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Welcome to our pages of Winter 2015, Fall 2014, Summer 2014, Spring 2014, Winter 2014, Fall 2013, and oh so many more Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME SUMME 2015 BOOK READINGS


May 14, 2015: Brad Garrett reads from When the Balls Drop. B&N Grove Los Angeles
May 18, 2015: Dan Ariely reads from Irrationally Yours On Missing Socks, Pickup Lines, and Other Existential Puzzles. B&N 82md Bway NYC 7PM
May 28, 2015: Vivian Gornick reads from her memoir: The Odd Woman and the City. B&N UWS NYC

June 02, 2015: Scott Barnett reads from Gumption Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant. B&N UES NYC 86th St
June 04, 2015: Reynold Levy reads from They Told Me Not to Take that Job Tumult, Betrayal, Heroics, and the Transformation of Lincoln Center. B&N 82nd Bway NYC
June 21, 2015: Judy Blume reads from In the Unlikely Event. B&N Carle Place Long Island NY
June 22, 2015: Judy Blume reads from In the Unlikely Event. B&N Paramus NJ
June 25, 2015: Josh Sabarra reads from his memoir of sex and slamming celebrities, “Porn Again: A Memoir” B&N NYC Union Square
June 29, 2015: Daniel Silva reads from The English Spy (Gabriel Allon Series #15). B&N NYC Union Square

July 07, 2015: Jimmy Carter reads from A Full Life Reflections at Ninety. B&N Fifth Avenue NYC

August 11-17 2015: Yidish-Vokh. Yugntruf Yiddishland. Reisterstown MD

September 01, 2015: Linda Hirshman reads from Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World. B&N UWS NYC
September 10, 2015: Rita Gabis reads from A Guest at the Shooters' Banquet: My Grandfather's SS Past, My Jewish Family, A Search for the Truth. B&N NYC UWS
September 24, 2015: Jesse Eisenberg reads from Bream Gives Me Hiccups. B&N Union Square NYC.
October 06, 2015: Anita Diamant reads from Boston Girl. B&N NYC UWS 82nd & Bway
October 08, 2015: Geraldine Brooks reads from The Secret Chord. B&N NYC UWS 82nd & Bway
October 15, 2015: Chaya Deitsch reads from Here and There: Leaving Hasidism, Keeping My Family. B&N NYC UWS 82nfd and Bway
November 05, 2015: David Evanier reads from Woody: A Biography. B&N NYC UWS 82nd & Bway
November 10, 2015: Kenneth Wishnia reads from Jewish Noir: Contemporary Tales of Crime and Other Dark Deeds. B&N UWS NYC







JUNE 2015 BOOKS




[book] IN THE UNLIKELY EVENT
A NOVEL
BY JUDY BLUME
KNOPF
June 2015
In 1987, Miri Ammerman returns to her hometown of Elizabeth, New Jersey, to attend a commemoration of the worst year of her life. It was 1951-1952 when three plane crashes ended in deaths.

Thirty-five years earlier, when Miri was fifteen, and in love for the first time, a succession of airplanes fell from the sky, leaving a community reeling. Against this backdrop of actual events in the early 1950s, when airline travel was new and exciting and everyone dreamed of going somewhere, Judy Blume imagines and weaves together a haunting story of three generations of families, friends, and strangers, whose lives are profoundly changed by these disasters. She paints a vivid portrait of a particular time and place—Nat King Cole singing “Unforgettable,” Elizabeth Taylor haircuts, young (and not-so-young) love, explosive friendships, A-bomb hysteria, rumors of Communist threat. And a young journalist who makes his name reporting tragedy. Through it all, one generation reminds another that life goes on.
We learn of the events from several perspectives. Miri. Her single mother Rusty. Her uncle. Her grandmother. Her best friend Natalie. Christina, a Greek girl in a secret dating relationship with an Irish boy. Passengers on a plane.
In the Unlikely Event is a gripping novel with all the hallmarks of Judy Blume’s unparalleled storytelling.















[book] Innocence; or,
Murder on Steep Street
by Heda Margolius Kovály (1919-2010)
Translated by Alex Zucker
Soho
June 2, 2015
Famed Holocaust memoirist Heda Margoulis Kovály (Under a Cruel Star) knits her own terrifying experiences in Soviet Prague into a powerful, Raymond Chandler-esque work of literary suspense.
1950s Prague is a city of numerous small terrors, of political tyranny, corruption and surveillance. There is no way of knowing whether one’s neighbor is spying for the government, or what one’s supposed friend will say under pressure to a State Security agent. A loyal Party member might be imprisoned or executed as quickly as a traitor; innocence means nothing for a person caught in a government trap.
But there are larger terrors, too. When a little boy is murdered at the cinema where his aunt works, the ensuing investigation sheds a little too much light on the personal lives of the cinema’s female ushers, each of whom is hiding a dark secret of her own.
Nearly lost to censorship, this rediscovered gem of Czech literature depicts a chilling moment in history, redolent with the stifling atmosphere of political and personal oppression of the early days of Communist Czechoslovakia.















[book] Primates of Park Avenue
A Memoir
by Wednesday Martin Ph.D.
Simon and Schuster
June 2, 2015
A cute book for a chapter, but to keep up the “anthropology” satire of Upper East Side families gets lame and irritating quickly. Plus is this is slightly more fiction than non-fiction?

Sorry... was I too mean?

Dr. Wednesday Martin (PhD in Comparative Literature) acts as an urban anthropologist (amateur anthroplogist) and explores wives and families on Manhattan's Upper East Side.
She tries to decode the “primate social behaviors” of Upper East Side mothers.
After marrying a Jewish man from the Upper East Side and moving to the neighborhood from downtown (downtown is for the young to drink and play, then you move to the Upper East Side to nest and send kids to private school), She says she lived there six years, but really lived there for three, but we are reading this for entertanment, not as a journal article. Wednesday Martin struggled to fit in, figure out the pecking order, figure out who the top dog is, etc. I think this has been written about decades before.
Drawing on her interest in anthropology and primatology, she tries looking at her new world through that lens. She compares snobbish mothers at school drop-offs to olive baboons. Her obsession to acquire an Hermes Birkin handbag made sense when she realized other females wielded them to establish dominance in their troop. She asserts that one woman used her bag defensively against another mother. Etc. etc.















[book] THE COLORING BOOK
A Comedian Solves
Race Relations in America
by Colin Quinn
Grand Central Publishing
June 9, 2015
From former SNL "Weekend Update" host and legendary stand-up Colin Quinn comes a controversial and laugh-out-loud investigation into cultural and ethnic stereotypes.... Jews included

Colin grew up in Park Slope Brooklyn when it was extremely diverse and poor and middle class. (Remember that film from the 1970s that was based in slummy Park Slope called The Landlord?)
Colin Quinn has noticed a trend during his decades on the road - that Americans' increasing political correctness and sensitivity have forced us to tiptoe around the subjects of race and ethnicity altogether. Colin wants to know: What are we all so afraid of? Every ethnic group has differences, everyone brings something different to the table, and this diversity should be celebrated, not denied. So why has acknowledging these cultural differences become so taboo?
In THE COLORING BOOK, Colin, a native New Yorker, tackles this issue head-on while taking us on a trip through the insane melting pot of 1970s Brooklyn, the many, many dive bars of 1980s Manhattan, the comedy scene of the 1990s, and post-9/11 America. He mixes his incredibly candid and hilarious personal experiences with no-holds-barred observations to definitively decide, at least in his own mind, which stereotypes are funny, which stereotypes are based on truths, which have become totally distorted over time, and which are actually offensive to each group, and why.
















[book] Kabbalah:
A Neurocognitive Approach to
Mystical Experiences
by Shahar Arzy and Moshe Idel
Yale University Press
June 30, 2015
In this original study, Moshe Idel, an eminent scholar of Jewish mysticism and thought, and the cognitive neuroscientist and neurologist Shahar Arzy combine their considerable expertise to explore the mysteries of the Kabbalah from an entirely new perspective: that of the human brain. In lieu of the theological, sociological, and psychoanalytic approaches that have generally dominated the study of ecstatic mystical experiences, the authors endeavor to decode the brain mechanisms underlying these phenomena. Arzy and Idel analyze first-person descriptions to explore the Kabbalistic techniques employed by most prominent Jewish mystics to effect bodily reduplications, dissociations, and other phenomena, and compare them with recent neurological observations and modern-day laboratory experiments. The resultant study offers readers a scientific, more brain-based understanding of how ecstatic Kabbalists achieved their most precious mystical experiences. The study further demonstrates how these Kabbalists have long functioned as pioneering investigators of the human self.















[book] A TRAVELING HOMELAND
The Babylonian Talmud as Diaspora
by Daniel Boyarin
University of Pennsylvania Press
June 12, 2015
A word conventionally imbued with melancholy meanings, "diaspora" has been used variously to describe the cataclysmic historical event of displacement, the subsequent geographical scattering of peoples, or the conditions of alienation abroad and yearning for an ancestral home. But as Daniel Boyarin writes, diaspora may be more constructively construed as a form of cultural hybridity or a mode of analysis. In A Traveling Homeland, he makes the case that a shared homeland or past and traumatic dissociation are not necessary conditions for diaspora and that Jews carry their homeland with them in diaspora, in the form of textual, interpretive communities built around talmudic study.

For Boyarin, the Babylonian Talmud is a diasporist manifesto, a text that produces and defines the practices that constitute Jewish diasporic identity. Boyarin examines the ways the Babylonian Talmud imagines its own community and sense of homeland, and he shows how talmudic commentaries from the medieval and early modern periods also produce a doubled cultural identity. He links the ongoing productivity of this bifocal cultural vision to the nature of the book: as the physical text moved between different times and places, the methods of its study developed through contact with surrounding cultures. Ultimately, A Traveling Homeland envisions talmudic study as the center of a shared Jewish identity and a distinctive feature of the Jewish diaspora that defines it as a thing apart from other cultural migrations.

















[book] ALLY
My Journey Across the
American-Israeli Divide
By Michael B. Oren
Random House
June 23, 2015
From Michael Oren—former Ambassador and bestselling author of Six Days of War—comes a memoir of his time as Israel’s Ambassador to the United States and a fascinating and critical look at US-Israeli relations.
Michael Oren served as Israel’s ambassador to the United States from 2009-2013, a transformative period for America and a time of violent revolutions throughout the Middle East. Hundreds of thousands of the region’s people were killed, and the lives of millions more threatened. Israel and America grappled not only with the peace process and other complex bilateral issues, but matters such as terrorism and the Iranian nuclear program which imperiled the world. The alliance would be subjected to enormous strains and its future questioned by commentators in both countries. On more than one occasion, the friendship’s very fabric seemed near to unraveling.
This is the story of that alliance and of its divides, as experienced by one who treasures his American identity while proudly serving the State of Israel. In a world in which presidents and prime ministers can chat or shout at each other by videophone, without any need for go-betweens, the role of an ambassador seems increasingly nebulous. But ambassadors represent not only leaders but peoples and, in the case of Americans and Israelis, peoples linked at multiple levels.
A quintessentially American story of a young person who refused to relinquish a dream, irrespective of the obstacles, and an inherently Israeli story about assuming onerous responsibilities. It is a record, a chronical, and a confession. And it is a story about love, about someone fortunate enough to love two countries and to represent one to the other. But, above all, this memoir is a testament to an alliance that was and will remain vital for Americans, Israelis, and the world.

















[book] The Blue Between Sky and Water
A novel
by Susan Abulhawa
Bloomsbury
June 2015
From the author of Mornings in Jenin
It is 1947, and Beit Daras, a quiet village in Palestine surrounded by olive groves, is home to the Baraka family. Eldest daughter Nazmiyeh looks after her widowed mother, prone to wandering and strange outbursts, while her brother Mamdouh tends to the village bees. Their younger sister, Mariam, with her striking mismatched eyes, spends her days talking to imaginary friends and writing.
When Israeli Defense Forces gather outside the town's borders, nobody suspects the terror that is about to descend.
Soon the village is burning and, amidst smoke and ash, the family must take the long road to Gaza, in a walk that will test them to their limits.
Sixty years later, 2007, Mamdouh's granddaughter Nur is living in America. She falls in love with a married man, a doctor who works in Palestine, and follows him to Gaza. There she meets Alwan, the mother of Khaled - a boy trapped in his own body, unable to wake up from a deep blue dream. It is through her that Nur will at last discover the ties of kinship that transcend distance - and even death. The Blue Between Sky and Water is a story of powerful, flawed women; of relocation, separation and heartache; of renewal, family, endurance, and love.

Susan Abulhawa writes that she moved to America as a teenager after the Six Day War of 1967, after “her family's land was seized and Israel captured what remained of Palestine, including Jerusalem.” In July 2001, she founded Playgrounds for Palestine, a children's organization dedicated to upholding The Right to Play for Palestinian children. She resides in Pennsylvania with her daughter.













[book] THE PINCH
A NOVEL
BY STEVE STERN
Graywolf Press
June 2015
A dazzling, spellbinding novel set in a mythical Jewish community by the acclaimed author of the New York Times Notable Book The Book of Mischief

It’s the late 1960s. The Pinch, once a thriving Jewish community centered on North Main Street in Memphis, has been reduced to a single tenant. Lenny Sklarew awaits the draft by peddling drugs and shelving books—until he learns he is a character in a book about the rise and fall of this very Pinch. Muni Pinsker, who authored the book in an enchanted day containing years, arrived in the neighborhood at its height and was smitten by an alluring tightrope walker. Muni’s own story is dovetailed by that of his uncle Pinchas Pin, whose epic journey to North Main Street forms the book’s spine. Steve Stern interweaves these tales with an ingenious structure that merges past with present, and his wildly inventive fabulism surpasses everything he’s done before. Together, these intersecting stories transform the real-world experience of Lenny, whose fate determines the future of the Pinch, in this brilliant, unforgettable novel.















[book] The Theft of Memory:
Losing My Father,
One Day at a Time
by Jonathan Kozol
Crown
June 2015
National Book Award winner Jonathan Kozol is best known for his fifty years of work among our nation’s poorest and most vulnerable children. Now, in the most personal book of his career, he tells the story of his father’s life and work as a nationally noted specialist in disorders of the brain and his astonishing ability, at the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, to explain the causes of his sickness and then to narrate, step-by-step, his slow descent into dementia.
Dr. Harry Kozol was born in Boston in 1906. Classically trained at Harvard and Johns Hopkins, he was an unusually intuitive clinician with a special gift for diagnosing interwoven elements of neurological and psychiatric illnesses in highly complicated and creative people. “One of the most intense relationships of his career,” his son recalls, “was with Eugene O’Neill, who moved to Boston in the last years of his life so my father could examine him and talk with him almost every day.”
At a later stage in his career, he evaluated criminal defendants including Patricia Hearst and the Boston Strangler, Albert H. DeSalvo, who described to him in detail what was going through his mind while he was killing thirteen women.
But The Theft of Memory is not primarily about a doctor’s public life. The heart of the book lies in the bond between a father and his son and the ways that bond intensified even as Harry’s verbal skills and cogency progressively abandoned him. “Somehow,” the author says, “all those hours that we spent trying to fathom something that he wanted to express, or summon up a vivid piece of seemingly lost memory that still brought a smile to his eyes, left me with a deeper sense of intimate connection with my father than I’d ever felt before.”
Lyrical and stirring, The Theft of Memory is at once a tender tribute to a father from his son and a richly colored portrait of a devoted doctor who lived more than a century.















[book] GENDER EQUALITY AND
PRAYER IN JEWISH LAW
BY Rabbi Ethan Tucker and Rabbi Micha'el Rosenberg
URIM
2015
As gender equality has spread throughout society, including its religiously observant sectors, traditional communities turn to their guiding sources to re-examine old questions. This book opens the reader’s eyes to the wealth of Jewish legal material surrounding gender and prayer, with a particular focus on who can lead the prayers in a traditional service and who can constitute the communal quorum—or minyan—that they require. With honesty, transparency, and rigor, Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law is a powerful resource for grappling with these complex questions. The authors not only explore this specific issue in depth, but they also model how we can mine the Jewish legal tradition for its underlying values, enabling its complex sources to serve as effective guides for contemporary communal decision-making.

















[book] Allen Klein
The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles,
Made the Stones, and
Transformed Rock & Roll
by Fred Goodman
Eamon
June 23, 2015
The story of notorious celebrity manager Allen Klein, revealing new, behind-the-scenes details about some of the biggest rock bands in history.
He was born in NJ. His mother passed away when Allen was a year old and he was raised by his father, a Jewish butcher. A great accountant, numbers man, Allen said that 'he walked through tha valley of death but feared no evil, cuase he was the biggest bastard in town.' He did get convicted of ripping off a charity concert, but what is the real story?
Allen Klein was like no one the music industry had seen before. The hard-nosed business manager became infamous for allegedly catalyzing the Beatles’ breakup and robbing the Rolling Stones, but the truth is both more complex and more fascinating.
As the manager of the Stones and then the Beatles—not to mention Sam Cooke, the Who, Donovan, the Kinks, and numerous other performers—he taught young soon-to-be legends how to be businessmen as well as rock stars. In so doing, Klein made millions for his clients and changed music forever.
But Klein was as merciless with his clients as he was with anyone else, earning himself an outsize reputation for villainy that has gone unchallenged until now. Through unique, unprecedented access to Klein’s archives, veteran music journalist Fred Goodman tells the full story of how the Beatles broke up, how the Stones achieved the greatest commercial success in rock history, and how the music business became what it is today.
















[book] The Physicist and the Philosopher:
Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That
Changed Our Understanding of Time
by Jimena Canales
Princeton
June 2015
On April 6, 1922, in Paris, Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson publicly debated the nature of time. Einstein considered Bergson's theory of time to be a soft, psychological notion, irreconcilable with the quantitative realities of physics. Bergson, who gained fame as a philosopher by arguing that time should not be understood exclusively through the lens of science, criticized Einstein's theory of time for being a metaphysics grafted on to science, one that ignored the intuitive aspects of time. The Physicist and the Philosopher tells the remarkable story of how this explosive debate transformed our understanding of time and drove a rift between science and the humanities that persists today.
Jimena Canales introduces readers to the revolutionary ideas of Einstein and Bergson, describes how they dramatically collided in Paris, and traces how this clash of worldviews reverberated across the twentieth century. She shows how it provoked responses from figures such as Bertrand Russell and Martin Heidegger, and carried repercussions for American pragmatism, logical positivism, phenomenology, and quantum mechanics. Canales explains how the new technologies of the period--such as wristwatches, radio, and film--helped to shape people's conceptions of time and further polarized the public debate. She also discusses how Bergson and Einstein, toward the end of their lives, each reflected on his rival's legacy--Bergson during the Nazi occupation of Paris and Einstein in the context of the first hydrogen bomb explosion.
The Physicist and the Philosopher reveals how scientific truth was placed on trial in a divided century marked by a new sense of time















[book] The 51 Day War:
Ruin and Resistance in Gaza
by Max Blumenthal
Nation Books
June 30, 2015
From NationBooks, known for its very Leftist books, and Max Blumenthal, whose book GOLIATH, focused on Israeli occupation and authoritarianism, comes a book about Gaza and how Israel ruined it
On July 8, 2014, Israel launched air strikes and a ground invasion of Hamas-controlled Gaza, that lasted 51 days, leaving over 2,000 people dead, the vast majority of whom were Gazan civilians.
During the assault, at least 10,000 homes were destroyed and, according to the United Nations, nearly 300,000 Palestinians were displaced.
Max Blumenthal was on the ground during what he argues was an entirely avoidable catastrophe. Blumenthal writes about the harrowing conditions and cynical deceptions that led to the ruinous war — details that he says never got reported by the mainstream media.
Blumenthal writes that he has unearthed evidence of atrocities he gathered in the rubble of Gaza after much of the Western media had packed up. He writes that Israel used Gazan civilians as human shields; that Isreal arbitrarily targeted Palestinian civilians; that the IDF was pushed to commit genocide against Arabs by Israeli military personnel, Israel's political leaders, and rabbis that receive government salaries. Blumenthal recorded testimonies from many Gaza residents in order to document potential war crimes committed by the IDF. He explains the outcome of the ceasefire agreement that arrived after 51 days of fighting, showing how US and Egyptian-led diplomacy makes another, even more horrifying war almost inevitable.
Blumenthal argues that these atrocities reflect the political trajectory of the state of Israeli society today. Gazans suffer at the hands of Israel but they also are engaged in dramatic acts of resistance.
















[book] Revelation and Authority:
Sinai in Jewish Scripture and Tradition
(The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library)
by Benjamin D. Sommer
Yale
June 2015
At once a study of biblical theology and modern Jewish thought, this volume describes a “participatory theory of revelation” as it addresses the ways biblical authors and contemporary theologians alike understand the process of revelation and hence the authority of the law. Benjamin Sommer maintains that the Pentateuch’s authors intend not only to convey God’s will but to express Israel’s interpretation of and response to that divine will. Thus Sommer’s close readings of biblical texts bolster liberal theologies of modern Judaism, especially those of Abraham Joshua Heschel and Franz Rosenzweig. This bold view of revelation puts a premium on human agency and bears witness to the grandeur of a God who accomplishes a providential task through the free will of the human subjects under divine authority. Yet, despite their diverse views of revelation, all the Pentateuch’s authors regard the binding authority of the law as sacrosanct. Sommer’s book demonstrates why a law-observant religious Jew can be open to discoveries about the Bible that seem nontraditional or even antireligious.
















What happens when lawyers hire their clients and fund the case and act as entrepreneurs to get a big payoff in class action suits
[book] Entrepreneurial Litigation:
Its Rise, Fall, and Future
by John C. Coffee Jr.
Harvard
June 2015
Uniquely in the United States, lawyers litigate large cases on behalf of many claimants who could not afford to sue individually. In these class actions, attorneys act typically as risk-taking entrepreneurs, effectively hiring the client rather than acting as the client’s agent. Lawyer-financed, lawyer-controlled, and lawyer-settled, such entrepreneurial litigation invites lawyers to sometimes act more in their own interest than in the interest of their clients. And because class litigation aggregates many claims, defendants object that its massive scale amounts to legalized extortion. Yet, without such devices as the class action and contingent fees, many meritorious claims would never be asserted.

John Coffee examines the dilemmas surrounding entrepreneurial litigation in a variety of specific contexts, including derivative actions, securities class actions, merger litigation, and mass tort litigation. His concise history traces how practices developed since the early days of the Republic, exploded at the end of the twentieth century, and then waned as Supreme Court decisions and legislation sharply curtailed the reach of entrepreneurial litigation. In an evenhanded account, Coffee assesses both the strengths and weaknesses of entrepreneurial litigation and proposes a number of reforms to achieve a fairer balance. His goal is to save the class action, not discard it, and to make private enforcement of law more democratically accountable. Taking a global perspective, he also considers the feasibility of exporting a modified form of entrepreneurial litigation to other countries that are today seeking a mechanism for aggregate representation.














[book] PORN AGAIN
A MEMOIR
BY JOSH SABARRA
Kirkus said it is the life and times of a randy Hollywood public relations guru. Entrepreneur and television personality Sabarra’s spicy debut memoir begins with an awkward sexual episode (the first of many to come) and ends with a genuinely heartfelt epiphany. He writes of being a sensitive Jewish child growing up in South Florida, where the heat was oppressive. School and summer camp were uncomfortable, he says, for a sexually precocious young boy who explored gay sex at an early age. The accompanying guilt and shame made him swear off sex until he was in his early 30s, despite his high sex drive. Compounding these issues was his burgeoning obsessive-compulsive disorder and a platonic affinity for women — particularly for his junior high school teacher Sylvia Bastaja, whose life would later end suddenly.
As a young man, Sabarra took solace in food, ballooned to 175 pounds and underwent several fat-reduction surgeries. His fascination with film in college manifested itself in an internship at the soap opera Guiding Light. The baby-faced author honed his schmoozing technique on set with Hollywood stars and soon rocketed up the executive chain at a major Hollywood studio. The memoir’s sex scenes flow as freely as the lavish name-dropping after he comes out to his parents and begins to date again.
However, the book’s G-rated anecdotes about his bar mitzvah, his trials in Little League baseball and his “Jewish T-Rex” college roommate are also delightfully funny, painting the author as a man who struggled with youthful insecurities but emerged as a gleefully self-confident sex obsessed adult. Sabarra also offers insider details about his tumultuous friendship with the actress and talk show host Ricki Lake and his flings with actor Alan Cumming, figure skater Johnny Weir and a deeply troubled porn star with mild Tourette’s syndrome, which leads to the book’s most undeniably moving scenes. He and his BF brought in porn actors and $300 prostitutes from rentboy.com to spice up their lives. He relates that Johnny Weir was a “10” out of “10” for sexual exploits. Kirkus says the book’s title is potentially misleading. Sabarra’s multitiered chronicle is salacious and provocative yet also intimate on a whole different level.


















[book] Who Made Early Christianity?:
The Jewish Lives of the Apostle Paul
by John G. Gager Jr.
Columbia Univesity Press
June 23, 2015
n this philosophical and theological study, John Gager undermines the Apostle Paul's rejection of Judaism, conversion to Christianity, and founding of Christian anti-Judaism. Through meticulous research and well-supported argument, he finds that the rise of Christianity occurred well after Paul's death and attributes the distortion of the Apostle's views to early and later Christians. Though these elites ascribed a rejection-replacement theology to Paul's legend, Gager shows that the Apostle was considered a loyal Jew by many of his Jesus-believing contemporaries and that later Jewish and Muslim thinkers held the same view. He holds that one of the earliest misinterpretations of Paul was to make him the founder of Christianity, and in recent times numerous Jewish and Christian readers of Paul have moved beyond this understanding.
Gager also finds that Judaism did not fade away after Paul's death but continued to appeal to both Christians and pagans for centuries. Jewish synagogues remained important religious and social institutions throughout the Mediterranean world. Making use of all possible literary and archaeological sources, including Muslim texts, Gager helps recover the long pre-history of a Jewish Paul, obscured by recent, negative portrayals of the Apostle, and recognizes the enduring bond between Jews and Christians that influenced all aspects of a developing Christianity.


John Gager's Who Made Early Christianity? re-frames the question in its title and offers a new and revisionist account of the origins of Christianity. In this very accessible book, Gager reveals the profound Jewishness of early Christianity, and reconsiders Paul's role in the formation of Christianity, anti-Judaism in the early Church, and the parting of the ways between the two religious faiths. With stunning clarity, this book demonstrates how timely and relevant great scholarship can be to our contemporary world.
(David Stern, Harry Starr Professor of Classical and ModernHebrew and Jewish Literature at Harvard University.)

After a lifetime of reflection on Paul and his Jewish connections, John Gager gives us, in this extraordinarily lucid and accessible book, a portrait of the Jewish Paul. Within the early Church there were Christians who saw Jews not as enemies but as friends, and Gager argues that this stance derives from Paul. A provocative book, which rescues Paul from the charge of anti-semitism.
(Shaye J.D. Cohen, Harvard University)

For two thousand years, the Church claimed that the Jews were blind, and because of their blindness they did not understand the Old Testament. Now comes John Gager, and argues that it was Christianity that was blind, and because of this blindness, Christians did not understand the New Testament. Paul did not abrogate the Law; he did not convert to Christianity; he was neither the founder of Christianity nor the father of Christian anti-Judaism. Paul was a fateful Jew who wanted to bring salvation to the Gentiles. A revolutionary and fascinating book
(Israel Jacob Yuval, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)













[book] FISH IN THE DARK
A PLAY
BY LARRY DAVID
Grove Press
2015
Fish in the Dark is the astonishing playwriting debut by Larry David, the multiple Emmy-winning star of Curb Your Enthusiasm and co-creator of Seinfeld. This sidesplitting play, a testimony to David’s great writing talent, is also his first time on Broadway—in fact, his first time acting on stage since eighth grade. In Fish in the Dark Larry David stars as Norman Drexel, a man in his fifties who is average in most respects except for his hyperactive libido. As Norman and his family try to navigate the death of a loved one, old acquaintances and unsettled arguments resurface with hilarious consequences.g
Fish in the Dark has its world premiere at the Cort Theatre on Broadway on March 5, 2015, starring Larry David

















[book] The Bible on Location
Off the Beaten Path in Ancient
and Modern Israel
by Julie Baretz
June 2015
Jewish Publication Society / Nebraska
In this innovative guidebook Julie Baretz takes readers to twenty-one off-the-beaten-path locations in Israel where Bible stories are said to have happened. At each site she sets the scene by relating the historical context of the event, then follows with the biblical text itself and her own lively commentary. Captivating and complex Bible characters bring the locations to life as they face social, ethical, and spiritual dilemmas not unlike our own today. Baretz’s narratives draw on history, archaeology, academic scholarship, and rabbinic literature for interpretations that enhance the meaning of the biblical events. Each story is told in the voice of Baretz as the tour guide—knowledgeable yet informal and friendly.
The Bible on Location traces the chronology and narrative arc of the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, Ezra, and Nehemiah. The book begins with the Israelites’ arrival in the land of Israel (following the exodus from Egypt and the forty years of wandering) and continues over more than six hundred years, until the return of the Jewish exiles from Babylon to their homeland.
Baretz’s descriptions are accompanied by colorful maps and photographs that put actual and armchair visitors in the middle of the action. Each location reveals a new episode in the biblical narrative and provides inspiration and commentary that will enhance visits to the various sites.


















[book] Exiles in Sepharad:
The Jewish Millennium in Spain
by Jeffrey Gorsky
June 2015
Jewish Publication Society / Nebraska
The dramatic one-thousand-year history of Jews in Spain comes to life in Exiles in Sepharad. Jeffrey Gorsky vividly relates this colorful period of Jewish history, from the era when Jewish culture was at its height in Muslim Spain to the horrors of the Inquisition and the Expulsion.
Twenty percent of Jews today are descended from Sephardic Jews, who created significant works in religion, literature, science, and philosophy. They flourished under both Muslim and Christian rule, enjoying prosperity and power unsurpassed in Europe. Their cultural contributions include important poets; the great Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides; and Moses de Leon, author of the Zohar, the core text of the Kabbalah.
But these Jews also endured considerable hardship. Fundamentalist Islamic tribes drove them from Muslim to Christian Spain. In 1391 thousands were killed and more than a third were forced to convert by anti-Jewish rioters. A century later the Spanish Inquisition began, accusing thousands of these converts of heresy. By the end of the fifteenth century Jews had been expelled from Spain and forcibly converted in Portugal and Navarre. After almost a millennium of harmonious existence, what had been the most populous and prosperous Jewish community in Europe ceased to exist on the Iberian Peninsula.


















