the translators of the King James Version knew, the authority of the Bible is inseparable from its literary authority.

For these reasons, the Bible can be brought to life in English only by re-creating its literary virtuosity, and Alter discusses the principal aspects of style in the Hebrew Bible that any translator should try to reproduce: word choice, syntax, word play and sound play, rhythm, and dialogue. In the process, he provides an illuminating and accessible introduction to biblical style that also offers insights about the art of translation far beyond the Bible.




















[book] In Another Time:
A Novel
by Jillian Cantor
March 5, 2019
Harper

A sweeping historical novel that spans Germany, England, and the United States and follows a young couple torn apart by circumstance leading up to World War II—and the family secret that may prove to be the means for survival.

Love brought them together. But only time can save them…

1931, Germany. Bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist, and immediately he feels a powerful chemistry between them. It isn’t long before they fall in love and begin making plans for the future. As their love affair unfolds over the next five years, the climate drastically changes in Germany as Hitler comes to power. Their love is tested with the new landscape and the realities of war, not the least of which is that Hanna is Jewish and Max is not. But unbeknownst to Hanna is the fact that Max has a secret, which causes him to leave for months at a time—a secret that Max is convinced will help him save Hanna if Germany becomes too dangerous for her because of her religion.

In 1946, Hanna Ginsberg awakens in a field outside of Berlin. Disoriented and afraid, she has no memory of the past ten years and no idea what has happened to Max. With no information as to Max’s whereabouts—or if he is even still alive—she decides to move to London to live with her sister while she gets her bearings. Even without an orchestra to play in, she throws herself completely into her music to keep alive her lifelong dream of becoming a concert violinist. But the music also serves as a balm to heal her deeply wounded heart and she eventually gets the opening she long hoped for. Even so, as the days, months, and years pass, taking her from London to Paris to Vienna to America, she continues to be haunted by her forgotten past, and the fate of the only man she has ever loved and cannot forget.

Told in alternating viewpoints—Max in the years leading up to WWII, and Hanna in the ten years after—In Another Time is a beautiful novel about love and survival, passion and music, across time and continents.




















[book] America's Jewish Women:
A History from Colonial Times to Today
by Pamela Nadell
March 5, 2019
WW NORTON

A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history.

What does it mean to be a Jewish woman in America? In a gripping historical narrative, Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people-from the colonial-era matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter, poet Emma Lazarus, to labor organizer Bessie Hillman and the great justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to scores of other activists, workers, wives, and mothers who helped carve out a Jewish American identity.

The twin threads binding these women together, she argues, are a strong sense of self and a resolute commitment to making the world a better place. Nadell recounts how Jewish women have been at the forefront of causes for centuries, fighting for suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, and feminism, and hoisting banners for Jewish rights around the world. Informed by shared values of America’s founding and Jewish identity, these women’s lives have left deep footprints in the history of the nation they call home.




















[book] Ethiopia:
Recipes and Traditions from
the Horn of Africa
by Yohanis Gebreyesus
Peter Cassidy (Illustrator)
March 1, 2019
Clarkson Potter
Interlink

Experience the wonderful flavors of Ethiopia and chef Yohanis's dazzling collection of recipes.

Ethiopia stands as a land apart: never colonized, it celebrates ancient traditions. The fascinatingly distinct cuisine is influenced by a history enriched with a religious mix of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as some of the most fertile land on the continent. The delicious dishes featured here include Doro Wat, chicken stewed with berbere spice, Siga Tibs, flashfried beef, and Asa Shorba, a hearty spiced fish soup, plus vegetarian dishes such as Gomen, collard greens with ginger and garlic, Azifa, green lentil salad, and Dinich Alicha, potatoes and carrots in an onion turmeric sauce.

Along with photography of the stunning landscapes and vibrant artisans of Ethiopia combined with insightful cultural and historical details this book demonstrates why Ethiopian food should be considered one of the world s most singular and enchanting cuisines.



























[book] How to Be a Capitalist
Without Any Capital:
The Four Rules You Must
Break To Get Rich
by Nathan Latka
March 5, 2019
Portfolio

I don't agree with his advice or family's ideas. I just like the surname of this Loudoun County guy who started a firm in his Virginia dorm room and got funding for projects from a Virginia billionaire. The host of a popular ENTREPRENEUR podcast, here are his thoughts on how to succeed monetarily. Not a MOT

He writes, “At nineteen, I founded a software company with $119 in my bank account. Five years later, it was valued at $10.5 million. I don't consider myself exceptionally brilliant. I just realized something few people know: You don't need lots of money or an original idea to get really rich. Now, I make more than $100,000 in passive income every month, while also running my own private equity firm and hosting The Top Entrepreneurs podcast, which has more than 10 million downloads. This book will show you how I went from college dropout to member of the New Rich. And I'm holding nothing back. You'll see my tax returns, my profit and loss statements, my email negotiations when buying and selling companies. It's time to forget your grandfather's advice. I'll teach you how to be a modern opportunist--investor, entrepreneur, or side hustler--by breaking these four golden rules of the old guard:

1. Focus on one skill: Wrong. Don't cultivate one great skill to get ahead. In today's business world, success goes to the multitaskers.
2. Be unique: Wrong. The way to get rich is not by launching a new idea but by aggressively copying others and then adding your own twist.
3. Focus on one goal: Wrong. Focus instead on creating a system to produce the outcome you want, not just once, but over and over again.
4. Appeal to the masses: Wrong. The masses are broke ($4k average net worth in America?). Let others cut a trail through the jungle so you can peacefully walk in and capitalize on their hard work.
By rejecting these defunct rules and following my unconventional path, you can copy other people's ideas shamelessly, bootstrap a start-up with almost no funding, invest in small local businesses for huge payoffs, and reap all the benefits.






















[book] How We Fight White Supremacy:
A Field Guide to Black Resistance
by Akiba Solomon
and Kenrya Rankin
March 26, 2019
NationBooks

This celebration of Black resistance, from protests to art to sermons to joy, offers a blueprint for the fight for freedom and justice-and ideas for how each of us can contribute

Many of us are facing unprecedented attacks on our democracy, our privacy, and our hard-won civil rights. If you're Black in the US, this is not new. As Colorlines editors Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin show, Black Americans subvert and resist life-threatening forces as a matter of course. In these pages, leading organizers, artists, journalists, comedians, and filmmakers offer wisdom on how they fight White supremacy. It's a must-read for anyone new to resistance work, and for the next generation of leaders building a better future.` Featuring contributions from: Ta-Nehisi Coates Tarana Burke Harry Belafonte adrienne maree brown Alicia Garza Patrisse Khan-Cullors Reverend Dr. Valerie Bridgeman Kiese Laymon Jamilah Lemieux Robin DG Kelley Damon Young Michael Arceneaux



















[book] Giraffes on Horseback Salad:
Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers,
and the Strangest Movie Never Made
by Josh Frank and Tim Heidecker
Manuela Pertega (Illustrator)
March 2019
Quirk
Surrealism meets Hollywood meets film history in this graphic novel, which turns an unproduced script by Salvador Dali into a fantastic comedy starring Groucho, Chico, and Harpo Marx.

Grab some popcorn and take a seat...The curtain is about to rise on a film like no other! But first, the real-life backstory: Giraffes on Horseback Salad was a Marx Brothers film written by modern art icon Salvador Dali, who’d befriended Harpo. Rejected by MGM, the script was thought lost forever. But author Josh Frank found it, and with comedian Tim Heidecker and Spanish comics creator Manuela Pertega, he’s re-created the film as a graphic novel in all its gorgeous full-color, cinematic, surreal glory. In the story, a businessman named Jimmy (played by Harpo) is drawn to the mysterious Surrealist Woman, whose very presence changes humdrum reality into Dali-esque fantasy. With the help of Groucho and Chico, Jimmy seeks to join her fantastical world—but forces of normalcy threaten to end their romance. Includes new Marx Brothers songs and antics, plus the real-world story behind the historic collaboration.


















[book] A Woman Is No Man:
A Novel
by Etaf Rum
March 2019
HarperCollins

Three generations of Palestinian-American women living in Brooklyn are torn between individual desire and the strict mores of Arab culture in this powerful debut—a heart-wrenching story of love, intrigue, courage, and betrayal that will resonate with women from all backgrounds, giving voice to the silenced and agency to the oppressed.

"Where I come from, we’ve learned to silence ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence will save us. Where I come from, we keep these stories to ourselves. To tell them to the outside world is unheard of—dangerous, the ultimate shame.”

Palestine, 1990. Seventeen-year-old Isra prefers reading books to entertaining the suitors her father has chosen for her. Over the course of a week, the naïve and dreamy girl finds herself quickly betrothed and married, and is soon living in Brooklyn. There Isra struggles to adapt to the expectations of her oppressive mother-in-law Fareeda and strange new husband Adam, a pressure that intensifies as she begins to have children—four daughters instead of the sons Fareeda tells Isra she must bear.

Brooklyn, 2008. Eighteen-year-old Deya, Isra’s oldest daughter, must meet with potential husbands at her grandmother Fareeda’s insistence, though her only desire is to go to college. Deya can’t help but wonder if her options would have been different had her parents survived the car crash that killed them when Deya was only eight. But her grandmother is firm on the matter: the only way to secure a worthy future for Deya is through marriage to the right man.

But fate has a will of its own, and soon Deya will find herself on an unexpected path that leads her to shocking truths about her family—knowledge that will force her to question everything she thought she knew about her parents, the past, and her own future.

Set in an America at once foreign to many and staggeringly close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is a story of culture and honor, secrets and betrayals, love and violence. It is an intimate glimpse into a controlling and closed cultural world, and a universal tale about family and the ways silence and shame can destroy those we have sworn to protect.






























[book] AMERICA'S JEWISH WOMEN
A History from Colonial Times to Today
(or maybe til 2018)
By Pamela S. Nadell
American University
March 2019
Norton

A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women have maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history.

What does it mean to be a Jewish woman in America? In a gripping historical narrative, Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people-from the colonial era’s Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter Emma Lazarus to Bessie Hillman and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to scores of other activists, workers, wives, and mothers who helped carve out a Jewish American identity.

The twin threads binding these women together, she argues, are a strong sense of self and a resolute commitment to making the world a better place. Nadell recounts how Jewish women have been at the forefront of causes for centuries, fighting for suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, and feminism, and hoisting banners for Jewish rights around the world. Informed by shared values of America’s founding and Jewish identity, these women’s lives have left deep footprints in the history of the nation they call home.































[book] The Altruists:
A Novel
by Andrew Ridker
March 5, 2019
VIKING

A vibrant and perceptive novel about a father's plot to win back his children's inheritance

Arthur Alter is in trouble. A middling professor at a Midwestern college, he can't afford his mortgage, he's exasperated his much-younger girlfriend, and his kids won't speak to him. And then there's the money--the small fortune his late wife Francine kept secret, which she bequeathed directly to his children.

Those children are Ethan, an anxious recluse living off his mother's money on a choice plot of Brooklyn real estate; and Maggie, a would-be do-gooder trying to fashion herself a noble life of self-imposed poverty. On the verge of losing the family home, Arthur invites his children back to St. Louis under the guise of a reconciliation. But in doing so, he unwittingly unleashes a Pandora's box of age-old resentments and long-buried memories--memories that orbit Francine, the matriarch whose life may hold the key to keeping them together.

Spanning New York, Paris, Boston, St. Louis, and a small desert outpost in Zimbabwe, The Altruists is a darkly funny (and ultimately tender) family saga in the tradition of Jonathan Franzen and Jeffrey Eugenides, with shades of Philip Roth and Zadie Smith. It's a novel about money, privilege, politics, campus culture, dating, talk therapy, rural sanitation, infidelity, kink, the American beer industry, and what it means to be a "good person."
























[book] Was Yosef on the Spectrum?:
A Contemporary Reading of the
Joseph Story in the Torah
by Samuel J. Levine
(Touro Law Center)

Urim Publications
Yosef’s behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and personal development are often difficult to understand and seem to defy explanation. This book presents a coherent and cohesive reading of the well known Bible story that offers a plausible account of Yosef’s behaviors, specifically those of an individual on the autism spectrum. His actions were not accepted by his family, but a wise pharaoh knew how to draw out, extract and apply his interpretations. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder.

Sure, the author is not a psychologist, but his insights can be used by you to view Jospeh differently and aid in new interpretations of the story.

























[book] When Brooklyn Was Queer:
A History
by Hugh Ryan
March 2019
St. Martin's Press

The never-before-told story of Brooklyn’s vibrant and forgotten queer history, from the mid-1850s up to the present day.

Hugh Ryan’s When Brooklyn Was Queer is a groundbreaking exploration of the LGBT history of Brooklyn, from the early days of Walt Whitman in the 1850s up through the queer women who worked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard during World War II, and beyond. No other book, movie, or exhibition has ever told this sweeping story. Not only has Brooklyn always lived in the shadow of queer Manhattan neighborhoods like Greenwich Village and Harlem, but there has also been a systematic erasure of its queer history-a great forgetting.

Ryan is here to unearth that history for the first time. In intimate, evocative, moving prose he discusses in new light the fundamental questions of what history is, who tells it, and how we can only make sense of ourselves through its retelling; and shows how the formation of the Brooklyn we know today is inextricably linked to the stories of the incredible people who created its diverse neighborhoods and cultures. Through them, When Brooklyn Was Queer brings Brooklyn’s queer past to life.
“Meticulous research and wonderfully skillful storytelling make Hugh Ryan’s book a revelation of queer history as well as a joy to read.” -Cleve Jones, Lambda award winning author of When We Rise






















[book] STONE MEN
The Palestinians Who
Built Israel
by Andrew Ross
NYU, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis
March 2019
Verso Books

The Story of Palestine's Stonemasons and the Building of Israel

Andrew Ross, a social activist, social activist, and author of essays in The Nation and defunct Village Voice, writes, "They demolish our houses while we build theirs." This is how a Palestinian stonemason, in line at a checkpoint outside a Jerusalem suburb, described his life to Andrew Ross. Palestinian "stone men", utilizing some of the best quality dolomitic limestone deposits in the world and drawing on generations of artisanal knowledge, have built almost every state in the Middle East except their own. Today the business of quarrying, cutting, fabrication, and dressing is Palestine's largest employer and generator of revenue, supplying the construction industry in Israel, along with other Middle East countries and even more overseas.

Drawing on hundreds of interviews, Ross writes about Palestinian labor, and how Palestinians worked at constructions sites that built the state of Israel, but how the industry generates revenue that is used to fight Israel – or as Ross writes, Arab labor built that separation barriers. Ross asks how the record of achievement and labor can be recognized.

Note: in 2015, Professor Ross was barred by UAE from visiting NYU's Abu Dhabi's campus, most likely due to his research into the labor conditions of migrant laborers in Abu Dhabi.

























[book] Cold War in the Islamic World:
Saudi Arabia, Iran and
the Struggle for Supremacy
by Dilip Hiro
March 1, 2019
Oxford University Press

For four decades Saudi Arabia and Iran have vied for influence in the Muslim world. At the heart of this ongoing Cold War between Riyadh and Tehran lie the Sunni-Shia divide, and the two countries' intertwined histories. Saudis see this as a conflict between Sunni and Shia; Iran's ruling clerics view it as one between their own Islamic Republic and an illegitimate monarchy.

This foundational schism has played out in a geopolitical competition for dominance in the region: Iran has expanded its influence in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon, while Saudi Arabia's hyperactive crown prince, Muhammad bin Salman, has intervened in Yemen, isolated Qatar and destabilized Lebanon.

Dilip Hiro examines the toxic rivalry between the two countries, tracing its roots and asking whether this Islamic Cold War is likely to end any time soon.

























[book] The Book of David:
David Horowitz:
Dean of United Nations Press Corps
and Founder: United Israel World Union
by Ralph E Buntyn
James D Tabor (Foreword)
March 2019
Innerquest

For 10 years, author Ralph Buntyn spent many hours with renowned United Nations correspondent and United Israel founder David Horowitz. They engaged in lengthy discussions about his foundational views drawn from his experience and unique vantage point in the two world bodies. The Book of David is based on his personal notes, extensive archival records and reflections from these conversations.

In Horowitz's autobiography Thirty-three Candles published in 1956, he wrote: "Thirty-three Candles undoubtedly calls for a sequel because much has occurred on the world scene since 1944, most of it confirming its major thesis. I feel I shall have to bow to this demand." The Book of David is dedicated to fulfilling Horowitz's request for a historical accounting of the period that followed.

This book documents the life and legacy of David Horowitz and stands as a permanent accounting of the unfolding events in his life and his role in the affairs of the United Nations, the State of Israel, and United Israel World Union during the latter half of the twentieth century.






























[book] Sin•a•gogue:
Sin and Failure in Jewish Thought
by David Bashevkin
Yeshiva University
March 18, 2019
Cherry Orchard Press

It is no more possible to think about religion without sin than it is to think about a garden without dirt.

By its very nature, the ideals of religion entail sin and failure. Judaism has its own language and framework for sin that expresses themselves both legally and philosophically. Both legal questions-circumstances where sin is permissible or mandated, the role of intention and action-as well as philosophical questions-why sin occurs and how does Judaism react to religious crisis-are considered within this volume. This book will present the concepts of sin and failure in Jewish thought, weaving together biblical and rabbinic studies to reveal a holistic portrait of the notion of sin and failure within Jewish thought.

The suffix "agogue" means to lead or grow. Here as well, Sin•a•gogue: Sin and Failure in Jewish Thought will provide its readers frameworks and strategies to develop even in the face of failure.




























[book] I'm Not Really a Waitress:
How One Woman Took Over
the Beauty Industry One
Color at a Time
by Suzi Weiss-Fischmann
with Catherine Knepper
March 12, 2019
SEAL PRESS

Known worldwide as the “First Lady of Nails,” OPI Co-Founder & Brand Ambassador Suzi Weiss-Fischmann initially made her mark on the beauty industry in 1989, when she created the first 30 OPI nail lacquers. She also pioneered the development of OPI partnerships, elevating consumers’ overall brand experience. Born in post-war, Communist Hungary to Holocaust survivors, Suzi immigrated to Israel before settling in the U.S. Personally, Suzi places a strong emphasis on Tzedakah contributions through her Fischmann Family Foundation – She serves on the Board of Directors of the Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School

Today, OPI is known as a global beauty icon, famous for its trend-setting colors, unforgettable shade names, and celebrity collaborations with the biggest stars from film, television, music, and sports. But behind all the glamour is the little-known tale of OPI's unlikely origins-an intimate and inspiring story of a timid schoolgirl who arrives in this country with little money and no English and becomes the business leader and industry game-changer known worldwide as "Suzi, the First Lady of Nails."