[book] Book of Numbers
A Novel
by Joshua Cohen
June 9, 2015
592 pages
Random House
A monumental, uproarious, and exuberant novel about the search—for love, truth, and the meaning of Life With The Internet.
The enigmatic billionaire founder of Tetration, the world’s most powerful tech company, hires a failed novelist, Josh Cohen, to ghostwrite his memoirs. The mogul, known as Principal, brings Josh behind the digital veil, tracing the rise of Tetration, which started in the earliest days of the Internet by revolutionizing the search engine before venturing into smartphones, computers, and the surveillance of American citizens. Principal takes Josh on a mind-bending world tour from Palo Alto to Dubai and beyond, initiating him into the secret pretext of the autobiography project and the life-or-death stakes that surround its publication.
Insider tech exposé, leaked memoir-in-progress, international thriller, family drama, sex comedy, and biblical allegory, Book of Numbers renders the full range of modern experience both online and off. Embodying the Internet in its language, it finds the humanity underlying the virtual.
Featuring one of the most unforgettable characters in contemporary fiction, Book of Numbers is an epic of the digital age, a triumph of a new generation of writers, and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do.
Please note that Book of Numbers uses a special pagination system inspired by binary notation: the part number precedes the page number, and is separated from it by a decimal point.


















[book] ALL or NOTHING
One Chef's Appetite for the Extreme
by Jesse Schenker, Chef
June 2015
Dey Street
Blending Kitchen Confidential, Blood, Bones & Butter, and Breaking Bad, a culinary memoir that illuminates the highs and lows of addiction, anxiety, and ambition in the world of haute cuisine.
Thirty-one-year-old Jesse Schenker has rocketed to the top of the culinary world. An Iron Chef winner and James Beard nominee, he was voted Best New Chef by New York Magazine, and his acclaimed Recette was named Best New Restaurant by the New York Times. But Jesse’s epic rise masks a little-known past filled with demons and obsession, genius and mania.
Growing up in wealthy suburban Florida, Jesse was introduced to the culinary world—and the world of hard drugs. Becoming a high-school dropout addicted to heroin and crack, he was alienated from his family and wanted by the cops. By twenty-one, he had robbed, cheated, and lied to everyone in his life—and had overdosed, been shot at and nearly beaten to death. His eventual arrest motivated him to get clean.
Jesse learned to channel his obsessiveness and need to get ever “higher” into his career. But his growing success fueled his anxiety, leading to panic attacks and hypochondria. In this startling and down to earth memoir, Jesse lays it all on the table for the first time, reflecting on his insatiable appetite for the extreme—which has led to his biggest triumphs and failures—and shares the shocking story of his turbulent life.












[book] Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda
A YA NOVEL
By Becky Albertalli
2015
B + Bray
Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier, a half Jewish grammar geek and drama phile, prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he's pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he's never met.
Incredibly funny and poignant, this twenty-first-century coming-of-age, coming out story—wrapped in a geek romance—is a knockout of a debut novel by Becky Albertalli.
























[book] Sick in the Head:
Conversations About Life and Comedy
by Judd Apatow
2015
Random House
From the writer and director of Knocked Up and the producer of Freaks and Geeks comes a collection of intimate, hilarious conversations with the biggest names in comedy from the past thirty years—including Mel Brooks, Jerry Seinfeld, Jon Stewart, Roseanne Barr, Harold Ramis, Louis C.K., Chris Rock, and Lena Dunham.
Before becoming one of the most successful filmmakers in Hollywood, Judd Apatow was the original comedy nerd. At fifteen, he took a job washing dishes in a local comedy club—just so he could watch endless stand-up for free. At sixteen, he was hosting a show for his local high school radio station in Syosset, Long Island—a show that consisted of Q&As with his comedy heroes, from Garry Shandling to Jerry Seinfeld. They talked about their careers, the science of a good joke, and their dreams of future glory (turns out, Shandling was interested in having his own TV show one day and Steve Allen had already invented everything).
Thirty years later, Apatow is still that same comedy nerd—and he’s still interviewing funny people about why they do what they do.
Sick in the Head gathers Apatow’s most memorable and revealing conversations into one hilarious, wide-ranging, and incredibly candid collection that spans not only his career but his entire adult life. Here are the comedy legends who inspired and shaped him, from Mel Brooks to Steve Martin. Here are the contemporaries he grew up with in Hollywood, from Spike Jonze to Sarah Silverman. And here, finally, are the brightest stars in comedy today, many of whom Apatow has been fortunate to work with, from Seth Rogen to Amy Schumer. And along the way, something kind of magical happens: What started as a lifetime’s worth of conversations about comedy becomes something else entirely. It becomes an exploration of creativity, ambition, neediness, generosity, spirituality, and the joy that comes from making people laugh.
Loaded with the kind of back-of-the-club stories that comics tell one another when no one else is watching, this fascinating, personal (and borderline-obsessive) book is Judd Apatow’s gift to comedy nerds everywhere.
















JULY 2015 BOOKS



[book] The Best Boy in the
United States Of America:
A Memoir of Blessings and Kisses
by Dr. Ron Wolfson
Jewish Lights
July 15, 2015
Life lessons in a funny and moving portrait of growing up Jewish in America.
Amusing and heartfelt, Ron Wolfson's moving memoir is the inspiring tale of a Hebrew school dropout from Omaha, Nebraska, whose surprising journey to become a visionary leader of American Jewry is filled with stories of tradition, romance and, yes, blessings and kisses.
Called and called to be "the best boy in the United States of America" by a beloved Zaydie (grandfather), he writes of growing up in a warm Jewish family, celebrating holidays, working in the family grocery store, navigating adolescence and enjoying (too much) Jewish foods that begin with the letter "k." He encounters the "merchants of Omaha," among them the colorful Mrs. B, who built the largest furniture store in America, and meets the famous oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett.
Groomed to be an entrepreneur, he unexpectedly becomes an educator while in college, marries his junior high school sweetheart, transforms his own young family into a laboratory for creative Jewish living and discovers his true passion teaching a post-Holocaust generation how to embrace a joyous Judaism in the family, the synagogue and the community.

With laugh-out-loud humor and profound poignancy, Ron's true stories illuminating the Jewish experience in late-twentieth-century America will resonate with the boomers who lived it and with their adult children who seek to shape stronger families, create compelling communities and take individual spiritual journeys that lead to a life of joy and laughter, meaning and purpose, belonging and blessing.
















[book] The Rhythms of Jewish Living
A Sephardic Exploration of
Judaism's Spirituality
by Rabbi Marc D. Angel
Jewish Lights
July 7, 2015
An engaging introduction to an ancient spirituality for modern times.
Judaism has provided the spiritual framework for millions of people for thousands of years. Yet its basic beliefs and observances often are misunderstood in our modern day. Today most Jews live in Westernized, technologically advanced cities and have become distanced from Judaism's central ideas that were originally developed in non-Western, non-technological and non-urban settings-particularly those of the Sephardim, the Jews of Southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.
In this thoughtful and accessible presentation of the Sephardic approach to Judaism's observance and rituals, Rabbi Marc D. Angel reclaims the natural, balanced and insightful teachings of Sephardic Judaism that can and should imbue modern Jewish spirituality. He draws on many classic sources and the great mystics of fifteenth-century Safed, illuminating the influence of the Golden Age of Spanish Jewry on the Sephardic tradition. The result is an approach to Judaism that is deep, rich and diverse.
With his keen overview of the sacred times, places and ideas of Judaism, Rabbi Angel offers an excellent primer for those beginning their study of Judaism as well as for those who wish to deepen their knowledge and experience of Jewish spirituality from a Sephardic perspective.
















[book] Erased from Space and Consciousness
Israel and the Depopulated
Palestinian Villages of 1948
by Noga Kadman
Foreword by Oren Yiftachel
Indiana
July 2015
Hundreds of Palestinian villages were left empty across Israel when their residents became refugees after the 1948 war. Most of these villages were razed by the new State of Israel, their lands and property confiscated, but in dozens of others, communities of Jews were settled—many refugees in their own right. The state embarked upon a systematic effort of renaming and remaking the landscape, and the Arab presence was erased from official maps and histories. While most Israelis are familiar with the walls, ruins, and gardens that mark these sites today—almost half are located within tourist areas or national parks—they are unaware that Arab communities existed there within living memory. Using official documents, kibbutz publications, and visits to the former village sites, Noga Kadman reconstructs this history of erasure for all 418 depopulated villages. This is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and contemporary Israeli society.
Noga Kadman is a researcher and licensed tour guide whose main interest is to explore the encounter between Israelis and the Palestinian presence in the landscape and history of the country. She is co-editor of Once Upon a Land: A Tour Guide to Depopulated Palestinian Villages and Towns (in Hebrew and Arabic).
















[book] The Realist
by Asaf Hanuka
Boom
2015
Acclaimed Israeli cartoonist Asaf Hanuka’s weekly strips collected into one volume and translated into English for the first time.

In 2010, Israeli newspaper The Calcalist asked Hanuka, already well known in Israel as a commercial illustrator and as a contributor to the animated film Waltz With Bashir, for a weekly comic strip. The first of the autobiographical strips chronicled Hanuka discovering that he and his wife and their young son need to find a new place to live, immediately and in a “crazy” Tel Aviv real estate market, because the apartment they’ve been renting has been sold. As an artist, husband, father or a regular Israeli citizen, Asaf Hanuka chronicles everyday life in his country, with humor that is offbeat and sometimes surreal. Shot for shot, Hanuka's home is depicted as a vibrant metropolis and provides a brilliant depiction of modern Tel Aviv. Archaia's edition of The Realist translates and collects both volumes of the work previously titled KO À Tel Aviv into a single book for the first time.
















[book] JEWISH ETHICAL VALUES
A Sourcebook of Classic Texts and
Their Practical Uses for Our Lives
by Dr. Seymour J. Cohen and
Dr. Byron L Sherwin
Jewish Lights
July 2015
An invitation into a history rich with wisdom and guidance, making classic Jewish ethical literature available for our twenty-first-century lives.
Timeless texts from classic Jewish ethical literature are combined with the authors' insightful commentary to address the ultimate human moral issue and the most intimate personal question: How can I best live the life God has entrusted into my care?
Rabbis Sherwin and Cohen bring the genre of Jewish ethical literature from its origins in the ancient and medieval worlds straight into our twenty-first-century lives. They highlight a wide variety of classic texts, including selections from the Zohar, The Holy Letter, The Path of the Upright by Moshe Hayyim Luzzatto, Duties of the Heart by Bahya ibn Pakudah and Nachmanides’s Commentary on the Torah. This manual for living, with teachings from rabbis across the ages, invites us to explore how to deal with ego, be wise, die, behave sexually, believe in God, study the Torah, treat our parents, be a parent, speak about one another and more.
With expertise and passion, Sherwin and Cohen show us how these unusual texts not only inform but can transform our lives.
















[book] NAMING GOD
AVINU MALKEINU
OUR FATHER, OUR KING
Edited By Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, PhD
Jewish Lights
July 2015
Forty contributors from six countries and three continents interpret one of Judaism's favorite prayers-and the difficulty of naming the unnameable.

One of the oldest and most beloved prayers-known even to Jews who rarely attend synagogue-is Avinu Malkenu ("Our Father, Our King"), a liturgical staple for the entire High Holy Day period. "Our Father, Our King" has resonance also for Christians, whose Lord's Prayer begins "Our Father."

Despite its popularity, however, Avinu Malkenu causes great debate because of the difficulties in thinking of God as father and king. Americans no longer relate positively to images of royalty; victims of parental abuse note the problem of assuming a benevolent father; and feminists have long objected to masculine language for God. These issues are just the tip of a larger linguistic and spiritual “iceberg”: How do we name God altogether, without recourse to imagery that defies belief?

A detailed study of a particular prayer, and a thoughtful analysis of the age-old but altogether modern problem of naming God, it is intended for people who worship but have questions about God. It features some forty contributors, men and women from all Jewish denominations and from around the world-scholars, rabbis, artists and thinkers from Canada, France, Israel, the Netherlands, UK and US, who contribute fascinating thought-pieces on a critical question for religious consciousness today.

Contributors:
Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, Los Angeles
Rabbi Anthony Bayfield, London, UK
Rabbi Will Berkowitz, Seattle, WA
Dr. Annette Boeckler, London, UK
Dr. Marc Brettler, Boston, MA
Dr. Erica Brown, Silver Spring, MD
Rabbi Angela Buchdahl, New York, NY
Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, New York, NY
Rabbi Joshua Davidson, New York, NY
Rabbi Lawrence Englander, Mississauga, ON, Canada
Lisa Exler, New York, NY
Rabbi Paul Freedman, London, UK
Rabbi Elyse Frishman, Franklin Lakes, NJ
Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand, London, UK
Rabbi Edwin Goldberg, Chicago, IL
Rabbi Andrew Goldstein, London, UK
Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Katonah, NY
Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, Mamaroneck, NY
Rabbi Delphine Horvilleur, Paris, France
Rabbi Elie Kaunfer, New York, NY
Rabbi Karen Kedar, Chicago, IL
Rabbi Reuven Kimelman, Boston, MA
Rabbi Daniel Landes, Israel
Liz Lerman, Washington, DC
Rabbi Asher Lopatin, New York, NY
Catherine Madsen, Amherst, MA
Rabbi Jonathan Magonet, London, UK
Rabbi Dalia Marx, Israel
Ruth Messinger, New York, NY
Rabbi Charles H. Middleburgh, London, UK
Rabbi Jay Henry Moses, Columbus, OH
Rabbi Jack Riemer, Boca Raton, FL
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, South Orange, NJ
Rabbis Dennis and Sandy Sasso, Indianapolis, IN
Rabbi Marc Saperstein, London, UK
Rabbi Jonathan P. Slater, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY
Rabbi David Stern, Dallas, TX
Rabbi David Teutsch, Philadelphia, PA
Dr. Ellen Umansky, White Plains, NY
Edward van Voooen, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Rabbi Margaret Moers Wenig, Brooklyn, NY
Dr. Ron Wolfson, Los Angeles, CA
Rabbi Daniel Zemel, Arlington, VA
Dr. Wendy Zierler, New York, NY
















[book] Mike's Place
A True Story of Love,
Blues, and Terror in Tel Aviv
by Jack Baxter, Joshua Faudem, and Koren Shadmi
First Second
2015
Mike's Place was one of the few spots in Tel Aviv where Jews, Christians, and Muslims could hang out peaceably, surrounded by the expats who filled the bar every night. It was a cosmopolitan haven from the conflict, a local gem that many pointed to as a hopeful sign that peace could come to the Middle East after all. In the spring of 2003, filmmakers Jack Baxter and Josh Faudem had just begun making a documentary about the phenomenon of Mike's Place.
And then the bar was destroyed in a suicide bombing that took three lives and wounded another fifty people—an attack that changed Jack and Josh's lives forever.
With art from Israeli cartoonist Koren Shadmi, Mike's Place is a gripping nonfiction accounting of the lives of a handful of people who came together in hope, then had to find their way together through despair.
















[book] The Divine
by Boaz Lavie
Illustrated by Asaf Hanuka and Tomer Hanuka
First Second
July 2015
Mark's out of the military, these days, with his boring, safe civilian job doing explosives consulting. But you never really get away from war. So it feels inevitable when his old army buddy Jason comes calling, with a lucrative military contract for a mining job in an obscure South-East Asian country called Quanlom. They'll have to operate under the radar—Quanlom is being torn apart by civil war, and the US military isn't strictly supposed to be there.
With no career prospects and a baby on the way, Mark finds himself making the worst mistake of his life and signing on with Jason. What awaits him in Quanlom is going to change everything.
What awaits him in Quanlom is weirdness of the highest order: a civil war led by ten-year-old twins wielding something that looks a lot like magic, leading an army of warriors who look a lot like gods.
What awaits him in Quanlom is an actual dragon.

From world-renowned artists Asaf and Tomer Hanuka (twins, whose magic powers are strictly confined to pen and paper) and Boaz Lavie, The Divine is a fast-paced, brutal, and breathlessly beautiful portrait of a world where ancient powers vie with modern warfare and nobody escapes unscathed.
















[book] A FULL LIFE
REFLECTIONS AT NINETY
BY JIMMY CARTER
(former President of the United States)
Simon & SchusterFirst Second
July 2015
James Earl “Jimmy” Carter, thirty-ninth President of the United State, Governor of Georgia, Nobel Peace Prize winner, international humanitarian, fisherman, peanut farmer, lover of Zion (just kidding) reflects on his full and happy life with pride, humor, and a few second thoughts.
You just know that many critics will say the ttle is Full (of Crap) Life

At ninety, Jimmy Carter reflects on his public and private life with a frankness that is disarming. He adds detail and emotion about his youth in rural Georgia that he described in his magnificent An Hour Before Daylight. He writes about racism and the isolation of the Carters. He describes the brutality of the hazing regimen at Annapolis (US Naval Academy), and how he nearly lost his life twice serving on submarines and his amazing interview with Admiral Hyman Rickover, who was not known for his friendliness.
Carter describes the profound influence his mother Lillian had on him, and how he admired his father even though he didn’t emulate him.
(someone should write a study of U.S. Presidents and their fathers)
He admits that he decided to quit the Navy and later enter politics without consulting his wife, Rosalynn, and how appalled he is in retrospect.
In A Full Life, Carter tells what he is proud of and what he might do differently. He discusses his regret at losing his re-election, but how he and Rosalynn pushed on and made a new life and second and third rewarding careers. He is frank about the presidents who have succeeded him, world leaders, and his passions for the causes he cares most about, particularly the condition of women and the deprived people of the developing world.
















[book] Six Singular Figures:
Understanding the Conflict:
Jews and Arabs Under
the British Mandate
by Hadara Lazar
mosaic press
June 2015
This is that story of six people who lived and worked in Palestine in the 1930s; remarkable nonconformists who tried to find a solution to the deteriorating relations between Jews and Arabs, the two people living under British Mandate rule. Some took an active part in dialogues between the two peoples and believed that it was possible to live together, altthough they knew that the chances were slim. When World War II broke out, the contacts ended. Two Jews-Manya Shocat and Judah Leib Magnes; two Arabs-Mussa Alami and George Antonius; and two Britons-Arthur Wauchope and Order Wingate, left their distinctive mark on the events of that period, when the Arabs of Plaestine realized that they might become a minority under the Jews, whose numbers where growing because of the persection in Europe.

Hadara Lazar has spoken to the descendants of these six individuals and has explored archives and libraries, in Israel and abroad, to produce a book whose personal voice places it squarely in the middle ground between history and literature. Succinctly and with spellbinding narrative skill, she describes the uniqueness, the inner stife, the controversial actions, and the extraordinary, sometimes tragic, lives of her six subjects. And through their portraits, a trubulent and fateful period emerges from the past, during which it might have been possible to proven what has happened and is still happening between Jews and Arabs today.
















[book] SEVEN GOOD YEARS
A MEMOIR
By ETGAR KERET
Riverhead
June 2015
A brilliant, life-affirming, and hilarious memoir from a “genius” (The New York Times) and master storyteller.
The seven years between the birth of Etgar Keret’s son and the death of his father were good years, though still full of reasons to worry. Lev is born in the midst of a terrorist attack. Etgar’s father gets cancer. The threat of constant war looms over their home and permeates daily life.
What emerges from this dark reality is a series of sublimely absurd ruminations on everything from Etgar’s three-year-old son’s impending military service to the terrorist mind-set behind Angry Birds. There’s Lev’s insistence that he is a cat, releasing him from any human responsibilities or rules. Etgar’s siblings, all very different people who have chosen radically divergent paths in life, come together after his father’s shivah to experience the grief and love that tie a family together forever. This wise, witty memoir—Etgar’s first nonfiction book published in America, and told in his inimitable style—is full of wonder and life and love, poignant insights, and irrepressible humor.















[book] The Good Garden
The Landscape Architecture of
Edmund Hollander Design
by Edmund Hollander and Anne Raver
Monacelli
June 2015
Ian McHarg would be proud
Crisp hornbeam hedges lining a country drive and throwing geometric shadows on the gravel below. Decadent cascades of fragrant wisteria spilling over a stone pergola. Rustling leaves along an allée of delicate crepe myrtle trees. Waving blossoms of roses, sage, and hydrangeas—along a salty shoreline. Edmund Hollander Landscape Architects creates gardens filled with unexpected textures, colors, and sounds meant to appeal to all the senses, inviting us to truly live in the landscape.
This volume presents dozens of gorgeous estate gardens throughout the Northeast, approached thematically; individual sections reveal how components such as gateways, paths, pool terraces, bosques and groves, walls, and borders contribute to lush garden rooms, windblown seaside gardens, calming meadow gardens, intricate formal gardens, and shady tracts of woodland. Over 300 color photographs of beautiful properties in the Hamptons, Connecticut, and upstate New York provide glimpses of the best garden design happening today while breaking down its ideas for the home gardener.
Evocative text by New York Times and Landscape Architecture columnist Anne Raver details how the firm works to envelop visitors in landscapes that feel entirely whole: plantings near architecture create a dynamic entry progression; hardscape features that lead out into a broader garden gradually cede to more natural, living elements; pools are surrounded by gracious swaths of flowers that bloom in sequence as the season progresses to provide privacy for bathers and a sense of quiet seclusion. The ideas presented here will help owners of gardens of every size enjoy their land to the fullest.















[book] "Lew the Jew" Alberts:
Early 20th Century Tattoo Drawings
by Albert Kurzman (Aut
hardymarks
2015
The original creator of tattoo "flash" was largely unknown. Now a private collection of works by this Jewish tattooer from New York, "Lew the Jew" Alberts, has come to light. Around 1905 he was the first to make these design sheets commercially available, as well as developing the electric tattoo machine. His previously unpublished and rare original tattoo artwork is being published as a tattoo flash collection for the first time.

Albert Kurzman (1880-1954) aka Lew the Jew was one of America s most influential tattoo artists at the beginning of the 20th century. Operating primarily on New York s Bowery, Lew constructed some of the earliest electric tattoo machines, and was the first to design and market printed design sheets to other tattooers. His artwork in these flash displays codified the repertoire of American tattooing, and many are still in use today.

This first book to document this amazing man presents over 150 drawings. Included in these is correspondence between Al and two of his closest confidants, San Francisco Bay Area tattooers Brooklyn Joe Lieber and C.J. Pop Eddy. These candid fragments provide a vivid sense of a hardboiled, secretive world. Additional business cards, vintage tattoo photographs, and previously unknown biographical data illuminate the then-shadowy business of skin art. This material laid the ground for the avalanche of tattooing that permeates the world today.















[book] MAIMONIDES
LIFE AND THOUGHTS
NOW IN PAPERBACK
WINNER OF THE 2013 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
BY MOSHE HALBERTAL (NYU)
Princeton
June 2015
Maimonides was the greatest Jewish philosopher and legal scholar of the medieval period, a towering figure who has had a profound and lasting influence on Jewish law, philosophy, and religious consciousness. This book provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to his life and work, revealing how his philosophical sensibility and outlook informed his interpretation of Jewish tradition.
Moshe Halbertal vividly describes Maimonides's childhood in Muslim Spain, his family's flight to North Africa to escape persecution, and their eventual resettling in Egypt. He draws on Maimonides's letters and the testimonies of his contemporaries, both Muslims and Jews, to offer new insights into his personality and the circumstances that shaped his thinking. Halbertal then turns to Maimonides's legal and philosophical work, analyzing his three great books--Commentary on the Mishnah, the Mishneh Torah, and the Guide of the Perplexed. He discusses Maimonides's battle against all attempts to personify God, his conviction that God's presence in the world is mediated through the natural order rather than through miracles, and his locating of philosophy and science at the summit of the religious life of Torah. Halbertal examines Maimonides's philosophical positions on fundamental questions such as the nature and limits of religious language, creation and nature, prophecy, providence, the problem of evil, and the meaning of the commandments.
A stunning achievement, Maimonides offers an unparalleled look at the life and thought of this important Jewish philosopher, scholar, and theologian.















[book] HUSTLING HITLER
THE JEWISH VAUDEVILLIAN
WHO FOOLED THE FUHRER
By Walter Shapiro
June 2015
Blue Rider Press
Vaudeviille Manager, boxing promoter, oil stock swindler, card shark, con man, and self proclaimed Jade King of China, Freeman Bernstein was a master of excess of cons. In February 1937, he was arrested for selling Nazis carloads of fake metal, saying it was high grade nickel. Freeman was the author's great uncle. He thought the stories were a fictitious Jewish revenge story. Byt the scam was real. Here is the story.

Award-winning political columnist Walter Shapiro is a Special Correspondent for the New Republic. He is the winner of the Sigma Delta Chi Award, given by the Society of Professional Journalists, as the best 2010 online columnist for his work for Politics Daily. In recent years, he was the Washington bureau chief for Salon, twice weekly political columnist for USA Today and monthly columnist for Esquire. In prior incarnations, he was on the staffs of Time, Newsweek and the Washington Post. He was also a White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter..























[book] MOODS
By YOEL HOFFMAN
Translated by Peter Cole (MacArthur Fellow)
June 2015
New Directions
Yoel Hoffmann—“Israel’s celebrated avant-garde genius” (The Forward)—supplies the magic missing link between the infinitesimal and the infinite
Part novel and part memoir, Yoel Hoffmann’s Moods is flooded with feelings about his family, losses, loves, the soul’s hidden powers, old phone books, and life in the Galilee, with its every scent, breeze, notable dog, and odd neighbor.
Carrying these shards is a general tenderness accentuated by a new dimension brought along with “that great big pill of Prozac.” Beautifully translated by Peter Cole, Moods is fiction for lovers of poetry and poetry for lovers of fiction—a small marvel of a book, and with its pockets of joy, a curiously cheerful book by an author who once compared himself to “a praying mantis inclined to melancholy.”























[book] HOTEL MOSCOW
A NOVEL
BY By Talia Carner
William Morrow
June 2015
From the author of Jerusalem Maiden comes a mesmerizing, thought-provoking novel that tells the riveting story of an American woman—the daughter of Holocaust survivors—who travels to Russia shortly after the fall of communism, and finds herself embroiled in a perilous mafia conspiracy that could irrevocably destroy her life.
Brooke Fielding, a thirty-eight year old New York investment manager and daughter of Jewish Holocaust survivors, finds her life suddenly upended in late September 1993 when her job is unexpectedly put in jeopardy. Brooke accepts an invitation to join a friend on a mission to Moscow to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian business women, which will also give her a chance to gain expertise in the new, vast emerging Russian market. Though excited by the opportunity to save her job and be one of the first Americans to visit Russia after the fall of communism, she also wonders what awaits her in the country that persecuted her mother just a generation ago.
Inspired by the women she meets, Brooke becomes committed to helping them investigate the crime that threatens their businesses. But as the uprising of the Russian parliament against President Boris Yeltsin turns Moscow into a volatile war zone, Brooke will find that her involvement comes at a high cost. For in a city where “capitalism” is still a dirty word, where neighbors spy on neighbors and the new economy is in the hands of a few dangerous men, nothing Brooke does goes unnoticed—and a mistake in her past may now compromise her future.
A moving, poignant, and rich novel, Hotel Moscow is an eye-opening portrait of post-communist Russia and a profound exploration of faith, family, and heritage.















[book] WHAT'S DIVINE ABOUT DIVINE LAW?
EARLY PERSPECTIVES
BY CHRISTINE HAYES (Yale)
Princeton
June 2015
In the thousand years before the rise of Islam, two radically diverse conceptions of what it means to say that a law is divine confronted one another with a force that reverberates to the present. What's Divine about Divine Law? untangles the classical and biblical roots of the Western idea of divine law and shows how early adherents to biblical tradition--Hellenistic Jewish writers such as Philo, the community at Qumran, Paul, and the talmudic rabbis--struggled to make sense of this conflicting legacy.
Christine Hayes shows that for the ancient Greeks, divine law was divine by virtue of its inherent qualities of intrinsic rationality, truth, universality, and immutability, while for the biblical authors, divine law was divine because it was grounded in revelation with no presumption of rationality, conformity to truth, universality, or immutability. Hayes describes the collision of these opposing conceptions in the Hellenistic period, and details competing attempts to resolve the resulting cognitive dissonance. She shows how Second Temple and Hellenistic Jewish writers, from the author of 1 Enoch to Philo of Alexandria, were engaged in a common project of bridging the gulf between classical and biblical notions of divine law, while Paul, in his letters to the early Christian church, sought to widen it. Hayes then delves into the literature of classical rabbinic Judaism to reveal how the talmudic rabbis took a third and scandalous path, insisting on a construction of divine law intentionally at odds with the Greco-Roman and Pauline conceptions that would come to dominate the Christianized West.
A stunning achievement in intellectual history, What's Divine about Divine Law? sheds critical light on an ancient debate that would shape foundational Western thought, and that continues to inform contemporary views about the nature and purpose of law and the nature and authority of Scripture.



















[book] SAINT MAZIE
A NOVEL
BY JAMI ATTENBERG
June 2015
Grand Central Publishing
Meet Mazie Phillips: big-hearted and bawdy, she's the truth-telling proprietress of The Venice, the famed New York City movie theater. It's the Jazz Age, with romance and booze aplenty--even when Prohibition kicks in--and Mazie never turns down a night on the town. But her high spirits mask a childhood rooted in poverty, and her diary, always close at hand, holds her dearest secrets.
When the Great Depression hits, Mazie's life is on the brink of transformation. Addicts and bums roam the Bowery; homelessness is rampant. If Mazie won't help them, then who? When she opens the doors of The Venice to those in need, this ticket-taking, fun-time girl becomes the beating heart of the Lower East Side, and in defining one neighborhood helps define the city.
Then, more than ninety years after Mazie began her diary, it's discovered by a documentarian in search of a good story. Who was Mazie Phillips, really? A chorus of voices from the past and present fill in some of the mysterious blanks of her adventurous life.
Inspired by the life of a woman who was profiled in Joseph Mitchell's classic Up in the Old Hotel, SAINT MAZIE is infused with Jami Attenberg's signature wit, bravery, and heart. Mazie's rise to "sainthood"--and her irrepressible spirit--is unforgettable.
















[book] THE PINCH
A NOVEL
BY STEVE STERN
June 2015
Graywolf
A dazzling, spellbinding novel set in a mythical Jewish community by the acclaimed author of the New York Times Notable Book The Book of Mischief.
It’s the late 1960s. The Pinch, once a thriving Jewish community centered on North Main Street in Memphis, has been reduced to a single tenant. Lenny Sklarew awaits the draft by peddling drugs and shelving books—until he learns he is a character in a book about the rise and fall of this very Pinch. Muni Pinsker, who authored the book in an enchanted day containing years, arrived in the neighborhood at its height and was smitten by an alluring tightrope walker. Muni’s own story is dovetailed by that of his uncle Pinchas Pin, whose epic journey to North Main Street forms the book’s spine. Steve Stern interweaves these tales with an ingenious structure that merges past with present, and his wildly inventive fabulism surpasses everything he’s done before. Together, these intersecting stories transform the real-world experience of Lenny, whose fate determines the future of the Pinch, in this brilliant, unforgettable novel.
















[book] Journey to My Father,
Isaac Bashevis Singer
by Israel Zamir
Spring 2015
Astrolog
When Isaac Bashevis Singer emigrated from Poland to America in 1935, he left behind his wife and five-year-old son, Israel, with the promise to send for them as soon as he got settled. He never did. Mother and child moved first to the USSR and ultimately to Israel, where Zamir grew up on a kibbutz. In 1995, 20 years after their separation, Zamir came to New York to meet his father. Singer's strengths and failings, his methods of working, his passion for the Yiddish language, his lust for words, for women, and for life, all come to new light in Zamir's candid and touching account. This memoir is not only a personal and moving portrait of one of this century's major writers, but also an honest exploration of the often charged and complex relationship between son and father.
















[book] Henry Morgenthau, Jr.:
The Remarkable Life of FDR's
Secretary of the Treasury
by Herbert Levy
June 2015
Skyhorse
A fascinating exploration of early to mid-twentieth-century politics as seen through the eyes of a Roosevelt technocrat.
History seems to repeat itself. With ongoing wars abroad and the collapse of financial institutions at home, Americans rely on President Barack Obama and Secretary of the Treasury Jacob Lew to bring about positive change. When the US stock market collapsed in 1928 and World War II broke out, the nation turned to Franklin D. Roosevelt and his Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., for leadership.
Henry Morgenthau, Jr. explores the life of this native New Yorker. Born into a prominent Jewish family, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., became a controversial figure in politics. Yet, his contributions were integral to social, political, and economic milestones in American history, all while he grappled with his identity as an American Jew during the atrocities of WWII in Europe. This new biography offers a glimpse of yesterday and lessons for today.
Author Herbert Levy offers an extensively researched life of this important American leader. From thorough research in the archives of Hyde Park to careful study of Morgenthau’s letters, Levy delivers an in-depth account of the fascinating life of this remarkable man. This book explores the complex and oftentimes frustrating world in which Morgenthau was forced to live and illuminates his odyssey as a Roosevelt technocrat.
















[book] The Doctor Is In:
Dr. Ruth on Love, Life, and Joie de Vivre
by Ruth K. Westheimer
with Pierre A. Lehu
June 2015
Amazon
The Doctor Is In! America’s best-loved therapist, Dr. Ruth, is known for her wise counsel on all matters of the heart. Here she shares private stories from her past and her present, and her insights into living life to the fullest, at any age.
Everyone knows Dr. Ruth as the most famous and trusted sex therapist, but few people know she narrowly escaped death from the Holocaust, was raised in an orphanage in Switzerland, or that she was a sniper during Israel's War of Independence. After years spent as a student in Paris, Dr. Ruth came to America dreaming of a new life though never expecting the dramatic turns that would take place. And at the age of eighty-seven, she is as spirited as ever.
Through intimate and funny stories, Dr. Ruth sheds light on how she's learned to live a life filled with joie de vivre. And she shows readers how they too can learn to deal with tragedy and loss, challenges and success, all while nourishing an intellectual and emotional spark, and, above all, having fun! Hilarious, inspiring, and profound, The Doctor Is In will change the way you think about life and love, in all their limitless possibilities.























[book] LEO STRAUSS on the Borders of
Judaism, Philosophy, and History
by Jeffrey A. Bernstein
June 2015
SUNY Press
Explores how the thought of Leo Strauss amounts to a model for thinking about the connection between philosophy, Jewish thought, and history.
In Leo Strauss on the Borders of Judaism, Philosophy, and History, Jeffrey A. Bernstein explores how the thought of Leo Strauss amounts to a model for thinking about the connection between philosophy, Jewish thought, and history. For Bernstein, Strauss shows that a close study of the history of philosophy—from the “ancients” to “Medievals” to “moderns”—is necessary for one to appreciate the fundamental distinction between the forms of life Strauss terms “Jerusalem” and “Athens,”—order through revealed Law and free philosophical thought, respectively. Through an investigation of Strauss’s published texts; examination of his intellectual biography and history; and making use of correspondence, archival materials, and seminar transcripts, Bernstein shows how Strauss’s concern with the relation between Judaism and philosophy spanned his entire career. His findings will be of use to those interested in the thought of Strauss, the history of Jewish thought, and the relation between religion, philosophy, and politics.
















[book] The Bible on Location
Off the Beaten Path in Ancient
and Modern Israel
by Julie Baretz
June 2015
JPS
In this innovative guidebook, Julie Baretz takes readers to twenty-one off-the-beaten-path locations in Israel where Bible stories are said to have happened. At each site, she sets the scene by relating the historical context of the event, then follows with the biblical text itself and her own lively commentary. Captivating and complex Bible characters bring the locations to life as they face social, ethical, and spiritual dilemmas not unlike our own today. Baretz’s narratives draw on history, archaeology, academic scholarship, and rabbinic literature for interpretations that enhance the meaning of the biblical events. Each story is told in the voice of Baretz as the tour guide: knowledgeable yet informal and friendly.
Together these chapters and locations trace the chronology and narrative arc of the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, Ezra, and Nehemiah, beginning with the Israelites’ arrival in the land of Israel (following the exodus from Egypt and the forty years of wandering) and continuing over more than six hundred years, until the return of the Jewish exiles from Babylon to their homeland.
Baretz’s descriptions are accompanied by colorful maps and photographs that put actual and armchair visitors in the middle of the action. Each location reveals a new episode in the biblical narrative and provides inspiration and commentary that will enhance visits to the various sites.
















[book] SAFEKEEPING
A NOVEL
BY JESSAMYN HOPE
June 2015
Fig Tree Books
Jessamyn Hope’s Safekeeping is a profound and moving novel about love, the inevitability of loss, and the courage it takes to keep starting over.
It’s 1994 and Adam, a drug addict from New York City, arrives at a kibbutz in Israel with a medieval sapphire brooch. To make up for a past crime, he needs to get the priceless heirloom to a woman his grandfather loved when he was a Holocaust refugee on the kibbutz fifty years earlier.
There Adam joins other troubled people trying to turn their lives around: Ulya, the ambitious and beautiful Soviet émigré; Farid, the lovelorn Palestinian farmhand; Claudette, the French Canadian Catholic with OCD; Ofir, the Israeli teenager wounded in a bus bombing; and Ziva, the old Zionist Socialist firebrand who founded the kibbutz. By the end of that summer, through their charged relationships with one another, they each get their last chance at redemption.
In the middle of this web glows the magnificent sapphire brooch with its perilous history spanning three continents and seven centuries. With insight and beauty, Safekeeping tackles that most human of questions: how can we expect to find meaning and happiness when we know that nothing lasts?
















[book] Apollo in the Grass
Selected Poems
by Aleksandr Kushner
Translated by Carol Ueland and Robert Carnevale
FSG
July 2015
For the Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky, the poems of Aleksandr Kushner were essential: "Kushner is one of the best Russian lyric poets of the twentieth century, and his name is destined to rank with those close to the heart of everyone whose mother tongue is Russian."
Apollo in the Grass is the first collection in English translation of Kushner's post-Soviet poems, and also includes certain earlier ones that could not be published during the Soviet era.
Kushner speaks to us from a place where the mythic and the historic coexist with the everyday, where Odysseus is one of us, and the "stern voice" of history can transform any public square into a harrowing schoolroom. This layering of times and events is also embodied in Kushner's distinctive poetic voice. Echoes of earlier Russian poets and styles enrich and complicate an idiom that is utterly natural and contemporary.

Now, as in the Soviet era, Kushner's work is especially cherished for its exemplary stoic integrity. But these lyrical poems are also pieces of exquisite chamber music, songs where poetry dazzles but "greatness is . . . sooner scaled to the heart / Than to anything very enormous."
















[book] A MASTER PLAN FOR RESCUE
A NOVEL
BY JANIS COOKE NEWMAN
July 2015
Riverhead Books
A magical novel about the surprising acts we are capable of in the name of love.
Set in 1942 New York and Berlin, A Master Plan for Rescue is an enchanting novel about the life-giving powers of storytelling, and the heroism that can be inspired by love. In essence, it is two love stories. It is the story of a child who worships his parents, then loses his father to an accident and his mother to her resulting grief. And it is the story of a young man who stumbles into the romance of his life, then watches her decline, forever changing the arc of his future. Each is propelled by the belief that if he acts heroically enough, it will restore some part of what -- or whom -- he has lost.
But when they meet, this boy and this man, their combined grief and magical thinking will allow them to dream the impossible. Sharing stories of the people they have lost, they are inspired to join forces and act in their memory. To do something so memorable that it might actually bring their loved ones back – even if only in spirit.
A Master Plan for Rescue is a beautiful tale, propelled by history and imagination, that suggests people’s impact upon the world doesn’t necessarily end with their lives, and that, to some degree, we are the sum of the stories we tell.
















[book] TOWARD A NEW MARITIME STRATEGY
AMERICAN NAVAL THINKING
IN THE POST-COLD WAR ERA
BY PETER D. HAYNES, CAPT.
July 2015
Naval Institute Press
Capt. Peter D. Haynes, USN is the deputy director, Strategy, Plans, and Policy, U.S. Special Operations Command. A carrier aviator, former squadron commander, and decorated combat veteran, he has a PhD in security studies and a master's degree in strategic planning, both from the Naval Postgraduate School.
Provocative
Tries to break “institutional thinking” of the Pentagon
Toward a New Maritime Strategy examines the evolution of American naval thinking in the post-Cold War era. It recounts the development of the U.S. Navy's key strategic documents from the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 to the release in 2007 of the U.S. Navy's maritime strategy, A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower.
It took 20 years for the Navy to finalize the strategy
This penetrating intellectual history critically analyzes the Navy's ideas and recounts how they interacted with those that govern U.S. strategy to shape the course of U.S. naval strategy. Captain Haynes criticizes Naval leaders for a narrow worldview and a failure to understand the “virtues of American “sea power,” the rise of the Chinese navy, and declining budgets.






























[book] BRADSTREET GATE
A Novel
by Robin Kirman
July 2015
Crown
Israeli American Robin Kirman’s novel:
A tour de force debut about a campus murder for readers of Donna Tartt, Meg Wolitzer, and Jeffrey Eugenides
Georgia, Charlie and Alice each arrive at Harvard with hopeful visions of what the future will hold. But when, just before graduation, a classmate is found murdered on campus, they find themselves facing a cruel and unanticipated new reality. Moreover, a charismatic professor who has loomed large in their lives is suspected of the crime. Though his guilt or innocence remains uncertain, the unsettling questions raised by the case force the three friends to take a deeper look at their tangled relationship. Their bond has been defined by the secrets they’ve kept from one another—Charlie’s love and Alice’s envy, Georgia’s mysterious affair—and over the course of the next decade, as they grapple with the challenges of adulthood and witness the unraveling of a teacher's once-charmed life, they must reckon with their own deceits and shortcomings, each desperately in search of answers and the chance to be forgiven.
A relentless, incisive, and keenly intelligent novel about promise, disappointment, and the often tenuous bonds of friendship, Bradstreet Gate is the auspicious debut of a tremendously talented new writer.












[book] The Underground Girls of Kabul
In Search of a Hidden
Resistance in Afghanistan
by Jenny Nordberg
July 2015
paperback edition – Broadway Books
An investigative journalist uncovers a hidden custom that will transform your understanding of what it means to grow up as a girl
In Afghanistan, a culture ruled almost entirely by men, the birth of a son is cause for celebration and the arrival of a daughter is often mourned as misfortune. A bacha posh (literally translated from Dari as “dressed up like a boy”) is a third kind of child – a girl temporarily raised as a boy and presented as such to the outside world. Jenny Nordberg, the reporter who broke the story of this phenomenon for the New York Times, constructs a powerful and moving account of those secretly living on the other side of a deeply segregated society where women have almost no rights and little freedom.
The Underground Girls of Kabul is anchored by vivid characters who bring this remarkable story to life: Azita, a female parliamentarian who sees no other choice but to turn her fourth daughter Mehran into a boy; Zahra, the tomboy teenager who struggles with puberty and refuses her parents’ attempts to turn her back into a girl; Shukria, now a married mother of three after living for twenty years as a man; and Nader, who prays with Shahed, the undercover female police officer, as they both remain in male disguise as adults.
At the heart of this emotional narrative is a new perspective on the extreme sacrifices of Afghan women and girls against the violent backdrop of America’s longest war. Divided into four parts, the book follows those born as the unwanted sex in Afghanistan, but who live as the socially favored gender through childhood and puberty, only to later be forced into marriage and childbirth. The Underground Girls of Kabul charts their dramatic life cycles, while examining our own history and the parallels to subversive actions of people who live under oppression everywhere.


















[book] More Awesome Than Money
Four Boys and Their Heroic Quest
to Save Your Privacy from Facebook
By Jim Dwyer, NYT
Viking
Their idea was simple. Four NYU undergrads - Dan Grippi, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, Max Salzberg and Raphael Sofaer - wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control their personal data, instead of surrendering it to big businesses like Facebook. They called it Diaspora. In days, they raised $200,000, and reporters, venture capitalists, and the digital community’s most legendary figure were soon monitoring their progress. Max dreamed of being a CEO. Ilya was the idealist. Dan coded like a pro, and Rafi tried to keep them all on track. But as the months passed and the money ran out, the Diaspora Four fell victim to errors, bad decisions, and their own hubris. In November 2011, Ilya committed suicide.
Diaspora has been tech news since day one, but the story reaches far beyond Silicon Valley to the now urgent issues about the future of the Internet. With the cooperation of the surviving partners, New York Times bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and naÏve young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy—and paid the ultimate price.


















[book] 2 Billion Under 20:
How Millennials Are Breaking Down
Age Barriers and Changing the World
Edited by Stacey Ferreira, Jared Kleinert
Foreword by Masters Blake
St. Martin's Press
Welcome to the future!
2 Billion Under 20 is a book, online community, and movement inspired by the 2 billion people in the world currently at or under the age of twenty. We stand for Millennials, Gen Z'ers, and those who want to better understand them and their unique potential. This book shows how we can all act on our passions and make a difference at any age.
Young entrepreneurs Stacey Ferreira and Jared Kleinert have brought together seventy-five stories from ambitious young people like Paige McKenzie, who started her own YouTube channel at sixteen that now has more than 55 million views; Sam Mikulak, who's represented Team USA in the Olympics and is a seven-time NCAA champion in Men's Gymnastics; Jack Andraka, who developed an early detection test for pancreatic cancer at fifteen; Tallia Storm, a Scottish singer who was discovered by and opened a concert for Elton John, on her way to signing a record deal with Virgin Records; Dau Jok, who escaped civil war in South Sudan to become captain of the University of Pennsylvania's Division 1 basketball team and founder of a nonprofit to help youth in his native country, and many other accomplished and inspiring Millennials from all walks of life.
All of these young people-members of the 2BillionUnder20.com community-have joined forces to show the world how Millennials are taking care of business. Join the movement and change the world!
























[book] Golda Slept Here
by Suad Amiry
Translated from Arabic by Ayman Haddad
(author of Sharon and My Mother-in-Law)
July 2015
Bloomsbury USA
Politics enters the lives of every family in Palestine. In this literary historical work, Suad Amiry traces the lives of individual members of Palestinian families and, through them, the histories of both Palestine and the émigré Palestinian community in other countries of the Middle East

She mixes nostalgia with anger while mocking Israeli doublespeak that, she writes from her home in Ramallah, seeks to wipe out any trace of a Palestinian past in West Jerusalem.
She juxtaposes serial bombardments and personal tragedies, evokes the sights and smells of Palestinian architecture and food, and weaves for us the tapestry that is her Palestinian reality, caught between official histories and private memories.
Through poetry and prose, monologue and dialogue, we glimpse her perceived lost Palestinian landscape, obscured by the silent battle between remembering and forgetting.










AUGUST 2015 BOOKS




[book] The Marriage of Opposites
A Novel
by Alice Hoffman
Simon and Schuster
August 2015
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Dovekeepers and The Museum of Extraordinary Things: a forbidden love story set on the tropical island of St. Thomas about the extraordinary woman who gave birth to painter Camille Pissarro—the Father of Impressionism.
Growing up on idyllic St. Thomas in the early 1800s, Rachel dreams of life in faraway Paris. Rachel’s mother, a pillar of their small refugee community of Jews who escaped the Inquisition, has never forgiven her daughter for being a difficult girl who refuses to live by the rules. Growing up, Rachel’s salvation is their maid Adelle’s belief in her strengths, and her deep, life-long friendship with Jestine, Adelle’s daughter. But Rachel’s life is not her own. She is married off to a widower with three children to save her father’s business. When her husband dies suddenly and his handsome, much younger nephew, Frédérick, arrives from France to settle the estate, Rachel seizes her own life story, beginning a defiant, passionate love affair that sparks a scandal that affects all of her family, including her favorite son, who will become one of the greatest artists of France.
Building on the triumphs of The Dovekeepers and The Museum of Extraordinary Things, set in a world of almost unimaginable beauty, The Marriage of Opposites showcases the beloved, bestselling Alice Hoffman at the height of her considerable powers. Once forgotten to history, the marriage of Rachel and Frédérick is a story that is as unforgettable as it is remarkable.












[book] The Sound of Our Steps:
A Novel
by Ronit Matalon
Translated by Dalya Bilu
August 2015
Metropolitan Books
Gorgeously observed and emotionally powerful, The Sound of Our Steps is an inventive novel of immigration and exile from Ronit Matalon, a major voice in contemporary Israeli fiction
In the beginning there was Lucette, who is the mother to three children—Sammy, a gentle giant, almost blind, but a genius with locks; Corinne, a flighty beauty who cannot keep a job; and "the child," an afterthought, who strives to make sense of her fractured Egyptian-Jewish immigrant family. Lucette's children would like a kinder, warmer home, but what they have is a government-issued concrete box, out in the thorns and sand on the outskirts of Tel Aviv; and their mother, hard-worn and hardscrabble, who cleans homes by night and makes school lunches by day. Lucette quarrels with everybody, speaks only Arabic and French, is scared only of snakes, and is as likely to lock her children out as to take in a stray dog.
The child recounts her years in Lucette's house, where Israel's wars do not intrude and hold no interest. She puzzles at the mysteries of her home, why Maurice, her father, a bitter revolutionary, makes only rare appearances. And why her mother rebuffs the kind rabbi whose home she cleans in his desire to adopt her. Always watching, the child comes to fill the holes with conjecture and story.
In a masterful accumulation of short, dense scenes, by turns sensual, violent, and darkly humorous,The Sound of Our Steps questions the virtue of a family bound only by necessity, and suggests that displacement may not lead to a better life, but perhaps to art.












[book] DAYS OF AWE
A Novel
BY LAUREN FOX
Knopf
August 2015
The Days of Awe, as told by our friend SY Agnon, are the ten days between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, a period of introspection and examination. And through prayer and teshuva, you can be inscribed and sealed in the Book of Life.
We meet Isabel “IZ” Moore. She is reflecting on the past year. A year during which her bestie, Josie Abrams, has passed away.

Celebrated for her irresistibly witty, strikingly intelligent examinations of friendship and marriage, Lauren Fox (“An immensely gifted writer—a writer adept at capturing the sad-funny mess that happens to be one woman’s life” —Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times) has written her most powerful novel to date. Days of Awe is the story of a woman who, in the wake of her best friend’s sudden death, must face the crisis in her marriage, the fury of her almost-teenage daughter, and the possibility of opening her cantankerous heart to someone new.
Only a year ago Isabel Moore was married, was the object of adoration for her ten-year-old daughter, and thought she knew everything about her wild, extravagant, beloved best friend, Josie. But in that one short year her husband moved out and rented his own apartment; her daughter grew into a moody insomniac; and Josie—impulsive, funny, secretive Josie—was killed behind the wheel in a single-car accident. As the relationships that long defined Isabel—wife, mother, daughter, best friend—change before her eyes, Isabel must try to understand who she really is.
Teeming with longing, grief, and occasional moments of wild, unexpected joy, Days of Awe is a daring, dazzling book—a luminous exploration of marriage, motherhood, and the often surprising shape of new love.
























[book] HIGH HOLIDAY PORN
A MEMOIR
By Eytan Bayne
August 2015
St. Martin's Press
OMG. Such nachas to AJC Director and Top 50 U.S. Jewish leader Steven Bayme on the publication of a memoir by his son on his most embarrassing moments of childhood... you know.. like masturbating at the Passover seder.

Eytan Bayme went to Jewish day school and Jewish camp. He lived across the street from a synagogue in the Bronx (yeah right.. in Riverdale... dont try to be cool by saying the Bronx), which he attended weekly, and ate strictly kosher food for most of his childhood.
Yet even at the age of six, he wanted to know what the deal was with those Pizza Huts and Burger Kings that he wasn't allowed into "God wouldn't put them on earth if He didn't mean for us to try them," he thought. (He was quite the whiner even as a pre schooler)
Wasn't that obvious?
Also, why can't he stop thinking about his female classmates in bed, late at night, with his little brother not five feet away; and how come the starting line-up for the 1986 Mets keep creeping into those fantasies? Religious life is difficult enough without the urges of a typical adolescent boy, yet Eytan's urges develop well before his teens, and they just keep on developing and developing.
High Holiday Porn is a heartwarming and hilarious story about learning to become an adult. It chronicles how an anxious boy finally stops masturbating in public (put the walrus tooth dildo down), gets the girl, grows up, spends a year “in the West Bank” (meaning Efrat, not Jenin), gets a BA from McGill in Montreal, and begrudgingly makes peace with the unfairness of life and love, and decamps for London. It's a funny, fantasy-laden, usually embarrassing, sometimes raunchy and always outrageous look at coming of age that will resonate with anyone who ever felt awkward growing up.












[book] An Older Man
a novel
by Wayne Hoffman
August 8, 2015
Bear Bones Books
(bears... get it?)
Moe Pearlman – once the twenty-something protagonist of Wayne Hoffman's earlier novel “Hard” -– is now over forty, overweight, bearded, and going gray. 42 is considered ancient in his milieu. For someone used to being the adorable younger guy chasing after older men, that's not particularly easy. But Moe Pearlman's whole conception of himself is challenged when he spends Bear Week in Provincetown, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, an event that brings thousands of mature gay and bisexual men to the tip of Cape Cod the week after Independence Day to revel and relax.
Still singular in his focus and sexual appetites, Moe hopes he'll find a hot older guy and have an intense summer fling. He dresses in his bear wear, put a handkerchief in his pocket, and heads to a dock
Joining him on vacation are Moe's ex-lover Gene and Gene's new boyfriend Carlos, so Moe has no reason to feel lonely, but when the older objects of Moe's affection start looking right past him in favor of younger rivals, Moe is shaken to the core.
Click the cover to read more
















[book] The Tail Wags the Dog
International Politics and
the Middle East
by Efraim Karsh (Bar Ilan, King's College)
August 11, 2015
Bloomsbury
Professor Karsh is busy at work on his history of the Jewish People, to be published in 2018. But while we wait, here is a new book of his on Syria.
The continuing crisis in Syria has raised questions over the common perception of Middle Eastern affairs as an offshoot of global power politics. To Western intellectuals, foreign policy experts, and politicians, "empire" and "imperialism" are categories that apply exclusively to Europe and more recently to the United States of America. As they see it, Middle Eastern history is the product of its unhappy interaction with these powers. Forming the basis of President Obama's much ballyhooed "new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world," this outlook is continuing to shape crucial foreign policy among Western governments, but in these pages, Efraim Karsh propounds a radically different interpretation of Middle Eastern experience. He argues that the Western view of Muslims and Arabs as hapless victims is absurd. On the contrary, modern Middle Eastern history has been the culmination of long-existing indigenous trends. Great power influences, however potent, have played a secondary role constituting neither the primary force behind the region's political development nor the main cause of its notorious volatility.
Karsh argues it is only when Middle Eastern people disown their victimization mentality and take responsibility for their actions and their Western champions drop their condescending approach to Arabs and Muslims, that the region can at long last look forward to a real "spring."


















[book] AVENUE OF SPIES
A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and
One American Family’s Heroic Resistance
In Nazi-occupied Paris
By Alex Kershaw
August 2015
Crown
The best-selling author of The Liberator brings to life the incredible true story of an American doctor in Paris, and his heroic espionage efforts during World War II
The leafy Avenue Foch, one of the most exclusive residential streets in Nazi-occupied France, was Paris's hotbed of daring spies, murderous secret police, amoral informers, and Vichy collaborators. So when American physician Sumner Jackson, who lived with his wife and young son Phillip at Number 11, found himself drawn into the Liberation network of the French resistance, he knew the stakes were impossibly high. Just down the road at Number 31 was the "mad sadist" Theodor Dannecker, an Eichmann protégé charged with deporting French Jews to concentration camps. And Number 84 housed the Parisian headquarters of the Gestapo, run by the most effective spy hunter in Nazi Germany.
From his office at the American Hospital, itself an epicenter of Allied and Axis intrigue, Jackson smuggled fallen Allied fighter pilots safely out of France, a job complicated by the hospital director's close ties to collaborationist Vichy. After witnessing the brutal round-up of his Jewish friends, Jackson invited Liberation to officially operate out of his home at Number 11--but the noose soon began to tighten. When his secret life was discovered by his Nazi neighbors, he and his family were forced to undertake a journey into the dark heart of the war-torn continent from which there was little chance of return.
Drawing upon a wealth of primary source material and extensive interviews with Phillip Jackson, Alex Kershaw recreates the City of Light during its darkest days. The untold story of the Jackson family anchors the suspenseful narrative, and Kershaw dazzles readers with the vivid immediacy of the best spy thrillers. Awash with the tense atmosphere of World War II's Europe, Avenue of Spies introduces us to the brave doctor who risked everything to defy Hitler.


















[book] The Madagaskar Plan
a novel
by Guy Saville
August 2015
Henry Holt
Guy Saville's The Madagaskar Plan imagines a disturbing alternate history in which Nazi victory in World War II brings their "Final Solution" ever closer The year is 1953. There is peace in Europe, but a victorious Germany consolidates power in Africa. The lynchpin to its final solution is Madagaskar. Hitler has ordered the resettlement of European Jews to the remote island.

British forces conspire to incite colony-wide revolt, resting their hopes on the expertise of Reuben Salois, an escaped leader of Jewish resistance. Ex-mercenary Burton Cole scours the island for his wife and child. But as chaos descends and the Nazis brutally suppress the nascent insurrection, Cole must decide whether he is master of-or at the mercy of-history.
The Madagaskar Plan is alternate history of the highest order, a thriller of terrifying scope based on the Nazis' actual plans prior to the Holocaust.












[book] WHO DO YOUR LOVE
A Novel
by Jennifer Weiner
August 2015
Atria
An unforgettable story about true love, real life, and second chances…

Rachel Blum and Andy Landis are just eight years old when they meet one night in an ER waiting room. Born with a congenital heart defect, Rachel is a veteran of hospitals, and she’s intrigued by the boy who shows up alone with a broken arm. He tells her his name. She tells him a story. After Andy’s taken back to a doctor and Rachel’s sent back to her bed, they think they’ll never see each other again.
Rachel grows up in an affluent Florida suburb, the popular and protected daughter of two doting parents. Andy grows up poor in Philadelphia with a single mom and a rare talent for running.
Yet, over the next three decades, Andy and Rachel will meet again and again—linked by chance, history, and the memory of the first time they met, a night that changed the course of both of their lives.
A sweeping, warmhearted, and intimate tale, Who Do You Love is an extraordinary novel about the passage of time, the way people change and change each other, and how the measure of a life is who you love.












[book] The Man That Got Away:
The Life and Songs of Harold Arlen
(Music in American Life)
by Walter Rimler
August 15, 2015
University of Illinois Press
Over the Rainbow, "Stormy Weather," and "One for My Baby" are just a few of Harold Arlen's well-loved compositions. Yet his name is hardly known--except to the musicians who venerate him. At a gathering of songwriters George Gershwin called him "the best of us." Irving Berlin agreed. Paul McCartney sent him a fan letter and became his publisher. Bob Dylan wrote of his fascination with Arlen's "bittersweet, lonely world." A cantor's son, Arlen believed his music was from a place outside himself, a place that also sent tragedy. When his wife became mentally ill and was institutionalized he turned to alcohol. It nearly killed him. But the beautiful songs kept coming: "Blues in the Night," "My Shining Hour," "Come Rain or Come Shine," and "The Man That Got Away." Walter Rimler drew on interviews with friends and associates of Arlen and on newly available archives to write this intimate portrait of a genius whose work is a pillar of the Great American Songbook.












[book] The Grammar of God
A Journey into the Words
and Worlds of the Bible
by Aviya Kushner
August 18, 2015
Spiegel and Grau
For readers of Bruce Feiler’s Walking the Bible.
Aviya Kushner grew up in a Hebrew-speaking family, reading the Bible in the original Hebrew and debating its meaning over the dinner table. She knew much of it by heart—and was therefore surprised when, while getting her MFA at the University of Iowa, she took the novelist Marilynne Robinson’s class on the Old Testament and discovered she barely recognized the text she thought she knew so well. From differences in the Ten Commandments to a less ambiguous reading of the creation story to a new emphasis on the topic of slavery, the English translation often felt like another book entirely from the one she had grown up with.
Kushner began discussing the experience with Robinson, who became a mentor, and her interest in the differences between the ancient language and the modern one gradually became an obsession. She began what became a ten-year project of reading different versions of the Hebrew Bible in English and traveling the world in the footsteps of the great biblical translators, trying to understand what compelled them to take on a lifetime project that was often considered heretical and in some cases resulted in their deaths.
In this eye-opening chronicle, Kushner tells the story of her vibrant relationship to the Bible, and along the way illustrates how the differences in translation affect our understanding of our culture’s most important written work. A fascinating look at language and the beliefs we hold most dear, The Grammar of God is also a moving tale about leaving home and returning to it, both literally and through reading.













[book] COMBAT-READY KITCHEN
How the U.S. Military Shapes
The Way You Eat
By Anastacia Marx de Salcedo
August 2015
Current
An eye-opening examination of the U.S. military’s influence on the American food industry and the way we eat.
You probably don’t realize that your supermarket is filled with foods that have a military origin: canned goods, packaged deli meats, TV dinners, cling wrap, energy bars. . . . The list is almost endless. In fact, there’s a watered-down combat ration lurking in practically every bag, box, can, bottle, jar, and carton Americans buy.
Anastacia Marx de Salcedo shows how the Department of Defense Combat Feeding Directorate plans, funds, and spreads the food science that enables it to produce cheap, imperishable rations. It works with an immense network of university, government, and industry collaborators such as ADM, ConAgra, General Mills, Hershey, Hormel, Mars, Nabisco, Reynolds, Smithfield, Swift, Tyson and Unilever. It’s a good deal for both sides: The conglomerates get exclusive patents or a headstart on the next breakthrough technology; the Army ensures that it has commercial suppliers if it ever needs to manufacture millions of rations.
And for us consumers, who eat this food originally designed for soldiers on the battlefield? We’re the guinea pigs in a giant public health experiment, one in which science and technology, at the beck of the military, have taken over our kitchens. This book will change the way you think about food forever.