In I'm Not Really a Waitress--titled after OPI's top-selling nail color--Suzi reveals the events that led her family to flee Communist Hungary and eventually come to New York City in pursuit of the American dream. She shares how those early experiences gave rise to OPI's revolutionary vision of freedom and empowerment, and how Suzi transformed an industry by celebrating the power of color-and of women themselves.



























[book] Win or Die:
Leadership Secrets from
Game of Thrones
by Bruce Craven
(Columbia Business School)
March 19, 2019
Thomas Dunne Books

A guide to leading without losing your head, inspired by the bestselling books and smash television series Game of Thrones.

"When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die. There is no middle ground." -Cersei Lannister

One of the great joys of Game of Thrones is strategizing what bold moves you'd make in this bloody, volatile world-from the comfort of your living room. And one of the great terrors of being a leader is knowing your real world can be just as brutal-and offices bring no comfort.

Every day you're presented with opportunities and challenges, and must decide which roads to follow, which risks to confront, when to deny an opportunity and when to pursue the call to adventure. And you won't know whether you'll profit or fail while you're in the thick of it. In Win or Die: Leadership Secrets from Game of Thrones, Bruce Craven brilliantly analyzes the journeys of the best and worst leaders in Westeros, so that leaders can create their own narratives of success.

Craven considers beloved characters such as Ned Stark, Jon Snow, Daenerys Targaryen, and Tyrion Lannister as they make terrible decisions and fatal mistakes, but also achieve incredible victories and surprising successes, learning and growing along their (often bloody) ways. Readers will learn how to face conflict and build resilience, develop contextual and emotional intelligence, develop their vision, and more.

This entertaining and accessible guide will show readers how to turn danger into opportunity, even when dragons threaten.



























[book] Too Much Is Not Enough:
A Memoir of Fumbling Toward Adulthood
by Andrew Rannells
March 12, 2019
Crown Archetype

Rannells' essay in The New York Times about a late night hookup and the death of his father was such a brutally honest success that a full memoir is greatly anticipated.
From the star of Broadway's The Book of Mormon and HBO's Girls, comes the heartfelt and hilarious memoir of a Midwestern guy surviving bad auditions, bad relationships, and some really bad highlights as he chases his dreams in New York City. When Andrew Rannells arrived in New York City from Omaha, Nebraska in 1997, he, like many, saw the city as a chance to break free. To start over. To transform the fiercely ambitious but sexually confused teenager he saw in the mirror into the Broadway leading man of his dreams.

In Too Much Is Not Enough, Rannells takes us on the journey of a twentysomething hungry to experience everything: new friends, wild nights, great art, standing ovations. And at the heart of his hunger lies a powerful drive to reconcile the boy he was and the man he might have been with the man he wants to be. As Rannells reveals how he merged these Andrews into the one who made his Broadway debut at 26, he also shares stories from his path to the Great White Way, from horrible auditions and behind-the-curtain romances to the exhilaration of landing his first gig in Hairspray and the heartbreaking death of his father at the height of his ascent. Along the way, Rannells learns that you never really leave your past--or your family--behind; that the most painful, and perversely motivating, jobs are the ones you almost get; and that sometimes the most unforgettable nights are marked not by the hot clubs you danced at, but by the recap over diner food after.



























[book] FUNNY MAN
MEL BROOKS
by Patrick McGilligan
March 19, 2019
Harper (no, it's not Yale Jewish Lives)

A deeply textured and compelling biography of comedy giant Mel Brooks, covering his rags-to-riches life and triumphant career in television, films, and theater, from Patrick McGilligan, the acclaimed author of Young Orson: The Years of Luck and Genius on the Path to Citizen Kane and Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light.

Oscar, Emmy, Tony, and Grammy award–winner Mel Brooks was behind (and sometimes in front the camera too) of some of the most influential comedy hits of our time, including The 2,000 Year Old Man, Get Smart, The Producers, Blazing Saddles, and Young Frankenstein. But before this actor, writer, director, comedian, and composer entertained the world, his first audience was his family.

The fourth and last child of Max and Kitty Kaminsky, Mel Brooks was born on his family’s kitchen table in Brooklyn, New York, in 1926, and was not quite three-years-old when his father died of tuberculosis. Growing up in a household too poor to own a radio, Mel was short and homely, a mischievous child whose birth role was to make the family laugh.

Beyond boyhood, after transforming himself into Mel Brooks, the laughs that came easily inside the Kaminsky family proved more elusive. His lifelong crusade to transform himself into a brand name of popular humor is at the center of master biographer Patrick McGilligan’s Funny Man. In this exhaustively researched and wonderfully novelistic look at Brooks’ personal and professional life, McGilligan lays bare the strengths and drawbacks that shaped Brooks’ psychology, his willpower, his persona, and his comedy.

McGilligan insightfully navigates the epic ride that has been the famous funnyman’s life story, from Brooks’s childhood in Williamsburg tenements and breakthrough in early television—working alongside Sid Caesar and Carl Reiner—to Hollywood and Broadway peaks (and valleys). His book offers a meditation on the Jewish immigrant culture that influenced Brooks, snapshots of the golden age of comedy, behind the scenes revelations about the celebrated shows and films, and a telling look at the four-decade romantic partnership with actress Anne Bancroft that superseded Brooks’ troubled first marriage. Engrossing, nuanced and ultimately poignant, Funny Man delivers a great man’s unforgettable life story and an anatomy of the American dream of success.











[book] RABBA, MAHARAT,
RABBANIT, REBBETZIN:
Women with Leadership Authority
According to Halachah
by Rabbi Daniel Sperber, PhD
(Bar Ilan University)
March 2019
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A book about women in Jewish leadership and authority... wait for it... by a man. I jest... But seriously, how many book by religious publishers are authored by women?

Welcoming Women Clergy: Women with Leadership Authority According to Halacha examines in detail the legitimacy for feminine leadership in Jewish law. Exploring the various manifestations of female leadership, whether as women rabbis or other forms of female halachic adjudication, Welcoming Women Clergy responds to the standard criticisms leveled at the recent phenomenon of female authority within the Orthodox community. In this ground-breaking book, Rabbi Professor Daniel Sperber argues the halachic, political, and sociological levels of female leadership in Judaism.


















[book] Salt Smoke Time:
Homesteading and Heritage Techniques
for the Modern Kitchen
by Will Horowitz, and
Marisa Dobson, and
Julie Horowitz
March 2019
William Morrow

A celebrated young chef hailed by the New York Times as a "fearless explorer," brings time-tested heritage techniques to the modern home kitchen.

Executive chef and owner of New York City’s highly acclaimed Ducks Eatery and Harry & Ida’s, Will Horowitz is also an avid forager, fisherman, and naturalist.

In Salt Smoke Time, he explores ideas of self-reliance, sustainability, and seasonality, illuminating our connection to the natural world and the importance of preserving American stories and food traditions. Drawing from the recipes and methods handed down by our ancestors, Horowitz teaches today’s home cooks a variety of invaluable techniques, including curing & brining, cold smoking, canning, pickling, and dehydration. He provides an in-depth understanding of milk products, fishing, trapping seafood, hunting, butchering meat, cooking whole animals, foraging, and harvesting, and even offers tips on wild medicine.

Horowitz takes traditional foods that have been enjoyed for generations and turns them into fresh new (non kosher) dishes. With Salt Smoke Time, you’ll learn how to make his signature Jerky and a host of other sensational recipes, including Smoked Tomato and Black Cardamom Jam, Fermented Corn on the Cob with Duck Liver Butter, North Fork Clam Bake, Preserved Duck Breast & Mussels with Blood Orange, Crab Apple Cream, Blac Walnut and Smoked Cream Ice Cream, Smoked Trout, Smoked Cod, Smoked Long Island Crescent Farms Duck Breast, and Will’s Smoked Beef Brisket.

Complete with step-by-step line drawings inspired by vintage Boy Scout and Field Guides and illustrated with beautiful rustic photos, Salt Smoke Time is both a nostalgic study of our roots, and a handy guide for rediscovering self-reliance and independence in our contemporary lives.
















[book] The Lions' Den:
Zionism and the Left from
Hannah Arendt to Noam Chomsky
by Susie Linfield
March 2019
Yale University Press

A lively intellectual history that explores how prominent midcentury public intellectuals approached Zionism and then the State of Israel itself and its conflicts with the Arab world

In this lively intellectual history of the political Left, cultural critic Susie Linfield investigates how eight prominent twentieth-century intellectuals struggled with the philosophy of Zionism, and then with Israel and its conflicts with the Arab world. Constructed as a series of interrelated portraits that combine the personal and the political, the book includes philosophers, historians, journalists, and activists such as Hannah Arendt, Arthur Koestler, I. F. Stone, and Noam Chomsky. In their engagement with Zionism, these influential thinkers also wrestled with the twentieth century’s most crucial political dilemmas: socialism, nationalism, democracy, colonialism, terrorism, and anti-Semitism. In other words, in probing Zionism, they confronted the very nature of modernity and the often catastrophic histories of our time. By examining these leftist intellectuals, Linfield also seeks to understand how the contemporary Left has become focused on anti-Zionism and how Israel itself has moved rightward.




















[book] Hate:
The Rising Tide of
Anti-Semitism in France
(and What It Means for Us)
by Marc Weitzmann
March 12, 2019
HMH

From an award-winning journalist, Tablet writer, a provocative, deeply reported exposé of the history and present crisis of anti-Semitism in France—and its dire message for the rest of the world.

What is the connection between a rise in the number of random attacks against Jews on the streets of France and strategically planned terrorist acts targeting the French population at large? Before the attacks on Charlie Hebdo, the Bataclan night club, and others made international headlines, Marc Weitzmann had noticed a surge of seemingly random acts of violence against the Jews of France. His disturbing and eye-opening new book, Hate, proposes that both the small-scale and large-scale acts of violence have their roots in not one, but two very specific forms of populism: an extreme and violent ethos of hate spread among the Muslim post-colonial suburban developments on the one hand, and the deeply-rooted French ultra-conservatism of the far right. Weitzmann’s shrewd on-the-ground reporting is woven throughout with the history surrounding the legacies of the French Revolution, the Holocaust, and Gaulist “Arab-French policy.”

Hate is a chilling and important account that shows how the rebirth of French Anti-Semitism relates to the new global terror wave, revealing France to be a veritable localized laboratory for a global phenomenon.




















[book] The Back Channel:
A Memoir of American Diplomacy
and the Case for Its Renewal
by William J. Burns
(Carnegie Endowment for Peace)
March 12, 2019
Random House

From America’s “secret diplomatic weapon” (The Atlantic)
From America's Abba Eban, America's finest U.S. Carter Admin diplomat
A man who has served five presidents and ten secretaries of state — comes an impassioned argument for the enduring value of diplomacy in an increasingly volatile world.

Great insights on Iran's bombs, Jordan's transition, Putin, the Arab Spring

Over the course of more than three decades as an American diplomat, William J. Burns played a central role in the most consequential diplomatic episodes of his time—from the bloodless end of the Cold War to the collapse of post–Cold War relations with Putin’s Russia, from post–9/11 tumult in the Middle East to the secret nuclear talks with Iran. Burns is widely regarded as one of the most distinguished and admired American statesmen of the last half century. Upon his retirement in 2014, Secretary John Kerry said Burns belonged on “a very short list of American diplomatic legends,” alongside George Kennan.

In The Back Channel, Burns recounts, with novelistic detail and incisive analysis, some of the seminal moments of his career. Drawing on a trove of newly declassified cables and memos, he gives readers a rare inside look at American diplomacy in action. His dispatches from war-torn Chechnya and Qaddafi’s bizarre camp in the Libyan desert and his warnings of the “Perfect Storm” that would be unleashed by the Iraq War will reshape our understanding of history—and inform the policy debates of the future. Burns sketches the contours of effective American leadership in a world that resembles neither the zero-sum Cold War contest of his early years as a diplomat nor the “unipolar moment” of American primacy that followed. Ultimately, The Back Channel is an eloquent, deeply informed, and timely story of a life spent in service of American interests abroad. It is also a powerful reminder, in a time of great turmoil, of the enduring importance of diplomacy.






















[book] Good Talk:
A Memoir in Conversations
by Mira Jacob
March 2019
One World

A bold, wry, and intimate graphic memoir about American identity, interracial families, and the realities that divide us, from the acclaimed author of The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing.
“Who taught Michael Jackson to dance?”
“Is that how people really walk on the moon?”
“Is it bad to be brown?”
“Are white people afraid of brown people?”


Like many six-year-olds, Mira Jacob’s half-Jewish, half-Indian son, Z, has questions about everything. At first they are innocuous enough, but as tensions from the 2016 election spread from the media into his own family, they become much, much more complicated. Trying to answer him honestly, Mira has to think back to where she’s gotten her own answers: her most formative conversations about race, color, sexuality, and, of course, love.

How brown is too brown?
Can Indians be racist?
What does real love between really different people look like?

Written with humor and vulnerability, this deeply relatable graphic memoir is a love letter to the art of conversation—and to the hope that hovers in our most difficult questions.























[book] Typically Jewish
Paperback
by Ms. Nancy Kalikow Maxwell
March 2019
The JPS – Jewish Publication Society

Is laughter essential to Jewish identity? Do Jews possess special radar for recognizing members of the tribe? Since Jews live longer and make love more often, why don’t more people join the tribe? “More deli than deity” writer Nancy Kalikow Maxwell poses many such questions in eight chapters—“Worrying,” “Kvelling,” “Dying,” “Noshing,” “Laughing,” “Detecting,” “Dwelling,” and “Joining”—exploring what it means to be “typically Jewish.” While unearthing answers from rabbis, researchers, and her assembled Jury on Jewishness (Jewish friends she roped into conversation), she—and we—make a variety of discoveries. For example:

Jews worry about continuity, even though Rabbi Mordechai of Lechovitz prohibited even that: “All worrying is forbidden, except to worry that one is worried.”

Kvell-worthy fact: About 75 percent of American Jews give to charity versus 63 percent of Americans as a whole.

Since reciting Kaddish brought secular Jews to synagogue, the rabbis, aware of their captive audience, moved the prayer to the end of the service.

Who’s Jewish? About a quarter of Nobel Prize winners, an estimated 80 percent of comedians at one point, and the winner of Nazi Germany’s “Most Perfect Aryan Child Contest.”

Readers will enjoy learning about how Jews feel, think, act, love, and live. They’ll also schmooze as they use the book’s “Typically Jewish, Atypically Fun Discussion Guide.”


























[book] America's Jewish Women:
A History from Colonial Times to Today
by Pamela Nadell
March 2019
Norton

A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history.

What does it mean to be a Jewish woman in America? In a gripping historical narrative, Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people-from the colonial-era matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter, poet Emma Lazarus, to labor organizer Bessie Hillman and the great justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to scores of other activists, workers, wives, and mothers who helped carve out a Jewish American identity.

The twin threads binding these women together, she argues, are a strong sense of self and a resolute commitment to making the world a better place. Nadell recounts how Jewish women have been at the forefront of causes for centuries, fighting for suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, and feminism, and hoisting banners for Jewish rights around the world. Informed by shared values of America’s founding and Jewish identity, these women’s lives have left deep footprints in the history of the nation they call home.
20 black and white illustrations


























[book] Who Wants to Be a Jewish Writer?:
And Other Essays
by Adam Kirsch
March 19, 2019
Yale University Press

Roth, Malamud, Bellow,,, did not want to be called Jewish writers. Maybe only Wouk accepted it. What did it mean? Why did a top Christian writer begin a series featuring a Jewish character?

From one of today’s keenest critics comes a collection of essays on poetry, religion, and the connection between the two

Adam Kirsch is one of today’s finest literary critics. This collection brings together his essays on poetry, religion, and the intersections between them, with a particular focus on Jewish literature. He explores the definition of Jewish literature, the relationship between poetry and politics, and the future of literary reputation in the age of the internet.

Several essays look at the way Jewish writers such as Stefan Zweig and Isaac Deutscher, who coined the phrase “the non-Jewish Jew,” have dealt with politics. Kirsch also examines questions of spirituality and morality in the writings of contemporary poets, including Christian Wiman, Kay Ryan, and Seamus Heaney. He closes by asking why so many American Jewish writers have resisted that category, inviting us to consider “Is there such a thing as Jewish literature?”





















[book] Kushner, Inc.:
Greed. Ambition. Corruption.
The Extraordinary Story of
Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump
by Vicky Ward
March 18, 2019
ST. Martin's Press

Ward, a former Vanity Fair and current Huffpost contributor who was called a tattler of Wall Street focuses on “Javanka” - the combo of Jared and Ivanka.

She writes that Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are the self-styled Prince and Princess of America. Their power in Donald Trump’s White House is unconstitutional and dangerous. In Kushner Inc., Vicky Ward digs beneath what she writes is a myth the couple has created that depicts themselves as the voices of reason in an otherwise crazy presidency and reveals that Jared and Ivanka are not just the President’s chief enablers, they are, like him, disdainful of rules, of laws, and of ethics. She wrotes that the couple are entitled inheritors of the worst kind; they are both ignorant and arrogant, and they harbor an insatiable lust for power and a future in the White House.

Ward follows their trajectory from New Jersey and New York City to the White House, where the couple’s many forays into policy-making and national security have mocked long-standing U.S. policy and protocol. They have pursued a personal agenda that is making them very rich while their actions have mostly gone unchecked. In Kushner Inc., Ward holds Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump accountable: she unveils the couple’s secret self-serving transactional motivations and how those have propelled them into the highest levels of the US government where no one, the President included, has been able to stop them.






















[book] The World of Aufbau:
Hitler's Refugees in America
by Peter Schrag
March 19, 2019
University of Wisconsin Press

Aufbau—a German-language weekly, published in New York and circulated nationwide—was an essential platform for the generation of refugees from Hitler and the displaced people and concentration camp survivors who arrived in the United States after the war. The publication served to link thousands of readers looking for friends and loved ones in every part of the world.

In its pages Aufbau focused on concerns that strongly impacted this community in the aftermath of World War II: anti-Semitism in the United States and in Europe, the ever-changing immigration and naturalization procedures, debates about the designation of Hitler refugees as enemy aliens, questions about punishment for the Holocaust and other Nazi crimes, the struggle for compensation and restitution, and the fight for a Jewish homeland.

Shrag, a refugee and Guggenheim Fellow, examines the columns and advertisements that chronicled the social and cultural life of that generation and maintained a detailed account of German-speaking cultures in exile. Peter Schrag is the first to present a definitive account of the influential publication that brought postwar refugees together and into the American mainstream.















[book] H. G. Adler:
A Life in Many Worlds
by Peter Filkins
(Bard College at Simons Rock)
March 1, 2019
University of Wisconsin Press

The biography of H.G. Adler (1910-88) is the story of a survivor of Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, and two other concentration camps who not only lived through the greatest cataclysm of the 20th century, but someone who also devoted his literary and scholarly career to telling the story of those who perished in over two dozen books of fiction, poetry, history, sociology, and religion. And yet for much of his life he remained almost entirely unknown.

A writer's writer, a scholar of seminal, pioneering works on the Holocaust, a renowned radio essayist in postwar Germany, a last representative of the Prague Circle of literature headed by Kafka, a key contributor to the prosecution in the trial of Adolf Eichmann, Adler was a man of his time whose times lived through him. His is the story of many others, but also one that is singularly his own. And at its heart lies a profound story of love and perseverance amid the loss of his first wife, Gertrud Klepetar, who accompanied her mother to the gas chamber in Auschwitz, and the courtship and extended correspondence with Bettina Gross, a Prague artist who escaped to the Britain, only to later learn that her mother had also been in Theresienstadt with Adler before her eventual death in Auschwitz. His delivery of a lecture in Theresienstadt commemorating Kafka's sixtieth birthday, and with Kafka's favorite sister present; the nurturing of a younger generation of artists and intellectuals, including the Israeli artist Jehuda Bacon and the Serbian novelist Ivan Ivanji; the preservation of Viktor Ullmann's compositions and his opera The Emperor of Atlantis, only to see them premiered decades later to world acclaim; and the penury of postwar life while churning out the novels, poetry, and scholarship that would make his reputation - all of these are part of a life survived in the moment, but dedicated to the future, and that of a man committed to helping human dignity survive in his time and that to come.





























[book] A DELICATE AGGRESSION
Savagery and Survival in the
Iowa Writers' Workshop
by Professor David O. Dowling
(University of Iowa)
March 2019
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS

A vibrant history of the renowned and often controversial Iowa Writers’ Workshop and its celebrated alumni and faculty

As the world’s preeminent creative writing program, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop has produced an astonishing number of distinguished writers and poets since its establishment in 1936. Its alumni and faculty include twenty-eight Pulitzer Prize winners, six U.S. poet laureates, and numerous National Book Award winners. This volume follows the program from its rise to prominence in the early 1940s under director Paul Engle, who promoted the “workshop” method of classroom peer criticism.

Meant to simulate the rigors of editorial and critical scrutiny in the publishing industry, this educational style created an environment of both competition and community, cooperation and rivalry. Focusing on some of the exceptional authors who have participated in the program—such as Flannery O’Connor, Dylan Thomas, Kurt Vonnegut, Jane Smiley, Sandra Cisneros, T. C. Boyle, and Marilynne Robinson—David Dowling examines how the Iowa Writers’ Workshop has shaped professional authorship, publishing industries, and the course of American literature.




























[book] Grover Goes to Israel
Board book
by Joni Kibort Sussman
Tom Leigh (Illustrator)
MARCH 2019
Kar Ben
Shalom! Hop aboard a plane with Grover to visit Israel in this board book from Kar-Ben featuring characters from Sesame Street. Join Grover as he tours the sights of Israel, munching on pita at Machane Yehuda and swimming in Eilat.





























[book] A Hoopoe Says Oop!:
Animals of Israel Board book
by Jamie Kiffel-alcheh
Ivana Kuman (Illustrator)
MARCH 2019
Kar Ben

Ibexes on crater ledges
Call out, "Maa!" and walk the edges.
A rhyming introduction to some of Israel's unique animals like the hoopoe (the national bird of Israel), hyrax, and sand cats.





























[book] A Woman First:
First Woman:
The Deeply Personal
Memoir by the Former President
by Selina Meyer
Former President of the United States
March 19, 2019
Abrams Press
The long-awaited memoir of her tumultuous year in office, A Woman First: First Woman is an intimate first-person account of the public and private lives of Selina Meyer, America’s first woman president. Known and beloved throughout the world as a vocal and fearless advocate for adult literacy, fighting AIDS, our military families, and as a stalwart champion of the oppressed, especially the long-suffering people of Tibet, President Meyer is considered one of the world’s most notable people. In her own words, she reveals the innermost workings of the world’s most powerful office, sharing previous secret details along with her own personal feelings about the historic events of her time.

In A Woman First: First Woman, President Selina Meyer tells the story of her times the way that only she could, Readers will gain new insights not only into Meyer herself but also the mechanics of governing and the many colorful personalities in Meyer’s orbit, including world leaders and her devoted cadre of allies and aides, many of them already familiar to the American people.

























[book] Never a Native
by Alice Shalvi
March 2019


The memoir of Alice Shalvi, a pioneer in advancing the status of women in Israel and in religious girls' education. Well known as a public speaker and a social activist, Shalvi's contribution to Jewish education, to Israeli culture and to Jewish feminism has been widely recognized.

Born in Germany in 1926 to Orthodox parents, Shalvi grew up in London and studied English at Cambridge, before moving to Jerusalem in 1949 where she went on to pursue a PhD at Hebrew University, eventually teaching English Literature. In 1950, Shalvi met and married her husband, Moshe Shelkowitz (later Shalvi), who died in 2013. One of Shalvi's greatest accomplishments was the establishment of the Pelech School which she headed from 1975 to 1990. This experimental/ progressive religious high school for girls in Jerusalem has become a model for women's Orthodox education across the country.























[book] Sin•a•gogue:
Sin and Failure in
Jewish Thought
by David Bashevkin
March 18, 2019

It is no more possible to think about religion without sin than it is to think about a garden without dirt.

By its very nature, the ideals of religion entail sin and failure. Judaism has its own language and framework for sin that expresses themselves both legally and philosophically. Both legal questions-circumstances where sin is permissible or mandated, the role of intention and action-as well as philosophical questions-why sin occurs and how does Judaism react to religious crisis-are considered within this volume. This book will present the concepts of sin and failure in Jewish thought, weaving together biblical and rabbinic studies to reveal a holistic portrait of the notion of sin and failure within Jewish thought.

The suffix "agogue" means to lead or grow. Here as well, Sin•a•gogue: Sin and Failure in Jewish Thought will provide its readers frameworks and strategies to develop even in the face of failure
























[book] War and Religion:
Europe and the Mediterranean from
the First through the Twenty-first Centuries
by Arnaud Blin
March 19, 2019
Univ of California Press

The resurgence of violent terrorist organizations claiming to act in the name of God has rekindled dramatic public debate about the connection between violence and religion and its history.

Offering a panoramic view of the tangled history of war and religion throughout Europe and the Mediterranean, War and Religion takes a hard look at the tumultuous history of war in its relationship to religion. Arnaud Blin examines how this relationship began through the concurrent emergence of the Mediterranean empires and the great monotheistic faiths. Moving through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and into the modern era, Blin concludes with why the link between violence and religion endures. For each time period, Blin shows how religion not only fueled a great number of conflicts but also defined the manner in which wars were conducted and fought.























[book] Rewriting Masculinity:
Gideon, Men, and Might
by Kelly J. Murphy
March 2019
Oxford Univ Press

Who is the biblical Gideon? A mighty warrior, or a fearful son? Hesitant solider, clever tactician, commanding father, ruthless killer, idolater, or illegitimate king?

Gideon has long challenged readers of the book of Judges. How did so many conflicting portraits become inscribed in our biblical text and its reception? What might these portraits tell us about the authors, editors, and interpreters of Gideon's story-especially their expectations for men?

Rewriting Masculinity interweaves redaction criticism, reception history, and masculinity studies to explore how Gideon's image changes from a mighty warrior to a weakling, from a successful leader to a man who led Israel astray. Kelly J. Murphy first considers the ways that older traditions about Gideon were rewritten throughout ancient Israel's history, sometimes in order to align the story of Gideon with new ideas about what it meant to act like a man. At other times, she shows that the story of Gideon was used to explain why older standards of masculinity no longer worked in new contexts. Murphy then traces how some later interpreters, from the ancient to the contemporary, continually rewrote Gideon in light of their own models for men, might, and masculinity.

Murphy offers an in-depth case study of how a biblical text was continuously updated. Emphasizing the importance of reading biblical stories and expansions alongside their later reception, she shows that the story of Gideon the mighty warrior is, in many ways, the story of masculinity in miniature: a constantly-transforming construct.























[book] My Struggle for Peace:
The Diary of Moshe Sharett, 1953–1954, 1956
ALL THREE VOLUMES
by Moshe Sharett
Edited by Neil Caplan and Yaakov Sharett
March 24, 2019
Indiana Univ Press

My Struggle for Peace is a remarkable political document offering insights into the complex workings of the young Israeli political system, set against the backdrop of the disintegration of the country’s fragile armistice with the Arab states. Replete with the diarist’s candid comments on Israel’s first generation leaders and world statesmen of the day, the diary also tells the dramatic human story of a political career cut short-the removal of an unusually sensitive, dedicated, and talented public servant. My Struggle for Peace is, above all, an intimate record of the decline of Moshe Sharett’s moderate approach and the rise of more "activist-militant" trends in Israeli society, culminating in the Suez/Sinai war of 1956. The diary challenges the popular narrative that Israel’s confrontation with its neighbors was unavoidable by offering daily evidence of Sharett’s statesmanship, moderation, diplomacy, and concern for Israel’s place in international affairs.

These is the long-awaited 3-volume English abridgement of Sharett’s Yoman Ishi [Personal diary] (Ma’ariv, 1978). It maintains the integrity, flavor, and impact of the 8-volume Hebrew original and includes additional documentary material that was not accessible at the time. The volumes are also available to purchase as a set or individually.

























[book] Ten Drugs:
How Plants, Powders, and
Pills Have Shaped the
History of Medicine
by Thomas Hager
March 2019
Harry Abrams

Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be an oddball researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. Piece together these stories, as Thomas Hager does in this remarkable, century-spanning history, and you can trace the evolution of our culture and the practice of medicine.

Beginning with opium, the “joy plant,” which has been used for 10,000 years, Hager tells a captivating story of medicine. His subjects include the largely forgotten female pioneer who introduced smallpox inoculation (inoculation, not vaca-vaccination) to Britain from the Ottoman women she meant; the infamous knockout drops; the first antibiotic; which saved countless lives; the first antipsychotic, which helped empty public mental hospitals, Viagra, statins, and the new frontier of monoclonal antibodies. This is a deep, wide-ranging, and wildly entertaining book.























[book] On the Run in Nazi Berlin:
A Memoir
by Bert Lewyn and
Bev Saltzman Lewyn
March 2019
Chicago Review Press

BERLIN, 1942. The Gestapo arrest eighteen-year-old Bert Lewyn and his parents, sending the latter to their deaths and Bert to work in a factory making guns for the Nazi war effort. Miraculously tipped off the morning the Gestapo round up all the Jews who work in the factories, Bert goes underground. He finds shelter sometimes with compassionate civilians, sometimes with people who find his skills useful and sometimes in the cellars of bombed-out buildings. Without proper identity papers, he survives as a hunted Jew in the flames and terror of Nazi Berlin in part by successfully mimicking non-Jews, even masquerading as an SS officer. But the Gestapo are hot on his trail…

Before World War II, 160,000 Jews lived in Berlin. By 1945, only 3,000 remained alive. Bert was one of the few, and his thrilling memoir—from witnessing the famous 1933 book burning to the aftermath of the war in a displaced persons camp—offers an unparalleled depiction of the life of a runaway Jew caught in the heart of the Nazi empire.






















APRIL 2019 BOOKS


[book] Wounds into Wisdom:
Healing Intergenerational Jewish Trauma
by Rabbi Tirzah Firestone PhD
April 16, 2019
Adam Kadmon Books

Note: On April 24, 2019, at the NYC 92StY, Rabbi Firestone will appear with Gloria Steinem to launch the book and discuss trauma and recovery and Jewish wisdom. Steinem worked closely with Firestone's sister, Shulamith

Do Many In The Jewish Community and Israel suffer from intergenerational PTSD?
Should we acknowledge that Jewish historical trauma, left unexamined, is having an effect on Jewish ethics and actions?
When Firestone was 25 and searching exploring various spiritual traditions, she dreamed of a Hungarian skeletal woman in a fur coat. An intergenerational trauma of the Shoah perhaps, passed down through her parents. Although they did not speak of their trauma, it passed to their children. At forty, she learned the story of her extended family and their slaughter by the Nazis. As Professor Dori Laub writes, one has to know the buried truth in order to live.

The lasting effects of individual trauma are now widely recognized. But what of the consequences of extreme trauma on an entire ethnic group?
New research in neuroscience and clinical psychology demonstrates that even when they are hidden, trauma histories - from persecution and deportation to the horrors of the Holocaust - leave imprints on the minds and bodies of future generations.

Wounds Into Wisdom makes a compelling case that trauma legacies can be transformed and healed. Fusing contemporary neuroscience, psychology, and ancient Jewish wisdom and values, this work provides a roadmap for Jews, and all individuals and groups with trauma history, who wish to seize the power to change their lives.

Gripping case studies and interviews with trauma survivors and their descendants - from Berlin to Shanghai, Cairo to Colorado - demonstrate what Viktor Frankl called, "the uniquely human potential to transform personal tragedy into triumph."

As a rabbi and psychotherapist who has studied and counseled hundreds of Jewish families and individuals for over 30 years, Tirzah Firestone brings to life these real people who have surmounted their tragedies. From them we learn the many ways that past trauma shapes the present-from the timid young woman who discovers she has been repeating her lost grandmother's exact words, to the Israeli war hero who has endured decades of terrifying nightmares.

From these moving testimonies Firestone distills seven principles, rich in Jewish wisdom, that mark the way to new freedom. Building on the work of acclaimed traumatologists such as
Drs. Rachel Yehuda,
Bessel van der Kolk, and
Yael Danieli,
Rabbi Firestone shows how people can transform the residual effects of their families' painful pasts and change their long-term futures. The brave characters in Wounds Into Wisdom remind us of our own human capacity to rise up after devastation and reclaim our innate wisdom and inner freedom.

Wounds Into Wisdom also awakens us to the impact of collective trauma in the world today, as entire populations are being dislocated by war, poverty, and climatic changes. The book provides a template for people everywhere to emerge from the wreckage of their tragedies and reshape their destinies. Relevant not only to the tragic past, but to the world of turmoil and displacement we live in today, Wounds into Wisdom is an essential book for our times.

“deeply moving book...to find sources of solace to transform wounds into wisdom.” —Susannah Heschel, Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies, Dartmouth College "...grounding it in her own family’s story makes the book come alive."-Judith Rosenbaum, PhD, Executive Director of Jewish Women's Archive














[book] Rachel's Tomb
by J. A. Bernstein
April 15, 2019
New Issues Poetry and Prose

“Rachel’s Tomb is a deftly ambitious novel about young soldiers in the Israeli Defense Forces and the loved ones they’ve left behind. It brings to life with great artistry a diverse cast of secular and religious Jews, Arabs, Russian and Ethiopian immigrants, soldiers and civilians—a complex image of Israel. The book’s absurdist humor gracefully counterpoints the waste, loss, and early sorrow faced by its indelibly drawn characters.”—Zachary Lazar

“Rachel’s Tomb is at once profound, moving and deeply engaging, a novel that puts you right in the middle of one of the world’s most ancient and intractable conflicts.” —T. C. Boyle

“There’s no shortage of complexity in Bernstein’s book—politically and emotionally—but the writing is so clear and engaging that it allows the layers to emerge with a beautiful lucidity, and for the reader to live and think alongside them. There is a deep thoughtfulness on every page of this notable debut.”—Aimee Bender

“From the commander’s seat (a toilet) at Rachel’s Tomb Outpost, Joshua Bernstein creates a multi-narrational novel that plumbs the nature of war with humor, compassion, and an astounding historical depth, one that ricochets from the sacred to the profane in a trigger’s stroke. He writes about war from the inside and creates complex characters that are often as joyously imperiled as an e.e. cummings line: ‘death’s clever enormous voice which hides in a fragility / of poppies…’ —A complex and moving novel that confronts the loss of innocence and profoundly questions notions of temporality.”—Mark Irwin
“Rachel’s Tomb marks the arrival of an important new voice in American letters. J. A. Bernstein writes with power and sympathy and an unerring eye, in prose of crackling intensity. This is a magnificent first novel. I eagerly await the next.”—Steve Yarbrough




























[book] Hermann Cohen and
the Crisis of Liberalism:
The Enchantment of the
Public Sphere
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Paul E. Nahme
(Brown University)
April 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

Hermann Cohen (1842–1918) is often held to be one of the most important Jewish philosophers of the nineteenth century. Paul E. Nahme, in this new consideration of Cohen, liberalism, and religion, emphasizes the idea of enchantment, or the faith in and commitment to ideas, reason, and critique-the animating spirits that move society forward. Nahme views Cohen through the lenses of the crises of Imperial Germany-the rise of antisemitism, nationalism, and secularization-to come to a greater understanding of liberalism, its Protestant and Jewish roots, and the spirits of modernity and tradition that form its foundation. Nahme’s philosophical and historical retelling of the story of Cohen and his spiritual investment in liberal theology present a strong argument for religious pluralism and public reason in a world rife with populism, identity politics, and conspiracy theories.



























[book] A Well-Read Woman:
The Life, Loves, and
Legacy of Ruth Rappaport
by Kate Stewart
April 1, 2019
Little A
The inspiring true story of an indomitable librarian’s journey from Nazi Germany to Seattle to Vietnam—all for the love of books.

Growing up under Fascist censorship in Nazi Germany, Ruth Rappaport absorbed a forbidden community of ideas in banned books. After fleeing her home in Leipzig at fifteen and losing both parents to the Holocaust, Ruth drifted between vocations, relationships, and countries, searching for belonging and purpose. When she found her calling in librarianship, Ruth became not only a witness to history but an agent for change as well.

Culled from decades of diaries, letters, and photographs, this epic true story reveals a driven woman who survived persecution, political unrest, and personal trauma through a love of books. It traces her activism from the Zionist movement to the Red Scare to bibliotherapy in Vietnam and finally to the Library of Congress, where Ruth made an indelible mark and found a home. Connecting it all, one constant thread: Ruth’s passion for the printed word, and the haven it provides—a haven that, as this singularly compelling biography proves, Ruth would spend her life making accessible to others. This wasn’t just a career for Ruth Rappaport. It was her purpose.
































[book] SEEDS IN THE DESERT
By MENDEL MANN
Translated by Heather Valencia
From the 1950s classic
2019
Yiddish Book Center of Amherst Mass

Available for the first time in translation, Mendel Mann’s stories follow his life in reverse, from Israel in the 1950s to his experiences in the post-War Soviet Union and his childhood in Poland. With psychological insight and a focus on the tension between remembrance and reinvention, Mann provides indelible portraits of survivors as they confront the past and struggle to create a meaningful existence in the fledgling state of Israel.


