[book] OUT ON THE WIRE
THE STORYTELLING SECRETS OF THE
NEW MASTERS OF RADIO
By Jessica Abel
Foreword by Ira Glass
August 2015
BDWY Broadway Books
Go behind the scenes of our most ambitious radio programs and witness an intensely creative moment in a medium that’s changing the way we tell stories.
Every week, millions of devoted fans download or tune in to This American Life, The Moth, Radiolab (Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich), Planet Money (Adam Davidson, Alex Blumberg), Snap Judgment, Radio Diaries, 99% Invisible, Transom Story Workshop (Rob Rosenthal), and other nonfiction narrative radio shows. The compelling stories they produce are almost cinematic in scope and approach—intricately weaving sound into robust and engaging storytelling. A lot goes into making the shows we love. Anchored by surprising characters and big questions, their stories are tightly structured, edited, and soundtracked, and they introduce us to authentic voices from every walk of life.
Radio and podcasts today are entrepreneurial and DIY; there’s a can-do, collaborative spirit that characterizes people working in this field, fearlessly breaking new artistic ground. And more than ever, given the excellence and explosive popularity of shows like Serial, it’s clear that the creative producers working in this medium hold the key to storytelling secrets that the rest of us must learn.

Out on the Wire, a documentary comic, literally illustrates those secrets, gleaned straight from those on the frontlines of radio’s revolution. With the help of This American Life’s Ira Glass, cartoonist Jessica Abel uncovers just how producers construct a story, spilling some juicy insider details along the way. Jad Abumrad of RadioLab talks about chasing moments of awe with scientists, while Planet Money’s Robert Smith speaks candidly about his slightly embarrassing strategy for putting interviewees at ease. And Abel reveals how mad—really mad—Ira Glass becomes when he receives tough edits from his colleagues. Informative and inventive, Out on the Wire shows us the magic that makes these shows great and why we can’t stop listening to them.












[book] THE PRESIDENT AND THE APPRENTICE
EISENHOWER AND NIX. 1952-1961
August 25, 2015
Yale University Press
More than half a century after Eisenhower left office, the history of his presidency is so clouded by myth, partisanship, and outright fraud that most people have little understanding of how Ike’s administration worked or what it accomplished. We know—or think we know—that Eisenhower distrusted his vice president, Richard Nixon, and kept him at arm’s length; that he did little to advance civil rights; that he sat by as Joseph McCarthy’s reckless anticommunist campaign threatened to wreck his administration; and that he planned the disastrous 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. None of this is true.

The President and the Apprentice reveals a different Eisenhower, and a different Nixon. Ike trusted and relied on Nixon, sending him on many sensitive overseas missions. Eisenhower, not Truman, desegregated the military. Eisenhower and Nixon, not Lyndon Johnson, pushed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 through the Senate. Eisenhower was determined to bring down McCarthy and did so. Nixon never, contrary to recent accounts, saw a psychotherapist, but while Ike was recovering from his heart attack in 1955, Nixon was overworked, overanxious, overmedicated, and at the limits of his ability to function.












[book] Talia and the Very YUM Kippur
by Linda Elovitz Marshall
Illustrated by Francesca Assirelli
August 2015
Kar Ben
. Ages 3 – 8
Talia of Talia and the RUDE Vegetable fame is back with another pun-driven story of misheard words and malapropisms.
When Grandma talks abour preparing for break the YOM Kippur fast, Talia instead hears breakfast and YUM, creating a series of funny events


















[book] Torah Mysteries Illuminated:
Intriguing Insights into the Essence
of Major Torah Topics of Contemporary Relevance
by Thomas Furst
August 2015
Urim Publications
Why are certain days Yom Tov's and others not?
This book is a collection of intriguing insights relating to Jewish law and tradition. Thomas Furst articulates an original approach to fundamental questions and teachings in Judaism, including the hidden essence of Shabbat, the striking significance of the Seder night, marital harmony, the immense importance of the mitzvah of inviting guests, the overriding importance of Israel, as well as other topics of contemporary relevance. The author provides clear and profound insights into crucial issues of Jewish law and life in ways that animate the Torah’s wise teachings

Furst is a descendant of the Chasam Sofer. He was born in Czechoslavakia. He is a graduate of McGill, Toronto and Michigan and earned both an MBA and Law degree, as well as a degree from Yeshivah Kerem b”Yavneh. He is named for a great leader of Czechoslavakia who saved many Jewish lives.
















[book] HANUKKAH COOKIES WITH SPRINKLES
by David A. Adler and Jeffrey Ebbeler
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press

Sara sees an old man pick up a bruised apple from the discarded pile next to the local market. She wonders if he's hungry, as she eats her own breakfast. She wonders if he's lonely, as she shares Shabbat dinner with Mom and Grandma. As Hanukkah approaches, a season of light and hope, Sara discovers that tzedakah can be as bright and colorful as a Hanukkah cookie with sprinkles. A Note for Families provides context about the story and traditions of Hanukkah, and about the meaning of tzedakah, and challenges readers to think about ways they can give tzedakah, too


















[book] KAYLA AND KUGEL
By Ann Koffsky
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press
Kayla's dog Kugel is a big help as Kayla sets the table for Shabbat . . . despite a few paw prints on the tablecloth, a missing Kiddush cup, and other mishaps. When they're done, even Kugel knows that a beautiful Shabbat needs one more thing family!
An author note at the end explains the values of shalom bayit (creating peace in the home), and hiddur mitzvah (using beauty to enhance a religious practice), and provides discussion prompts for readers.


















[book] Somewhere There Is Still a Sun
A Memoir of the Holocaust
by Michael Gruenbaum
and Todd Hasak-Lowy
Aladdin
August 2015
Resilience shines throughout a boy’s firsthand, present-tense account of life in the Terezin concentration camp during the Holocaust, an ideal companion to the bestselling Boy on the Wooden Box.
Michael “Misha” Gruenbaum enjoyed a carefree childhood playing games and taking walks through Prague with his beloved father. All of that changed forever when the Nazis invaded Prague. The Gruenbaum family was forced to move into the Jewish Ghetto in Prague. Then, after a devastating loss, Michael, his mother and sister were deported to the Terezin concentration camp.
At Terezin, Misha roomed with forty other boys who became like brothers to him. Life in Terezin was a bizarre, surreal balance—some days were filled with friendship and soccer matches, while others brought mortal terror as the boys waited to hear the names on each new list of who was being sent “to the East.”
Those trains were going to Auschwitz. When the day came that his family’s name appeared on a transport list, their survival called for a miracle—one that tied Michael’s fate to a carefully sewn teddy bear, and to his mother’s unshakeable determination to keep her children safe.
Collaborating with acclaimed author Todd Hasak-Lowy, Michael Gruenbaum shares his inspiring story of hope in an unforgettable memoir that recreates his experiences with stunning immediacy. Michael’s story, and the many original documents and photos included alongside it, offer an essential contribution to Holocaust literature.















[book] SHANGHAI SUKKAH
By Heidi Smith Hyde
Illustrated by Jing Jang Tsang
August 2015
Kar Ben
Ages 5 – 9
Fleeing the anti-Semitic laws in Germany
Marcus moves with his family from Berlin to Shanghai
Will such an unfamiliar city fee llike home?
But he befriends Liang
Teamed with Liang and the answers to a rabbi's riddle
Marcus sets out to build a unique Sukkah in time for the
holiday of SUkkot
















[book] TAMAR'S SUKKAH
By Ellie B. Gellman
Illustrated by Katherine Janus Kahn
August 2015
Kar Ben
Ages 3 – 8
Something's missing, Tamar decides, as she studies her family's sukkah. It takes a lot of friends -- each one a little bigger -- to add the decorations, furnishings, and snacks that make it "just right."
















[book] ONE GOOD DEED
by Terri Fields
Illustrated by Deborah Melman
August 2015
Kar Ben
Ages 3 – 8
In this version of a paying it forward story
one good deed leads to another
as people in this multicultural neighborhood
including a family of the Jewish faith
change the life of the community
















[book] THE LITTLEST PAIR
By Sylvia Rouss and Holly Hannon
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press
None of the animals want the termites to come aboard Noah’s Ark.
After all, termites eat arks. But when the rain starts pouring and the animals start slipping helter skelter across the Ark, the termites use their wood munching abilities to save the day.
The entire book is done in rhyme.


















[book] NONNA's HanuKKah Surprise
By Karen Fisman
Illustrated by Martha Aviles
August 2015
Kar Ben
Ages 3 – 8
Rachel loves visiting her Italian grandmother
even though Nonna celebrates Christmas and Rachel
and her parents celebrate Haukkah
Rachel plans to share Hanukkah with her whole Family
so when Rachel special Hanukkah goes mission,
Nonna steps in to save the day
















[book] Farmer Kobi's Hanukkah Match
by Rabbi Ron Isaacs and
Karen Rostoker-Gruber and CB Decker
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press
Come join Farmer Kobi and his animals for a hilarious Hanukkah dinner.
Kobi's well-mannered goats, donkey, and sheep know just how to play host, and they give Polly, Kobi's Hanukkah guest, a gracious welcome. But when Polly isn't sure animals belong in a house, what will happen next?
Find out with laugh-out-loud pictures and puns that are sure to entertain all readers.
As donkey says: Hee-Haw-Yahoo!



















[book] Sammy Spider's First Taste of Hanukkah:
A Cookbook
by Sylvia Rouss and Genene Turndorf
Illustrated by Katherine Kahn
August 2015
Kar Ben
32 pages
The fifteenth book featuring Sammy the Spider
This has a cookbook with cute recipes
and crafts. Snacks and meals

















[book] Avi the Ambulance Goes to School
by Claudia Carlson and the Magen David Adom
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press
Meet Avi the Ambulance! Avi dreams of being a life-saving ambulance just like his Mom, Dad, and big sister Maya. So what's s a young, ambitious ambulance to do? Go to school of course! Avi learns all sort of important skills from the ambulance teacher at school: How to zig-and-zag, zoom-and-stop, and of course how to treat patients well and drive gently. This first book of the new Avi the Ambulance series will charm young readers, and give them a taste of Israel and the Jewish value of helping others.

















a spider? Really? Is Gefen/Berman trying to muscle in on Kar-Ben's Samy the Spider??


[book] King David & Akavish the Spider
by Sylvia Rouss and
Ari Binus
August 2015
Apples and Honey Press
When a young shepherd boy aims a stone at a spider web, he little dreams that it is the beginning of a lasting friendship or that the small creature will one day save his life.
Akavish the Spider makes a promise to David, which he keeps. But the greatest gift he gives is the knowledge that size and strength don't always win the day: by using your own special gift and your wits, anything is possible!
It's a lesson for a king, and one that the future King of Israel will never forget.



















[book] The Mountain Jews
and the Mirror
(Kar-Ben Favorites)
by Ruchama Feuerman and Polona Kosec
and Marcela Calderon
August 2015
Kar Ben
32 pages
Yosef and Estrella have spent their whole lives in Morocco, and its Atlas Mountains
They move to the city (Casablanca) and face new issues
Will their love survive the stress of the big city?
When they get a wardrobe with a mirror and see their reflection, they think their spouse has taken another lover.
A folktale-like story of mistaken identities

















[book] My Name Is Aviva
by Leslea Newman
Illustrated by Ag Jatkowska
August 2015
Kar Ben
32 pages
My name is AVIVA not Amoeba

shouts Aviva to her teasing classmates
Aviva wants to change her name so badly
until she learns the source and reason for
her name

(reminds me of the Name Jar about a Chinese girl, but
in a Jewish chicken soup context















[book] Sadie and Ori
and the Blue Blanket
(Passover)
by Jamie Korngold
Illustrated by Julie Fortenberry
August 2015
Kar Ben
32 pages
Sadie, Ori, and Grandma all love the soft blue Together Blanket
that Grandma knit when Sadie was born
The blanket provides comfort now and in the future
Grandma provided comfort and nurturing,
now it is time for the kids to help grandma
as her frailty progresses

















[book] Meg Goldberg on Parade
by Andria Rosenbaum
illustrated by Christopher Lyles
August 2015
Kar Ben
32 pages
New York City's Israel Parade is special
Meg is timid and small, but she finds a way to participate
and maybe earn a Grand Marshall's crown

















[book] The Bridge Builder
The Life and Legacy of
Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein
by Zev Chafets
August 2015
Sentinel Books
Love him? Despise him? Hee is a story about him to help you decide.

The story of Yechiel Eckstein, a Chicago-based rabbi who founded the world’s largest philanthropic organization of Evangelical Christians in support of Israel.
When the Anti-Defamation League sent a young Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein to Chicago to foster interfaith relations in the late 1970’s, he was surprised to see how responsive Christian evangelicals were to the cause of supporting and defending Israel.
Eckstein founded The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews in 1983 to promote cross-cultural understanding and build broad support for Israel, Soviet Jewry, and other shared concerns. The Fellowship has grown and thrived over the last three decades, raising more than $1.1 billion, and is one of the largest 50 NGOs in America today. American Christians have become one of Israel’s most reliable sources of financial and moral support.
Zev Chafets explores Eckstein’s role in this interfaith evolution, showing how an American orthodox rabbi promoted dialogue, cooperation, and what is believed to be mutual respect in the face of harsh and unrelenting opposition.















[book] RECONCEIVING INFERTILITY
Biblical Perspectives on
Procreation and Childlessness
August 2015
Princeton
In the Book of Genesis, the first words God speaks to humanity are "Be fruitful and multiply." From ancient times to today, these words have been understood as a divine command to procreate. Fertility is viewed as a sign of blessedness and moral uprightness, while infertility is associated with sin and moral failing. Reconceiving Infertility explores traditional interpretations such as these, providing a more complete picture of how procreation and childlessness are depicted in the Bible.
Closely examining texts and themes from both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, Candida Moss and Joel Baden offer vital new perspectives on infertility and the social experiences of the infertile in the biblical tradition. They begin with perhaps the most famous stories of infertility in the Bible--those of the matriarchs Sarah, Rebekah, and Rachel--and show how the divine injunction in Genesis is both a blessing and a curse. Moss and Baden go on to discuss the metaphorical treatments of Israel as a "barren mother," the conception of Jesus, Paul's writings on family and reproduction, and more. They reveal how biblical views on procreation and infertility, and the ancient contexts from which they emerged, were more diverse than we think.
Reconceiving Infertility demonstrates that the Bible speaks in many voices about infertility, and lays a biblical foundation for a more supportive religious environment for those suffering from infertility today.












[book] THE HABIT OF LABOR
Lessons from a Life of Struggle and Success
by Stef Wertheimer
August 2015
Duckworth
Stef fled Nazi Germany at the age of ten with his family and came to British Palestine. After the 1948 War, he started a company – ISCAR – which grew and grew and turned Wertheimer into an industrialist. Here is his story of business and life and peace and vocational education and economic development.

















[book] Kissinger's Shadow
The Long Reach of America's
Most Controversial Statesman
by Greg Grandin
August 25, 2015
Metropolitan Books
A new account of America's most controversial diplomat that moves beyond praise or condemnation to reveal Kissinger as the architect of America's current imperial stance.

In his fascinating new book, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand the crisis of contemporary America--its never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home--we have to understand Henry Kissinger.
Examining Kissinger's own writings, as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency. Believing that reality could be bent to his will, insisting that intuition is more important in determining policy than hard facts, and vowing that past mistakes should never hinder future bold action, Kissinger anticipated, even enabled, the ascendance of the neoconservative idealists who took America into crippling wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Going beyond accounts focusing either on Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world.












[book] Salvaged Pages
Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust,
Second Edition Now in Paperback
Edited by Alexandra Zapruder
AlexandraZapruder dot com
August 25, 2015
Yale University Press
This stirring collection of diaries written by young people, aged twelve to twenty-two years, during the Holocaust has been fully revised and updated. Some of the writers were refugees, others were in hiding or passing as non-Jews, some were imprisoned in ghettos, and nearly all perished before liberation. This seminal National Jewish Book Award winner preserves the impressions, emotions, and eyewitness reportage of young people whose accounts of daily events and often unexpected thoughts, ideas, and feelings serve to deepen and complicate our understanding of life during the Holocaust.

The second paperback edition includes a new preface by Alexandra Zapruder examining the book’s history and impact. Simultaneously, an enhanced e-book incorporates a wealth of new content in a variety of media, including photographs of the writers and their families, images of the original diaries, artwork made by the writers, historical documents, glossary terms, maps, survivor testimony (some available for the first time), and video of the author teaching key passages. In addition, an in-depth, interdisciplinary curriculum in history, literature, and writing developed by the author and a team of teachers, working in cooperation with the educational organization Facing History and Ourselves, is now available to support use of the book in middle- and high-school classrooms.















[book] THE WHEREWITHAL
A NOVEL IN VERSE
By PHILIP SCHULTZ
August 03, 2015
Paperback edition
WW Norton & Company
“Gripping, eloquent, moving, this is a powerful tale about what remains hidden and/or unspeakable in history.” -Elie Wiesel

I, one
Henryk Stanislaw Wyrzykowski,
Head Clerk of Closed Files,
a department of one,
work…
in a forgotten well of ghostly sighs

This astonishing novel in verse tells the story of Henryk Wyrzykowski, a drifting, haunted young man hiding from the Vietnam War in the basement of a San Francisco welfare building and translating his mother’s diaries. The diaries concern the Jedwabne massacre, an event that took place in German-occupied Poland in 1941. Wildly inventive, dark, beautiful, and unrelenting, The Wherewithal is a meditation on the nature of evil and the destruction of war.


















[book] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Values
by Rabbi Dr. Nachum Amsel
August 25, 2015
URIM
A follow-up to his widely acclaimed The Jewish Encyclopedia of Moral and Ethical Issues, this is a comprehensive reference book on Jewish ethics for contemporary times. The topics addressed in this work include Jewish attitudes toward homosexuality, stem cell medical procedures, the environment, Internet piracy, and more. Gleaning from the Bible and classic Jewish texts, as well as later authorities such as Maimonides, Nachmanides, Rashi, and the Code of Jewish Law, this work is accessible to readers of all backgrounds.

Rabbi Dr. Amsel received his doctorate in Education (E.D.D.) from the Azrieli Graduate School of Yeshiva University. He received his Rabbinic Ordination from Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik, as well as a B.A., B.S. and Masters in Education from Yeshiva University. He has served in almost every capacity in Jewish education, including as a teacher in elementary, high school, and afternoon congregational schools. He has also been a principal of Elementary, High School and Congregational Schools, and was the principal of the Hillel Academy in Connecticut for three years. He has also held the position of Dean in a girls Seminary. Nachum has also taught in Bar Ilan University and Touro College, and ran the Bar Ilan University Overseas program for 7 years (both days and nights). Nachum also founded and set up the STARS program (Student Torah Alliance for Russian Speakers)
















[book] The New Kosher
Simple Recipes to Savor and Share
by Kim Kushner
August 2015
Weldon Owen Books
Born in Montreal, Canada, Kim grew up in an Orthodox home, learned to cook from her Moroccan-born mother, and spent summers with family in Israel. A graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education, Kim worked as a recipe developer for Food & Wine and Chile Pepper magazines and a private chef before becoming an instructor; her classes have been sold out for the last four consecutive years. She has appeared on the Today show and been featured in The Huffington Post and The Chicago Tribune. Kim lives in New York City with her husband and three children. Her self-published first cookbook, The Modern Menu, is now in its third printing.

Kosher cooking has been redefined for the modern family. The New Kosher is filled with healthy recipes, exquisite flavors, and a fresh sensibility for the modern lifestyle. Emphasizing fast, easy, and delicious dishes for everyday meals and special occasions, this is your comprehensive guide to kosher cooking.
Kim Kushner comes from a diverse foodie background and her easygoing, mix and match style has helped her redefine kosher cooking. With over 100 recipes from all over the world, there’s something for everyone in this unique cookbook.
Looking for a modern twist on a traditional dish? Try Kim’s sticky date and caramel challah bread pudding, homemade challah with za’atar everything topping, 5-minute sundried tomato hummus or Mediterranean-inspired lentil, carrot and lemon soup.
Trying to find a new family favorite? Whip up some coconut- banana muffins with dark chocolate, penne with lemon zest, pine nuts and Parmesan “pesto”, easy dill chicken and stew or a crispy rice cake with saffron crust. Need a dessert everyone will love? You can’t go wrong with recipes like deconstructed s’mores, crunchy-chewy-nutty “health” cookies, miniature peanut butter cups and dark chocolate bark with rose petals, pistachios and walnuts.

Warmly written with personal narratives and detailed nuance, Kim’s recipes reflect her experience as a generous instructor who loves to teach and a mom who cooks tasty and nourishing fare for a big family.

Click the book cover to read more, purchase the book, or to read a free recipe for Sticky Date and Caramel Challah Bread Pudding
































[book] The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen:
A Fresh Take on Tradition
by Amelia Saltsman
Photos by Staci Valentine
Foreword by Deborah Madison
August 2015
Sterling Epicure.
Amelia Saltsman is the daughter of a Romanian mother and an Iraqi father who met in the Israeli army and immigrated to Los Angeles, where she was born and raised. Her first book, The Santa Monica Farmers’ Market Cookbook, is beloved. You probably know her from KCRW FM – Santa Moinca’s Good Food with Evan Kleiman
Here is a fresh, new way to think about Jewish food.
In The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen, Amelia Saltsman takes us far beyond deli meats and kugel to a world of diverse flavors ideal for modern meals. Inspired by the farm-to-table movement, her 150 recipes offer a refreshingly different take on traditional and contemporary Jewish cooking.

Amelia traces the delicious thread of Jewish cuisine from its roots to today’s focus on seasonality and sustainability. Guided by the Jewish lunar calendar, she divides the book into six micro-seasons that highlight the deep connection of Jewish traditions to the year’s natural cycles.
Amelia draws on her own rich food history to bring you a warmly personal cookbook filled with soul-satisfying spins on beloved classics and bold new dishes. From her Iraqi grandmother’s kitchri—red lentils melted into rice with garlic slow-cooked to sweetness—to four-ingredient Golden Borscht with Buttermilk and Fresh Ginger and vibrant Blood Orange and Olive Oil Polenta Upside-Down Cake, Amelia’s game-changing approach is sure to win over a new generation of cooks. You’ll find naturally vegan dishes, Middle Eastern fare, and new ways to use Old-World ingredients—buckwheat, home-cured herring, and gribenes—in fresh, modern meals.

The recipe list here HERE
(but please come back to buy the book from us hehe)















[book] A Jewish Baker's Pastry Secrets
Recipes from a New York Baking
Legend for Strudel, Stollen, Danishes,
Puff Pastry, and More
by George Greenstein and Elaine Greenstein
Julia Greenstein and Isaac Bleicher
(THE CHEESCAKE KING OF LONG ISLAND)
August 2015
Ten Speed Press
This follow-up to the author's James Beard award-winning Secrets of a Jewish Bakeris a charming collection of European-style bakery classics, such as coffee cake and strudel.

George Greenstein had a gift for teaching home bakers to think, work, and bake like the pros with his evocative and tactile descriptions of baking. In A Jewish Baker’s Pastry Secrets, he crafts master dough recipes for Jewish holiday baking and European classics, creating a comprehensive set of building blocks for both beginners and baking enthusiasts. Greenstein’s expert guidance for making doughs like bundt, babka, strudel, gugelhopf, stollen, pressburger, puff pastry, and Danish create a jumping-off point for more than 200 variations of classic pastries, including napoleons, coffee cakes, and sweet buns.
The book also offers an in-depth guide to ingredients and equipment, including both professional and home ovens, as well as basic recipes for fillings, icings, and glazes. With Greenstein’s steady guidance and familiar voice, home bakers and professionals alike will be encouraged to turn out flawless pastry creations for any occasion.

















[book] Something Sweet:
Desserts, Baked Goods,
and Treats for Every Occasion
by Miriam Pascal
August 26, 2015
MESORAH PRESS
It is from MESORAH PUBLICATIONS, Miriam is a top source for recipes, she has a huge family. Need I say more about the greatness of this book?
There's always room for Something Sweet! Desserts and treats for every occasion; Accessible ingredients and easy-to-follow instructions; Detailed 'Plan Ahead' instructions for every recipe; Baking, Holiday and Party Guides; and Every recipe is accompanied by a mouthwatering, full-color photo

As the creator of the immensely popular food blog overtimecook.com, Miriam Pascal shares her innovative, exciting, and delicious recipes with literally hundreds of thousands of eager home cooks. She now presents close to 100 brand-new, never-seen recipes plus a number of her readers' favorite treats.
Miriam's frequent interaction with readers has given her a unique understanding of what today's cooks need. You'l see this influence in numerous reader-requested features: handy ingredient substitutions, such as oil in place of margarine in many recipes, a number of health-conscious and allergy-friendly recipes, and additional helpful variations. She also shares 'plan ahead' instructions on freezing and storage, and she presents special guides that offer tips and ideas for holidays and parties. In the Baking Guide, Miriam provides information about ingredients, substitutions, kitchen tools, and baking tips.
Miriam is a master at taking familiar kosher ingredients and combining them into creative treats that look beautiful, taste amazing, and aren't hard to create. And, with her infectious enthusiasm, she makes it so much fun Something Sweet is for everyone who loves dessert. And isn't that all of us?















[book] Jewish Slow Cooker Recipes:
120 Holiday and Everyday Dishes Made Easy
Paperback
by Laura Frankel
August 2015
Agate Surrey
This first paperback edition of Jewish Slow Cooker Recipes by Laura Frankel collects more than 120 sophisticated, simple, and satisfying kosher dishes. From everyday meals to holiday favorites, each recipe makes convenient use of the humble, ever-reliable slow cooker, using seasonal ingredients that can be found at your local market.
When Chef Frankel opened her first restaurant in 1999, she was driven not only by her love of cooking, but also by the desire to prove that kosher food can be as delicious and exciting as any other type of contemporary cuisine. The same goes in her own kitchen. When her family decided to keep kosher, they gave up eating pork, shellfish, and the combination of meat and dairy—but that didn’t mean they wanted to sacrifice flavor.
Frankel focused her culinary talents on creating kosher meals that are every bit as refined as their non-kosher counterparts—both at home and at her nationally acclaimed kosher restaurants. But creating inspiring dishes at home isn’t as easy without the elaborate prep that goes into a restaurant meal. That’s why Frankel turned to her slow cooker—a device she had been using once a week to prepare meals for Shabbat, when cooking with the stove or oven is prohibited. Once she realized the slow cooker could produce creative meals all week long, Frankel’s culinary imagination was off and running.
The book is divided by course and includes sections on appetizers, soups, entrees, sides, and desserts and breakfasts. For ease of use, each recipe clearly indicates seasonal ingredients and if it is a meat, dairy, or pareve dish.
Featuring Frankel’s signature blend of convenience and globe-spanning flavors, these recipes are designed to be kosher, yet accessible to eaters of all backgrounds. Anyone interested in time-saving, family-pleasing meals will find Jewish Slow Cooker Recipes a reliable, inspiring resource in the kitchen. Whether you need a little nosh or a full-on fress, this cookbook has the recipe for you.



















[book] Transforming the World
The Jewish Impact on Modernity
by Leo Dee
Summer 2015
URIM
Rabbi Leo Dee answers the fundamental question: why bother being Jewish in a modern world?
Using history and logic, Rabbi Dee explains how Judaism enhances daily life to make it more meaningful. Transforming the World: The Jewish Impact on Modernity focuses on the tolerance and equality of all mankind that is fundamental in Judaism. With a combination of commandments, traditions, and history, Rabbi Dee shows how Jewish culture transforms your life and the wider world for the better.
















[book] The Shame Borne in Silence
Spouse Abuse in the Jewish Community
by Rabbi Abraham J. Twerski MD (
2015
URIM paperback
Providing a religious lens on the topic, this book directly addresses the problem of spousal abuse in the Jewish community, in hopes of confronting the truth and taking definitive steps to end this violation of all that Judaism stands for. A leading rabbi and psychiatrist reveals with striking candor, firmness, and compassion what may have been closely kept dark secrets in many Jewish families and offers urgently needed advice and direction. Rabbi Twerski’s book was one of the first titles to break open the issue, and this new edition relates the recognition of abuse, the warning signs, and how to respond.






















[book] Dot Con:
The Art of Scamming a Scammer
by James Veitch
August 13, 2015
Quadrille UK Publishing
"Dear valued recipient, My late father was Gold and Diamond merchant and he has merchandise (250kgs Gold Dust) for safe keep. I am here seeking an assistance of a reliable and trustworthy person to take these goods out for investment - " We've all had those blatant scamming emails: un-claimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safety deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. Standard procedure is to delete on sight.

Dot Con is the story of what happened when comedian James Veitch decided to play the scammers at their own game. Packed full of Nigerian princes, can't-miss investment opportunities and eligible Russian brides, his correspondence leads to surprising, bizarre and hilarious results.






















SEPTEMBER 2015 BOOKS



[book] Pastrami on Rye
An Overstuffed History of the Jewish Deli
by Ted Merwin
Associate Professor of Religion
and Judaic Studies at Dickinson College
September 2015
NYU Press
For much of the twentieth century, the New York Jewish deli was an iconic institution in both Jewish and American life. As a social space it rivaled—and in some ways surpassed—the synagogue as the primary gathering place for the Jewish community. In popular culture it has been the setting for classics like When Harry Met Sally. And today, after a long period languishing in the trenches of the hopelessly old-fashioned, it is experiencing a nostalgic resurgence.

Pastrami on Rye is the first full-length history of the New York Jewish deli. The deli, argues Ted Merwin, reached its full flowering not in the immigrant period, as some might assume, but in the interwar era, when the children of Jewish immigrants celebrated the first flush of their success in America by downing sandwiches and cheesecake in theater district delis. But it was the kosher deli that followed Jews as they settled in the outer boroughs of the city, and that became the most tangible symbol of their continuing desire to maintain a connection to their heritage. Ultimately, upwardly mobile American Jews discarded the deli as they transitioned from outsider to insider status in the middle of the century. Now contemporary Jews are returning the deli to cult status as they seek to reclaim their cultural identities.

Richly researched and compellingly told, Pastrami on Rye gives us the surprising story of a quintessential New York institution..