[book] MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE
A Therapist, HER Therapist,
and Our Lives Revealed
By Lori Gottlieb
April 2019
HMH
From a New York Times best-selling author, psychotherapist, and national advice columnist, a hilarious, thought-provoking, and surprising new book that takes us behind the scenes of a therapist’s world—where her patients are looking for answers (and so is she).

One day, Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who helps patients in her Los Angeles practice. The next, a crisis causes her world to come crashing down. Enter Wendell, the quirky but seasoned therapist in whose office she suddenly lands. As Gottlieb explores the inner chambers of her patients’ lives—a self-absorbed Hollywood producer, a young newlywed diagnosed with a terminal illness, a senior citizen threatening to end her life on her birthday if nothing gets better, and a twenty-something who can’t stop hooking up with the wrong guys—she finds that the questions they are struggling with are the very ones she is now bringing to Wendell: about desire and need, guilt and redemption, meaning and mortality, loneliness and love.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is revolutionary in its candor, pulling back the curtain on the therapeutic process and offering the rarest of gifts: an entertaining, illuminating, and quite possibly life-changing account of our own mysterious lives and our power to transform them. With humor and warmth, Gottlieb reveals the ultimate truth: we are all human, and we grow in connection with others.





























[book] Why Don't You Write My
Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?
A Mother's Suggestions
by Patricia Marx,
Roz Chast
April 2019
Celadon

While reading it on the subway... I HOWLED with laughter. OMG! It is too funny for words

The perfect Mother's Day gift: A collection of witty one-line advice New Yorker writer Patricia Marx heard from her mother, accompanied by full-color illustrations by New Yorker staff cartoonist Roz Chast.

Every mother knows best, but New Yorker writer Patty Marx's knows better. Patty has never been able to shake her mother's one-line witticisms from her brain, so she's collected them into a book, accompanied by full color illustrations by New Yorker staff cartoonist Roz Chast. These snappy maternal cautions include:

If you feel guilty about throwing away leftovers, put them in the back of your refrigerator for five days and then throw them out.

If you run out of food at your dinner party, the world will end.

When traveling, call the hotel from the airport to say there aren't enough towels in your room and, by the way, you'd like a room with a better view.

Why don't you write my eulogy now so I can correct it?























[book] The Book of Exodus:
A Biography
by Joel S. Baden
April 30, 2019
Yale Univ Press

An essential biography of one of the Bible’s most powerful and inspiring books

Exodus is the second book of the Hebrew Bible, but it may rank first in lasting cultural importance. It is here that the classic biblical themes of oppression and redemption, of human enslavement and divine salvation, are most dramatically expressed. Joel Baden tells the story of this influential and enduring book, tracing how its famous account of the Israelites’ journey to the promised land has been adopted and adapted for millennia, often in unexpected ways.

Baden draws a distinction between the Exodus story and the book itself, which is one of the most multifaceted in the Bible, containing poems, law codes, rituals, and architectural plans. He shows how Exodus brings together an array of oral and written traditions from the ancient Middle East, and how it came to be ritualized in the Passover Seder and the Eucharist. Highlighting the remarkable resilience and flexibility of Exodus, Baden sheds light on how the bestowing of the Torah to Moses on Mount Sinai divided Jewish and Christian thinkers, on the importance of Exodus during the Reformation and the American Revolution, and on its uses in debates for and against slavery. He also traces how the defining narrative of ancient Israel helped to define Mormon social identity, the American civil rights movement, and liberation theology.

Though three thousand years old, the Exodus-as history, as narrative, as metaphor, as model-continues to be vitally important for us today. Here is the essential biography of this incomparable spiritual masterpiece.


















[book] PARK AVENUE SUMMER
A NOVEL
BY RENEE ROSEN
April 2019
BERKLEY PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE

Mad Men meets The Devil Wears Prada as Renée Rosen draws readers into the glamorous New York City of 1965 and Cosmopolitan magazine, where a brazen new editor-in-chief--Helen Gurley Brown--shocks America and saves a dying publication by daring to talk to women about all things off-limits...

New York City is filled with opportunities for single girls like Alice Weiss, who leaves her small midwestern town to chase her big-city dreams and unexpectedly lands the job of a lifetime working for the first female editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine, Helen Gurley Brown.

Nothing could have prepared Alice for the world she enters as editors and writers resign on the spot, refusing to work for the woman who wrote the scandalous bestseller Sex and the Single Girl, and confidential memos, article ideas, and cover designs keep finding their way into the wrong hands. When someone tries to pull Alice into a scheme to sabotage her boss, she is more determined than ever to help Helen succeed. While pressure mounts at the magazine and Alice struggles to make her way in New York, she quickly learns that in Helen Gurley Brown's world, a woman can demand to have it all.


























[book] HOTBOX
Inside Catering,
the Food World's Riskiest Business
by Matt Lee and Ted Lee
April 2019
Henry Holt

Matt Lee and Ted Lee take on the competitive, wild world of high-end catering, exposing the secrets of a food business few home cooks or restaurant chefs ever experience.

Hotbox reveals the real-life drama behind cavernous event spaces and soaring white tents, where cooking conditions have more in common with a mobile army hospital than a restaurant. Known for their modern take on Southern cooking, the Lee brothers steeped themselves in the catering business for four years, learning the culture from the inside-out. It’s a realm where you find eccentric characters, working in extreme conditions, who must produce magical events and instantly adapt when, for instance, the host’s toast runs a half-hour too long, a hail storm erupts, or a rolling rack of hundreds of ice cream desserts goes wheels-up.

Whether they’re dashing through black-tie fundraisers, celebrity-spotting at a Hamptons cookout, or following a silverware crew at 3:00 a.m. in a warehouse in New Jersey, the Lee brothers guide you on a romp from the inner circle-the elite team of chefs using little more than their wits and Sterno to turn out lamb shanks for eight hundred-to the outer reaches of the industries that facilitate the most dazzling galas. You’ll never attend a party-or entertain on your own-in the same way after reading this book.

























[book] The Siege of Tel Aviv
A Thriller
by Hesh Kestin
April 16, 2019
Dzanc Books

Stephen King calls Hesh Kestin’s The Siege of Ghetto Tel Aviv “scarier than anything Stephen King ever wrote.” Iran leads five Arab armies in a brutal victory over Israel, which ceases to exist. Within hours, its leaders are rounded up and murdered, the IDF is routed, and the country's six million Jews concentrated in Tel Aviv, which becomes a starving ghetto. While the US and the West sit by, the Moslem armies-taking a page from the Nazi playbook-prepare to kill off the entire population.

On the eve of genocide, Ghetto Tel Aviv makes one last attempt to save itself, as an Israeli businessman, a gangster, and a cross-dressing fighter pilot put together a daring plan to counterattack. Will it succeed?

The Siege of Ghetto Tel Aviv is as as bizarrely funny as it is fast-paced. In the words of Stephen King: “An irrepressible sense of humor runs through it. It’s not satire I’m talking about-it’s stuff like the cross-dressing pilot (my favorite character) and any number of deliciously absurd situations (the pink jets). It’s the inevitable result of an eye that sees the funny side, even in horror. So few writers have that. This novel will cause talk and controversy. Most of all, it will be read.”



























[book] Reinventing Maimonides in Contemporary Jewish Thought
by James A. Diamond
Menachem Kellner, and Seth Kadish
2019
Liverpool University Press/Littman

Every work on Jewish thought and law since the twelfth century bears the imprint of Maimonides. A. N. Whitehead's famous dictum that the entire European philosophical tradition 'consists of a series of footnotes to Plato' could equally characterize Maimonides' place in the Jewish tradition. The critical studies in this volume explore how Orthodox rabbis of different orientations - Shlomo Aviner, Naftali Zvi Yehudah Berlin (Netziv), Kalonymus Kalman Shapira, Joseph Kafih, Abraham Isaac Kook, Aaron Kotler, Joseph Soloveitchik, and Elhanan Wasserman - have read and provided footnotes to Maimonides in the long twentieth century. How well did they really understand Maimonides? And where do their arguments fit in the mainstream debates about him and his works? Each of the seven core chapters examines a particular approach. Some rabbis have tried to liberate themselves from the influence of his ideas. Others have sought to build on those ideas or expand them in ways which Maimonides himself did not pursue, and which he may well not have agreed with. Still others advance patently non-Maimonidean positions, while attributing them to none other than Maimonides. Above all, the essays published here demonstrate that his legacy remains vibrantly alive today.

























[book] Never a Lovely So Real:
The Life and Work of Nelson Algren
by Colin Asher
April 2019
Norton

This definitive biography reclaims Nelson Algren as a towering literary figure and exposes how his radical politics sabotaged his career. Born in 1909, the third child of Gerson – a machinist - and Goldie – a homemaker - Abraham, named for a grandfather who was a pauper, a teller of wild tales, and a crazed zealot: Nelson Algren Abraham.

For a time, Nelson Algren (1909–1981) was America’s most famous author. Millions bought his books; The Man with the Golden Arm, winner of the first National Book Award, was made into a film starring Frank Sinatra. Yet the cause of Algren’s decline was never clear. Some said he drank his talent away, others cited writer’s block. The truth, hidden in the pages of his books, is far more complicated and tragic.

In this magisterial biography-drawing from interviews, archived correspondence, and the first unredacted version of Algren’s FBI file-Colin Asher reestablishes Algren not only as a legendary figure, but a dramatic iconoclast. He recounts the author’s development as a thinker, his affair with Simone de Beauvoir, and his unapologetic left-leaning politics. Most intriguingly, Asher uncovers the true cause of Algren’s artistic exile: a reckless creative decision that led to increased FBI scrutiny and may have caused a mental breakdown.



















The Jewish Founding Father:
Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life
by Andrew Porwancher, Phd.
(Univ of Oklahoma School of Law)
Harvard University Press
forthcoming 2019
Jewish …? most say no. Yes, he studied in a Jewish school... but he was Christian? Wasn't he? Porwancher seeks to prove otherwise. Why? Hamilton’s mother, Rachel Faucette, was married to Jewish merchant Johann Michael Lavien (aka Levine) in St. Croix in 1745, at a time that Danish law would have required her conversion to Judaism. She left him within a decade, a lived with James Hamilton in Nevis (BWI). She bore Alexander around 1755, and having been born out of wedlock, attended a Jewish school... either out of necessity since he was not baptised or because his mother was considered Jewish...













[book] The Lure of Authoritarianism:
The Maghreb after the Arab Spring
(Indiana Series in Middle East Studies)
Edited by Stephen J. King,
and Abdeslam M. Maghraoui.
(Georgetown)
Afterword by Hicham Alaoui
April 2019
Indiana University Press

The works collected in The Lure of Authoritarianism consider the normative appeal of authoritarianism in light of the 2011 popular uprisings in the Middle East. Despite what seemed to be a popular revolution in favor of more democratic politics, there has instead been a slide back toward authoritarian regimes that merely gesture toward notions of democracy. In the chaos that followed the Arab Spring, societies were lured by the prospect of strong leaders with firm guiding hands. The shift toward normalizing these regimes seems sudden, but the works collected in this volume document a gradual shift toward support for authoritarianism over democracy that stretches back decades in North Africa. Contributors consider the ideological, socioeconomic, and security-based justifications of authoritarianism as well as the surprising and vigorous reestablishment of authoritarianism in these regions. With careful attention to local variations and differences in political strategies, the volume provides a nuanced and sweeping consideration of the changes in the Middle East in the past and what they mean for the future.


























[book] God's Favorites:
Judaism, Christianity, and
the Myth of Divine Chosenness
by Michael Coogan
Harvard Divinity School
April 2, 2019
Beacon Press

A noted biblical scholar explores how the claim of divine choice has been used from ancient times to the present to justify territorial expansion and prejudice.

The Bible describes many individuals and groups as specially chosen by God. But does God choose at all? Michael Coogan explains the temporally layered and allusive storytelling of biblical texts and describes the world of the ancient Near East from which it emerged, laying bare the power struggles, the acts of vengeance, and persecutions made sacred by claims of chosenness.

Jumping forward to more modern contexts, Coogan reminds us how the self-designation of the Puritan colonizers of New England as God's new Israel eventually morphed, in the United States, into the self-justifying doctrines of manifest destiny and American exceptionalism. In contemporary Israel, both fundamentalist Zionists and their evangelical American partners cite the Jews' status as God's chosen people as justification for taking land--for very different ends. Appropriated uncritically, the Bible has thus been used to reinforce exclusivity and superiority, with new myths based on old myths.

Finally, in place of the pernicious idea of chosenness, Coogan suggests we might instead focus on another key biblical concept: taking care of the immigrant and the refugee, reminding the reader of the unusual focus on the vulnerable in both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament.

“What does it mean to be chosen by God? The biblical promise of the covenant has become the basis for remarkable political movements, both of liberation and xenophobia, freedom, and oppression. Tracing the history of this key concept from the Bible to the present day, Michael Coogan brilliantly brings to life the extraordinary journey of this complex religious idea.” —Susannah Heschel, Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies, Dartmouth College, and author of The Aryan Jesus
















[book] The Brisket Chronicles:
How to Barbecue, Braise,
Smoke, and Cure the World's
Most Versatile Cut of Meat
by Steven Raichlen
April 30, 2019
Workman

It all starts with the big kahuna: an authentic Texas barbecued brisket, aka 18 pounds of smoky, fatty, proteinaceous awesomeness. And from this revelation of pure beefy goodness comes burnt ends. Corned beef. Ropa Vieja. Bollito Misto. Pho . . . and slowly it dawns on you: Brisket must be the tastiest, most versatile, and most beloved cut of meat in the world.

In The Brisket Chronicles, Steven Raichlen—“The Julia Child of BBQ” (Los Angeles Times)—shares his 50 best brisket recipes while showing us step-by-foolproof-step how to ’cue it, grill it, smoke it, braise it, cure it, and boil it. This is next-level comfort food: Texas brisket and Kansas City brisket, Jamaican Jerk Brisket, Old School Pastrami, a perfect Passover brisket with dried fruits and sweet wine, Brisket Ramen, even burgers. Plus what to do with the leftovers: the ultimate Brisket Hash, Brisket Baked Beans, Bacon-Grilled Brisket Bites. And for total mind-blowing pleasure, Kettle Corn with Crispy Brisket. You heard right.

Includes full-color photographs throughout; complete tips and techniques for choosing the right cuts; handling, prepping, and storing a brisket; and recipes for accompaniments, too, including slaws, salads, and sauces.


















[book] Mensch-Marks:
Life Lessons of a Human
Rabbi-Wisdom for Untethered Times
by Rabbi Joshua Hammerman
April 2019
HCI

The Talmud states, "In a world that lacks humanity, be human." In a world as untethered as ours has become, simply being human, a good person, is a measure of heroism. At a time when norms of civility are being routinely overwhelmed, it may be the only measure that matters. Mensch-Marks represents Rabbi Joshua Hammerman's personal Torah scroll-the sacred text of his experiences, the life lessons he has learned along his winding, circuitous journey. Mirroring 42 steps Israel wandered in the Wilderness, Hammerman offers 42 brief essays, several of which first appeared in The New York Times Magazine, organized into categories of character, or "mensch-marks," each one a stepping stone toward spiritual maturation. These essays span most of Rabbi Hammerman's life, revealing how he has striven to be a "mensch," a human of character, through every challenge.

He writes, "If by sharing what I've learned, I can add a modicum of generosity, honesty and human connection in a world overflowing with cruelty, loneliness and deceit, then I'll have done my job." The essays cover crucial moments of failure and forgiveness, loving and letting go, finding deeper meaning in one's work, and holiness in the seemingly inconsequential moments of everyday life. Rabbi Hammerman, ever the optimist, believes that we can turn things around, one mensch at a time.


















[book] A Bend in the Stars
a novel
by Rachel Barenbaum
May 14, 2019
Grand Central Publishing

For fans of All the Light We Cannot See and The Women in the Castle comes a riveting literary novel that is at once an epic love story and a heart-pounding journey across WWI-era Russia, about an ambitious young doctor and her scientist brother in a race against Einstein to solve one of the greatest mysteries of the universe.

In Russia, in the summer of 1914, as war with Germany looms and the Czar's army tightens its grip on the local Jewish community, Miri Abramov and her brilliant physicist brother, Vanya, are facing an impossible decision. Since their parents drowned fleeing to America, Miri and Vanya have been raised by their babushka, a famous matchmaker who has taught them to protect themselves at all costs: to fight, to kill if necessary, and always to have an escape plan. But now, with fierce, headstrong Miri on the verge of becoming one of Russia's only female surgeons, and Vanya hoping to solve the final puzzles of Einstein's elusive theory of relativity, can they bear to leave the homeland that has given them so much?

Before they have time to make their choice, war is declared and Vanya goes missing, along with Miri's fiancé. Miri braves the firing squad to go looking for them both. As the eclipse that will change history darkens skies across Russia, not only the safety of Miri's own family but the future of science itself hangs in the balance. Grounded in real history --and inspired by the solar eclipse of 1914 --A Bend in the Stars offers a heartstopping account of modern science's greatest race amidst the chaos of World War I, and a love story as epic as the railways crossing Russia.


















[book] The Song of the Jade Lily:
A Novel
by Kirsty Manning
May 14, 2019
William Morrow

I was sad when I first saw this book. Why? Because a friend and I wrote a short story with a somewhat similar plot, except it took place in Shanghai and the USA, and not Australia. Best wishes to the success of this book.

“Kirsty Manning weaves together little-known threads of World War II history, family secrets, the past and the present into a page-turning, beautiful novel."— Heather Morris, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz

A gripping historical novel that tells the little-known story of Jewish refugees who fled to Shanghai during WWII.

1939: Two young girls meet in Shanghai, also known as the “Paris of the East”. Beautiful local Li and Jewish refugee Romy form a fierce friendship, but the deepening shadows of World War II fall over the women as they slip between the city's glamorous French Concession district and the teeming streets of the Shanghai Ghetto. Yet soon the realities of war prove to be too much for these close friends as they are torn apart.

2016: Fleeing London with a broken heart, Alexandra returns to Australia to be with her grandparents, Romy and Wilhelm. Her grandfather is dying, and over the coming weeks Romy and Wilhelm begin to reveal the family mysteries they have kept secret for more than half a century. As fragments of her mother's history finally become clear, Alexandra struggles with what she learns while more is also revealed about her grandmother's own past in Shanghai.

After Wilhelm dies, Alexandra flies to Shanghai, determined to trace her grandparents' past. Peeling back the layers of their hidden lives, she is forced to question what she knows about her family—and herself.

The Song of the Jade Lily is a lush, provocative, and beautiful story of friendship, motherhood, the price of love, and the power of hardship and courage that can shape us all.


















[book] Howard Stern Comes Again
by Howard Stern
May 14, 2019
Simon and Schuster

Howard Stern’s first book in more than twenty years, Howard Stern Comes Again, will be published by Simon & Schuster on May 14, 2019.




























[book] JERUSALEM
CITY OF THE BOOK
by Merav Mack and Benjamin Balint
Frederic Brenner (Photographer)
May 14, 2019
Yale University Press

A captivating journey through the hidden libraries of Jerusalem, where some of the world’s most enduring ideas were put into words

In this enchanting book, Merav Mack and Benjamin Balint explore Jerusalem’s libraries to tell the story of this city as a place where some of the world’s most enduring ideas were put into words. The writers of Jerusalem, although renowned the world over, are not usually thought of as a distinct school; their story as Jerusalemites has never before been woven into a single narrative. Nor have the stories of the custodians, past and present, who safeguard Jerusalem’s literary legacies.

By showing how Jerusalem has been imagined, safeguarded, and shelved in libraries, Mack and Balint tell the untold history of how the peoples of the book have populated the city with texts. In their hands, Jerusalem itself—perched between East and West, antiquity and modernity, violence and piety—comes alive as a kind of labyrinthine library.


















[book] MASADA:
From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth
by Jodi Magness
May 14, 2019
Princeton Univ Press

A new account of the famous site and story of the last stand of a group of Jewish rebels who held out against the Roman Empire

Two thousand years ago, 967 Jewish men, women, and children-the last holdouts of the revolt against Rome following the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Second Temple-reportedly took their own lives rather than surrender to the Roman army. This dramatic event, which took place on top of Masada, a barren and windswept mountain overlooking the Dead Sea, spawned a powerful story of Jewish resistance that came to symbolize the embattled modern State of Israel. The first extensive archaeological excavations of Masada began in the 1960s, and today the site draws visitors from around the world. And yet, because the mass suicide was recorded by only one ancient author-the Jewish historian Josephus-some scholars question if the event ever took place.

Jodi Magness, an archaeologist who has excavated at Masada, explains what happened there, how we know it, and how recent developments might change understandings of the story. Incorporating the latest findings, she integrates literary and historical sources to show what life was like for Jews under Roman rule during an era that witnessed the reign of Herod and Jesus’s ministry and death.

Featuring numerous illustrations, this is an engaging exploration of an ancient story that continues to grip the imagination today.


















[book] Voices from the Warsaw Ghetto:
Writing Our History
by David G. Roskies (Editor),
Samuel D. Kassow (Foreword)
April 23, 2019
Yale University Press

A powerful and original compilation of writings from the Jewish captives of the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II

Hidden in metal containers and buried underground during World War II, these writings from the Warsaw Ghetto record the Holocaust in the words of its first interpreters, the victims themselves. Gathered clandestinely by an underground ghetto collective called Oyneg Shabes, this anthology comprises reportage, diaries, prose, poems, jokes, and sermons that capture the heroism, tragedy, humor, and social dynamics of the ghetto.

Miraculously surviving the devastation of war, this extraordinary archive encompasses a vast range of voices—young and old, men and women, the pious and the secular, optimists and pessimists—and chronicles different perspectives on the topics of the day while also preserving rapidly endangered cultural traditions. Described by David G. Roskies as “a civilization responding to its own destruction,” these texts tell the story of the Warsaw Jews in real time, against time, and for all time.





















[book] ARABS
A 3,000-Year History of
Peoples, Tribes and Empires
by Tim Mackintosh-Smith, Senior Fellow
April 16, 2019
Yale University Press

A riveting, comprehensive history of the Arab peoples and tribes that explores the role of language as a cultural touchstone

This kaleidoscopic book covers almost 3,000 years of Arab history and shines a light on the footloose Arab peoples and tribes who conquered lands and disseminated their language and culture over vast distances. Tracing this process to the origins of the Arabic language, rather than the advent of Islam, Tim Mackintosh-Smith begins his narrative more than a thousand years before Muhammad and focuses on how Arabic, both spoken and written, has functioned as a vital source of shared cultural identity over the millennia.

Mackintosh-Smith reveals how linguistic developments—from pre-Islamic poetry to the growth of script, Muhammad’s use of writing, and the later problems of printing Arabic—have helped and hindered the progress of Arab history, and investigates how, even in today’s politically fractured post–Arab Spring environment, Arabic itself is still a source of unity and disunity.





















[book] The Restless Hungarian:
Modernism, Madness, and
The American Dream
by Tom Weidlinger
April 16, 2019
Spark Press

The Restless Hungarian is the saga of an extraordinary life set against the history of the rise of modernism, the Jewish Diaspora, and the Cold War. A Hungarian Jew whose inquiring spirit helped him to escape the Holocaust, Paul Weidlinger became one of the most creative structural engineers of the twentieth century. As a young architect, he broke ranks with the great modernists with his radical idea of the “Joy of Space.” As an engineer, he created the strength behind the beauty in mid-century modern skyscrapers, churches, museums, and he gave concrete form to the eccentric monumental sculptures of Pablo Picasso, Isamu Noguchi, and Jean Dubuffet.

In his private life, he was a divided man, living behind a wall of denial as he lost his family to war, mental illness, and suicide. In telling his father’s story, the author sifts meaning from the inspiring and contradictory narratives of a life: a motherless child and a captain of industry, a clandestine communist who designed silos for the world’s deadliest weapons during the Cold War, a Jewish refugee who denied he was a Jew, a husband who was terrified of his wife’s madness, and a man whose personal saints were artists.





















[book] The Thirty-Year Genocide:
Turkey’s Destruction of Its
Christian Minorities, 1894–1924
by Benny Morris and Dror Ze'evi
April 24, 2019
Harvard Press

A reappraisal of the giant massacres perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire, and then the Turkish Republic, against their Christian minorities.

Between 1894 and 1924, three waves of violence swept across Anatolia, targeting the region’s Christian minorities, who had previously accounted for 20 percent of the population. By 1924, the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks had been reduced to 2 percent. Most historians have treated these waves as distinct, isolated events, and successive Turkish governments presented them as an unfortunate sequence of accidents. The Thirty-Year Genocide is the first account to show that the three were actually part of a single, continuing, and intentional effort to wipe out Anatolia’s Christian population.

The years in question, the most violent in the recent history of the region, began during the reign of the Ottoman sultan Abdulhamid II, continued under the Young Turks, and ended during the first years of the Turkish Republic founded by Ataturk. Yet despite the dramatic swing from the Islamizing autocracy of the sultan to the secularizing republicanism of the post–World War I period, the nation’s annihilationist policies were remarkably constant, with continual recourse to premeditated mass killing, homicidal deportation, forced conversion, mass rape, and brutal abduction. And one thing more was a constant: the rallying cry of jihad. While not justified under the teachings of Islam, the killing of two million Christians was effected through the calculated exhortation of the Turks to create a pure Muslim nation.

Revelatory and impeccably researched, Benny Morris and Dror Ze’evi’s account is certain to transform how we see one of modern history’s most horrific events.





















[book] Wunderland:
A Novel
by Jennifer Cody Epstein
April 23, 2019
Crown

An intimate portrait of a friendship severed by history, and a sweeping saga of wartime, motherhood, and legacy by an award-winning novelist

East Village, 1989:
Things had never been easy between Ava Fisher and her estranged mother Ilse. Too many questions hovered between them: Who was Ava's father? Where had Ilse been during the war? Why had she left her only child in a German orphanage during the war’s final months? But now Ilse’s ashes have arrived from Germany, and with them, a trove of unsent letters addressed to someone else unknown to Ava: Renate Bauer, a childhood friend. As her mother’s letters unfurl a dark past, Ava spirals deep into the shocking history of a woman she never truly knew.

Berlin, 1933:
As the Nazi party tightens its grip on the city, Ilse and Renate find their friendship under siege—and Ilse’s increasing involvement in the Hitler Youth movement leaves them on opposing sides of the gathering storm. Then the Nuremburg Laws force Renate to confront a long-buried past, and a catastrophic betrayal is set in motion…

An unflinching exploration of Nazi Germany and its legacy... with details of life in Germany, Wunderland is a at once a powerful portrait of an unspeakable crime history and a page-turning contemplation of womanhood, wartime, and just how far we might go in order to belong.





















[book] Shadows of Doubt:
Stereotypes, Crime, and the
Pursuit of Justice
by Brendan O'Flaherty and Rajiv Sethi
April 15, 2019
Harvard Press

Do robbers think Jews are easy marks?
Do police officers think brown suspects are more dangerous so they are harsher? Do judges think dual citizens will flee the jurisdiction after bail?
Shadows of Doubt reveals how deeply stereotypes distort our interactions, shape crime, and deform the criminal justice system.

If you’re a robber, how do you choose your victims? As a police officer, how afraid are you of the young man you’re about to arrest? As a judge, do you think the suspect in front of you will show up in court if released from pretrial detention? As a juror, does the defendant seem guilty to you? Your answers may depend on the stereotypes you hold, and the stereotypes you believe others hold. In this provocative, pioneering book, economists Brendan O’Flaherty and Rajiv Sethi explore how stereotypes can shape the ways crimes unfold and how they contaminate the justice system through far more insidious, pervasive, and surprising paths than we have previously imagined.

Crime and punishment occur under extreme uncertainty. Offenders, victims, police officers, judges, and jurors make high-stakes decisions with limited information, under severe time pressure. With compelling stories and extensive data on how people act as they try to commit, prevent, or punish crimes, O’Flaherty and Sethi reveal the extent to which we rely on stereotypes as shortcuts in our decision making. Sometimes it’s simple: Robbers tend to target those they stereotype as being more compliant. Other interactions display a complex and sometimes tragic interplay of assumptions: “If he thinks I’m dangerous, he might shoot. I’ll shoot first.”

Shadows of Doubt shows how deeply stereotypes are implicated in the most controversial criminal justice issues of our time, and how a clearer understanding of their effects can guide us toward a more just society.





















[book] IN SEARCH OF DEEPER LEARNING
The Quest to Remake
the American High School
by Jay Mehta and Sarah Fine
(Harvard GSE, UCSD)
April 1, 2019
Harvard Press

An award-winning professor and an accomplished educator take us beyond the hype of reform and inside some of America’s most innovative classrooms to show what is working-and what isn’t-in our schools.

What would it take to transform industrial-era schools into modern organizations capable of supporting deep learning for all? Jal Mehta and Sarah Fine’s quest to answer this question took them inside some of America’s most innovative schools and classrooms-places where educators are rethinking both what and how students should learn.

The story they tell is alternately discouraging and hopeful. Drawing on hundreds of hours of observations and interviews at thirty different schools, Mehta and Fine reveal that deeper learning is more often the exception than the rule. And yet they find pockets of powerful learning at almost every school, often in electives and extracurriculars as well as in a few mold-breaking academic courses. These spaces achieve depth, the authors argue, because they emphasize purpose and choice, cultivate community, and draw on powerful traditions of apprenticeship. These outliers suggest that it is difficult but possible for schools and classrooms to achieve the integrations that support deep learning: rigor with joy, precision with play, mastery with identity and creativity.

This boldly humanistic book offers a rich account of what education can be. The first panoramic study of American public high schools since the 1980s, In Search of Deeper Learning lays out a new vision for American education-one that will set the agenda for schools of the future.



















[book] Romanland:
Ethnicity and Empire
in Byzantium
by Anthony Kaldellis
(OSU)
April 1, 2019
Harvard Press

A leading historian argues that in the empire we know as Byzantium, the Greek-speaking population was actually Roman, and scholars have deliberately mislabeled their ethnicity for the past two centuries for political reasons.

Was there ever such a thing as Byzantium? Certainly no emperor ever called himself “Byzantine.”

And while the identities of minorities in the eastern empire are clear-contemporaries speak of Slavs, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, and Muslims-that of the ruling majority remains obscured behind a name made up by later generations.

Historical evidence tells us unequivocally that Byzantium’s ethnic majority, no less than the ruler of Constantinople, would have identified as Roman. It was an identity so strong in the eastern empire that even the conquering Ottomans would eventually adopt it. But Western scholarship has a long tradition of denying the Romanness of Byzantium. In Romanland, Anthony Kaldellis investigates why and argues that it is time for the Romanness of these so-called Byzantines to be taken seriously.

In the Middle Ages, he explains, people of the eastern empire were labeled “Greeks,” and by the nineteenth century they were shorn of their distorted Greekness and became “Byzantine.” Only when we understand that the Greek-speaking population of Byzantium was actually Roman will we fully appreciate the nature of Roman ethnic identity. We will also better understand the processes of assimilation that led to the absorption of foreign and minority groups into the dominant ethnic group, the Romans who presided over the vast multiethnic empire of the east.


















[book] 111 Places in Jerusalem That You Shouldn't Miss
by Laszlo Trankovits
April 30, 2019
111 Places Press/Emons

An insider's guide to Jerusalem
•Features interesting and unusual places not found in traditional travel guides
•Appeals to both the local market (nearly 900,000 people call Jerusalem home) and the tourist market (more than 3.5 million people visit Jerusalem every year)
•Fully illustrated with 111 full-page color photographs

Jerusalem is truly unique in almost every way. For 3,000 years, people have fought over this city, destroyed it, and rebuilt it again. It is a place of great spirituality and beauty, and also of prophecy, historical intrigue and violence. It has been a stage for kings, conquerors, prophets and saints. Legends and secrets surround the palaces and ruins, churches and tombs and the overwhelming Old City, filled with sacred places. Although a place of contention among religions and between Israelis and Palestinians, the city is also a modern metropolis with bold architecture, vibrant markets, spectacular restaurants, dozens of theaters and 80 museums. Join us on an exciting tour of Jerusalem, a stronghold of culture and science and an international magnet for artists and writers.






















[book] 111 Places in Tel Aviv That You Shouldn't Miss
by Adriana Livnat
111 Places Press/Emons

An insider's guide
Features interesting and unusual places not found in traditional travel guides Appeals to both the local market (almost 433,000 people call Tel Aviv home) and the tourist market (2.3 million people visit Tel Aviv every year!) Fully illustrated with 111 full-page color photographs

Tel Aviv is known for two things above all: its Bauhaus architecture and its nightlife. Both are wonderful, but represent only a small part of this many-faceted city. Often called the Big Orange, for many people this white city on the sea is a synonym for innovation and diversity, but in many ways it is astonishingly provincial, orderly and family-friendly. Tel Aviv has classic sights to see. If you want to get to know the city really well, you simply have to walk its streets. 111 Places in Tel Aviv That You Shouldn't Miss shows you the way.






















[book] 111 Places in Silicon Valley That You Shouldn't Miss
by Floriana Petersen
2019
111 Places Press/Emons

An insider's guide
The ultimate insider's guide to Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley has become the Mesopotamia of the Digital Age, built on cycles of innovation and disruption, monstrous ambition, and a steady supply of labor and capital. Yet for all that's known about companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook - and the personas behind those companies - the culture of Silicon Valley remains elusive and contradictory, even to many locals. This unique guidebook, written by longtime local Floriana Petersen, takes you on an insider's tour of 111 cool, offbeat, and very compelling places that offer insight into the evolving character of Silicon Valley.

Visit the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford to see drawings done by Leland Jr. Stanford, after whom the university was named after his death at age 15 in 1884. Sit at the Rosewood Hotel bar to witness the mating habits of venture capitalists. Go to the Music@Menlo Festival to listen some of the best chamber music to be found anywhere in the country. Enjoy the Stanford Powwow, a festival to celebrate some of the great American Indian tribes of Northern California. Visit Steve Job's final resting place, or spend an afternoon at the Hakone Japanese gardens. Explore the Filoli Estate, a living testimony to the wealthy families who used the Gold Rush to build the infrastructure that has become Silicon Valley.




















Coming in April 2019...


[book] Life Will Be the Death of Me:
. . . and you too!
by Chelsea Handler
April 9, 2019
Random House, Spiegel and Grau

Why look for the right person, when you can focus on being the right person? And should you endorse a line of edibles? In 2016, Handler imagined life in the USA with a female President. But Clinton lost to Trump, and Handler was filled with constant anger... but was anger with Trump ad his cronies just a cover for her anger of lack of control? Handler decided to change her life and try a year of self sufficiency. She also must finally confront how the death of her mother and brother, and her relationships with her siblings has changed her. She asked herself, Where have <<< I >>> been all my life? She enters therapy with a new doctor who follows PDP birth trauma (patterns of Developmental pathways) and who makes her go deep on past love and loss. Why can't she do menial tasks? Why does she have a short fuse and break friendships at the slightest criticism? Why did she think less of one sister when she became a Mormon, why does religious belief offend her? She has to make her own toast (not a metaphor), she cant ask her assistant to ask the other assistant to fix the TV. She has to find her toaster. She body shames her fat chow chow (dog). She wonders when she last flew coach? She develops a crush on Robert Mueller.

From Book Cover:
In a haze of vape smoke on a rare windy night in L.A. in the fall of 2016, Chelsea Handler daydreams about what life will be like with a woman in the White House. And then Donald Trump happens. In a torpor of despair, she decides that she’s had enough of the privileged bubble she’s lived in—a bubble within a bubble—and that it’s time to make some changes, both in her personal life and in the world at large.

At home, she embarks on a year of self-sufficiency—learning how to work the remote, how to pick up dog shit, where to find the toaster. She meets her match in an earnest, brainy psychiatrist and enters into therapy, prepared to do the heavy lifting required to look within and make sense of a childhood marked by love and loss and to figure out why people are afraid of her. She becomes politically active—finding her voice as an advocate for change, having difficult conversations, and energizing her base. In the process, she develops a healthy fixation on Special Counsel Robert Mueller and, through unflinching self-reflection and psychological excavation, unearths some glittering truths that light up the road ahead.

Thrillingly honest, insightful, and deeply, darkly funny, Chelsea Handler’s memoir keeps readers laughing, even as it inspires us to look within and ask ourselves what really matters in our own lives.























[book] Living in the Presence:
A Jewish Mindfulness
Guide for Everyday Life
by Rabbi Benjamin Epstein, Ph.D.
April 1, 2019
URIM

In our frantic, fast paced society, we need constant guidance to remind us that we can only find the peace of mind we sorely lack by looking inward. Judaism, like many other spiritual traditions, offers a unique path to cultivating fulfillment and presence of mind. In cultivating peace of mind, we do not aim to achieve transcendence. Rather, our goal is to enter fully into whatever is occurring in our lives and meet it with full presence. But being a better Jew and a happier person are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they are mutually interdependent. From the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep, biblical commandments provide us with guidelines that encourage us to be aware of the present moment. A Guide to Jewish Mindfulness provides concise and clear instructions on how to cultivate peace of mind in order to attain a life of greater commitment and inspiration for the present moment.





