[book] The Israeli Mind
How the Israeli National Character
Shapes Our World
by Alon Gratch, PhD (Columbia)
St. Martin’s Press
September 2015
Drawing on a broad cultural and historical canvas, and weaving in the author's personal and professional experience, as an Israeli-American clinical psychologist, teacher, consultant for corporate branding, and author of two books on psychology, The Israeli Mind presents a portrait of the Israeli national character.
Dr. Gratch posits that Israeli Jews are struggling to forge an identity based on Jewish history and Zionism. He writes that they are grand and grandiose, visionary and generous but also delusional and self-centered. Deeply caring because of the history of Jewish victimization, they also demonstrate a shocking indifference to the sufferings of others.
Gratch says that Israeli national character says “no” and it is their first, second and third line of defense, even as they are totally capable of complete and sudden capitulation. They are willing to sacrifice themselves for the collective but also to sacrifice that very collective-for a higher, and likely unattainable ideal.
Alon Gratch draws a vivid, provocative portrait of the conflicts embedded in the Israeli mind.
Annihilation anxiety,
narcissism,
a failure to fully process the Holocaust,
hyper-masculinity,
post-traumatic stress, and
an often unexamined narrative of self-sacrifice,
all clash with the nation's aspiration for normalcy or even greatness. Failure to resolve these conflicts, Gratch speculates, will threaten Israel's very existence, will injure its ability to deal with Iran and BDS, and threaten the whole Western modern world.

In USA TODAY in Spring 2015, Dr. Gratch wrote that, “…in the aftermath of WWII, Israeli foreign policy rested on the idea that if you want to make history, you must forget history. This idea allowed the government to negotiate with Germany over diplomatic relations and financial restitution on the basis of self-interest rather than emotions. It resulted in a tremendous economic growth and greater security for the fledgling state. But then came the Adolf Eichmann trial of 1961, bringing home to all Israelis the horrific personal stories of the survivors and ushering in what historian Hanna Yablonka called "the privatization of the Holocaust." Starting then, Israel gradually embraced the opposite idea, the notion that those who are unwilling to remember history are doomed to repeat it, as the organizing principle of its foreign policy… foreign observers often fail to grasp the extent to which the trauma of the Holocaust has penetrated every aspect of Israeli life… the Holocaust has become the central building block of the national identity of many Israelis. A 1992 study among university students studying to become teachers found that close to 80% identified with the statement, "We are all Holocaust survivors." And in present-day Israel, hardly a day goes by without some mention of Holocaust in the media. Underlying this national preoccupation are the twin emotions of anxiety and rage, along with the refusal or inability to tolerate any feelings of helplessness. "Never again will Jews go like lambs to the slaughter" is a phrase inculcated in the mind of every Israeli child. More than anything else, it is this psychological burden that will determine Israeli reaction to the West's negotiations with Iran. If the Obama administration can reduce Israeli anxiety, it will mitigate the rage, the corollary of which is the call to bomb Iran. But there is no reducing the anxiety without addressing the underlying fear of helplessness.”












[book] Let There Be Water
Israel's Solution for a Water-Starved World
by Seth M. Siegel
September 15, 2015
Thomas Dunne Books
St. Martin's Press
As every day brings urgent reports of growing water shortages around the world, there is no time to lose in the search for solutions. The US government predicts that forty of our fifty states-and sixty percent of the earth's land surface-will soon face alarming gaps between available water and the growing demand for it. Without action, food prices will rise, economic growth will slow, and political instability is likely to follow.
LET THERE BE WATER illustrates how Israel can serve as a model for the US and countries everywhere by showing how to blunt the worst of the coming water calamities.
Even with 60 percent of its country a desert, not only doesn't Israel have a water problem; it has an abundance of water. Israel even supplies water to its neighbors-the Palestinians and the Kingdom of Jordan-every day. Based on meticulous research and hundreds of interviews, Let There Be Water reveals the methods and techniques of the often off-beat inventors who enabled Israel to lead the world in cutting-edge water technology. Let There Be Water also tells unknown stories of how cooperation on water systems can forge diplomatic ties and promote unity.
Remarkably, not long ago, now-hostile Iran relied on Israel to manage its water systems, and access to Israel's water know-how helped to warm China's frosty relations with Israel. Every town, every country, and every reader can benefit from learning what Israel did in order to transform itself from a parched land into a water superpower. Beautifully written, Let There Be Water is an inspiring account of vision and sacrifice that will long be admired by government officials and engaged citizens facing water shortages and other seemingly insurmountable challenges.
With blurbs from Dan Senor, Tony Blair, Shimon Peres, and Robt Kennedy Jr. Seth Siegel is an attorney, activist, writer, and member of the U.S. Council of Foreign Relations

Click the cover to read more













NYT writes – this book may be one of the most important books on education to come along in years
[book] THE PRIZE:
WHO’S IN CHARGE OF AMERICA’S SCHOOLS?
BY DALE RUSSAKOFF
September 2015
HMH
Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Chris Christie (NJ Governor), and Cory Booker (Mayor of Newark NJ, now a Senator) were ready to reform our failing schools. They got an education. Mark pledged $100 Million to Newark to fix the schools in five years. Booker got matching funds. Washington Post reporter embedded herself in the process for five years. What happened?

When Mark Zuckerberg announced in front of a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the Newark Schools — and to solve the education crisis in every city in America — it looked like a huge win for then-mayor Cory Booker and governor Chris Christie. But their plans soon ran into a constituency not so easily moved — Newark’s key education players, fiercely protective of their billion-dollar-per-annum system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s students. (less the 40% of its students can read at grade level, and about 50% of students never finish high school in Newark)

Expert journalist Dale Russakoff delivers a story of high ideals and hubris, good intentions and greed, celebrity and street smarts — as reformers face off against entrenched unions, skeptical parents, and bewildered students.
(You realize that much of the millions went to $1000 a day consultants who profit from failing schools)
The growth of charters forces the hand of Newark’s superintendent Cami Anderson, who closes, consolidates, or redesigns more than a third of the city’s schools — a scenario on the horizon for many urban districts across America. Most moving are Russakoff’s portraits from inside the district’s schools, of home-grown principals and teachers, long stuck in a hopeless system — and often the only real hope for the children of Newark. The Prize is a portrait of a titanic struggle over the future of education for the poorest kids, and a cautionary tale for those who care about the shape of America’s schools..















[book] LEADERSHIP BS
Fixing Workplaces and Careers
One Truth At A Time
By Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford GSB
September 2015
HarperBusiness
The author of Power, Stanford business school professor, and a leading management thinker offers a hard-hitting dissection of the leadership industry and ways to make workplaces and careers work better.
The leadership enterprise is enormous, with billions of dollars, thousands of books, and hundreds of thousands of blogs and talks focused on improving leaders. But what we see worldwide is employee disengagement, high levels of leader turnover and career derailment, and failed leadership development efforts.
In Leadership BS, Jeffrey Pfeffer shines a bright light on the leadership industry, showing why it’s failing and how it might be remade. He sets the record straight on the oft-made prescriptions for leaders to be honest, authentic, and modest, tell the truth, build trust, and take care of others. By calling BS on so many of the stories and myths of leadership, he gives people a more scientific look at the evidence and better information to guide their careers.
Rooted in social science, and will practical examples and advice for improving management, Leadership BS encourages readers to accept the truth and then use facts to change themselves and the world for the better.
Click the cover to read more



















[book] Sisters in Law
How Sandra Day O'Connor
and Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Went to the Supreme Court
and Changed the World
by Linda Hirshman
Harper
September 2015
The author of the celebrated Victory tells the fascinating story of the intertwined lives of Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first and second women to serve as Supreme Court justices.
The relationship between Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg—Republican and Democrat, Christian and Jew, western rancher’s daughter and Brooklyn girl—transcends party, religion, region, and culture. Strengthened by each other’s presence, these groundbreaking judges, the first and second to serve on the highest court in the land, have transformed the Constitution and America itself, making it a more equal place for all women.
Linda Hirshman’s dual biography includes revealing stories of how these trailblazers fought for their own recognition in a male-dominated profession—battles that would ultimately benefit every American woman. She also makes clear how these two justices have shaped the legal framework of modern feminism, including employment discrimination, abortion, affirmative action, sexual harassment, and many other issues crucial to women’s lives.
Sisters-in-Law combines legal detail with warm personal anecdotes that bring these very different women into focus as never before. Meticulously researched and compellingly told, it is an authoritative account of our changing law and culture, and a moving story of a remarkable friendship.














[book] THE FOOD LAB
BETTER HOME COOKING THROUGH SCIENCE
By J. KENJI LOPEZ-ALT
Norton
September 2015
A grand tour of the science of cooking explored through popular American dishes, illustrated in full color.
Ever wondered how to pan-fry a steak with a charred crust and an interior that's perfectly medium-rare from edge to edge when you cut into it? How to make homemade mac 'n' cheese that is as satisfyingly gooey and velvety-smooth as the blue box stuff, but far tastier? How to roast a succulent, moist turkey (forget about brining!)-and use a foolproof method that works every time?
As Serious Eats's culinary nerd-in-residence, J. Kenji López-Alt has pondered all these questions and more. In The Food Lab, Kenji focuses on the science behind beloved American dishes, delving into the interactions between heat, energy, and molecules that create great food. Kenji shows that often, conventional methods don’t work that well, and home cooks can achieve far better results using new-but simple-techniques. In hundreds of easy-to-make recipes with over 1,000 full-color images, you will find out how to make foolproof Hollandaise sauce in just two minutes, how to transform one simple tomato sauce into a half dozen dishes, how to make the crispiest, creamiest potato casserole ever conceived, and much more. Over 1000 color photographs. (cookbook)


















[book] BREAM GIVES ME HICCUPS
BY JESSE EISENBERG
Grove Atlantic Press
September 2015
“Eisenberg is truly a talented writer. . . Hilarious and poignant.”—Entertainment Weekly
Bream Gives Me Hiccups: And Other Stories is the whip-smart fiction debut of Academy Award-nominated actor Jesse Eisenberg. His publisher says he is an emerging voice in fiction. I plan to see his new play in Manhattan during the BookExpo
I havent enjoyed this so much since reading A Model World by Chabon and Without Feathers by Woody Allen

Taking its title from a group of stories that begin the book, Bream Gives Me Hiccups moves from contemporary Los Angeles to the dorm rooms of an American college to ancient Pompeii, throwing the reader into a universe of social misfits, reimagined scenes from history, and ridiculous overreactions.
In one story, a tense e-mail exchange between a young man and his girlfriend is taken over by the man’s sister, who is obsessed with the Bosnian genocide;
In another, a college freshman forced to live with a roommate is stunned when one of her ramen packets goes missing (she didn’t have “one” of my ramens. She had a chicken ramen);
in another piece, Alexander Graham Bell has teething problems with his invention (I’ve been calling Mabel all day, she doesn’t pick up! Yes, of course I dialed the right number – 2!).
United by Eisenberg’s gift for humor and character, and grouped into chapters that each open with an illustration by award-winning cartoonist Jean Jullien, the witty pieces collected in Bream Gives Me Hiccups explore the various insanities of the modern world, and mark the arrival of a fantastically funny, self-ironic, and original voice.














[book] An Improbable Friendship:
The Remarkable Lives of
Israeli Ruth Dayan and
Palestinian Raymonda Tawil and
Their Forty-Year Peace Mission
by Anthony David
September 1, 2015
Arcade
Sometimes you can find the most astounding of friendships in the most unlikely of places. An Improbable Friendship is the dual biography of Israeli Ruth Dayan, Moshe Dayan’s widow, now ninety-seven, and Palestinian journalist Raymonda Tawil, Yasser Arafat’s mother-in-law, now seventy-four. It reveals for the first time the two women’s surprising and secret forty-year friendship and delivers the story of their extraordinary and turbulent lives growing up in a war-torn country.
Based on personal interviews, diaries, and journals drawn from both women—Ruth lives today in Tel Aviv, Raymonda in Malta—author Anthony David delivers a fast-paced, fascinating narrative that is a beautiful story of reconciliation and hope in a climate of endless conflict. By telling their stories and following their budding relationship, which began after the Six-Day War in 1967, we learn the behind-the-scenes, undisclosed history of the Middle East’s most influential leaders from two prominent women on either side of the ongoing conflict.
An award-winning biographer and historian, Anthony David brings us the story of unexpected friendship while he discovers the true pasts of two outstanding women. Their story gives voice to Israelis and Palestinians caught in the Middle East conflict and holds a persistent faith in a future of peace.














[book] Nine Essential Things
I've Learned About Life
by Rabbi Harold S. Kushner
(Temple Israel, Natick MA)
September 1, 2015
Knopf
A profoundly inspiring yet practical guide to well-being from one of modern Judaism's most beloved sages.
As a congregational rabbi for half a century and the best-selling author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People and thirteen other books on faith, ethics, and how to apply the timeless wisdom of religious thought to everyday challenges, Harold S. Kushner has proven his understanding of what it means to live a good life. In this compassionate new work, Kushner distills nine essential lessons from the sum of his teaching, study, and experience, offering a lifetime's worth of spiritual food for thought, pragmatic advice, inspiration for a more fulfilling life, and strength for trying times.
With fresh, vital insight into everything from belief ("there is no commandment in Judaism to believe in God") to conscience (the Garden of Eden story as you've never heard it) to mercy ("forgiveness is a favor you do yourself, not a favor to the person who offended you"), grounded in Kushner's brilliant readings of scripture, history, and popular culture, Nine Essential Things I've Learned About Life is the capstone to Kushner's luminous oeuvre.












[book] FEAR AND CLOTHING
FEAR AND C(LOTHING)
UNBUCKLING AMERICAN FASHION
BY CINTRA WILSON
Norton
September 2015
Former New York Times columnist Cintra Wilson treks around America to decode the deeper meanings of this country’s regional fashion statements.
Cintra Wilson takes her celebrated eye for style on the road, traveling around the “belt regions” of the United States: the Cotton, Rust, Bible, Sun, Frost, Corn, and Gun Belts. She tackles the fashion choices of scantily clad club-goers on South Beach, unpacks the altogether impractical clothing choices at the Sundance Festival in Utah, and digs beneath the sartorial armor of politicians and their wives in Washington, DC.
In this smart and rollicking book, Wilson illustrates how every closet is a declaration of the owner’s politics, sexuality, class, education, hopes, and dreams. She also documents her own personal fashion journey, tracing her coming-of-age in San Francisco’s punk scene to her unlikely appointment to the New York Times Style section. With her signature wit and utterly irreverent humor, Wilson proves that, by donning our daily costume, we create our future selves, for good or ill. Indeed: your fate hangs in your closet. Dress wisely.


















[book] THE SENSUAL GOD
HOW THE SENSES MAKE
THE ALMIGHTY SENSELESS
BY AVIAD KLEINBERG
Columbia
September 2015
In the Old Testament, God wrestles with a man (and loses). In the Talmud, God wriggles his toes to make thunder and takes human form to shave the king of Assyria. In the New Testament, God is made flesh and dwells among humans. For religious thinkers trained in Greek philosophy and its deep distaste for matter, sacred scripture can be distressing. A philosophically respectable God should be untainted by sensuality, yet the God of sacred texts is often embarrassingly sensual.
Setting experts' minds at ease was neither easy nor simple, and often faith and logic were stretched to their limits. Focusing on examples from both Christian and Jewish sources, from the Bible to sources from the Late Middle Ages, Aviad Kleinberg examines the way Christian and Jewish philosophers, exegetes, and theologians attempted to reconcile God's supposed ineffability with numerous biblical and postbiblical accounts of seeing, hearing, smelling, touching, and even tasting the almighty. The conceptual entanglements ensnaring religious thinkers, and the strange, ingenious solutions they used to extricate themselves, tell us something profound about human needs and divine attributes, about faith, hope, and cognitive dissonance.

















[book] EIGHT QUESTIONS OF FAITH
BIBLICAL CHALLENGES THAT
Guide and Ground Our Lives
by Rabbi Niles Elliot Goldstein (Loyola Chicago)
September 2015
JPS/ Nebraska
Eight Questions of Faith is a spiritual exploration of some of life’s biggest questions—questions that have been asked by prophets and kings, mystics and sinners, and that continue to be asked by every one of us today.
Niles Elliot Goldstein uses eight questions found in the Bible to explore the human journey from cradle to grave, confronting such important existential experiences and themes as mortality, responsibility, forbidden knowledge, sin, and the afterlife. By interweaving texts from the Bible, commentaries, philosophy, psychology, and literature with his own experiences, Goldstein also meditates on midlife. This book will appeal to believers and nonbelievers alike and is aimed at anyone who has ever faced a challenge or wondered what life is all about.
















[book] The Grammar of God:
A Journey into the Words
and Worlds of the Bible
by Aviya Kushner
September 2015
Spiegel & Grau
For readers of Bruce Feiler’s Walking the Bible and Kathleen Norris’s The Cloister Walk comes a powerful exploration of the Bible in translation.
Aviya Kushner grew up in a Hebrew-speaking family, reading the Bible in the original Hebrew and debating its meaning over the dinner table. She knew much of it by heart—and was therefore surprised when, while getting her MFA at the University of Iowa, she took the novelist Marilynne Robinson’s class on the Old Testament and discovered she barely recognized the text she thought she knew so well. From differences in the Ten Commandments to a less ambiguous reading of the creation story to a new emphasis on the topic of slavery, the English translation often felt like another book entirely from the one she had grown up with.
Kushner began discussing the experience with Robinson, who became a mentor, and her interest in the differences between the ancient language and the modern one gradually became an obsession. She began what became a ten-year project of reading different versions of the Hebrew Bible in English and traveling the world in the footsteps of the great biblical translators, trying to understand what compelled them to take on a lifetime project that was often considered heretical and in some cases resulted in their deaths.

In this eye-opening chronicle, Kushner tells the story of her vibrant relationship to the Bible, and along the way illustrates how the differences in translation affect our understanding of our culture’s most important written work. A fascinating look at language and the beliefs we hold most dear, The Grammar of God is also a moving tale about leaving home and returning to it, both literally and through reading.

“Aviya Kushner has written a passionate, illuminating essay about meaning itself. The Grammar of God is also a unique personal narrative, a family story with the Bible and its languages as central characters.”—Robert Pinsky
“Kushner reminds us in The Grammar of God that in Hebrew beautiful things are also beautiful words. Her gift as a writer is to take us very near to the text, breathe into it, and give it a new life.”—Rodger Kamenetz, author of The Jew in the Lotus















[book] The Occupation Trilogy
La Place de l'Étoile
The Night Watch
Ring Roads
by Patrick Modiano
Nobel Prize for Literature
September 22, 2015
Bloomsbury USA
Born at the close of World War II, 2014 Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano was a young man in his twenties when he burst onto the Parisian literary scene with these three brilliant, angry novels about the wartime Occupation of Paris.
The epigraph to his first novel, among the first to seriously question Nazi collaboration in France, reads: "In June 1942 a German officer goes up to a young man and says: 'Excuse me, monsieur, where is La Place de l'Étoile?' The young man points to the star on his chest." The second novel, The Night Watch, tells the story of a young man caught between his work for the French Gestapo, his work for a Resistance cell, and the black marketeers whose milieu he shares. Ring Roads recounts a son's search for his Jewish father who disappeared ten years earlier, whom he finds trying to weather the war in service to unsavory characters.
Together these three brilliant, almost hallucinatory evocations of the Occupation attempt to exorcise the past by exploring the morally ambiguous worlds of collaboration and resistance. Award-winning translator Frank Wynne has revised the translations of The Night Watch and Ring Roads--long out of print--for our current day, and brings La Place de l'Étoile into English for the first time. The Occupation Trilogy provides the perfect introduction to one of the world's greatest writers.















[book] BLACK EARTH
The Holocaust as History and Warning
by Timothy Snyder
September 2015
Tim Duggan Books
STARRED REVIEW
A brilliant, haunting, and profoundly original portrait of the defining tragedy of our time.
In this epic history of extermination and survival, Timothy Snyder presents a new explanation of the great atrocity of the twentieth century, and reveals the risks that we face in the twenty-first. Based on new sources from eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Black Earth recounts the mass murder of the Jews as an event that is still close to us, more comprehensible than we would like to think, and thus all the more terrifying.
The Holocaust began in a dark but accessible place, in Hitler's mind, with the thought that the elimination of Jews would restore balance to the planet and allow Germans to win the resources they desperately needed. Such a worldview could be realized only if Germany destroyed other states, so Hitler's aim was a colonial war in Europe itself. In the zones of statelessness, almost all Jews died. A few people, the righteous few, aided them, without support from institutions. Much of the new research in this book is devoted to understanding these extraordinary individuals. The almost insurmountable difficulties they faced only confirm the dangers of state destruction and ecological panic. These men and women should be emulated, but in similar circumstances few of us would do so.
By overlooking the lessons of the Holocaust, Snyder concludes, we have misunderstood modernity and endangered the future. The early twenty-first century is coming to resemble the early twentieth, as growing preoccupations with food and water accompany ideological challenges to global order. Our world is closer to Hitler's than we like to admit, and saving it requires us to see the Holocaust as it was -- and ourselves as we are. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and utterly absorbing, Black Earth reveals a Holocaust that is not only history but warning.





















[book] HEARTLANDIA
Heritage Recipes from
The Country Cat
by Adam and Jackie Sappington
with Ashley Garland
Agent: Betsy Amster
Editor: Justin Schwartz
September 2015
HMH
I was never in Portland. I have the Portlandia cookbook. I was not aware of the Portland restaurant and culinary scene. But I read the Washington Post, July 1, 2015, story on its Quirky Comfort Food scene. In it they mentioned Le Pigeon, Ataula, Bollywood Theater, Pok Pok, Ox, Langhaan, and more. But not Country Cat. So I picked up this cookbook.
Heartlandia is based on Adam and Jackie Sappington’s acclaimed Portland restaurant, The Country Cat Dinner House & Bar. Adam, grew up on a Midwest farm and is the Executive Chef and a self-taught expert in whole animal butchery. His spouse and business partner Jackie, who mastered her first recipe at the age of ten, is the Executive Pastry Chef. They specialize in comfort food, or heritage recipes. Some of the mouthwatering dishes include Autumn Squash Soup with Apple Cider and Brown Butter, Red Wine-Braised Beef with Wild Mushroom Steak Sauce, and Brick-Pressed Cornish Game Hen with Grated Tomato Vinaigrette.
They are famous for their Skillet-Fried Chicken and the Challah French Toast with Maker’s Mark Custard and Clabber Cream, as well as Bourbon Peach Crumble Pie. The chicken is based on a recipe of granny Cris who served it to inmates at the old Maries County Jail (note... you can use beef tallow instead of the pig lard, but maybe u need to skip the buttermilk)
They should be famous for the Chanterelle and Blackberry Succotash; and the Honey Paprika Potatoes (uses salata cheese and honey)
The book opens (after a section on tools and techniques, with Breakfast and Buttermilk Biscuits, and Pancakes. The Challah French Toast (includes challah recipe) uses aggs (of course) but also half and half, vanilla extract, bourbon, and cinnamon. The Clabber cream on it uses heavy cream, confectioners sugar, and sour cream. (what the heck is a “knob” of butter?) Braiding: “2nd crosses over, first divides the rest, repeat”
Breakfast continues with Morel and Spring Vegetable Hash; Wedge Salad with Soft Paches Egg and Green Goddess Dressing; Chanterelle, GreenBean, and Freekah Salad with Huckleberry Vinaigrette; Sugar Snap Pea and Soft Goat Cheese Salad with Cornbread Muffins; and more. Their Ranch Dressing (when in doubt, serve ranch) includes thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, celery seed, lemon pepper, egg yolks, sour cream, and more. In their “homage to the Range,” the focus on recipes for kettles. Jill's Chili uses ground dark meat turkey, kidney and pinto beans, chicken stock and more than a half a dozen spices. (The secret to deviled eggs...? perhaps it is live juice and ground celery seed) I will skip the meat candy recipe (beef jerky). They make their own ketchup for their onion rings and home fries. It uses juniper and allspice berries, star anise, cloves, cinnamon, fennel, cornstarch, ginger, two vinegars, and of course tomatoes and tomato paste. Adam's Chicken Fried Steak is akin to American Schnitzel. His “Woo” gravy is just an easier way to say Worcestershire Sauce gravy (but it uses bacon fat with cofee, chicken stock, Worcestershire sauce, and more).”
Additional chapters include one for drinks and another for pickles and preserves. The cookbook also has beautiful photographs that capture not only the amazing food but also the spirit of the restaurant and the heartland.















[book] SAHRED STPORIES
RIVAL TELLINGS
Early Encounters of Jews, Christians, and Muslims
By Robert C. Gregg (Stanford)
September 2015
Oxford University Press
COMPARATIVE RELIGION STUDIES
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are considered kindred religions-holding ancestral heritages and monotheistic belief in common-but there are definitive distinctions between these "Abrahamic" peoples. Shared Stories, Rival Tellings explores the early exchanges of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and argues that their interactions were dominated by debates over the meanings of certain stories sacred to all three communities.
Robert C. Gregg shows how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim interpreters--artists as well as authors--developed their unique and particular understandings of narratives present in the two Bibles and the Qur'an. Gregg focuses on five stories: Cain and Abel, Sarah and Hagar, Joseph and Potiphar's Wife, Jonah and the Whale, and Mary the Mother of Jesus. As he guides us through the often intentional variations introduced into these shared stories, Gregg exposes major issues under contention and the social-intellectual forces that contributed to spirited, and sometimes combative, exchanges among Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
Offering deeper insight into these historical moments and their implications for contemporary relations among the three religions, Shared Stories, Rival Tellings will inspire readers to consider--and reconsider--the dynamics of traditional and current social-religious competition.





















[book] The Pentagon's Brain:
An Uncensored History of DARPA,
America's Top-Secret Military Research Agency
by Annie Jacobsen
September 2015
Little, Brown
DARPA. They gave us drones, the internet, MMORPGs, rifles, weapons, and more. The definitive history of DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency.
No one has ever written the history of the Defense Department's most secret, most powerful, and most controversial military science R&D agency. In the first-ever history about the organization, New York Times bestselling author Annie Jacobsen draws on inside sources, exclusive interviews, private documents, and declassified memos to paint a picture of DARPA, or "the Pentagon's brain," from its Cold War inception in 1958 to the present.
This is the book on DARPA--a compelling narrative about this clandestine intersection of science and the American military and the often frightening results.




























[book] The Crime and the Silence:
Confronting the Massacre of Jews
in Wartime Jedwabne
by Anna Bikont
Translated from Polish by Alissa Valles
September 2015
FS&G
A monumental work of nonfiction on a wartime atrocity, its sixty-year denial, and the impact of its truth by one of Poland’s award winning journalists who wrote about issues that people want to forget

In 2001, Jan Gross's hugely controversial NEIGHBORS was a historian's disclosure of the events in the small Polish town of Jedwabne on July 10, 1941, when the citizens rounded up the Jewish population and burned them alive in a barn.
The massacre was a shocking secret that had been suppressed for more than sixty years, and it provoked the most important public debate in Poland since 1989. From the outset, Anna Bikont reported on the town, combing through archives and interviewing residents who survived the war period and survivors in Poland, Central America, Israel and the USA. Her writing became a crucial part of the debate and she herself an actor in a national drama.
Part history, part memoir, The Crime and the Silence is the journalist's account of these events: both the story of the massacre told through oral histories of survivors and witnesses, and a portrait of a Polish town coming to terms with its dark past. Including the perspectives of both heroes and perpetrators, Bikont chronicles the sources of the hatred that exploded against Jews and asks what myths grow on hidden memories, what destruction they cause, and what happens to a society that refuses to accept a horrific truth.
She discusses the other massacres in neighboring towns, and investigates why people blamed the Germans when it was actually the Polish Catholics
A profoundly moving exploration of being Jewish in modern Poland that Julian Barnes called "one of the most chilling books," The Crime and the Silence is a vital contribution to Holocaust history and a fascinating story of a town coming to terms with its dark past..






















[book] THE GOLEM OF PARIS
a novel
by Jonathan Kellerman and Jesse Kellerman
September 2015
Putnam
From two #1 bestselling masters of crime fiction comes an extraordinary thriller about family, murder, and the secrets that refuse to stay buried.
It’s been more than a year since LAPD detective Jacob Lev learned the remarkable truth about his family, and he’s not coping well. He’s back to drinking, he’s not talking to his father, the LAPD Special Projects Department continues to shadow him, and the memory of a woman named Mai haunts him day and night.
And while Jacob has tried to build a bridge to his mother, she remains a stranger to him, imprisoned inside her own tattered mind.
Then he comes across the file for a gruesome unsolved murder that brings the two halves of his life into startling collision. Finding the killer will take him halfway around the world, to Paris—the city of romance, but also of gritty streets, behind the lights. It’s a dangerous search for truth that plunges him into the past. And for Jacob Lev, there is no place more frightening.
Jonathan Kellerman has long been known for his mastery of criminal psychology and his ability to create thrilling novels of nuanced drama and suspense. But in The Golem of Paris, he and Jesse Kellerman raise that suspense to a whole new level.






















[book] SIMPLE SABOTAGE
A Modern Field Manual for Detecting
and Rooting Out Everyday Behavior s That
Undermine Your Workplace
by Robert M. Galford, Bob Frisch
and Cary Greene
September 2015
Harperone
DO you serve on a synagogue committee or any working group? PTA? Maybe the OSS manual can help you deal with unintentional sabotage.

Inspired by the Simple Sabotage Field Manual released by the Office of Strategic Services in 1944 to train European resistors, this is the essential handbook to help stamp out unintentional sabotage in any working group, from major corporations to volunteer PTA committees.
In 1944, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS)—the predecessor of today’s CIA—issued the Simple Sabotage Field Manual that detailed sabotage techniques designed to demoralize the enemy. One section focused on eight incredibly subtle—and devastatingly destructive—tactics for sabotaging the decision-making processes of organizations. While the manual was written decades ago, these sabotage tactics thrive undetected in organizations today:

Insist on doing everything through channels.
Make speeches. Talk as frequently as possible and at great length. Refer all matters to committees.
Bring up irrelevant issues as frequently as possible. Haggle over precise wordings of communications.
Refer back to matters already decided upon and attempt to question the advisability of that decision.
Advocate caution and urge fellow-conferees to avoid haste that might result in embarrassments or difficulties later on.
Be worried about the propriety of any decision.

Everyone has been faced with someone who has used these tactics, even when they have meant well. Filled with proven strategies and techniques, this brief, clever book outlines the counter-sabotage measures to detect and reduce the impact of these eight classic sabotage tactics to improve productivity, spur creativity, and engender better collegial relationships
















[book] SCHMUCK
by Seth Kushner
September 2015
Alternate Comics
Schmuck drips with self-loathing, near-sightedness, and sexually frustrated Ashkenazi goodness. In Schmuck, Kushner tells "true" stories based on his own mishaps and mortifying memories, which are energetically illustrated by the cream of the indie comix crop."—Megan Sass, Heeb Magazine

One man's awkward coming-of-age-quest to find love in New York City, illustrated by twenty-two artists, whose individual short stories together tell a complete narrative. Artists include Josh Neufeld, Nick Bertozzi, Dean Haspiel, Gregory Benton, Noah Van Sciver, Stephan DeStefano, and Christa Cassano. Cover art by Joseph Remnant. Book design by Eisner award-winner Eric Skillman. Foreword by Jonathan Ames.




