[book] A Mortuary of Books:
The Rescue of Jewish Culture
after the Holocaust
(Goldstein-Goren Series in
American Jewish History)
by Alex Skinner (Translator)
BY Elisabeth Gallas
April 30, 2019
NYU PRESS

The astonishing story of the efforts of scholars and activists to rescue Jewish cultural treasures after the Holocaust

In March 1946 the American Military Government for Germany established the Offenbach Archival Depot near Frankfurt to store, identify, and restore the huge quantities of Nazi-looted books, archival material, and ritual objects that Army members had found hidden in German caches. These items bore testimony to the cultural genocide that accompanied the Nazis’ systematic acts of mass murder. The depot built a short-lived lieu de memoire—a “mortuary of books,” as the later renowned historian Lucy Dawidowicz called it—with over three million books of Jewish origin coming from nineteen different European countries awaiting restitution.

A Mortuary of Books tells the miraculous story of the many Jewish organizations and individuals who, after the war, sought to recover this looted cultural property and return the millions of treasured objects to their rightful owners. Some of the most outstanding Jewish intellectuals of the twentieth century, including Dawidowicz, Hannah Arendt, Salo W. Baron, and Gershom Scholem, were involved in this herculean effort. This led to the creation of Jewish Cultural Reconstruction Inc., an international body that acted as the Jewish trustee for heirless property in the American Zone and transferred hundreds of thousands of objects from the Depot to the new centers of Jewish life after the Holocaust.

The commitment of these individuals to the restitution of cultural property revealed the importance of cultural objects as symbols of the enduring legacy of those who could not be saved. It also fostered Jewish culture and scholarly life in the postwar world.






























MAY 2019 BOOKS



[book] A YEAR WITH THE SAGES:
Wisdom on the Weekly
Torah Portion
by Rabbi Reuven Hammer
May 2019
JPS

A Year with the Sages uniquely relates the Sages’ understanding of each Torah portion to everyday life. The importance of these teachings cannot be overstated. The Sages, who lived during the period from the fifth century BCE to the fifth century CE, considered themselves to have inherited the oral teachings God transmitted to Moses, along with the mandate to interpret them to each subsequent generation. Just as the Torah and the entire Hebrew Bible are the foundations of Judaism, the Sages’ teachings form the structures of Jewish belief and practice built on that foundation. Many of these teachings revolve around core concepts such as God’s justice, God’s love, Torah, Israel, humility, honesty, loving-kindness, reverence, prayer, and repentance.

You are invited to spend a year with the inspiring ideas of the Sages through their reflections on the fifty-four weekly Torah portions and the eleven Jewish holidays. Quoting from the week’s Torah portion, Rabbi Reuven Hammer presents a Torah commentary, selections from the Sages that chronicle their process of interpreting the text, a commentary that elucidates these concepts and their consequences, and a personal reflection that illumines the Sages’ enduring wisdom for our era.































[book] A Good American Family:
The Red Scare and My Father
by David Maraniss, Washington Post
May 14, 2019
Simon and Schuster

In a riveting book with powerful resonance today, Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Maraniss captures the pervasive fear and paranoia that gripped America during the Red Scare of the 1950s through the chilling yet affirming story of his family’s ordeal, from blacklisting to vindication.

Elliott Maraniss, David’s father, a WWII veteran who had commanded an all-black company in the Pacific, was spied on by the FBI, named as a communist by an informant, called before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952, fired from his newspaper job, and blacklisted for five years. Yet he never lost faith in America and emerged on the other side with his family and optimism intact.

In a sweeping drama that moves from the Depression and Spanish Civil War to the HUAC hearings and end of the McCarthy era, Maraniss weaves his father’s story through the lives of his inquisitors and defenders as they struggle with the vital twentieth-century issues of race, fascism, communism, and first amendment freedoms. A Good American Family powerfully evokes the political dysfunctions of the 1950s while underscoring what it really means to be an American. It is an unsparing yet moving tribute from a brilliant writer to his father and the family he protected in dangerous times.































[book] Where the Light Enters:
Building a Family,
Discovering Myself
by Jill Biden
(wife of Senator Joe Biden)
May 2019
Flatiron Books

An intimate look at the love that built the Biden family and the delicate balancing act of the woman at its center

"How did you get this number?" Those were the first words Jill Biden spoke to U.S. senator Joe Biden when he called her out of the blue to ask her on a date.

Growing up, Jill had wanted two things: a marriage like her parents'-strong, loving, and full of laughter-and a career. An early heartbreak had left her uncertain about love, until she met Joe. But as they grew closer, Jill faced difficult questions: How would politics shape her family and professional life? And was she ready to become a mother to Joe's two young sons?

She soon found herself falling in love with her three "boys," learning to balance life as a mother, wife, educator, and political spouse. Through the challenges of public scrutiny, complicated family dynamics, and personal losses, she grew alongside her family, and she extended the family circle at every turn: with her students, military families, friends and staff at the White House, and more.

This is the story of how Jill built a family-and a life-of her own. From the pranks she played to keep everyone laughing to the traditions she formed that would carry them through tragedy, hers is the spirited journey of a woman embracing many roles.

Where the Light Enters is a candid, heartwarming glimpse into the creation of a beloved American family, and the life of a woman at its center.


































[book] AUSCHWITZ:
NOT LONG AGO
NOT FAR AWAY
By Robert Jan Van Pelt
May 2019
Abbeville Press

A book issued to coincide with the exhibit of the same name at New York City's Museum of Jewish Heritage which will feature over 600 items that have never left the Auschwitz Birkenau museum in Poland.































[book] Kissinger on Kissinger:
Reflections on Diplomacy, Grand Strategy,
and Leadership
by Winston (Pillsbury) Lord
(Former Ambassador to China, former Pres of CFR) and Henry Kissinger
(Former NSC Chief and Secretary of State)
May 14, 2019
All Points Books

Winston Lord, son of Mary Pillsbury Lord, graduated near the top of his class at Yale and then top at Fletcher. He first worked with Kissinger in the Nixon White House, and was a top assistant in the U.S. negotiations with North Vietnam and the U.S> introductory relations with the People's Republic of China. He was later head of the Counsel of Foreign Relations and was u.S> Ambassador to China. Lord recently organized several panels with former Nixon officials in order to capture their oral histories. His interviews with 90+ year old Kissinger were so insightful that he asked this senior statesman and former professor to discuss the challenges of directing foreign policy during times of great global tension, conduct several oral history interviews, and compile them into this slim book.

Some consider Kissinger a war criminal, some hate him for his reactions to the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, and others delebrate him a great seer; either way there is much to learn from him, especially during the Trump Administration... and its efforts with China, Russia, and the Middle East. Namely, Kissinger believed in the long term GRAND STRATEGY... laying out a multi level chess game, and not reacting in a knee jerk fashion to daily events.

As National Security Advisor to Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger transformed America's approach to diplomacy with China, the USSR, Vietnam, and the Middle East, laying the foundations for geopolitics as we know them today.

Nearly fifty years later, escalating tensions between the US, China, and Russia are threatening a swift return to the same diplomatic game of tug-of-war that Kissinger played so masterfully. Kissinger on Kissinger is a series of faithfully transcribed interviews conducted by the elder statesman's longtime associate, Winston Lord, which captures Kissinger's thoughts on the specific challenges that he faced during his tenure as NSA, his general advice on leadership and international relations, and stunning portraits of the larger-than-life world leaders of the era. The result is a frank and well-informed overview of US foreign policy in the first half of the 70s-essential reading for anyone hoping to understand tomorrow's global challenges.































[book] Hold My Hand
a Teen Novel
by Michael Barakiva
May 2019
FS&G
Ages 12-18

The author is of Israeli/Armenian heritage.

Alek Khederian thinks about his life B.E. and A.E.: Before Ethan and After Ethan. Before Ethan, Alek was just an Armenian-American kid with a mess of curly dark hair, near-perfect grades, and conventional (okay, boring) fashion sense. Before Ethan, Alek didn’t even know he was gay. After he met-and got together with-Ethan, Alek was a new man. Well-coifed. Stylish. Out and proud!

With their six-month anniversary coming up, Alek and Ethan want to do something special to celebrate. Like, really special. Like, the most special thing two people in love can do with one another. But Alek’s not sure he’s ready for that. And then he learns something about Ethan that may not just change their relationship, but end it.

Alek can't bear the thought of finding out who he'd be P.E.: Post-Ethan. But he also can't bring himself to forgive or forget what Ethan did. Luckily, his best friend Becky and crazy (in a good way) family are there to help him figure out whether he should reach out and hold Ethan's hand, or just let it go.

Hold My Hand is a funny, smart, contemporary take on the joy and challenges of teenage love, the boundaries of forgiveness, and what it really means to be honest with yourself.















[book] Becoming Dr. Seuss:
Theodor Geisel and the
Making of an American Imagination
by Brian Jay Jones
May 7, 2019
Dutton

Dr. Seuss is a classic American icon. His work has defined our childhoods and the childhoods of our own children. More than twenty-five years after his death, his books continue to find new readers, now grossing over half a billion dollars in sales. His whimsical illustrations and silly, simple rhymes are timeless favorites because, quite simply, he makes us laugh.

Theodor Geisel, however, led a life that goes much deeper than the prolific and beloved children's book author. In fact, the allure and fascination of Dr. Seuss begins with this second, more radical side. He had a successful career as a political cartoonist, and his political leanings can be felt throughout his books--remember the environmentalist of The Lorax?

Geisel was a complicated man, who introduced generations to the wonders of reading while teaching young people about empathy and how to treat others well.

Coming right off the heels of multiple books-of-the-month- and year-winner GEORGE LUCAS and the bestselling JIM HENSON, Brian is quickly developing a reputation as a master biographer of the creative geniuses of our time.

















[book] A Life in Movies:
Stories from 50 years in Hollywood
by Irwin Winkler
May 7, 2019

A rollicking autobiography from the legendary producer of Goodfellas, Rocky, and Raging Bull, and an insider’s account of making movies in Hollywood over half a century

The list of films Irwin Winkler has produced in his more-than-fifty-year career is extraordinary:
Rocky, Goodfellas,
Raging Bull, De-Lovely,
The Right Stuff, and Creed.
His films have been nominated for fifty-two Academy Awards, including five movies for Best Picture, and have won twelve. Winkler’s new film Creed II, starring Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone, opening fall 2018, will be followed by Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman, a major mafia saga for Netflix starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci.

In A Life in Movies, his charming and insightful memoir, Winkler tells the stories of his career through his many films as a producer and then as a writer and director, charting the changes in Hollywood over the past decades. Winkler started in the famous William Morris mailroom and made his first film—starring Elvis—in the last days of the old studio system. Beginning in the late 1960s, and then for decades to come, he produced a string of provocative and influential films, making him one of the most critically lauded, prolific, and commercially successful producers of his era.

This is an engrossing and candid book, a beguiling exploration of what it means to be a producer, including purchasing rights, developing scripts, casting actors, managing directors, editing film, and winning awards.Filled with tales of legendary and beloved films, as well as some not-so-legendary and forgotten ones, A Life in Movies takes readers behind the scenes and into the history of Hollywood.


















[book] The Post-Widget Society:
Economic Possibilities for
Our Children
by Lawrence H. Summers
May 2019
FS&G Books
From Professors Anita and Bob Summers son, former U.S. Sec of Treasury Lawrence H. Summers, a presentation of a new paradigm for thinking about the current economic and technological revolution

We are buffeted by the sense that everything is accelerating: Digital technology is changing the way we work, shop, and socialize. And yet for all the talk about disruptive innovations, economic growth is largely stagnant. We are told that with new technologies average citizens are empowered as never before, and yet wide swaths of the population feel powerless and can no longer count on stable careers and a better life for their children. As Lawrence H. Summers shows in The Post-Widget Society, these are the paradoxes that define the economic revolution that is transforming our world.

At the heart of this revolution are two dramatic developments in Western economies: the declining significance of widgets (mass-produced goods) and the rise of design goods (products that cost a lot to design but little to produce); and the controversial prospect of secular stagnation, the long-term phenomenon of negligible economic growth and depressed employment in a dynamic market economy. Summers’s trenchant analysis of these trends reveals that they have profound implications not only for the future of jobs and widening income inequality but also for the nature of the state and the very stability of society.

A bold, pathbreaking book by one of our most important economists, The Post-Widget Society is necessary reading for every American concerned about our economic and political future.


















[book] The Queen:
The Forgotten Life Behind
an American Myth
by Josh Levin
May 21, 2019
Little, Brown

Slate editor Josh Levin's masterful account of the life and crimes of America's original "welfare queen" is "an invaluable work of nonfiction" (David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon).

On the South Side of Chicago in 1974, Linda Taylor reported a phony burglary, concocting a lie about stolen furs and jewelry. The detective who checked it out soon discovered she was a welfare cheat who drove a Cadillac to collect ill-gotten government checks. And that was just the beginning: Taylor, it turned out, was also a kidnapper, and possibly a murderer. A desperately ill teacher, a combat-traumatized Marine, an elderly woman hungry for companionship-after Taylor came into their lives, all three ended up dead under suspicious circumstances. But nobody-not the journalists who touted her story, not the police, and not presidential candidate Ronald Reagan-seemed to care about anything but her welfare thievery.

Growing up in the Jim Crow South, Taylor was made an outcast because of the color of her skin. As she rose to infamy, the press and politicians manipulated her image to demonize poor black women. Part social history, part true-crime investigation, Josh Levin's mesmerizing book, the product of six years of reporting and research, is a fascinating account of American racism, and an expose of the "welfare queen" myth, one that fueled political debates that reverberate to this day. THE QUEEN tells, for the first time, the fascinating story of what was done to Linda Taylor, what she did to others, and what was done in her name.

"THE QUEEN is a wild, only-in-America story that helped me understand my country better. It's a fascinating portrait of a con artist and a nation... and the ways the United States continually relies on oversimplified narratives about race and class to shape public policy, almost always at the expense of brown people and poor people." (Attica Locke, author of the Edgar Award winning Bluebird, Bluebird)


























[book] The Guarded Gate:
Bigotry, Eugenics and the Law
That Kept Two Generations of Jews,
Italians, and Other European
Immigrants Out of America
by Daniel Okrent
May 2019
Scribner

By the widely celebrated New York Times bestselling author of Last Call—the powerful, definitive, and timely account of how the rise of eugenics helped America close the immigration door to “inferiors” in the 1920s.

A forgotten, dark chapter of American history with implications for the current day, The Guarded Gate tells the story of the scientists who argued that certain nationalities were inherently inferior, providing the intellectual justification for the harshest immigration law in American history. Brandished by the upper class Bostonians and New Yorkers—many of them progressives—who led the anti-immigration movement, the eugenic arguments helped keep hundreds of thousands of Jews, Italians, and other unwanted groups out of the US for more than 40 years.

Over five years in the writing, The Guarded Gate tells the complete story from its beginning in 1895, when Henry Cabot Lodge and other Boston Brahmins launched their anti-immigrant campaign. In 1921, Vice President Calvin Coolidge declared that “biological laws” had proven the inferiority of southern and eastern Europeans; the restrictive law was enacted three years later. In his characteristic style, both lively and authoritative, Okrent brings to life the rich cast of characters from this time, including Lodge’s closest friend, Theodore Roosevelt; Charles Darwin’s first cousin, Francis Galton, the idiosyncratic polymath who gave life to eugenics; the fabulously wealthy and profoundly bigoted Madison Grant, founder of the Bronx Zoo, and his best friend, H. Fairfield Osborn, director of the American Museum of Natural History; Margaret Sanger, who saw eugenics as a sensible adjunct to her birth control campaign; and Maxwell Perkins, the celebrated editor of Hemingway and Fitzgerald. A work of history relevant for today, The Guarded Gate is an important, insightful tale that painstakingly connects the American eugenicists to the rise of Nazism, and shows how their beliefs found fertile soil in the minds of citizens and leaders both here and abroad.

















[book] Fidelity & Constraint:
How the Supreme Court
Has Read the American Constitution
by Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law School
May 1, 2019
FS&G Books
OUP – Oxford University Press

Lessig took Econ at Penn. Me too
Lessig worked for an Israeli professor at Penn. Me too
Lessig got a p-t job at WEFA and did regressions. I got rejected
Sigh, hehe
But he learned, over 35 years ago, about regressions, correlation, and causation; interpretation, and loyalty-fidelity to the document/model/theory and to your own role/position.

The U.S. Constitution is the oldest written constitution in the world. In Fidelity & Constraint, legal scholar Lawrence Lessig explains that one of the most basic approaches to interpreting the constitution is the process of translation. Indeed, some of the most significant shifts in constitutional doctrine are products of the evolution of the translation process over time. In every new era, judges understand their translations as instances of "interpretive fidelity," framed within each new temporal context.

Yet, as Lessig also argues, there is a repeatedly occurring countermove that upends the process of translation. Throughout American history, there has been a second fidelity in addition to interpretive fidelity: what Lessig calls "fidelity to role." In each of the cycles of translation that he describes, the role of the judge -- the ultimate translator -- has evolved too. Old ways of interpreting the text now become illegitimate because they do not match up with the judge's perceived role. And when that conflict occurs, the practice of judges within our tradition has been to follow the guidance of a fidelity to role. Ultimately, Lessig not only shows us how important the concept of translation is to constitutional interpretation, but also exposes the institutional limits on this practice.

The first work of both constitutional and foundational theory by one of America's leading legal minds, Fidelity & Constraint maps strategies that both help judges understand the fundamental conflict at the heart of interpretation whenever it arises and work around the limits it inevitably creates.















[book] I Will Teach You to Be Rich,
Second Edition, a decade update
No Guilt. No Excuses.
No B.S. Just a 6-Week Program That Works.
by Ramit Sethi
May 14, 2019, Independence (Financial)
Workman Books

Ramit Sethi is “the new finance guru” (Fortune), “a unique voice on money, one singularly attuned to . . . his generation” (San Francisco Chronicle). He reaches over 500,000 followers a month on his website, iwillteachyoutoberich.com. And his book, I Will Teach You to Be Rich, is a New York Times bestseller with 383,000 copies in print—and the kind of backlist title that is so robust that its sales increase year after year. Now on the eve of its tenth anniversary comes a significant cover-to-cover revision.

At the core of the book is Ramit’s extraordinarily simple, powerful, and effective six-week program for gaining control over your finances. Written in an irreverent and entertaining style, I Will Teach You to Be Rich shows you step-by-step how to beat banks and credit cards at the fee game, automate your savings and investments, negotiate a raise, manage student loans, and enjoy vacations and other things you love by practicing conscious spending.

In addition to completely updating everything from interest rates to financial instruments, Ramit has added a new dimension to the book: a guide for how to live a “rich life”—a life where money brings meaning, where you can afford to give back, and where experiences, and the time to pursue them, are a priority.

