[book] BEEF WITH TOMATO
a graphic novel
by Dean Haspiel
September 2015
Alternate Comics
Haspiel grew up on the Upper West Side and went to the LG HS for Music and Art
In this story, a native New York bruiser is fed up with life in the dregs of a drug-addled Alphabet City where his neighbors are shut-ins and his bicycle is always getting stolen.
He escapes from Manhattan to make a fresh start in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, only to face a new strain of street logic — where most everything he encounters is not as it seems.
(And as a former resident of Carroll Garden and Kane St synagogue member, I can attest to the author's perceptions
Emmy award-winning artist on HBO's Bored To Death—Dean Haspiel's comics include The Fox with Mark Waid, The Alcoholic with Jonathan Ames, and The Quitter with Harvey Pekar.
















[book] A Guest at the Shooters' Banquet:
My Grandfather's SS Past,
My Jewish Family,
A Search for the Truth
by Rita Gabis
September 2015
Bloomsbury USA
Rita Gabis comes from a family of Eastern European Jews and Lithuanian Catholics. She was close to her Catholic grandfather as a child and knew one version of his past: prior to immigration he had fought the Russians, whose brutal occupation of Lithuania destroyed thousands of lives before Hitler's army swept in.
Five years ago, Gabis discovered an unthinkable dimension to her family story: from 1941 to 1943, her grandfather had been the chief of security police under the Gestapo in the Lithuanian town of Svencionys, near the killing field of Poligon, where eight thousand Jews were murdered over three days in the fall of 1941. In 1942, the local Polish population was also hunted down. Gabis felt compelled to find out the complicated truth of who her grandfather was and what he had done.
Built around dramatic interviews in four countries, filled with original scholarship, and mesmerizing in its lyricism, A Guest at the Shooters' Banquet is a history and family memoir like no other, documenting "the holocaust by bullets" with a remarkable quest as Gabis returns again and again to the country of her grandfather's birth to learn all she can about the man she thought she knew.






















[book] The Last Season:
A Father, a Son,
and a Lifetime of College Football
by Stuart Stevens
September 2015
Knopf
What ever happened to Stuart Stevens, the author of NIGHT TRAIN TO TURKMISTAN and MALARIA DREAMS back in the late 1980s? I did not know he was the same guy who went on to write for TV shows including NORTHERN EXPOSURE, and worked as a GOP political consultant (BIG ENCHILADA) and as a senior strategist for Presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

Here is his latest book, Stevens goes to Ole Miss with his 95 year old father Phineas to explore football and Mississippi culture.
As an adolescent in an affluent, liberal enclave of Jackson, Mississippi, home of Ole Miss, Stevens idolized British travel writers like Evelyn Waugh and Peter Fleming (brother of Ian) because their stories offered a temporary escape from the provincialism of the Deep South. He also was a football fan; his father Phineas was a top player. (I think his grandfather was Judge John Morgan Stevens)
Fathers, sons, and sports are enduring themes of American literature. Here, in this fresh and moving account, a son returns to his native South to spend a special autumn with his ninety-five-year-old dad, sharing the unique joys, disappointments, and life lessons of Saturdays with their beloved Ole Miss Rebels.
After growing up in Jackson, Stuart Stevens built a successful career as a writer and political consultant. But in the fall of 2012, not long after he turned sixty, the presidential campaign he’d worked on suffered a painful defeat. Grappling with a profound sense of loss and mortality, he began asking himself some tough questions, not least about his relationship with his father. The two of them had spent little time together for decades. He made a resolution: to invite his father to attend a season of Ole Miss football games together, as they’d done when college football provided a way for his father to guide him through childhood—and to make sense of the troubled South of the 1960s. Now, driving to and from the games, and cheering from the stands, they take stock of their lives as father and son, and as individuals, reminding themselves of their unique, complicated, precious bond.
Poignant and full of heart, but also irreverent and often hilarious, The Last Season is a powerful story of parents and children and of the importance of taking a backward glance together while you still can.
Note: The Stevens are Methodists, not Jewish, but I like his books, and this should be an interesting read.













[book] The Modern Family Cookbook
by Modern Family Writers and 20th Century Fox
September 2015
Oxmoor House
From the hit television phenomenon Modern Family comes an unconventional cookbook that invites you into the kitchen with the CHARACTERS you know and love. NOTE... these a recipes by characters in character. In addition to recipes are scenes and dialogue from famous episodes, and an episode guide
There are more than 100 recipes
The Modern Family Cookbook teaches you how to make Phil's Traditional First-Day-of-School Pancakes (don't forget the whipped cream smile!), Claire's Spooky Pumpkin Cheese Ball with Crudités, Mitchell's PB & J (pear, brie, and jambon) Sandwiches, Jay's Sloppy Jay's (like a sloppy joe but made by Jay)
Gloria's Carnitas al Diablo, and other delicious dishes.
From Haley's forty cupcakes to Lily's first taste of pho, and all the family dinners in between, the show's most memorable moments come to life in a recipe collection that will please fans and foodies alike.
The recipes are very basic. Sloppy joes are beef and sauce and buns
Of course, family meals aren't just about eating. The Modern Family Cookbook also features some of the Dunphy-Tucker-Pritchett clan's most hilarious moments. Find out if you're a parent or a peer-ent and what to do when house guests overstay their welcome. Discover Lily's diva tips, Manny's love poems, and Jay's childhood recipe for "the perfect mom." Ever wondered what it looks like inside Phil Dunphy's brain? Open this book to find out.













[book] Underground in Berlin:
A Young Woman's Extraordinary Tale
of Survival in the Heart of Nazi Germany
by Marie Jalowicz Simon
Translated by Anthea Bell
Foreword and Afterword by Hermann Simon
September 8, 2015
Little, Brown
A thrilling piece of undiscovered history, this is the true account of a young Jewish woman who survived World War II in Berlin. In 1941, Marie Jalowicz Simon, a nineteen-year-old Berliner, made an extraordinary decision. All around her, Jews were being rounded up for deportation, forced labor, and extermination. Marie took off her yellow star, turned her back on the Jewish community, and vanished into the city.

In the years that followed, Marie lived under an assumed identity, forced to accept shelter wherever she found it. Always on the run, never certain whom she could trust, Marie moved between almost twenty different safe-houses, living with foreign workers, staunch communists, and even committed Nazis. Only her quick-witted determination and the most hair-raising strokes of luck allowed her to survive.

















[book] Building Art:
The Life and Work of Frank Gehry
by Paul Goldberger
September 2015
Knopf
From Pulitzer Prize–winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger: an engaging, nuanced exploration of the life and work of Frank Gehry, undoubtedly the most famous architect of our time. This first full-fledged critical biography presents and evaluates the work of a man who has almost single-handedly transformed contemporary architecture in his innovative use of materials, design, and form, and who is among the very few architects in history to be both respected by critics as a creative, cutting-edge force and embraced by the general public as a popular figure. Building Art shows the full range of Gehry’s work, from early houses constructed of plywood and chain-link fencing to lamps made in the shape of fish to the triumphant success of such late projects as the spectacular art museum of glass in Paris. It tells the story behind Gehry’s own house, which upset his neighbors and excited the world with its mix of the traditional and the extraordinary, and recounts how Gehry came to design the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, his remarkable structure of swirling titanium that changed a declining city into a destination spot. Building Art also explains Gehry’s sixteen-year quest to complete Walt Disney Concert Hall, the beautiful, acoustically brilliant home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
Although Gehry’s architecture has been written about widely, the story of his life has never been told in full detail. Here we come to know his Jewish immigrant family, his working-class Toronto childhood, his hours spent playing with blocks on his grandmother’s kitchen floor, his move to Los Angeles when he was still a teenager, and how he came, unexpectedly, to end up in architecture school. Most important, Building Art presents and evaluates Gehry’s lifetime of work in conjunction with his entire life story, including his time in the army and at Harvard, his long relationship with his psychiatrist and the impact it had on his work, and his two marriages and four children. It analyzes his carefully crafted persona, in which a casual, amiable “aw, shucks” surface masks a driving and intense ambition. And it explores his relationship to Los Angeles and how its position as home to outsider artists gave him the freedom in his formative years to make the innovations that characterize his genius. Finally, it discusses his interest in using technology not just to change the way a building looks but to change the way the whole profession of architecture is practiced.
At once a sweeping view of a great architect and an intimate look at creative genius, Building Art is in many ways the saga of the architectural milieu of the twenty-first century. But most of all it is the compelling story of the man who first comes to mind when we think of the lasting possibilities of buildings as art.
















[book] The Power of Resilience:
How the Best Companies Manage the Unexpected
by Yossi Sheffi
MIT Press
September 2015
From Yossi Sheffi - Technion trained and MIT based – and the founder of at least five companies.
A catastrophic earthquake is followed by a tsunami that inundates the coastline, and around the globe manufacturing comes to a standstill.
State-of-the-art passenger jets are grounded because of a malfunctioning part.
A strike halts shipments through a major port.
A new digital device decimates the sales of other brands and sends established firms to the brink of bankruptcy.
The interconnectedness of the global economy today means that unexpected events in one corner of the globe can ripple through the world's supply chain and affect customers everywhere. In this book, Yossi Sheffi shows why modern vulnerabilities call for innovative processes and tools for creating and embedding corporate resilience and risk management. Sheffi offers fascinating case studies that illustrate how companies have prepared for, coped with, and come out stronger following disruption -- from the actions of Intel after the 2011 Japanese tsunami to the disruption in the "money supply chain" caused by the 2008 financial crisis.

Sheffi, author of the widely read The Resilient Enterprise, focuses here on deep tier risks as well as corporate responsibility, cybersecurity, long-term disruptions, business continuity planning, emergency operations centers, detection, and systemic disruptions. Supply chain risk management, Sheffi shows, is a balancing act between taking on the risks involved in new products, new markets, and new processes -- all crucial for growth -- and the resilience created by advanced risk management.












[book] MAKE IT NEW
THE HISTORY OF SILICON VALLEY DESIGN
By Barry M. Katz
(Stanford, IDEO, Calif Coll of the Arts)
MIT Press
September 2015
Barry believes that there is no design problem that does not have its roots in history,
California's Silicon Valley is home to the greatest concentration of designers in the world: corporate design offices at flagship technology companies and volunteers at nonprofit NGOs; global design consultancies and boutique studios; research laboratories and academic design programs. Together they form the interconnected network that is Silicon Valley. Apple products are famously "Designed in California," but, as Barry Katz shows in this first-ever, extensively illustrated history, the role of design in Silicon Valley began decades before Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak dreamed up Apple in a garage.

Offering a thoroughly original view of the subject, Katz tells how design helped transform Silicon Valley into the most powerful engine of innovation in the world. From Hewlett-Packard and Ampex in the 1950s to Google and Facebook today, design has provided the bridge between research and development, art and engineering, technical performance and human behavior. Katz traces the origins of all of the leading consultancies -- including IDEO, frog, and Lunar -- and shows the process by which some of the world's most influential companies came to place design at the center of their business strategies. At the same time, universities, foundations, and even governments have learned to apply "design thinking" to their missions. Drawing on unprecedented access to a vast array of primary sources and interviews with nearly every influential design leader -- including Douglas Engelbart, Steve Jobs, and Don Norman -- Katz reveals design to be the missing link in Silicon Valley's ecosystem of innovation.



















[book] THE GIRL FROM KRAKOW
A NOVEL
BY ALEX ROSENBERG
Lake Union Publishing
September 2015
It’s 1935. Rita Feuerstahl comes to the university in Krakow intent on enjoying her freedom. But life has other things in store—marriage, a love affair, a child, all in the shadows of the oncoming war. When the war arrives, Rita is armed with a secret so enormous that it could cost the Allies everything, even as it gives her the will to live. She must find a way both to keep her secret and to survive amid the chaos of Europe at war. Living by her wits among the Germans as their conquests turn to defeat, she seeks a way to prevent the inevitable doom of Nazism from making her one of its last victims. Can her passion and resolve outlast the most powerful evil that Europe has ever seen?

In an epic saga that spans from Paris in the ’30s and Spain’s Civil War to Moscow, Warsaw, and the heart of Nazi Germany, The Girl from Krakow follows one woman’s battle for survival as entire nations are torn apart, never to be the same.



















[book] WHITE MATTER
A Memoir of Family and Medicine
by Janet Sternburg
Hawthorne
September 2015
White Matter: A Memoir of Family and Medicine is the story of a Bostonian close-knit Jewish working-class family of five sisters and one brother and the impact they and their next generation endured due to the popularization of lobotomy during the 20th century. When Janet Sternburg’s grandfather abandoned his family, and her uncle, Bennie, became increasing mentally ill, Sternburg’s mother and aunts had to bind together and make crucial decisions for the family’s survival. Two of the toughest familial decisions they made were to have Bennie undergo a lobotomy to treat his schizophrenia and later to have youngest sister, Francie, undergo the same procedure to treat severe depression. Both heartrending decisions were largely a result of misinformation disseminated that popularized and legitimized lobotomy.
Woven into Sternburg’s story are notable figures that influenced the family as well as the entire medical field. In 1949, Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for developing the lobotomy, and in the three years that followed his acceptance of the award, more Americans underwent the surgery than during the previous 14 years. By the early 1950s, Walter Freeman developed an alternate technique for lobotomy, which he proselytized during his travels throughout the country in a van he dubbed the “Lobotomobile.”






















OCTOBER 2015 BOOKS




[book] Doomed to Succeed:
The U.S.-Israel Relationship from Truman
to Obama
By Dennis Ross
October 2015
FSG

A MUST READ FOR EVERYONE. SERIOUSLY. Dennis Ross has consulted to Israeli PM's, American ambassadors to Mideast countries, and American Presidents for three decades. He was there on the scene. He was there when Obama had to defend Israel and Netanyahu against the threats from European leaders. A fascinated analysis

A necessary and unprecedented account of America's changing relationship with Israel
When it comes to Israel, U.S. policy has always emphasized the unbreakable bond between the two countries and our ironclad commitment to Israel's security. Today our ties to Israel are close--so close that when there are differences, they tend to make the news. But it was not always this way. Dennis Ross has been a direct participant in shaping U.S. policy toward the Middle East, and Israel specifically, for nearly thirty years. He served in senior roles, including as Bill Clinton's envoy for Arab-Israeli peace, and was an active player in the debates over how Israel fit into the region and what should guide our policies. In Doomed to Succeed, he takes us through every administration from Truman to Obama, throwing into dramatic relief each president's attitudes toward Israel and the region, the often tumultuous debates between key advisers, and the events that drove the policies and at times led to a shift in approach. Ross points out how rarely lessons were learned and how distancing the United States from Israel in the Eisenhower, Nixon, Bush, and Obama administrations never yielded any benefits and why that lesson has never been learned. Doomed to Succeed offers compelling advice for how to understand the priorities of Arab leaders and how future administrations might best shape U.S. policy in that light.















[book] ABRAHAM
THE WORLD'S FIRST
(AND CERTAINLY NOT THE LAST)
JEWISH LAWYER
By Alan M. Dershowitz
October 2015
Schocken
One of the world’s best-known attorneys gives us a no-holds-barred history of Jewish lawyers: from the biblical Abraham, who argued with God on behalf of the doomed sinners of Sodom, through modern-day advocates who have changed the world by challenging the status quo, defending the unpopular, contributing to the rule of law, and following the biblical command to pursue justice.
As Alan Dershowitz sees it, the Hebrew Bible’s two great examples of advocacy on behalf of problematic defendants—Abraham trying to convince God not to destroy the people of Sodom, and Moses trying to convince God not to destroy the golden-calf-worshipping Children of Israel—established the template for Jewish lawyers for the next four thousand years. Whether because throughout history Jews have found themselves unjustly accused of crimes ranging from deicide to ritual child murder to treason or because the biblical exhortations regarding “justice, justice, shall you pursue” have been implanted in the Jewish psyche, Jewish lawyers have been at the forefront of the battles against tyranny, in advocating for those denied due process, in negotiating for just and equitable solutions to complex legal problems, and in the efforts to ensure a fair trial for anyone accused of a crime.

In this survey of Jewish lawyers throughout history, Dershowitz profiles Jewish lawyers both wellknown and unheralded, admired and excoriated, victorious and defeated—and, of course, gives us some glimpses into the gungho practice of law Dershowitz-style. Louis Brandeis, Theodor Herzl, Judah Benjamin, Max Hirschberg, Rene Cassin, Bruno Kreisky, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Elena Kagan are just a few of the “idol-smashers, advocates, collaborators, rescuers, and deal-makers” whose advocacy helped to change history. Dershowitz’s concluding thoughts on the future of the Jewish lawyer—given today’s rates of intermarriage and assimilation—are presented with the same thought-provoking insight, shrewdness, and candor that are the hallmarks of more than four decades of his writings on the law and how it is (and should be!) practiced.















[book] THE SECRET CHORD
A NOVEL
BY GERALDINE BROOKS
October 2015
VIKING
A rich and utterly absorbing novel about the life of King David, from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of People of the Book and March
With more than two million copies of her novels sold, New York Times bestselling author Geraldine Brooks has achieved both popular and critical acclaim. Now, Brooks takes on one of literature’s richest and most enigmatic figures: a man who shimmers between history and legend. Peeling away the myth to bring David to life in Second Iron Age Israel, Brooks traces the arc of his journey from obscurity to fame, from shepherd to soldier, from hero to traitor, from beloved king to murderous despot and into his remorseful and diminished dotage.
The Secret Chord provides new context for some of the best-known episodes of David’s life while also focusing on others, even more remarkable and emotionally intense, that have been neglected. We see David through the eyes of those who love him or fear him—from the prophet Natan, voice of his conscience, to his wives Mikal, Avigail, and Batsheva, and finally to Solomon, the late-born son who redeems his Lear-like old age. Brooks has an uncanny ability to hear and transform characters from history, and this beautifully written, unvarnished saga of faith, desire, family, ambition, betrayal, and power will enthrall her many fans.
















[book] Maimonides, Between Philosophy and Halakhah:
Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik’s Lectures on
the Guide of the Perplexed Hardcover
Edited by Lawrence J. Kaplan
Foreword by Dov Schwartz
October 2015
URIM
This is the first and only comprehensive study of the philosophy of Maimonides by the noted 20th-century rabbinic scholar and thinker, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik. Based on a complete set of notes, taken by Rabbi Gerald (Yaakov) Homnick, on R. Soloveitchik’s lectures on Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed at the Bernard Revel Graduate School, and edited by the noted scholar Lawrence Kaplan, this work constitutes a major contribution to our knowledge of both Maimonides and Soloveitchik. In these lectures Soloveitchik emerges as a major commentator on the Guide. In a wide-ranging analysis he eloquently and incisively explores such diverse topics in Maimonides’ philosophy as his views on prophecy, the knowledge of and approach to God—normative, intellectual, and experiential; divine knowledge; human ethics and moral excellence; the divine creative act; imitation of God; and the love and fear of God. He also undertakes an extensive and penetrating comparison and contrast of Maimonides’ and Aristotle’s philosophical views. Over the course of these lectures develops a very profound and challenging overall approach to and interpretation of the Guide’s central and critical issue: the relationship between philosophy and divine law. This work sheds a bright light on the thought of both Maimonides and Soloveitchik—two great philosophers and rabbinic scholars..
















[book] Nefesh HaTzimtzum, Volume 1:
Rabbi Chaim Volozhin’s Nefesh HaChaim
with Translation and Commentary
by Avinoam Fraenkel
VOLUME ONE
October 2015
URIM
Nefesh HaTzimtzum provides the single most comprehensive and accessible presentation of the teachings and worldview of the Vilna Gaon’s primary student, Rabbi Chaim Volozhin. It is focused on Rabbi Chaim’s magnum opus, Nefesh HaChaim, a work that has lain in almost total obscurity for nearly two centuries due to its deep Kabbalistic subject matter. Nefesh HaTzimtzum opens up the real depth of the ideas presented in Nefesh HaChaim together with all of Rabbi Chaim’s related writings, making them accessible to the public for the first time in any language. In addition to the complete English translation, Nefesh HaTzimtzum includes the full facing page Hebrew text of Nefesh HaChaim and many other writings by Rabbi Chaim, along with in-depth explanations, an informative historical overview, an easily consumable innovative presentation layout and a full index.
After centuries of confusion, extensive clarification is provided of the central Kabbalistic concept of Tzimtzum, or the secret of how an infinite God occupies a finite world. Most importantly, it unequivocally demonstrates that the key Kabbalists, including the Vilna Gaon, Rabbi Chaim Volozhin and the Baal HaTanya, all unanimously agreed on the underlying principles of the concept of Tzimtzum and that contrary to widespread historical misunderstanding, there was no fundamental dispute about the philosophical principles of Judaism between the Hasidim and the Mitnagdim. Based on this Nefesh HaTzimtzum shows that both Nefesh HaChaim and Sefer HaTanya present the same methodology for serving God which is rooted in their identical understanding of the concept of Tzimtzum.
Nefesh HaTzimtzum is published in two volumes which are sold separately.
This volume contains the complete Hebrew text of Nefesh HaChaim which is brought to life by an illuminating translation and incisive commentary. It additionally provides extensive translated source material necessary to properly understand the basic text. The text is further complemented by an informative introduction which includes a historical overview.
















[book] Nefesh HaTzimtzum, Volume 2:
Understanding Nefesh HaChaim
through the key concept of of Tzimtzum
and Related Writings
by Avinoam Fraenkel
VOLUME TWO
October 2015
URIM
Nefesh HaTzimtzum provides the single most comprehensive and accessible presentation of the teachings and worldview of the Vilna Gaon’s primary student, Rabbi Chaim Volozhin. It is focused on Rabbi Chaim’s magnum opus, Nefesh HaChaim, a work that has lain in almost total obscurity for nearly two centuries due to its deep Kabbalistic subject matter. Nefesh HaTzimtzum opens up the real depth of the ideas presented in Nefesh HaChaim together with all of Rabbi Chaim’s related writings, making them accessible to the public for the first time in any language. In addition to the complete English translation, Nefesh HaTzimtzum includes the full facing page Hebrew text of Nefesh HaChaim and many other writings by Rabbi Chaim, along with in-depth explanations, an informative historical overview, an easily consumable innovative presentation layout and a full index.
After centuries of confusion, extensive clarification is provided of the central Kabbalistic concept of Tzimtzum, or the secret of how an infinite God occupies a finite world. Most importantly, it unequivocally demonstrates that the key Kabbalists, including the Vilna Gaon, Rabbi Chaim Volozhin and the Baal HaTanya, all unanimously agreed on the underlying principles of the concept of Tzimtzum and that contrary to widespread historical misunderstanding, there was no fundamental dispute about the philosophical principles of Judaism between the Hasidim and the Mitnagdim. Based on this Nefesh HaTzimtzum shows that both Nefesh HaChaim and Sefer HaTanya present the same methodology for serving God which is rooted in their identical understanding of the concept of Tzimtzum.
Nefesh HaTzimtzum is published in two volumes which are sold separately.
This companion volume presents a number of important concepts, including the concept of Tzitmzum, which together enable the true depth of Nefesh HaChaim to be understood. It also adds valuable insight by providing the full Hebrew text and translation of all of Rabbi Chaim Volozhin’s published writings which are related to Nefesh HaChaim. Additional related writings are also included together with detailed outlines and a full index for both volumes.
















[book] TIFERET YISRAEL
Translation and Commentaryu
Introduction and Chapters 1 – 9
by the MaHaRaL of Prague
Translated by Rabbi Ramon Widmonte
October 2015
URIM
The famed Maharal of Prague, a 16th-century mystic, is known for the legend of the Golem, but his Torah scholarship has remained a closed book to English speakers for far too long. While several attempts have been made to translate or abridge the Maharal’s Torah, the complexity of his thought has defied standard translation methodologies. This edition of the Tiferet Yisrael (the Splendor of Israel) seeks to present the Maharal’s thought in all its majesty and to enable beginners and scholars alike to grasp the overall structure of the Maharal’s concepts through the addition of innovative summaries and graphical aids. In the work, the Maharal contemplates questions of Jewish life, such as How can there be ritually observant Jews who behave immorally? What is the reason for performing Mitzvot (commandments)? Is there any relevance or meaning to performing Mitzvot if one doesn’t understand God’s reasons for commanding them? What is the path to self-fulfillment? The translation is lucid and faithful, with in-line comments to guide the reader in exploring the Maharal’s depths.
















[book] HIDDEN INHERITANCE
FAMILY SECRETS
MEMORY AND FAITH
BY HEIDI B. NEUMARK
October 6, 2015
Abingdon Press
Pastor Neumark has a passion to repair the world. Even more now.
Pastor Heidi Neumark’s (D. Div, Hon) life changed when a few computer keystrokes exposed a generation of family secrets. Late one night while her family slept, Neumark discovered her hidden Jewish heritage—and uncovered hundreds of questions: Did her grandfather really die in a concentration camp? How did she never know her grandmother was a death-camp survivor? Why had the family history and faith been rejected and hidden? (Her daughter was up late one night and googled Neumark's grandfather's name and discovered his Jewish past, his life at Theresienstadt, and death at a Nazi death camp)
Heidi’s search for the truth quickly became more than a personal journey; it also became spiritual. It caused profound ponderings on her thirty-year vocation as a Lutheran pastor.
It was a shocking revelation that her Jewish roots and successive family loss and trauma now suddenly and inherently connected her to the multi-ethnic, marginalized community in the South Bronx and Manhattan she had been ministering to for three decades. She currently leads a shelter for LGBTQ youth

Hidden Inheritance takes the reader on a journey that seamlessly weaves personal narrative, social history, and biblical reflection to challenge readers to explore their own identity, vocation, and theology. Neumark boldly calls readers to explore the harsh places of the past, uncover the possible buried secrets, ask new questions, forge new understanding, and discover new hope for transformation that is only possible when what has been hidden is finally brought to light.
Neumark grapples with anti-Semitism in the church and the role of the church in silencing trauma. The story is profound.
As Kierkegaard wrote; Life can only be understood backwards, but must be lived forward.
















THE SENSATION IN PARIS… IS NOW AVAILABLE IN AMERICA
[book] SUBMISSION
A Novel
by Michel Houellebecq
Translated from French by Lorin Stein
October 2015
FS&G
A controversial, intelligent, and mordantly funny new novel from France's most famous living literary figure
It's 2022. François is bored. He's a middle-aged lecturer at the New Sorbonne University and an expert on J. K. Huysmans, the famous nineteenth-century Decadent author. But François's own decadence is considerably smaller in scale. He sleeps with his students, eats microwave dinners, rereads Huysmans, queues up YouPorn.
Meanwhile, it's election season. And although Francois feels "about as political as a bath towel," things are getting pretty interesting. In an alliance with the Socialists, France's new Islamic party sweeps to power. Islamic law comes into force. Women are veiled, polygamy is encouraged, and François is offered an irresistible academic advancement--on the condition that he convert to Islam.
Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker has said of Submission that "Houellebecq is not merely a satirist but--more unusually--a sincere satirist, genuinely saddened by the absurdities of history and the madnesses of mankind." Michel Houellebecq's new book may be satirical and melancholic, but it is also hilarious, a comic masterpiece by one of France's great novelists.
















[book] JEWISH NOIR
Contemporary Tales of Crime
and Other Dark Deeds
Edited by Kenneth Wishnia
October 2015
PM PRESS
WAIT A SEC
This is NOT an Akashic Noir series book
but such is the noir life
A unique collection of all-new stories by award-winning authors.
This anthology includes the work of numerous authors such as Marge Piercy, Harlan Ellison, S. J. Rozan, Nancy Richler, Moe Prager (Reed Farrel Coleman), Wendy Hornsby, Charles Ardai, and Kenneth Wishnia. The stories explore such issues as the Holocaust and its long-term effects on subsequent generations, anti-Semitism in the mid- and late-20th-century United States, and the dark side of the Diaspora (e.g., the decline of revolutionary fervor, the passing of generations, the Golden Ghetto, etc.). The stories in this collection include “Trajectories,” Marge Piercy’s story of the divergent paths taken by two young men from the slums of Cleveland and Detroit in a rapidly changing post–WW II society; “Some You Lose,” Nancy Richler’s empathetic exploration of the emotional and psychological challenges of trying to sum up a man’s life in a eulogy; and “Yahrzeit Candle,” Stephen Jay Schwartz’s take on the subtle horrors of the inevitable passing of time. These works include many “teachable moments” about the history of prejudice, the contradictions of ethnic identity, and assimilation into American society and culture.















[book] Moadei HaRav
Public Lectures on the Festivals
by Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik
by Rabbi Dr. Shlomo Pick
October 2015
URIM
A concise and organized collection of ideas on Jewish festivals—from one of the seminal Jewish thinkers
Through a collection of essays and lectures, Rabbi Dr. Shlomo Pick provides insight on Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik’s thoughts on Jewish festivals. Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik was not only one of the outstanding Talmudists of the 20th century, but was also one of its most creative and seminal Jewish thinkers. Moadei HaRav provides lectures by the Rav on the major Jewish holidays, such as Passover and Sukkot, as well as Hanukah and Purim. An introductory essay analyzes the Rav’s works and interests in Judaism as well as his methodology of Talmud analysis.
















[book] AKIVA
Life, Legend, Legacy
Rabbi Reuven Hammer
October 2015
JPS/ Nebraska
I know you expected it to say Life, Legend, Legacy & Lover, right?

The legendary Akiva ben Yosef has fascinated Jews for centuries. One of and arguably the most important of the Tannaim, or early Jewish sages, he lived during a crucial era in the development of Judaism as we know it today, and his theology played a major part in the development of Rabbinic Judaism. Reuven Hammer details Akiva’s life as it led to a martyr’s death and delves into the rich legacy Akiva left us.

That legacy played an extraordinarily important role in helping the Jewish people survive difficult challenges and forge a vibrant religious life anew and it continues to influence Jewish law, ethics, and theology even today. Akiva’s contribution to the development of Oral Torah cannot be overestimated, and in this first book written in English about the sage since 1936, Hammer reassesses Akiva’s role from the period before the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE until the Bar Kokhba Revolt in 135 CE. He also assesses new findings about the growth of early Judaism, the reasons why Akiva was so outspoken about “Christian Jews,” the influence of Hellenism, the Septuagint, and the canonization of the Hebrew Bible. Ultimately, Hammer shows that Judaism without Akiva would be a very different religion.