[book] Damned If You Do . . .:
The Outrageous Book of
Bizarre Choices
May 14, 2019
Workman Books

Would you rather walk across a field with 1000 rattlesnakes or 3 landmines
Would you rather lose a shoe at 500 feet up while climbing, or your contact lenses

A perennial bestseller that begins with a warning: Proceed with caution. This book is only for those with a twisted imagination. Be prepared to leave conventional thought behind and join the ranks of the demented and insane.

Previously published as Would You Rather . . .?, with 356,000 copies in print, Damned If You Do . . . is an addictive game in a book that challenges readers to ask—and attempt to answer—more than 400 questions that range from the heinous to the nauseating to the downright disturbing. Each is a field-tested conversation starter guaranteed to provoke ridiculous fun, break the ice at any party, and, like some kind of sick Rorschach test, open a unique window into the minds of friends and family.

Some questions delight in their own grossness: Would you rather . . . Eat three earthworms–OR–wear a necklace made of them on your wedding day? Be trapped in an elevator with wet dogs–OR–three fat men with bad breath? Some force you to reveal values: Would you rather . . . Age only from the neck up–OR–age only from the neck down? Be stupid and rich–OR–smart and poor? Some create that squirming sensation: Would you rather . . . Get a bad case of poison ivy way up inside your nose–OR–inside your inner ear? And some are just deliciously absurd. Each question also features related, often off-the-wall information, from quotes to dumb jokes to delightfully odd trivia (326-pound President William Howard Taft once got stuck in the White House bathroom).



















[book] Tel Aviv:
Food. People. Stories.
A Culinary Journey With NENI
by Haya Molcho and Nuriel Molcho
May 31, 2019
Acc Art

Tel Aviv is colorful, cosmopolitan and modern; a city full of contrasts, fragrances, stories and flavors. It is a vibrant melting pot of cultures, religions and delicious culinary traditions. Successful restaurateurs Haya Molcho and her four sons take us on a journey to meet Tel Aviv's local chefs and story-tellers - from the epicures and the urban forager, to the magician and the survivor - capturing the special spirit of the city's many cuisines and inhabitants. Haya revisits the recipes of her home town, re-creating the flavors of her childhood: knafeh, green shakshuka, sarma, Israeli paella, pickled lemons and much more.




























[book] The Rational Bible:
Genesis
by Dennis Prager
MAY 7, 2019
Regnery Faith publishing
The continuation of Dennis Prager's bestselling five-part commentary,The Rational Bible.

Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today’s issues, but completely consistent with rational thought.






























[book] KABBALAH:
Secrecy, Scandal and the Soul
by Harry Freedman
May 14, 2019
Bloomsbury

Harry Freedman, author of The Talmud: A Biography and The Murderous History of Bible Translations, explores the mysterious Jewish mystical tradition of Kabbalah.

Kabbalah is popularly known as a fashionable system for personal and spiritual insight, a Jewish mystical tradition popularized by devoted celebrities like Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, Demi Moore, and Britney Spears. But behind the hype and simplicity of "pop-Kabbalah" lies an ancient, complex and very profound system that can take a lifetime to master. Kabbalah: Secrecy, Scandal and the Soul is a short introduction that untangles the complex history and spiritual tradition behind the phenomenon.

Kabbalah is difficult to define. The very phrase "story of Kabbalah" is as opaque and mysterious as the topic itself. This of course is its appeal. The word itself means "received." For over half a millennium, individuals and movements with no attachment to Judaism have incorporated Kabbalah into their own spiritual traditions. Kabbalah flourished in the Renaissance and its method was adopted in varying measures by Hermeticists, Rosicrucians, Freemasons and tarot card readers. Isaac Newton, Gottfried Leibnitz, Carl Jung and Harold Bloom have all admitted to the influence of Kabbalah. But it all goes back to the Hebrew Bible where the prophet Ezekiel described in detail his vision of the heavenly throne, perceived as a chariot.

Kabbalah became fashionable in the late 1960s in the wake of the hippy counter-culture and with the approach of the new age, and enjoyed its share of fame, scandal, and disrepute as the twenty first century approached.

This concise, readable, and thoughtful history of Kabbalah tells its story as it has never been told before. It demands no knowledge of Kabbalah, just an interest in asking the questions "why?" and "how?"













[book] Creativity and Copyright:
Legal Essentials for Screenwriters
and Creative Artists
by John L. Geiger
and Howard Suber
May 14, 2019
Univ of California Press

Inspired by Strunk & White's The Elements of Style, this elegant, short reference is the perfect guide for screenwriters and creative artists looking to succeed as industry professionals. Readers will quickly understand the laws that govern creativity, idea-making, and selling, and learn how to protect themselves and their works from the legal quagmires they may encounter. Written by an unrivaled pair of experts, John L. Geiger and Howard Suber, who use real-life case studies to cover topics such as clearance, contracts, collaboration, and infringement, Creativity and Copyright is poised to become an indispensable resource for beginners and experts alike.























[book] Fruit from the Sands:
The Silk Road Origins
of the Foods We Eat
by Robert N. Spengler III
May 14, 2019
Univ of California Press

The foods we eat have a deep and often surprising past. From almonds and apples to tea and rice, many foods that we consume today have histories that can be traced out of prehistoric Central Asia along the tracks of the Silk Road to kitchens in Europe, America, China, and elsewhere in East Asia. The exchange of goods, ideas, cultural practices, and genes along these ancient routes extends back five thousand years, and organized trade along the Silk Road dates to at least Han Dynasty China in the second century BC. Balancing a broad array of archaeological, botanical, and historical evidence, Fruit from the Sands presents the fascinating story of the origins and spread of agriculture across Inner Asia and into Europe and East Asia. Through the preserved remains of plants found in archaeological sites, Robert N. Spengler III identifies the regions where our most familiar crops were domesticated and follows their routes as people carried them around the world. With vivid examples, Fruit from the Sands explores how the foods we eat have shaped the course of human history and transformed cuisines all over the globe.























JUNE 2019 BOOKS


[book] In This Hour:
Heschel's Writings in Nazi
Germany and London Exile
by Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel
Stephen Lehmann (Translator)
Marion Faber (Translator)
Foreword by Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth)
June 2019
JPS: Jewish Publication Society

In 1937 Martin Buber appointed Heschel, 30 years of age, as his successor at the central organization for Jewish adult education in Frankfurt am Main. This was a year before 1938, when he fled to England and then to America. In time he became one of the most influential modern philosophers of religion in the United States. He formulated an original philosophy of Judaism, expressed in such foundational books as Man Is Not Alone (1951) and God in Search of Man (1955).

In This Hour offers the first English translations of selected German writings by Abraham Joshua Heschel from his tumultuous years in Nazi-ruled Germany and months in London exile, before he found refuge in the United States.

Several of the works have, moreover, never been published in any language. Composed during a time of intense crisis for European Jewry, these writings both argue for and exemplify a powerful vision of spiritually rich Jewish learning and its redemptive role in the past and the future of the Jewish people.

The collection opens with the text of a speech in which Heschel laid out with passion his vision for Jewish education. Then it goes on to present his teachings: a set of essays about the rabbis of the Mishnaic period, whose struggles paralleled those of his own time; the biography of the medieval Jewish scholar and leader Don Yitzhak Abravanel; reflections on the power and meaning of repentance written for the High Holidays in 1936; and a short story on Jewish exile written for Hanukkah 1937. The collection closes with a set of four recently discovered meditations—on suffering, prayer, and spirituality—in which Heschel grapples with the horrors unfolding around him. Taken together, these essays and story fill a significant void in Heschel’s bibliography: his Nazi Germany and London exile years.

These translations convey the spare elegance of Heschel’s prose, and the introduction and detailed notes make the volume accessible to readers of all knowledge levels.

As Heschel teaches history, his voice is more than that of a historian: the old becomes new, and the struggles of one era shed light on another. Even as Heschel quotes ancient sources, his words address the issues of his own time and speak urgently to ours.

“This collection of early writings by Abraham Joshua Heschel significantly expands our awareness of his full oeuvre. Readers of Heschel will want to see these prior confrontations with key issues and Heschel’s earliest stages as an activist in response to Nazi persecution.”—Rabbi Arthur Green, coeditor of A New Hasidism: Roots and A New Hasidism: Branches














[book] An Innocent Bystander:
The Killing of Leon Klinghoffer
by Julie Salamon
June 11, 2019
Little, Brown & Company

On October 3, 1985, Mr. Leon Klinghoffer, a disabled Jewish New Yorker, and his wife boarded the Achille Lauro to celebrate their 36th wedding anniversary with a Mediterranean cruise. Four days later, four Palestinian terrorists hijacked the Italian luxury liner and took the passengers and crew hostage. Leon Klinghoffer was shot in the head, his body and wheelchair thrown overboard. His murder became a flashpoint in the intractable struggle between Israelis and Arabs and gave Americans a horrifying preview of what it means when terrorism hits home.

In this richly reported book, drawing on multiple perspectives, Julie Salamon dispels the mythology that has grown around that shattering moment. What transpired on the Achille Lauro left the Klinghoffer family in the grip of irredeemable sorrow, while precipitating tragic reverberations for the wives and sons of Abu al-Abbas, the Palestinian mastermind behind the hijacking, and the family of Alex Odeh, a Palestinian-American murdered in Los Angeles in a brutal act of retaliation.

Through intimate interviews with almost all living participants, including one of the hijackers, Julie Salamon brings alive the moment-by-moment saga of the hijacking and the ensuing U.S.-led international manhunt; the diplomatic wrangling between the United States, Egypt, Italy, and Israel; and the long agonizing search for justice.

The book also reveals the back story of the controversial opera about the Klinghoffer tragedy that provoked a culture war.

An Innocent Bystander is a masterful work of journalism that moves between the personal and the global with the pace of a geopolitical thriller and the depth of a psychological drama. Throughout lies the tension wrought by terrorism and its repercussions today.


























[book] You're It:
Crisis, Change, and How to
Lead When It Matters Most
by Leonard Marcus, Eric McNulty,
Joseph M. Henderson, Barry C. Dorn
(Harvard)
June 11, 2019
PublicAffairs

Today, in an instant, any leader can find themselves face-to-face with crisis. In You're It, the faculty of the National Preparedness Leadership Inititative at Harvard University distill their extensive research and experience to show you to be a better leader through crisis and change.

The NPLI team has shadowed and interviewed the leaders who have forged through some of the most complex, high stakes disasters: the Boston Marathon bombings, the H1N1 pandemic, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the devastating string of 2017 hurricanes, and more. They also went inside the tough decision-making of the world's largest companies, the hottest startups, and leading not-for-profit organizations.

Here, the reader sits alongside, learning from these rich experiences and integrating their lessons into your leadership repertoire. Full of practical tools for routine practice, this is a guide for complex problem-solving and systemic transformation.With true life stories of today's watershed challenges and opportunities, You're It is an essential read for anyone preparing to lead an adaptive team through crisis and change.

The NPLI is a joint program of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government.



























I pity my cousin Shlomy who was also asked by Harvey Milk to create a flag in San Francisco, but his design came in second place....

[book] Rainbow Warrior:
My Life in Color
by Gilbert Baker
June 4, 2019
Chicago Review Press

Gilbert Baker was an active member of Congregation Beth Simchat Torah in Manhattan. He passed away in 2017. After leaving Kansas for the Army and finding safety ad comfort in San Franscisco, he became an artist, designer (Radar Jeans) and performer (sister chanel 2001 of sisters of perpetual indulgence). In 1978, Harvey Milk, a friend of over 3 years, asked Gilbert Baker to create a unifying symbol for the growing gay rights movement, and on June 25 of that year (1978), Baker’s Rainbow Flag debuted at San Francisco’s Gay Liberation Day parade.

Baker had no idea his creation would become an international emblem of freedom, forever cementing his place and importance in helping to define the modern LGBTQ+ movement.

Rainbow Warrior is Baker’s passionate personal chronicle, from a repressive childhood in 1950s Kansas to a harrowing stint in the US Army, and finally his arrival in San Francisco, where he bloomed as both a visual artist and social justice activist. His fascinating story weaves through the early years of the struggle for LGBTQ+ rights, where he worked closely with Milk, Cleve Jones, and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Baker continued his flag-making, street theater and activism through the Reagan years and the AIDS crisis. And in 1994, Baker spearheaded the effort to fabricate a mile-long Rainbow Flag—at the time, the world’s longest—to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City. Gilbert and parade organizers battled with the newly elected Mayor Giuliani for the right to carry it up Fifth Avenue, past St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Today, the Rainbow Flag has become a worldwide symbol of LGBTQ+ diversity and inclusiveness, and its rainbow hues have illuminated landmarks from the White House to the Eiffel Tower to the Sydney Opera House. Gilbert Baker often called himself the “Gay Betsy Ross,” and readers of his colorful, irreverent and deeply personal memoir will find it difficult to disagree.





















[book] DRIVE-THRU DREAMS
A Journey Through the Heart of
America's Fast-Food Kingdom
By Adam Chandler
June 2019
Flatiron Books

You may recall Chandler's work for Esquire, The Atlantic, or even TABLET, where he wrote of Texas and Jews. He opens this work on American Fast-Food with a quote from Shemot/Exodus, about the Hebrews not tarrying in their flight from Mitzrayim and their need for fast-food.

Most any honest person can own up to harboring at least one fast-food guilty pleasure. In Drive-Thru Dreams, Adam Chandler explores the inseparable link between fast food and American life for the past century. The dark underbelly of the industry’s largest players has long been scrutinized and gutted, characterized as impersonal, greedy, corporate, and worse. But, in unexpected ways, fast food is also deeply personal and emblematic of a larger than life image of America.

With wit and nuance, Chandler reveals the complexities of this industry through heartfelt anecdotes and fascinating trivia as well as interviews with fans, executives, and workers. He traces the industry from its roots in Wichita, where White Castle became the first fast food chain in 1921 and successfully branded the hamburger as the official all-American meal, to a teenager's 2017 plea for a year’s supply of Wendy’s chicken nuggets, which united the internet to generate the most viral tweet of all time.

Drive-Thru Dreams by Adam Chandler tells an intimate and contemporary story of America-its humble beginning, its innovations and failures, its international charisma, and its regional identities-through its beloved roadside fare.



















[book] War over Peace:
One Hundred Years of Israel's
Militaristic Nationalism
by Uri Ben-Eliezer (Univ of Haifa)
Shaul Vardi (Translator)
June 14, 2019
Univ of California Press

When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. When your thesis is that Israel poicy and leadership is militaristic... then your books see it all through this lens

Violence and war have raged between Zionists and Palestinians for over a century, ever since Zionists, trying to establish a nation-state in Palestine, were forced to confront the fact that the country was already populated. Covering every conflict in Israel’s history, War over Peace reveals that Israeli nationalism was born ethnic and militaristic and has embraced these characteristics to this day. In his sweeping and original synthesis, Uri Ben-Eliezer shows that this militaristic nationalism systematically drives Israel to find military solutions for its national problems, based on the idea that the homeland is sacred and the territory is indivisible. When Israelis opposed to this ideology brought about change during a period that led to the Oslo Accords in the 1990s, cultural and political forces, reinforced by religious and messianic elements, prevented the implementation of the agreements, which brought violence back in the form of new wars. War over Peace is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the role of ethnic nationalism and militarism in Israel as well as throughout the world.

























[book] VC: An American History
by Tom Nicholas
(Harvard B School)
June 3, 2019
Harvard University Press

A major exploration of venture financing, from its origins in the whaling industry to Silicon Valley, that shows how venture capital created an epicenter for the development of high-tech innovation.

VC tells the riveting story of how the industry arose from the United States’ long-running orientation toward entrepreneurship. Venture capital has been driven from the start by the pull of outsized returns through a skewed distribution of payoffs-a faith in low-probability but substantial financial rewards that rarely materialize. Whether the gamble is a whaling voyage setting sail from New Bedford or the newest startup in Silicon Valley, VC is not just a model of finance that has proven difficult to replicate in other countries. It is a state of mind exemplified by an appetite for risk-taking, a bold spirit of adventure, and an unbridled quest for improbable wealth through investment in innovation.

Tom Nicholas’s history of the venture capital industry offers readers a ride on the roller coaster of setbacks and success in America’s pursuit of financial gain.






















[book] Zionism and Melancholy:
The Short Life of Israel Zarchi
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Nitzan Lebovic
June 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

Nitzan Lebovic claims that political melancholy is the defining trait of a generation of Israelis born between the 1960s and 1990s. This cohort came of age during wars, occupation and intifada, cultural conflict, and the failure of the Oslo Accords. The atmosphere of militarism and conservative state politics left little room for democratic opposition or dissent. Lebovic and others depict the failure to respond not only as a result of institutional pressure but as the effect of a long-lasting "left-wing melancholy." In order to understand its grip on Israeli society, Lebovic turns to the novels and short stories of Israel Zarchi. For him, Zarchi aptly describes the gap between the utopian hope present in Zionism since its early days and the melancholic reality of the present. Through personal engagement with Zarchi, Lebovic develops a philosophy of melancholy and shows how it pervades Israeli society.


























[book] Shanghai in 12 Dishes:
How to eat like you live there
(Culinary travel guide)
by Antony Suvalko, Leanne Kitchen
June 2019
Red Pork Press

From a couple based in NZ and Australia, the fourth in a series of culinary travel guides. Shanghai In 12 Dishes helps you cut to the chase, culinarily speaking. Aimed at travelling food lovers, this book assumes you're visiting Shanghai for a limited period and don't have time to waste. You don't need to be overwhelmed with endless listings, options and recommendations; you just want a reliable entree into the local dining scene so you can cut right to the chase. You want authenticity. You want dining experiences that are meaningful. You want to rub shoulders with locals. Focusing squarely on Shanghainese cuisine, the emphasis here is as much on what to eat, as it is on where to eat. Structured around 12 iconic dishes, it features meaty information on each dish, guiding you to places you can find them. Dishes such as sheng jian bao (pan fried pork buns), xiao long bao (soup dumplings), lion's head meatballs, red cooked pork, squirrel-shaped mandarin fish and tofu braised crab. These define Shanghai and you'd be nuts to leave town without discovering them. The restaurants listed represent so much more than these essential dishes- this book merely gives you starting points for making your own culinary finds. All you need is a sharpened sense of adventure and to throw yourself into Shanghai's incredible world of food.























[book] Good Enough
The Tolerance for Mediocrity
in Nature and Society
by Daniel S. Milo
June 2019
Harvard University Press

ONLY THE FITTEST SURVIVE
WELL... maybe the GOOD ENOUGH survive as well

In this spirited and irreverent critique of Darwin’s long hold over our imagination, a distinguished philosopher of science makes the case that, in culture as well as nature, not only the fittest survive: the world is full of the “good enough” that persist too.

Why is the genome of a salamander forty times larger than that of a human? Why does the avocado tree produce a million flowers and only a hundred fruits? Why, in short, is there so much waste in nature? In this lively and wide-ranging meditation on the curious accidents and unexpected detours on the path of life, Daniel Milo argues that we ask these questions because we’ve embraced a faulty conception of how evolution-and human society-really works.

Good Enough offers a vigorous critique of the quasi-monopoly that Darwin’s concept of natural selection has on our idea of the natural world. Darwinism excels in accounting for the evolution of traits, but it does not explain their excess in size and number. Many traits far exceed the optimal configuration to do the job, and yet the maintenance of this extra baggage does not prevent species from thriving for millions of years. Milo aims to give the messy side of nature its due-to stand up for the wasteful and inefficient organisms that nevertheless survive and multiply.

But he does not stop at the border between evolutionary theory and its social consequences. He argues provocatively that the theory of evolution through natural selection has acquired the trappings of an ethical system. Optimization, competitiveness, and innovation have become the watchwords of Western societies, yet their role in human lives-as in the rest of nature-is dangerously overrated. Imperfection is not just good enough: it may at times be essential to survival.



















[book] Der Nister's Soviet Years:
Yiddish Writer as Witness
to the People
by Mikhail Krutikov
(University of Michigan)
June 2019
Indiana University Press

In Der Nister's Soviet Years, author Mikhail Krutikov focuses on the second half of the dramatic writing career of Soviet Yiddish writer Der Nister, pen name of Pinhas Kahanovich (1884–1950). Krutikov follows Der Nister's painful but ultimately successful literary transformation from his symbolist roots to social realism under severe ideological pressure from Soviet critics and authorities. This volume reveals how profoundly Der Nister was affected by the destruction of Jewish life during WWII and his own personal misfortunes. While Der Nister was writing a history of his generation, he was arrested for anti-government activities and died tragically from a botched surgery in the Gulag. Krutikov illustrates why Der Nister's work is so important to understandings of Soviet literature, the Russian Revolution, and the catastrophic demise of the Jewish community under Stalin.


























JULY 2019 BOOKS


[book] HITLER'S SECRET ARMY
A Hidden History of Spies, Saboteurs,
and Traitors in the World War II
By Tim Tate
July 2019
Pegasus Books

This dramatic exposé of Allied subterfuge and betrayal uncovers the treachery of undercover fascists and American Nazi spy rings during the height of World War II.

Between 1939 and 1945, more than seventy Allied men and women were convicted-mostly in secret trials-of working to help Nazi Germany win the war. In the same period, hundreds of British Fascists were also interned without trial on specific and detailed evidence that they were spying for, or working on behalf of, Germany. Collectively, these men and women were part of a little-known Fifth Column: traitors who committed crimes including espionage, sabotage, communicating with enemy intelligence agents and attempting to cause disaffection amongst Allied troops. Four of these traitors were sentenced to death; two were executed, whilst most of the others received lengthy prison sentences or were interned throughout the war.

Hundreds of official files, released piecemeal and in remarkably haphazard fashion in the years between 2002 and 2017, reveal the truth about the Allied men and women who formed these spy rings. Most were ardent fascists: all willingly betrayed their own country in the hope and anticipation of a German victory. Several were part of international espionage rings based in the United States.

If these men and women were, for the most part, lone wolves or members of small networks, others were much more dangerous. In 1940, during some of the darkest days of the war, two well-connected British Nazi sympathizers planned overlapping conspiracies to bring about a “fascist revolution.” These plots were foiled by Allied spymasters through radical-and often contentious-methods of investigation. Its agents set up elaborate agent provocateur and sting operations which uncovered scores of the Nazi sympathizers seeking to pass military and defense secrets to the enemy.



























[book] The Floating Feldmans
a novel
by Elyssa Friedland
July 23, 2019
Berkley

Sink or swim. Or at least that's what Annette Feldman tells herself when she books a cruise for her entire family. It's been over a decade since the Feldman clan has spent more than twenty-four hours under the same roof, but Annette is determined to celebrate her seventieth birthday the right way. Just this once, they are going to behave like an actual family.
Too bad her kids didn't get the memo.
Between the troublesome family secrets, old sibling rivalries, and her two teenage grandkids, Annette's birthday vacation is looking more and more like the perfect storm. Adrift together on the open seas, the Feldmans will each face the truths they've been ignoring--and learn that the people they once thought most likely to sink them are actually the ones who help them stay afloat.



























[book] Don't Wait Up:
Confessions of a
Stay-at-Work Mom
by Liz Astrof
July 30, 2019
Gallery Books

For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens (a reboot of Alice; a rom com about an engaged single mother whose ex hubby who is an ex con shows up; The Connors; Trial & Error; Kath and Kim, Last Man Standing; and more), who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them.

Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth. They somehow manage to make pregnancy look effortless, bring out the beauty in a screaming child, and keep the back seat of their cars as spotless as their kitchens.

And then there’s women like Liz Astrof. Who originally had children because “everyone else was.”

In this blunt and side-splittingly funny book of essays, Liz Astrof embraces the realities of motherhood (and womanhood) that no one ever talks about: like needing to hide from your kids in your closet, your car, or a yoga class on the other side of town, letting them eat candy for dinner because you just can't deal, to the sheer terror of failing them or at the very least losing them in a mall. And sometimes, many times, wondering if the whole parenting thing wasn’t for you.

In vivid and relatable prose, she discusses her love for her career, how she’s managed to overcome some of her own dysfunctional childhood, and the ups and downs of raising the little demons she calls her own…from the office.

Soul-baring, entertaining, and insightful, Don't Wait Up is an abashedly honest look at parenting and relationships for moms who realize that motherhood doesn’t have to be your entire life—just an amazing part of it—that you would definitely most likely do all over again.

























[book] When Islam Is Not a Religion:
Inside America's Fight
for Religious Freedom
by Asma T. Uddin
July 9, 2019
Pegasus Books

A galvanizing look at the threat to religious freedom in the United States through the prism of attacks on the constitutional rights of American Muslims.

American Muslim religious liberty lawyer Asma Uddin has long considered her work defending people of all faiths to be a calling more than a job. Yet even as she seeks equal protection for Evangelicals, Sikhs, Muslims, Native Americans, Jews, and Catholics alike, she has seen an ominous increase in attempts to criminalize Islam and exclude Muslim Americans from those protections.

Somehow, the view that Muslims aren’t human enough for human rights or constitutional protections is moving from the fringe to the mainstream-along with the claim “Islam is not a religion.” This conceit is not just a threat to the First Amendment rights of American Muslims. It is a threat to the freedom of all Americans.

When Islam Is Not a Religion reveals a significant but overlooked danger to our religious liberty. Woven throughout this national saga is Uddin’s own story and the stories of American Muslims and other people of faith who have faced tremendous indignities as they attempt to live and worship freely.

Combining her experience of Islam as a religious truth and her legal and philosophical appreciation that all individuals have a right to religious liberty, Uddin examines the shifting tides of American culture and outlines a way forward for individuals and communities navigating today’s culture wars.



























[book] FROM SCHLEMIel to SABRA
Zionist Masculinity and Palestinian
Hebrew Literature
By Philip Hollander
(University of Wisconsin - Madison)
July 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

In From Schlemiel to Sabra Philip Hollander examines how masculine ideals and images of the New Hebrew man shaped the Israeli state. In this innovative book, Hollander uncovers the complex relationship that Jews had with masculinity, interrogating narratives depicting masculinity in the new state as a transition from weak, feminized schlemiels to robust, muscular, and rugged Israelis. Turning to key literary texts by S. Y. Agnon, Y. H. Brenner, L. A. Arieli, and Aharon Reuveni, Hollander reveals how gender and sexuality were intertwined to promote a specific Zionist political agenda. A Zionist masculinity grounded in military prowess could not only protect the new state but also ensure its procreative needs and future. Self-awareness, physical power, fierce loyalty to the state and devotion to the land, humility, and nurture of the young were essential qualities that needed to be cultivated in migrants to the state. By turning to the early literature of Zionist Palestine, Hollander shows how Jews strove to construct a better Jewish future.


























AUGUST 2019 BOOKS




[book] Chutzpah:
Why Israel Is a Hub of
Innovation and Entrepreneurship
by Inbal Arieli
August 2019
HarperBusiness

Discover the secret behind how Israel, a tiny country with the highest concentration of start-ups per capita worldwide, is raising generations of entrepreneurs who are disrupting markets around the globe and bringing change to the world.

Dubbed “Silicon Wadi,” Israel ranks third in the World Economic Forum Innovation Rating. Despite its small size, it attracts more venture capital per capita than any other country on the planet. What factors have led to these remarkable achievements, and what secrets do Israeli tech entrepreneurs know that others can learn?

Tech insider Inbal Arieli goes against the common belief that Israel’s outstanding economic accomplishments are the byproduct of its technologically advanced military or the result of long-standing Jewish traditions of study and questioning. Rather, Arieli gives credit to the unique way Israelis are raised in a culture that supports creative thinking and risk taking. Growing up within a tribal-like community, Israelis experience childhoods purposely shaped by challenges and risks—in a culture that encourages and rewards chutzpah. This has helped Israelis develop the courage to pursue unorthodox, and often revolutionary, approaches to change and innovation and is the secret behind the country’s economic success.

While chutzpah has given generations of Israelis the courage to break away from conventional thinking, the Israeli concept balagan—messiness in Hebrew—is at the root of how Israelis are taught to interact with the world. Instead of following strict rules, balagan fosters ambiguity, encouraging the development of the skills necessary for dealing with the unpredictability of life and business. Living with balagan provides Israelis with the opportunity to constantly practice the soft skills defined by the World Economic Forum as the Skills for the Future, as balagan promotes creativity, problem-solving, and independence—key characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.

By revealing the unique ways in which Israelis parent, educate and acculturate, Chutzpah offers invaluable insights and proven strategies for success to aspiring entrepreneurs, parents, executives, innovators, and policymakers.































[book] Medieval Jewish Philosophy
and Its Literary Forms
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
Edited by
Aaron W. Hughes, James T. Robinson
August 2019
Indiana University Press

Too often the study of philosophical texts is carried out in ways that do not pay significant attention to how the ideas contained within them are presented, articulated, and developed. This was not always the case. The contributors to this collected work consider Jewish philosophy in the medieval period, when new genres and forms of written expression were flourishing in the wake of renewed interest in ancient philosophy. Many medieval Jewish philosophers were highly accomplished poets, for example, and made conscious efforts to write in a poetic style. This volume turns attention to the connections that medieval Jewish thinkers made between the literary, the exegetical, the philosophical, and the mystical to shed light on the creativity and diversity of medieval thought. As they broaden the scope of what counts as medieval Jewish philosophy, the essays collected here consider questions about how an argument is formed, how text is put into the service of philosophy, and the social and intellectual environment in which philosophical texts were produced.
























[book] Heidegger and Kabbalah:
Hidden Gnosis and the
Path of Poi?sis
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Elliot R. Wolfson
August 2019
Indiana University Press

While many scholars have noted Martin Heidegger’s indebtedness to Christian mystical sources, as well as his affinity with Taoism and Buddhism, Elliot R. Wolfson expands connections between Heidegger’s thought and kabbalistic material. By arguing that the Jewish esoteric tradition impacted Heidegger, Wolfson presents an alternative way of understanding the history of Western philosophy. Wolfson’s comparison between Heidegger and kabbalah sheds light on key concepts such as hermeneutics, temporality, language, and being and nothingness, while yielding surprising reflections on their common philosophical ground. Given Heidegger’s involvement with National Socialism and his use of antisemitic language, these innovative readings are all the more remarkable for their juxtaposition of incongruent fields of discourse. Wolfson’s entanglement with Heidegger and kabbalah not only enhances understandings of both but, more profoundly, serves as an ethical corrective to their respective ethnocentrism and essentialism. Wolfson masterfully illustrates the redemptive capacity of thought to illuminate common ground in seemingly disparate philosophical traditions.





































[book] BEATEN DOWN, WORKED UP
The Past, Present, and
Future of American Labor
by Steven Greenhouse
August 2019
Knopf

From the longtime New York Times labor correspondent, an in-depth look at working men and women in America, the challenges they face, and how they can be re-empowered. It is a history of major labor events and also a repeating manifesto on why unions and organized labor is the solution to many problems. If you get irritated by lovingly pro-union paragraphs, this is not a book for you.

In an era when corporate profits have soared while wages have flatlined, millions of Americans are searching for ways to improve their lives, and they're often turning to labor unions and worker action, whether #RedforEd teachers' strikes or the Fight for $15. Wage stagnation, low-wage work, and blighted blue-collar communities have become an all-too-common part of modern-day America, and behind these trends is a little-discussed problem: the decades-long decline in worker power.

Steven Greenhouse sees this decline reflected in some of the most pressing problems facing our nation today, including income inequality, declining social mobility, the gender pay gap, and the concentration of political power in the hands of the wealthy. He rebuts the often-stated view that labor unions are outmoded--or even harmful--by recounting some of labor's victories, and the efforts of several of today's most innovative and successful worker groups. He shows us the modern labor landscape through the stories of dozens of American workers, from G.M. workers to Uber drivers, and we see how unions historically have empowered--and lifted--the most marginalized, including young women garment workers in New York in 1909, black sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968, and hotel housekeepers today. Greenhouse proposes concrete, feasible ways in which workers' collective power can be--and is being--rekindled and reimagined in the twenty-first century.



























[book] The Kindertransport:
Contesting Memory
(Studies in Antisemitism)
by Jennifer Craig-norton
August 2019
Indiana University Press

Jennifer Craig-Norton sets out to challenge celebratory narratives of the Kindertransport that have dominated popular memory as well as literature on the subject. According to these accounts, the Kindertransport was a straightforward act of rescue and salvation, with little room for a deeper, more complex analysis. This volume reveals that in fact many children experienced difficulties with settlement: they were treated inconsistently by refugee agencies, their parents had complicated reasons for giving them up, and their caregivers had a variety of motives for taking them in. Against the grain of many other narratives, Craig-Norton emphasizes the use of archival sources, many of them newly discovered testimonial accounts and letters from Kinder to their families. This documentary evidence together with testimonial evidence allows compelling insights into the nature of interactions between children and their parents and caregivers and shows readers a more nuanced and complete picture of the Kindertransport.



















SEPTEMBER 2019 BOOKS




[book] DONE WANDERING
A Reintroduction to Judaism
by Sarah Hurwitz
September 2019
Spiegel & Grau

Attorney Hurwitz, a long term speechwriter in the Obama White House, specifically for FLOTUS Michelle Obama, (also wrote Clinton concession speech in 2008, and speeches for Kerry, General Clark, Gore and Clinton) and a graduate of Harvard and Harvard Law writes a deeply felt compelling book on why the Jewish religion – Judaism – is urgent and relevant in the present times. She was named to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council by POTUS Barack Obama.

As she told the JFN Jewish Funders Network a year ago... she did not enjoy “Hebrew School” as a child. Neither she nor any of her classmates had any kind of meaningful Jewish practice going on at home. High Holy Day services were excruciating. After her bat mitzvah, she left the religion behind her. Then, about four years ago, she broke up with a guy she had been dating, and she took an eight week intro to Judaism class at the JCC jCC in response to an email. To fill up her Wednesday nights. The texts on Jewish ethics and values articulated HER ethics and values, but in a way that was far deeper, and more insightful. Seen through adult eyes, practices like Shabbat struck her as utterly brilliant. She found that Judaism has so much to offer today, but few people made it beyond the juvenile ideas from Hebrew School. Her book will try to rectify the epic communications problem American Judaism has. (Also, shout out to Rabbi Aaron Potek and “Gather” which focuses on engaging 20 and 30 somethings in Jewish life.)



















[book] Sababa: Fresh,
Sunny Flavors From My Israeli Kitchen
by Adeena Sussman
with a Foreword by Zahav's Michael Solomonov
September 3, 2019
Avery

"The pages of this book ooze with [Adeena's] passion for the romance and beauty of Israeli cuisine. The recipes are soulful, elemental and stunningly delicious." --from the foreword by Michael Solomonov

In an Israeli cookbook as personal as it is global, Adeena Sussman celebrates the tableau of flavors the region has to offer, in all its staggering and delicious variety. Adeena is the secret powerhouse recipe developer behind the scenes on many cookbooks, including her collaboration on Cravings and Cravings: Hungry for More with Chrissy Teigen and The Sprinkles Baking Book with Candace Nelson. She has also written about Jewish and Israeli cooking and food culture for Food & Wine, The Wall Street Journal, Epicurious, and the now defunct Gourmet.

In Hebrew (derived from the original Arabic), sababa means "everything is awesome," and it's this sunny spirit with which the American food writer and expat Adeena Sussman cooks and dreams up meals in her Tel Aviv kitchen. Every morning, Sussman makes her way through the bustling stalls of Shuk Hacarmel, her local market, which sells irresistibly fresh ingredients and tempting snacks--juicy ripe figs and cherries, locally made halvah, addictive street food, and delectable cheeses and olives. In Sababa, Sussman presents 125 recipes for dishes inspired by this culinary wonderland and by the wide-varying influences surrounding her in Israel.

Americans have begun to instinctively crave the spicy, bright flavors of Israeli cuisine, and in this timely cookbook, Sussman shows readers how to use border-crossing kitchen staples-- tahini, sumac, silan (date syrup), harissa, za'atar---to delicious effect, while also introducing more exotic spices and ingredients. From Freekeh and Roasted Grape Salad and Crudo with Cherries and Squeezed Tomatoes, to Schug Marinated Lamb Chops and Tahini Caramel Tart, Sussman's recipes make a riot of fresh tastes accessible and effortless for the home cook. Filled with transporting storytelling, Sababa is the ultimate, everyday guide to the Israeli kitchen.



















[book] What We Will Become:
A Mother, a Son, and a
Journey of Transformation
by Mimi Lemay
November 12, 2019
Houghton Mifflin HMH

A mother’s memoir of her transgender child’s odyssey, and her journey outside the boundaries of the faith and culture that shaped her.

From the age of two-and-a-half, Jacob, born “Em,” adamantly told his family he was a boy. While his mother Mimi struggled to understand and come to terms with the fact that her child may be transgender, she experienced a sense of déjà vu—the journey to uncover the source of her child’s inner turmoil unearthed ghosts from Mimi’s past and her own struggle to live an authentic life.

Raised in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish family, every aspect of Mimi’s life was dictated by ancient rules and her role in life largely preordained from cradle to grave. As a young woman, Mimi wrestled with the demands of her faith and eventually made the painful decision to leave her faith and community and the strict gender roles it upheld.

Having risen from the ashes of this past life, Mimi was prepared to help her son forge a new one, at a time when there was little consensus on how best to help young transgender children. Brimming with love and courage, and an honest, heartfelt portrait of an unforgettable family, What We Will Become is a testament to how painful events from the past can be redeemed to give us hope for the future.
























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