[book] NOT IN GOD'S NAME
CONFRONTING RELIGIOUS VIOLENCE
By Sir Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
October 13, 2015
Schocken
In this groundbreaking work of biblical analysis and interpretation, one of the most admired religious leaders of our time shows that religiously inspired violence has as its source misreadings of the texts of the Bible that have influenced all three of the Abrahamic faiths.
When religion becomes a zero-sum conceit--i.e., my religion is the only “right” path to God, therefore your religion is by definition “wrong”--violence between peoples of different beliefs is the only natural outcome, argues Rabbi Sacks. But by looking anew at seminal biblical texts in the Book of Genesis--in which we find the foundational stories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--Rabbi Sacks offers an entirely different understanding of God's multiple relationships: with Jacob, patriarch of Judaism; with Ishmael, patriarch of Islam; and with Esau, whose blessing is understood to confirm God's relationship with monotheists from other faiths and overarching relationship with all of humanity. By analyzing the texts that recount how Abraham's immediate descendants resolved their various sibling rivalries, Rabbi Sacks teaches us a powerful lesson in the existence of multiple pathways to God.
Rabbi Sacks’s bold statement of our need to look with new eyes at specific scriptural passages--passages that, when interpreted literally, can lead to hatred, violence, and war--is an eloquent, clarion call for people of goodwill from all faiths to join together to end the misunderstandings that threaten to destroy us all.















[book] Renewing the Process of Creation:
A Jewish Integration of Science and Spirit
by Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, PhD/DHL
October 2015
Jewish Lights
Science and religion embrace to inspire an open future that is creative, compassionate and honest.
This challenging integration of science and faith is aimed at Jews and non-Jews seeking to reconcile their religious beliefs and modern science, as well as readers who are seeking a deeper understanding of the intersection of Judaism and Process Thought.
We humans like to think of ourselves as the capstone of creation, above nature-we yearn to be special, distinct and superior. The result of this delusion is that we feel fractured, incomplete and perpetually missing an explanation for who we are, what we are doing, where we come from and where we are headed. But what if we realized that humanity and all that it does is an integral part of all creation, and that creation is best understood not as a singular event but as a continuous process in which we participate? How does this impact our pursuit of meaningful lives and inclusive communities of justice, compassion and love? How does it help us extend our capacity to love other people, the earth itself and the cosmos as a whole?
In this daring blend of Jewish theology, science and Process Thought, theologian Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson explores our actions through Judaism and the sciences as dynamically interactive and mutually informative. He shows us how integrating human knowing with human living can help us arrive at a plausible and likely account of what we can know about the beginning and unfolding of our cosmos. He offers us new ways to find fresh insights in the cultural and spiritual resources of the Jewish tradition-Torah, midrash, philosophy-and new possibilities for human wholeness.















[book] HUMANS OF NEW YORK:
STORIES
By Brandon Stanton
October 2015
St. Martin's
Part 2 of his bestseller of 2013. More street pictures of New Yorkers and stories. Stanton was living in Illinois working a a securities/bond trader when he lost his job. He came to NYC and started taking pictures and posting them on a blog/facebook. After hundreds of thousands of followers and hundreds of posts, he got a book deal, and now another one. Where is the fridge magnet and calendar?

Actually, I expected more “deeper” stories. But for nearly all of the over 800 pictures, there is still just one, two, or five sentences or so. It still leaves you hanging and wondering. The title should be “Story Tidbits.” I did recognize one celebrity if you are into that. Whimsical, sadness, joy, humor. Like on Page 77... the lacrosse team... Page 82 (I have an hour break between therapy and family therapy); Page 104 “we've been friends for 43 years. Every few years we meet up for a few hours... ; Page 113 (mental illness); Page 140 (a woman works 95 hours a week at 3 service jobs, put one child through Yale, and 2 others in college); Page 148-149 A father and family and the effect of their special needs son on the family); Page 179 (laughing at divorce papers); Page 180 (disagreement over the paper on which a post divorce letter was written shows shy they got divorced)... Page 214 (dreams and therapy); Page 224 (an adult remembering the pain of no kid coming to his tenth bday party); Page 261 (a former coke-addled amateur-professional wrestler); Page 263 (remembering a summer teen trip to France in 1959... and sex with a Frenchman who was really a creepy Chicagoan)... Page 205 (remembering their Star Wars themed wedding at Disney); Page 335 (the road to a divorce recalled); Page 371 (a husband on his love for his wife); Page 370 (remembering a best friend's suicide from decades ago); Page 395 (declining to comment for fear of it becoming just a soundbite); Page 402 (overcoming abandonment by his mother but making it through high school and college, without the cheers, encouragement or support); Page 427 (advice to artists... dont press down too hard on your crayons)














[book] THE SEA BEACH LINE
A NOVEL
By Ben Nadler
October 2015
Fig Tree Press
Set in post-Giuliani New York City, The Sea Beach Line melds mid-20th- century pulp fiction and traditional Jewish folklore as it updates the classic story of a young man trying to find his place in the world.
After being expelled from Oberlin for hallucinogenic drug use, Izzy Edel seeks out his estranged father—a Polish Jew turned Israeli soldier turned New York street vendor named Alojzy who is reported to be missing, possibly dead. To learn about Alojzy’s life and discover the truth behind his disappearance, Izzy takes over his father’s outdoor bookselling business and meets the hustlers, gangsters, and members of a religious sect who peopled his father’s world. He also falls in love.
As Izzy soon discovers, appearances can deceive; no one, not even his own father, is quite whom he seems to be. Vowing to prove himself equal to Alojzy’s legacy of fearlessness, Izzy plunges forward on a criminal enterprise that will bring him answers—at great personal cost.
Fans of Jonathan Lethem’s Motherless Brooklyn, Nathan Englander’s For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, and Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Union will relish to Ben Nadler’s combined mystery, love story, and homage to text and custom.















[book] EVERYONE HAS THEIR REASONS
A NOVEL
By Joseph Matthews
October 2015
PM Press
At a time when the issues of identity, immigration, and class remain both universally important and enormously controversial, this book is an accessible and captivating tale of one boy’s historically famous experience in the extraordinary setting of roiling pre-WWII Paris. On November 7, 1938, a small, slight 17-year-old Polish-German Jew named Herschel Grynszpan entered the German embassy in Paris and shot dead a consular official. Three days later, in supposed response, Jews across Germany were beaten, imprisoned, and killed, their homes, shops, and synagogues smashed and burned—Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass. Based on the historical record and told through his “letters” from German prisons, this novel begins in 1936, when 15-year-old Herschel flees Germany, and continues through his show trial, in which the Nazis sought to demonstrate through his actions that Jews had provoked the war. But Herschel throws a last-minute wrench in the plans, bringing the Nazi propaganda machine to a grinding halt and provoking Hitler to postpone the trial and personally give an order regarding Herschel’s fate.















[book] THE GOLDEN RULE and the
GAMES PEOPLE PLAY
The Ultimate Strategy for a
Meaning-FILLED Life
By Rabbi Rami Shapiro
October 2015
Skylight Paths
One thing almost everyone shares is a passion for the Golden Rule. Another thing almost everyone shares is a tendency to ignore it.
People play two kinds of games. In finite zero-sum games, like football, the goal is to defeat your opponent within the fixed timeframe of the game. In infinite non-zero games, such as a loving friendship, the goal is to keep the game going by continually enhancing the status of all players so they will want to continue the game. In finite games, there are clear winners and losers; in infinite games-the most important relationship games of life-everybody wins. This book is for people who want to play more infinite games and it presents the Golden Rule as the ultimate strategy for playing well.
This provocative and challenging exploration of the Golden Rule, widely accepted as humanity's moral true north, neither praises the Rule uncritically nor naively insists that it is applicable in every situation. Rather, it looks critically at the Rule in the context of game theory to see where it works and where it doesn’t, when it is applicable and when it isn’t. It shows you why knowing the difference can offer you a powerful way to transform your life from one driven by fear to one driven by love.
This philosophical game changer is written for people of all faiths or none who praise the Rule and yet violate it over and over again. It invites you into the fascinating world of ethical decision making in a way that helps you use the Golden Rule as a fulcrum for shifting your life from fearful and often unethical competition to compassionate and even loving cooperation.















[book] PEGGY GUGGENHEIM
THE SHOCK OF THE MODERN
BY FRANCINE PROSE
Jewish Lives
Yale University Press
October 2015
One of twentieth-century America’s most influential patrons of the arts, Peggy Guggenheim (1898–1979) brought to wide public attention the work of such modern masters as Jackson Pollock and Man Ray. In her time, there was no stronger advocate for the groundbreaking and the avant-garde. Her midtown gallery was the acknowledged center of the postwar New York art scene, and her museum on the Grand Canal in Venice remains one of the world’s great collections of modern art. Yet as renowned as she was for the art and artists she so tirelessly championed, Guggenheim was equally famous for her unconventional personal life, and for her ironic, playful desire to shock.
Acclaimed best-selling author Francine Prose offers a singular reading of Guggenheim’s life that will enthrall enthusiasts of twentieth-century art, as well as anyone interested in American and European culture and the interrelationships between them. The lively and insightful narrative follows Guggenheim through virtually every aspect of her extraordinary life, from her unique collecting habits and paradigm-changing discoveries, to her celebrity friendships, failed marriages, and scandalous affairs, and Prose delivers a colorful portrait of a defiantly uncompromising woman who maintained a powerful upper hand in a male-dominated world. Prose also explores the ways in which Guggenheim’s image was filtered through the lens of insidious antisemitism.

















[book] PROUST
THE FUTURE’S SECRET
BY BENJAMIN TAYLOR
Jewish Lives
Yale University Press
Fall 2015
Marcel Proust came into his own as a novelist comparatively late in life, yet only Shakespeare, Balzac, Dickens, Tolstoy, and Dostoyevsky were his equals when it came to creating characters as memorably human. As biographer Benjamin Taylor suggests, before writing In Search of Lost Time, his multivolume masterwork, Proust was a literary lightweight, but, following a series of momentous historical and personal events, he became—against all expectations—one of the greatest writers of his, and indeed any, era.
This insightful, beautifully written biography examines Proust’s artistic growth and stunning metamorphosis in the context of his times. Taylor provides an in-depth study of the author’s life while exploring how Proust’s personal correspondence and published works were greatly informed by his mother’s Judaism, his homosexuality, and such dramatic historical events as the Dreyfus Affair and, above all, the First World War.

















[book] ZAHAV
A World of Israeli Cooking
by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook
October 2015
HMH
The James Beard Award–winning chef and co-owner of Philadelphia's Zahav restaurant reinterprets the glorious cuisine of Israel for American home kitchens.
Ever since he opened Zahav in 2008, chef Michael Solomonov has been turning heads with his original interpretations of modern Israeli cuisine, attracting notice from the New York Times, Bon Appétit, ("an utter and total revelation"), and Eater ("Zahav defines Israeli cooking in America").
Zahav showcases the melting-pot cooking of Israel, especially the influences of the Middle East, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe. Solomonov's food includes little dishes called mezze, such as the restaurant's insanely popular fried cauliflower; a hummus so ethereal that it put Zahav on the culinary map; and a pink lentil soup with lamb meatballs that one critic called "Jerusalem in a bowl." It also includes a majestic dome of Persian wedding rice and a whole roasted lamb shoulder with pomegranate and chickpeas that's a celebration in itself. All Solomonov's dishes are brilliantly adapted to local and seasonal ingredients.
Zahav tells an authoritative and personal story of how Solomonov embraced the food of his birthplace. With its blend of technique and passion, this book shows readers how to make his food their own.

Highlights include “My Mom's Coffee-Braised Brisket” (unfortunately brisket is no longer cheap... my grandmother made her brisket with carrots, potatoes, and Heinz Chili Sauce... My mother added coffee – she doesnt remember wh, but she's pretty brilliant, actually. Unlike stock... that takes hours to make, coffee is ready in minutes. And its deep roasted flavors work really well with beef (coffee makes a great addition to bbq sauce, too.) I add cardamom to evole Turkish coffee. I've also replaced the sweetness of that chili sauce with dried apricots....); Israeli Salas with Mango, Cucumber, and Sumac Onions; Tehina (The Secret Sauce); and Hummus.
Chapters include (1) Tehina (The Secret Sauce); (2) Salatim; (3) Beyond Chicken Soup; (4) My Grandmoter's Borekas; (5) Mezze; (6) Live Fire; (7) Ben Gurion's Rice; (8)Mesibah (Party Time); (9) Milk and Honey.
f









[book] Holocaust Cinema in the Twenty-First Century:
Images, Memory, and the Ethics of Representation
by Gerd Bayer (Editor)
October 2015
Wallflower
In the first fifteen years of the twenty-first century, a large number of films were produced in Europe, Israel, the United States, and elsewhere addressing the historical reality and the legacy of the Holocaust. Contemporary Holocaust cinema exists at the intersection of national cultural traditions, aesthetic conventions, and the inner logic of popular forms of entertainment. It also reacts to developments in both fiction and documentary films following the innovations of a postmodern aesthetic. With the number of witnesses to the atrocities of Nazi Germany dwindling, medialized representations of the Holocaust take on greater cultural significance. At the same time, visual responses to the task of keeping memories alive have to readjust their value systems and reconsider their artistic choices. Both established directors and a new generation of filmmakers have tackled the ethically difficult task of finding a visual language to represent the past that is also relatable to viewers. Both geographical and spatial principles of Holocaust memory are frequently addressed in original ways. Another development concentrates on perpetrator figures, adding questions related to guilt and memory. Covering such diverse topics, this volume brings together scholars from cultural studies, literary studies, and film studies. Their analyses of twenty-first-century Holocaust films venture across national and linguistic boundaries and make visible various formal and intertextual relationships within the substantial body of Holocaust cinema












[book] Dear Santa, Love, Rachel Rosenstein
by Amanda Peet and
Andrea Troyer
Doubleday
October 2015
Preschool – 2 Yrs old.
Rachel Rosenstein is determined to celebrate Christmas this year—and the fact that her family is Jewish is not going to stop her. In a series of hilarious and heartwarming mishaps, Rachel writes a letter to Santa explaining her cause, pays him a visit at the mall, and covertly decorates her house on Christmas Eve (right down to latkes for Santa and his reindeer). And while Rachel may wrestle with her culture, customs, and love of sparkly Christmas ornaments, she also comes away with a brighter understanding of her own identity and of the gift of friends and family.














[book] The Hours Count
A Novel
by Jillian Cantor
Riverhead
October 2015
A spellbinding historical novel about a woman who befriends Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, and is drawn into their world of intrigue, from the author of Margot. On June 19, 1953, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were executed for conspiring to commit espionage. The day Ethel was first arrested in 1950, she left her two young sons with a neighbor, and she never came home to them again. Brilliantly melding fact and fiction, Jillian Cantor reimagines the life of that neighbor, and the life of Ethel and Julius, an ordinary-seeming Jewish couple who became the only Americans put to death for spying during the Cold War.

A few years earlier, in 1947, Millie Stein moves with her husband, Ed, and their toddler son, David, into an apartment on the eleventh floor in Knickerbocker Village on New York’s Lower East Side. Her new neighbors are the Rosenbergs. Struggling to care for David, who doesn’t speak, and isolated from other “normal” families, Millie meets Jake, a psychologist who says he can help David, and befriends Ethel, also a young mother. Millie and Ethel’s lives as friends, wives, mothers, and neighbors entwine, even as chaos begins to swirl around the Rosenbergs and the FBI closes in. Millie begins to question her own husband’s political loyalty and her marriage, and whether she can trust Jake and the deep connection they have forged as they secretly work with David. Caught between these two men, both of whom have their own agendas, and desperate to help her friends, Millie will find herself drawn into the dramatic course of history.

As Millie—trusting and naive—is thrown into a world of lies, intrigue, spies and counterspies, she realizes she must fight for what she believes, who she loves, and what is right.














[book] The Jewish Study Bible
Second Edition
Edited by Adele Berlin
And by Marc Zvi Brettler
Oxford University Press
October 2015
From Publishers Weekly: Serious students of Judaism will want to have a copy of this outstanding and surprisingly affordable study Bible, which stands in the tradition of Oxford's great study Bibles. Using the Jewish Publication Society translation, the books of the Jewish canon are presented in their traditional order: Torah (the five books of Moses); Nevi'im (the major and minor prophets); and Kethuvim (the other writings). Leading Jewish scholars introduce each book and offer extensive sidebar commentary, discussing the views of ancient and modern rabbinic scholars. In addition, the volume provides two dozen scholarly essays on different aspects of interpretation: the Bible's use in various periods in Jewish history, in the liturgy, in the Dead Sea Scrolls. There are essays on biblical languages, canonization, textual criticism, philosophical and mystical traditions, and biblical poetry. This landmark volume is at once serious and accessible, and spans the spectrum of Jewish thought.














[book] Wealth and Poverty in Jewish Tradition
Volume 26
Edited by Leonard J. Greenspoon (Creighton)
Purdue University Press
October 2015
Economic inequity is an issue of worldwide concern in the twenty-first century. Although these issues have not troubled all people at all times, they are nonetheless not new. Thus, it is not surprising that Judaism has developed many perspectives, theoretical and practical, to explain and ameliorate the circumstances that produce serious economic disparity. This volume offers an accessible collection of articles that deal comprehensively with this phenomenon from a variety of approaches and perspectives. Within this framework, the fourteen authors who contributed to Wealth and Poverty in Jewish Tradition bring a formidable array of experience and insight to uncover interconnected threads of conversation and activities that characterize Jewish thought and action.

Among the questions raised, for which there are frequently multiple responses: Is the giving of tzedakah (generally, although imprecisely, translated as charity) a command or an impulse?
Does the Jewish tradition give priority to the donor or to the recipient? To what degree is charity a communal responsibility?
Is there something inherently ennobling or, conversely, debasing about being poor?
How have basic concepts about wealth and poverty evolved from biblical through rabbinic and medieval sources until the modern period?
What are some specific historical events that demonstrate either marked success or bitter failure?
And finally, are there some relevant concepts and practices that are distinctively, if not uniquely, Jewish?
It is a singular strength of this collection that appropriate attention is given, in a style that is both accessible and authoritative, to the vast and multiform conversations that are recorded in the Talmud and other foundational documents of rabbinic Judaism. Moreover, perceptive analysis is not limited to the past, but also helps us to comprehend circumstances among todays Jews. It is equally valuable that these authors are attuned to the differences between aspirations and the realities in which actual people have lived.














[book] THE COURAGE TO ACT
A MEMOIR OF A CRISIS AND ITS AFTERMATH
By BEN S. BERNANKE
Norton
October 2015
Ben S. Bernanke’s rise to chair of the Fed, the massive financial crisis, and the Fed’s bold and effective response.
In 2006, Ben S. Bernanke was appointed chair of the Federal Reserve, capping a meteoric trajectory from a rural South Carolina childhood to professorships at Stanford and Princeton, to public service in Washington’s halls of power. There would be no time to celebrate, however-the burst of the housing bubble in 2007 set off a domino effect that would bring the global financial system to the brink of meltdown.
In The Courage to Act, Ben Bernanke pulls back the curtain on the tireless and ultimately successful efforts to prevent a mass economic failure. Working with two U.S. presidents and two Treasury secretaries, Dr. Bernanke and his colleagues used every Fed capability, no matter how arcane, to keep the U.S. economy afloat. From his arrival in Washington in 2002 and his experiences before the crisis, to the intense days and weeks of the crisis itself, and through the Great Recession that followed, Dr. Bernanke gives readers an unequaled perspective on the American economy. This narrative will reveal for the first time how the creativity and decisiveness of a few key leaders prevented an economic collapse of unimaginable scale. 16 pages of photographs

Bernanke was born in Augusta, Georgia, and was raised in Dillon, SC.[ His father Philip was a pharmacist. The Bernankes were one of the few Jewish families in Dillon. His maternal grandfather was Harold Friedman, a hazzan and shochet. His father's father was pharmacy owner Jonas Bernanke.
















[book] SAVING CAPITALISM
FOR THE MANY, NOT THE FEW
By Robert B. Reich (Berkeley)
Knopf
Autumn 2015
Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, was born in the holy city of Scranton PA, so we should buy and read his book.
The author of Aftershock and The Work of Nations, his most important book to date—a myth-shattering breakdown of how the economic system that helped make America so strong is now failing us, and what it will take to fix it.

Perhaps no one is better acquainted with the intersection of economics and politics than Robert B. Reich, and now he reveals how power and influence have created a new American oligarchy, a shrinking middle class, and the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in eighty years. He makes clear how centrally problematic our veneration of the “free market” is, and how it has masked the power of moneyed interests to tilt the market to their benefit.
Reich exposes the falsehoods that have been bolstered by the corruption of our democracy by huge corporations and the revolving door between Washington and Wall Street: that all workers are paid what they’re “worth,” that a higher minimum wage equals fewer jobs, and that corporations must serve shareholders before employees. He shows that the critical choices ahead are not about the size of government but about who government is for: that we must choose not between a free market and “big” government but between a market organized for broadly based prosperity and one designed to deliver the most gains to the top. Ever the pragmatist, ever the optimist, Reich sees hope for reversing our slide toward inequality and diminished opportunity when we shore up the countervailing power of everyone else.
Passionate yet practical, sweeping yet exactingly argued, Saving Capitalism is a revelatory indictment of our economic status quo and an empowering call to civic action.














[book] FIND A WAY
ONE WILD AND PRECIOUS LIFE
BY DIANA NYAD
Knopf
Autumn 2015
I saw Nyad speak in New York City at a breakfast in May 2015 and was amazed and energized by her few paragraphs and storytelling. She was quite inspiring. She even coached another breakfast speaker to get him over his stage fright and tell her how to control his speech and the audience. SO I am including her book.
Diana Nyad's amazing, inspiring firsthand account of her record-breaking swim, after four failed attempts, from Cuba to Florida, at the age of sixty-four--and of her extraordinary quest to live life at the highest level, in and out of the water.
On September 2, 2013, at the age of sixty-four, Diana Nyad emerged onto the shores of Key West after completing a 110-mile, fifty-three-hour, record-breaking swim through shark-infested waters from Cuba to Florida and delivered three messages to the world: never, ever give up; you're never too old to chase your dreams; and it looks like a solitary sport, but it takes a team. Millions of people around the world cheered for her and were moved by her incredible tenacity and determination, her triumph after so many bitter failures, and by the mantra--find a way--that enabled her to realize a dream in her sixties that had eluded her as a young Olympian in peak form.
In Find a Way, she tells the passionate, singularly inspiring story of this feat of epic endurance and the extraordinary life experiences and lessons that helped her to realize her dream. She was a world-class swimmer by the time she left high school; AND WHY NOT? Her father once sat her down and in his Greek accented English and took out a dictionary to show her that her name was important. It was in the dictionary. She should be proud and aspire to greatness

In 1975, at the age of twenty-six, she circumnavigated the island of Manhattan and became a star. She made her first attempt at the Cuba-to-Florida swim soon after, but was blown off course and pulled from the water after 79 miles. A year later, on her thirtieth birthday, she broke the open-ocean world record for both men and women, swimming 102 miles unassisted and without a shark cage. She did not swim another stroke for three decades.
Why, at sixty-four, was she able to achieve what she could not at thirty? How did her repeated failures contribute to her success? What inner resources did Nyad draw on during her days and nights in the water, and how did the power of her mind and spirit trump the limitations of her body? This is the story of an unforgettable journey--physical, spiritual, emotional, psychological--and a galvanizing meditation on facing fears, engaging our passions, and living life with no regrets.














[book] THE COMES MARRIAGE
UNITED STATES v WINDSOR
AND THE DEFEAT OF DOMA
BY ATTY ROBERTA KAPLAN
with LISA DICKEY
Norton
October 2015
Roberta Kaplan’s (Twitter @kaplanrobbie) gripping story of her defeat of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) before the Supreme Court.
Attorney Roberta Kaplan (Partner, Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison) knew it was the perfect case. Edie Windsor and Thea Spyer had stayed together for better or worse, for forty-four years-battling through society’s homophobia and Spyer’s paralysis from MS. The couple married in Canada in 2007, but when Spyer died two years later, the US government refused to recognize their marriage, forcing Windsor to pay a huge estate tax (over $360,000).
In this landmark work, Attorney Kaplan describes her strategy in the lower courts and her preparation and rehearsals before moot courts, and she shares insights into the dramatic oral argument before the Supreme Court justices. Then Comes Marriage is the story of the relationship behind the watershed case, Kaplan’s own difficult coming-out journey, and the fascinating unfolding of United States v. Windsor. Full of never-before-told details, this is the momentous account of a thrilling historic and political victory for gay rights.

Kaplan, known in legal circles as a powerhouse corporate litigator, is one of a handful of attorneys who over the past decade have decisively shaped and driven the legal fight for same-sex marriage nationally. She lost her first major case, a 2004 suit filed by 13 couples in New York State, including a woman awaiting a liver transplant who wanted to make sure her partner of 24 years could visit her in the hospital. But because the ruling said lawmakers should be the ones to decide if the laws should be changed, it paved the way for the 2011 vote in New York’s legislature legalizing same-sex marriages in the state.
Atty. Kaplan was raised in Cleveland and at her Bat Mitzvah, here parshah was Shoftim (Tzedek, Tzedek Shall You Pursue). She majored in Russian at Harvard. She spent time in Moscow and met Jewish Refuseniks. At Columbia Law School, she studied Talmud with famed scholar Rabbi Saul Berman. Kaplan and her wife, Rachel Lavine married in 2005 in Toronto
Client Windsor is a Temple University graduate from Philadelphia. Windsor met Spyer, who was born in Amsterdam but who fled the Holocaust with her family and eventually came to the United States as a refugee, at a Greenwich Village restaurant called Portofino in 1963, six years before the gay rights movement was born at the Stonewall Inn, a few blocks away. The pair danced all night and, in 1967, got engaged with a diamond brooch rather than a ring—a ruse to protect Windsor, a mathematics major and rising IBM executive, from having to answer questions at work about her fiance. They moved into an apartment in the Village, bought a place in the Hamptons, and kept dancing, even after the progression of Spyer’s illness, diagnosed in 1977, left her confined to a motorized wheelchair. They were among the first to register as domestic partners in New York City in 1993 and celebrated their 40th anniversary by getting married in Toronto—a marriage that was recognized by New York State because it was legal under Canadian law. Windsor was 77; Spyer was 75. The wedding was announced in the New York Times.

















[book] THE DEVIL IN JERUSALEM
A NOVEL
BY NAOMI RAGEN
St. Martin’s Press
October 2015
No details yet.


























[book] The Mystics of Mile End
A Novel
by Sigal Samuel
Morrow
October 2015
Brother and sister Lev and Samara Meyer live in Montreal’s Mile End—a mashup of hipsters and Hasidic Jews. They have a fairly typical childhood, other than that around the corner Mr. Katz is trying to recreate the Biblical Tree of Knowledge out of plucked leaves, toilet paper rolls, and dental floss. When their father, a professor of Jewish mysticism, is diagnosed with an unusual heart murmur, he becomes convinced that his heart is whispering divine secrets. But when their father’s frenzied attempts to ascend the Tree of Life lead to tragedy, Samara and Lev set out (in separate and divisive ways) to finish what he’s started. It falls to next-door neighbor and Holocaust survivor Chaim Glassman to shatter the silence that divides the members of the Meyer family. But can he break through to them in time? A remarkable debut novel reminiscent of The History of Love by Nicole Krauss and Bee Season by Myla Goldberg.




















[book] A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka
A Memoir
by Lev Golinkin
Now in paperback
Anchor Press
October 2015
A compelling story of two intertwined journeys: a Jewish refugee family fleeing persecution and a young man seeking to reclaim a shattered past. In the twilight of the Cold War (the late 1980s), nine-year old Lev Golinkin and his family cross the Soviet border with only ten suitcases, $600, and the vague promise of help awaiting in Vienna. Years later, Lev, now an American adult, sets out to retrace his family's long trek, locate the strangers who fought for his freedom, and in the process, gain a future by understanding his past.
Lev Golinkin's memoir is the vivid, darkly comic, and poignant story of a young boy in the confusing and often chilling final decade of the Soviet Union. It's also the story of Lev Golinkin, the American man who finally confronts his buried past by returning to Austria and Eastern Europe to track down the strangers who made his escape possible . . . and say thank you. Written with biting, acerbic wit and emotional honesty in the vein of Gary Shteyngart, Jonathan Safran Foer, and David Bezmozgis, Golinkin's search for personal identity set against the relentless currents of history is more than a memoir—it's a portrait of a lost era. This is a thrilling tale of escape and survival, a deeply personal look at the life of a Jewish child caught in the last gasp of the Soviet Union, and a provocative investigation into the power of hatred and the search for belonging. Lev Golinkin achieves an amazing feat—and it marks the debut of a fiercely intelligent, defiant, and unforgettable new voice.














[book] Ben Shahn's New Deal Murals
Jewish Identity in the American Scene
by Diana Linden
Wayne State University Press
October 2015
A study of Ben Shahn's New Deal murals (1933-43) in the context of American Jewish history, labor history, and public discourse.
Lithuanian-born artist Ben Shahn learned fresco painting as an assistant to Diego Rivera in the 1930s and created his own visually powerful, technically sophisticated, and stylistically innovative artworks as part of the New Deal Arts Project's national mural program. In Ben Shahn's New Deal Murals: Jewish Identity in the American Scene author Diana L. Linden demonstrates that Shahn mined his Jewish heritage and left-leaning politics for his style and subject matter, offering insight into his murals' creation and their sometimes complicated reception by officials, the public, and the press.
In four chapters, Linden presents case studies of select Shahn murals that were created from 1933 to 1943 and are located in public buildings in New York, New Jersey, and Missouri. She studies Shahn's famous untitled fresco for the Jersey Homesteads-a utopian socialist cooperative community populated with former Jewish garment workers and funded under the New Deal-Shahn's mural for the Bronx Post Office, a fresco Shahn proposed to the post office in St. Louis, and a related one-panel easel painting titled The First Amendment located in a Queens, New York, Post Office. By investigating the role of Jewish identity in Shahn's works, Linden considers the artist's responses to important issues of the era, such as President Roosevelt's opposition to open immigration to the United States, New York's bustling garment industry and its labor unions, ideological concerns about freedom and liberty that had signifcant meaning to Jews, and the encroachment of censorship into American art.
Linden shows that throughout his public murals, Shahn literally painted Jews into the American scene with his subjects, themes, and compositions. Readers interested in Jewish American history, art history, and Depression-era American culture will enjoy this insightful volume.


















[book] Notorious RBG:
The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik
October 2015
Dey Street Books
Irin Carmon: I heard you can do 20 pushups. Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Yes, but we do ten at a time. And then I breathe for a bit and do the second set.
Nearly a half-century into being a feminist and legal pioneer, something funny happened to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: the octogenarian won the internet. Across America, people who weren’t even born when Ginsburg made her name are tattooing themselves with her face, setting her famously searing dissents to music, and making viral videos in tribute. In a class of its own, and much to Ginsburg’s own amusement, is the Notorious RBG Tumblr, which juxtaposes the diminutive but fierce Jewish grandmother with the 350-pound rapper featuring original artwork submitted from around the world.
Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg offers a visually rich, intimate, unprecedented look at the Justice and how she changed the world. From Ginsburg’s refusal to let the slammed doors of sexism stop her to her innovative legal work, from her before-its-time feminist marriage to her perch on the nation’s highest court—with the fierce dissents to match—get to know RBG as never before. As the country struggles with the unfinished business of gender equality and civil rights, Ginsburg stands as a testament to how far we can come with a little chutzpah.


















[book] CITY ON FIRE
A NOVEL
by Garth Hallberg
October 2015
Knopf
A big-hearted, boundary-vaulting novel that heralds a remarkable new talent: set in 1970s New York, a story outsized in its generosity, warmth, and ambition, its deep feeling for its characters, its exuberant imagination.
The individuals who live within this extraordinary first novel are: Regan and William Hamilton-Sweeney, estranged heirs to one of the city's largest fortunes; Keith and Mercer, the men who, for better or worse, love them; Charlie and Samantha, two suburban teenagers seduced by downtown's punk scene; an obsessive magazine reporter and his idealistic neighbor; and the detective trying to figure out what any of them have to do with a shooting in Central Park. Their entangled relationships open up the loneliest-seeming corners of the crowded city. And when the infamous blackout of July 13, 1977, plunges this world into darkness, each of these lives will be changed forever. A novel about love and betrayal and forgiveness, about art and truth and rock 'n' roll, about how the people closest to us are sometimes the hardest to reach--about what it means to be human.
















[book] THE OTTOMAN ENDGAME
War, Revolution, and the Making
Of the Modern Middle East, 1908-1923
By Sean McMeekin (Bard)
October 2015
Penguin Press
An astonishing retelling of twentieth-century history from the Ottoman perspective, delivering profound new insights into World War I and the contemporary Middle East
Between 1911 and 1922, a series of wars would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states, in which the central conflict, of course, is World War I—a story we think we know well. As Sean McMeekin shows us in this revelatory new history of what he calls the “wars of the Ottoman succession,” we know far less than we think. The Ottoman Endgame brings to light the entire strategic narrative that led to an unstable new order in postwar Middle East—much of which is still felt today.
The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution, and the Making of the Modern Middle East draws from McMeekin’s years of groundbreaking research in newly opened Ottoman and Russian archives. With great storytelling flair, McMeekin makes new the epic stories we know from the Ottoman front, from Gallipoli to the exploits of Lawrence in Arabia, and introduces a vast range of new stories to Western readers. His accounts of the lead-up to World War I and the Ottoman Empire’s central role in the war itself offers an entirely new and deeper vision of the conflict. Harnessing not only Ottoman and Russian but also British, German, French, American, and Austro-Hungarian sources, the result is a truly pioneering work of scholarship that gives full justice to a multitiered war involving many belligerents.
McMeekin also brilliantly reconceives our inherited Anglo-French understanding of the war’s outcome and the collapse of the empire that followed. The book chronicles the emergence of modern Turkey and the carve-up of the rest of the Ottoman Empire as it has never been told before, offering a new perspective on such issues as the ethno-religious bloodletting and forced population transfers which attended the breakup of empire, the Balfour Declaration, the toppling of the caliphate, and the partition of Iraq and Syria—bringing the contemporary consequences into clear focus.
Every so often, a work of history completely reshapes our understanding of a subject of enormous historical and contemporary importance. The Ottoman Endgame is such a book, an instantly definitive and thrilling example of narrative history as high art.
















[book] AND THEN I DANCED
TRAVELING THE ROAD TO LGBT EQUALITY
By Mark Segal
(Founder, Philadelphia Gay News)
October 2015
Akashic / OpenLens
"Mark Segal's ideas run from the alpha to the omega. Sometimes I think there's got to be more than one Mark Segal: he has done way too much for one lifetime. I highly recommend this book. If you can’t get to meet Mark in person, this is the next best thing!"
--Michael Luongo, author of Gay Travels in the Muslim World

"Before there was Ellen, Will, Grace, Rosie, Andy, and Anderson, Mark Segal was the squeaky gay wheel of American television, pulling stunts that forced the medium to open its closet door. If Walter Cronkite were still alive, he'd say: Not HIM again! And that's the way it is. And was. Read all about it."
--Bruce Vilanch, Six-Time Emmy Award Winner

Sgeal stood out. One of just two Jews in his South Philly school, he stood out singing a Christian song. At 18, he writes that he was in Manhattan at Stonewall and was carded by cops. He founded a gay newspaper over 3 decades ago in Philadelphia and lived as a social activist.
On December 11, 1973, Mark Segal disrupted a live broadcast of the CBS Evening News when he sat on the desk directly between the camera and news anchor Walter Cronkite, yelling, "Gays protest CBS prejudice!" He was wrestled to the studio floor by the stagehands on live national television, thus ending LGBT invisibility. But this one victory left many more battles to fight, and creativity was required to find a way to challenge stereotypes surrounding the LGBT community. Mark Segal's job, as he saw it, was to show the nation who gay people are: our sons, daughters, fathers, and mothers.

Because of activists like Mark Segal, whose life work is dramatically detailed in this poignant and important memoir, today there are openly LGBT people working in the White House and throughout corporate America. An entire community of gay world citizens is now finding the voice that they need to become visible.
















[book] MY JOURNEY
By DONNA KARAN
Foreword by Barbra Streisand
October 2015
Ballantine
In this candid memoir, renowned designer Donna Karan shares intimate details about her lonely childhood, her four-plus decades in the fashion industry, her two marriages, motherhood, and her ongoing quest for self-acceptance and spiritual peace.

Donna Karan was born into the fashion business—her father was a tailor, and her mother was a showroom model and Seventh Avenue saleswoman—yet Karan dreamed of becoming a dancer like Martha Graham or a singer like Barbra Streisand. Fashion was her destiny, though. My Journey traces Karan’s early days as an intern at Anne Klein, the creation of her Seven Easy Pieces (which forever changed the way working women dressed), and the meteoric rise of her company. Along with juicy industry stories, Karan candidly discusses her difficult mother and traumatic childhood, her turbulent romantic life, all the loved ones she has lost over the years, and the personal awakening that occurred just as she reached the height of professional and financial success.

That awakening set Karan down a path of spiritual discovery and self-improvement. From est to Kabbalah, from silent retreats to leech therapy, Karan tried everything to find, as she writes, “calm in the chaos.” But she also reveals how a chaotic life, fueled by endless curiosity and childlike impulses, helped her design seminal collections season after season for global powerhouse brands Donna Karan New York and DKNY. She also details how she has channeled her creativity (and her urge to solve problems and nurture others) into philanthropic work, particularly her early outspoken advocacy for AIDS awareness and research, and the creation of her Urban Zen Foundation, focusing on integrated healthcare and education as well as preservation of culture, which led to her current efforts in Haiti.

Karan’s life has been crowded with glamorous characters and adventures around the world. But she sometimes still feels like that awkward teen from Long Island who never fit in—which makes her all the more endearing. Brimming with Karan’s infectious energy, My Journey is about much more than the fashion world: It is the story of a young woman whose vision and hard work made her a role model for women everywhere—a woman who dreamed big, fought to have it all, broke the rules, and loved passionately along the way.















[book] THE LOVE OF GOD
DIVINE GIFT, HUMAN GRATITUDE,
AND MUTUAL FAITHFULNESS IN JUDAISM
BY JON D. LEVENSON (Harvard)
October 2015
Princeton

The love of God is perhaps the most essential element in Judaism--but also one of the most confounding. In biblical and rabbinic literature, the obligation to love God appears as a formal commandment. Yet most people today think of love as a feeling. How can an emotion be commanded? How could one ever fulfill such a requirement? The Love of God places these scholarly and existential questions in a new light.
Jon Levenson traces the origins of the concept to the ancient institution of covenant, showing how covenantal love is a matter neither of sentiment nor of dry legalism. The love of God is instead a deeply personal two-way relationship that finds expression in God's mysterious love for the people of Israel, who in turn observe God's laws out of profound gratitude for his acts of deliverance. Levenson explores how this bond has survived episodes in which God's love appears to be painfully absent--as in the brutal persecutions of Talmudic times--and describes the intensely erotic portrayals of the relationship by biblical prophets and rabbinic interpreters of the Song of Songs. He examines the love of God as a spiritual discipline in the Middle Ages as well as efforts by two influential modern Jewish thinkers--Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig--to recover this vital but endangered aspect of their tradition.
A breathtaking work of scholarship and spirituality alike that is certain to provoke debate, The Love of God develops fascinating insights into the foundations of religious life in the classical Jewish tradition.













[book] NIETZSCHE'S JEWISH PROBLEM
Between Anti-semitism and Anti-Judaism
by Robert C. Holub (Ohio State University)
October 2015
Princeton

For more than a century, Nietzsche's views about Jews and Judaism have been subject to countless polemics. The Nazis infamously fashioned the philosopher as their anti-Semitic precursor, while in the past thirty years the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction. The increasingly popular view today is that Nietzsche was not only completely free of racist tendencies but also was a principled adversary of anti-Jewish thought. Nietzsche's Jewish Problem offers a definitive reappraisal of the controversy, taking the full historical, intellectual, and biographical context into account. As Robert Holub shows, a careful consideration of all the evidence from Nietzsche's published and unpublished writings and letters reveals that he harbored anti-Jewish prejudices throughout his life.
Nietzsche's Jewish Problem demonstrates how this is so despite the apparent paradox of the philosopher's well-documented opposition to the crude political anti-Semitism of the Germany of his day. As Holub explains, Nietzsche's "anti-anti-Semitism" was motivated more by distaste for vulgar nationalism than by any objection to anti-Jewish prejudice.
A richly detailed account of a controversial issue that goes to the heart of Nietzsche's reputation and reception, Nietzsche's Jewish Problem will fascinate anyone interested in philosophy, intellectual history, or the history of anti-Semitism.













[book] Lost Recipes of Prohibition:
Drugstore Whiskey
Pharmacy Gin
Notes from a Bootlegger's Manual
by Matthew Rowley
October 28, 2015
Countryman Press
A secret, handwritten collection of illicit booze recipes-hidden in a volume of poetry during the Prohibition-annotated and explained in fascinating detail
Nearly everyone has heard of bathtub gin, but how many people know what it really was-or how to make it? During the height of the Prohibition, one anonymous physician compiled more than 200 recipes for “compounding” spirits, hiding the manuscript from authorities. By adding extracts, essences, and oils to plain old sugar moonshine, bootleggers would simulate the taste of gin, whiskey, cordials, rums, absinthes…booze that was otherwise impossible to procure. The potential profits were staggering.
This document fell into the hands of author Matthew Rowley, who became fascinated with the process of compounding and the historical events that lead to this mysterious and lucrative manuscript. In addition to annotating the actual pages of the book, Rowley provides a historical background, and gives his readers an overview of the process, updating some of the recipes for modern distillers, bartenders, and cocktail enthusiasts.












[book] NAUGHTY MABEL
BY NATHAN LANE AND DEVLIN ELLIOTT
Illustrated by Dan Krall
October 2015
Simon & Schuster for Young Readers
A pampered pup takes center stage at her parents’ party in this charmingly hilarious picture book from film and Broadway star Nathan Lane (of The Lion King and The Producers fame) and Devlin Elliott!

Meet Mabel, she is five (it's the new three) and the fanciest French bulldog the Hamptons have ever seen. Mabel is many things: sassy, classy (and sometimes a bit gassy!), but especially...naughty! Actually, she is VERY NAUGHTY. Mabel’s always getting herself into trouble—and with style like hers, can you really blame her? She knocked over a tree, ate jewels, crashed a gold cart.
We learn a lot about her likes and dislikes, and the drawings reflect her naughty escapades (not ice capades).
There is only 1 reason to give her a bath. They are throwing a party. When Naughty Mabel’s parents try to leave her out of the fun, of course she must take matters into her own perfectly pedicured paws. As the hilarity ensues, Mabel and her parents learn that through thick and thin, naughty or nice, they’ll always be a family, just as they are. (and Mabel knows how to clear a room faster than Nathan Lane singing?)
















[book] ADAM AND THOMAS
ADAM & THOMAS
A novel
By Aharon Appelfeld
Triangle Square Books for Young Reader
October 2015
Age 8 - 12
Adam and Thomas is the story of two nine-year-old Jewish boys who survive World War II by banding together in the forest. They are alone, visited only furtively, every few days by Mina, a mercurial girl who herself has found refuge from the war by living with a peasant family. She makes secret journeys and brings the boys parcels of food at her own risk.

Adam and Thomas must learn to survive and do. They forage and build a small tree house, although it's more like a bird's nest. Adam's family dog, Miro, manages to find his way to him, to the joy of both boys. Miro brings the warmth of home with him. Echoes of the war are felt in the forest. The boys meet fugitives fleeing for their lives and try to help them. They learn to disappear in moments of danger. And they barely survive winter's harshest weather, but when things seem to be at their worst, a miracle happens.
















[book] THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE
a graphic novel memoir
By Riad Sattouf
Metropolitan
October 2015
A best seller in France.
The Arab of the Future, the #1 French best-seller, tells the unforgettable story of Riad Sattouf's childhood, spent in the shadows of 3 dictators--Muammar Gaddafi, Hafez al-Assad, and... his father.
In striking, virtuoso graphic style that captures both the immediacy of childhood and the fervor of political idealism, Riad Sattouf recounts his nomadic childhood growing up in rural France, Gaddafi's Libya, and Assad's Syria--but always under the roof of his father, a Syrian Pan-Arabist who drags his family along in his pursuit of grandiose dreams for the Arab nation.
Riad, delicate and wide-eyed, follows in the trail of his mismatched parents; his mother, a bookish French student, is as modest as his father is flamboyant. Venturing first to the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab State and then joining the family tribe in Homs, Syria, they hold fast to the vision of the paradise that always lies just around the corner. And hold they do, though food is scarce, children kill dogs for sport, and with locks banned, the Sattoufs come home one day to discover another family occupying their apartment.

The ultimate outsider, Riad, with his flowing blond hair, is called the ultimate insult… Jewish.

And in no time at all, his father has come up with yet another grand plan, moving from building a new people to building his own great palace
















[book] The Witch of Lime Street
Séance, Seduction, and Houdini
in the Spirit World
by David Jaher
October 2015
Crown
History comes alive in this textured account of the rivalry between Harry Houdini and the so-called Witch of Lime Street, whose iconic lives intersected at a time when science was on the verge of embracing the paranormal.

The 1920s are famous as the golden age of jazz and glamour, but it was also an era of fevered yearning for communion with the spirit world, after the loss of tens of millions in the First World War and the Spanish-flu epidemic. A desperate search for reunion with dead loved ones precipitated a tidal wave of self-proclaimed psychics—and, as reputable media sought stories on occult phenomena, mediums became celebrities.

Against this backdrop, in 1924, the pretty wife of a distinguished Boston surgeon came to embody the raging national debate over Spiritualism, a movement devoted to communication with the dead. Reporters dubbed her the blonde Witch of Lime Street, but she was known to her followers simply as Margery. Her most vocal advocate was none other than Sherlock Holmes' creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who believed so thoroughly in Margery's powers that he urged her to enter a controversial contest, sponsored by Scientific American and offering a large cash prize to the first medium declared authentic by its impressive five-man investigative committee. Admired for both her exceptional charm and her dazzling effects, Margery was the best hope for the psychic practice to be empirically verified. Her supernatural gifts beguiled four of the judges. There was only one left to convince...the acclaimed escape artist, Harry Houdini.

David Jaher's extraordinary debut culminates in the showdown between Houdini, a relentless unmasker of charlatans, and Margery, the nation's most credible spirit medium. He also discusses the anti Semitic invective against Houdini. The Witch of Lime Street, the first book to capture their electric public rivalry and the competition that brought them into each other’s orbit, returns us to an oft-mythologized era to deepen our understanding of its history, all while igniting our imagination and engaging with the timeless question: Is there life after death?















[book] THE STORY OF MY TITS
By Jennifer Hayden
Top Shelf
October 2015
“Heartbreaking and riveting, Jennifer Hayden's caustic, sarcastic wit streams through her quirky drawings, unfolding a survivor's tale and so much more. The Story of My Tits takes us from her flat-chested adolescence to small-boobed acceptance, then loss - until the dramatic reconstruction of Jennifer herself." - Marisa Acocella Marchetto, author of Cancer Vixen and Ann Tenna

"Hayden's work reminds me of why I began drawing comics, and why I continue... comforting, straightforward and strongly connected to life." - Gabrielle Bell, author of Lucky and Cecil & Jordan in New York "Hayden's cheerful profanity and scratchy lines give the work a homey, intimate feel." - Publishers Weekly

A landmark work of graphic memoir and a cancer narrative that pulls no punches! When Jennifer Hayden was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 43, she realized that her tits told a story. Across a lifetime, they'd held so many meanings: hope and fear, pride and embarrassment, life and death. And then they were gone. Now, their story has become a way of understanding her story. Growing up flat-chested and highly aware of her inadequacies... heading off to college, where she "bloomed" in more ways than one... navigating adulthood between her mother's mastectomy, her father's mistress, and her musician boyfriend's problems of his own - not to mention his sprawling family. Then the kids come along... As cancer strikes three different lives, some relationships crumble while others emerge even stronger, and this sarcastic child of the '70s finally finds a goddess she can believe in. For everyone who's faced cancer personally, or watched a loved one fight that battle, Hayden's story is a much-needed breath of fresh air, an irresistible blend of sweetness and skepticism. Rich with both symbolism and humor, The Story of My Tits will leave you laughing, weeping, and feeling grateful for every day.
















[book] Kissinger's Shadow
The Long Reach of America's
Most Controversial Statesman
by Greg Grandin
August 25, 2015
Metropolitan Books
A new account of America's most controversial diplomat that moves beyond praise or condemnation to reveal Kissinger as the architect of America's current imperial stance.

In his fascinating new book, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand the crisis of contemporary America--its never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home--we have to understand Henry Kissinger.
Examining Kissinger's own writings, as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency. Believing that reality could be bent to his will, insisting that intuition is more important in determining policy than hard facts, and vowing that past mistakes should never hinder future bold action, Kissinger anticipated, even enabled, the ascendance of the neoconservative idealists who took America into crippling wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Going beyond accounts focusing either on Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world.












[book] KISSINGER:
THE IDEALIST
1923 – 1960
Part 1 of 2
By Niall Ferguson
October 2015
Penguin Press
The definitive biography of Henry Kissinger, based on unprecedented access to his private papers
No American statesman has been as revered or as reviled as Henry Kissinger. Once hailed as “Super K”—the “indispensable man” whose advice has been sought by every president from Kennedy to Obama—he has also been hounded by conspiracy theorists, scouring his every “telcon” for evidence of Machiavellian malfeasance. Yet as Niall Ferguson shows in this magisterial two-volume biography, drawing not only on Kissinger’s hitherto closed private papers but also on documents from more than a hundred archives around the world, the idea of Kissinger as the ruthless arch-realist is based on a profound misunderstanding.
The first half of Kissinger’s life is usually skimmed over as a quintessential tale of American ascent: the Jewish refugee from Hitler’s Germany who made it to the White House. But in this first of two volumes, Ferguson shows that what Kissinger achieved before his appointment as Richard Nixon’s national security adviser was astonishing in its own right. Toiling as a teenager in a New York factory, he studied indefatigably at night. He was drafted into the U.S. infantry and saw action at the Battle of the Bulge—as well as the liberation of a concentration camp—but ended his army career interrogating Nazis. It was at Harvard that Kissinger found his vocation. Having immersed himself in the philosophy of Kant and the diplomacy of Metternich, he shot to celebrity by arguing for “limited nuclear war.” Nelson Rockefeller hired him. Kennedy called him to Camelot. Yet Kissinger’s rise was anything but irresistible. Dogged by press gaffes and disappointed by “Rocky,” Kissinger seemed stuck—until a trip to Vietnam changed everything.
The Idealist is the story of one of the most important strategic thinkers America has ever produced. It is also a political Bildungsroman, explaining how “Dr. Strangelove” ended up as consigliere to a politician he had always abhorred. Like Ferguson’s classic two-volume history of the House of Rothschild, Kissinger sheds dazzling new light on an entire era. The essential account of an extraordinary life, it recasts the Cold War world.










[book] HERE AND THERE:
LEAVING HASIDISM
KEEPING MY FAMILY
BY CHAYA DEITSCH
October 2015
Schocken
A heartfelt and inspiring personal account of a woman raised as a Lubavitcher Hasid who leaves that world without leaving the family that remains within it.
Even as a child, Chaya Deitsch felt that she didn’t belong in the Hasidic world into which she’d been born. She spent her teenage years outwardly conforming to but secretly rebelling against the rules that tell you what and when to eat, how to dress, whom you can befriend, and what you must believe. Loving her parents, grandparents, and extended family, Chaya struggled to fit in but instead felt angry, stifled, and frustrated. Upon receiving permission from her bewildered but supportive parents to attend Barnard College, she discovered a wider world in which she could establish an independent identity and fulfill her dream of an unconfined life that would be filled with the secular knowledge and culture that were largely foreign to her friends and relatives in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. As she gradually shed the physical and spiritual trappings of Hasidic life, Chaya found herself torn between her desire to be honest with her parents about who she now was and her need to maintain a loving relationship with the family that she still very much wanted to be part of.
Eventually, Chaya and her parents came to an understanding that was based on unqualified love and a hard-won but fragile form of acceptance. With honesty, sensitivity, and intelligence, Chaya Deitsch movingly shows us that lives lived differently do not have to be lives lived apart.
















[book] KETZEL
THE CAT WHO COMPOSED
By LESLEA NEWMAN
October 2015
Candlewick
A kitten’s stroll down a keyboard leads to a celebrated one-minute composition in this charming portrait of a remarkable true friendship.

Moshe Cotel was a composer who lived in a noisy building on a noisy street in a noisy city. But Moshe didn’t mind. Everything he heard was music to his ears. One day, while out for a walk, he heard a small, sad sound that he’d never heard before. It was a tiny kitten! "Come on, little Ketzel," Moshe said, "I will take you home and we will make beautiful music together." And they did—in a most surprising way. Inspired by a true story, Lesléa Newman and Amy June Bates craft an engaging tale of a creative man and the beloved cat who brings unexpected sweet notes his way.
















NOVEMBER 2015 BOOKS





[book] Killing a King
The Assassination of Yitzhak Rabin
and the Remaking of Israel
by Dan Ephron
November 2015
Norton
A riveting story about the murder that changed a nation: the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Ephron was a Mid East correspondent for Newsweek. He writes about the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by Yigal Amir, an Orthodox Jew, twenty years ago this November remains the single most consequential event in the country’s recent history.
Killing a King relates the parallel stories of Rabin and Amir over the two years leading up to the assassination, as one of them plotted political deals he hoped would lead to peace and the other plotted murder. This deeply reported narrative is based on a trove of documents from the era and interviews with all of the key players, including members of the assassin’s family. Only through the prism of the murder is it possible to understand Israel today, from the paralysis in peacemaking to the fraught relationship between Netanyahu and Obama. Dan Ephron covered both the rally where Rabin was assassinated and the subsequent murder trial. 16 pages of illustrations.














[book] ABBA EBAN
A BIOGRAPHY
By Asaf Siniver, PhD
November 3, 2015
Overlook Press
The definitive biography of Abba Eban, an Israeli diplomat often revered by every nation except the one he represented.
The book draws from a wide range of primary sources to create a complex portrait of a man who left an indelible mark on the quest for peace in the Middle East.
A skilled debater, a master of languages, and a passionate defender of Israel, Abba Eban’s diplomatic presence was in many ways a contradiction unlike any the world has seen since. While he was celebrated internationally for his exceptional wit and his moderate, reasoned worldview, these same qualities painted him as elitist and foreign in his home country.
The disparity in perception of Eban (a cousin to Oliver Sacks) at home and abroad was such that both his critics and his friends agreed that he would have been a wonderful prime minister?in any country but Israel. In Abba Eban, Asaf Siniver paints a nuanced and complete portrait of one of the most complex figures in twentieth-century foreign affairs.
We see Eban growing up and coming into his own as part of the Cambridge Union, and watch him steadily become known as “The Voice of Israel.” Siniver draws on a vast amount of interviews, writings, and other newly available material to show that, in his unceasing quest for stability and peace for Israel, Eban’s primary opposition often came from the homeland he was fighting for; no matter how many allies he gained abroad, the man never understood his own domestic politics well enough to be as effective in his pursuits as he hoped. The first examination of Eban in nearly forty years, Abba Eban is a fascinating look at a life that still offers a valuable perspective on Israel even today. .















[book] THE MURALIST
A NOVEL
By B.A. SHAPIRO
November 2015
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill/Workman
“B. A. Shapiro once again pens the art world into vivid, sensual life. Set during World War II and the dawn of Abstract Expressionism, The Muralist is an intriguing story masterfully imagined about art, war, family, truth, and freedom. If you liked The Art Forger, you're going to love The Muralist!” —Lisa Genova, author of Still Alice

Alizée Benoit, an American painter working for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), vanishes in New York City in 1940 amid personal and political turmoil. No one knows what happened to her. Not her Jewish family living in German-occupied France. Not her artistic patron and political compatriot, Eleanor Roosevelt. Not her close-knit group of friends, including Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Lee Krasner. And, some seventy years later, not her great-niece, Danielle Abrams, who while working at an auction house uncovers enigmatic paintings hidden behind recently found works by those now famous Abstract Expressionist artists. Do they hold answers to the questions surrounding her missing aunt?
Entwining the lives of both historical and fictional characters, and moving between the past and the present, The Muralist plunges readers into the divisiveness of prewar politics and the largely forgotten plight of European refugees refused entrance to the United States. It captures both the inner workings of today’s New York art scene and the beginnings of the vibrant and quintessentially American school of Abstract Expressionism.
B. A. Shapiro is a master at telling a riveting story while exploring provocative themes. In Alizée and Danielle she has created two unforgettable women, artists both, who compel us to ask, What happens when luminous talent collides with inexorable historical forces? Does great art have the power to change the world? And to what lengths should a person go to thwart evil?

















[book] FALAFEL NATION
Cuisine and the Making of
National Identity in Israel
by Yael Raviv, PhD(NYU)
November 2015
University of Nebraska
When people discuss food in Israel, their debates ask politically charged questions: Who has the right to falafel? Whose hummus is better? But Yael Raviv’s Falafel Nation moves beyond the simply territorial to divulge the role food plays in the Jewish nation. She ponders the power struggles, moral dilemmas, and religious and ideological affiliations of the different ethnic groups that make up the “Jewish State” and how they relate to the gastronomy of the region. How do we interpret the recent upsurge in the Israeli culinary scene—the transition from ideological asceticism to the current deluge of fine restaurants, gourmet stores, and related publications and media?

Focusing on the period between the 1905 immigration wave and the Six-Day War in 1967, Raviv explores foodways from the field, factory, market, and kitchen to the table. She incorporates the role of women, ethnic groups, and different generations into the story of Zionism and offers new assertions from a secular-foodie perspective on the relationship between Jewish religion and Jewish nationalism. A study of the changes in food practices and in attitudes toward food and cooking, Falafel Nation explains how the change in the relationship between Israelis and their food mirrors the search for a definition of modern Jewish nationalism.
















[book] RETURN TO ZION
THE RETURN OF MODERN ISRAEL
BY ERIC GARTMAN (US Dept of Defense)
November 2015
JPS/ Nebraska
The history of modern Israel is a story of ambition, violence, and survival. Return to Zion traces how a scattered and stateless people reconstituted themselves in their traditional homeland, only to face threats by those who, during the many years of the dispersion, had come to regard the land as their home. This is a story of the “ingathering of the exiles” from Europe to an outpost on the fringes of the Ottoman Empire, of courage and perseverance, and of reinvention and tragedy.
Eric Gartman focuses on two main themes of modern Israel: reconstitution and survival. Even as new settlers built their state, they faced constant challenges from hostile neighbors and divided support from foreign governments, being attacked by larger armies no fewer than three times during the first twenty-five years of Israel’s history. Focusing on a land torn by turmoil, Return to Zion is the story of Israel—the fight for independence through the Israeli Independence War in 1948, the Six-Day War of 1967, and the near collapse of the Israeli Army in the 1973 Yom Kippur War.
Gartman examines the roles of the leading figures of modern Israel—Theodor Herzl, Chaim Weizmann, David Ben-Gurion, Golda Meir, Moshe Dayan, Yitzchak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon—alongside popular perceptions of events as they unfolded in the post–World War II decades. He presents declassified CIA, White House, and U.S. State Department documents that detail America’s involvement in the 1967 and 1973 wars, as well as proof that the Israeli attack on the USS Liberty was a case of mistaken identity. Return to Zion pulls together the myriad threads of this history from inside and out to create a seamless look into modern Israel’s truest self.
















[book] The Pater
The Pater, My Father, My Judaism, My Childlessness
by Elliot Jager, PhD
(former LES fixer and Jerusalem Post editor)
November 2015
From Bible stories to Hasidic folktales to contemporary media, the discourse on infertility is becoming an increasingly widespread topic for open discussion. However, it largely remains within the context of womanhood.
In THE PATER, writer and journalist Elliot Jager tackles what has until now been an almost taboo subject: what it feels like to be a childless Jewish man. After a 30-year estrangement from his Hasidic father, a halting reconciliation is overshadowed by the elderly man’s desire that Jager father a male child.
The Pater, as Jager dubs the Romanian born Holocaust-survivor father who abandoned him as a small child on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, now implores his son to visit the graves of holy men to seek Divine intervention that will surely end his childlessness.
As Jager grapples with his relationship with the Pater and with the stigmas that Jewish tradition maintains towards the childless, he talks to other men single and married, gay and straight and shares their intense experiences for the first time.
Part memoir, part reportage, part self-help guide, THE PATER lifts the discussion out of the familiar rhetoric by sensitively chronicling how Jewish men process being the last in line of their family. Brave, sentimental, and uncompromisingly honest, THE PATER is a revealing personal and spiritual journey about earthly and Divine fathers and the about the meaning of life without children.













[book] The Mad Feast:
An Ecstatic Tour Through America's Food
by Matthew Gavin Frank
November 2015
Liveright
A richly illustrated culinary tour of the United States through fifty signature dishes, and a radical exploration of our gastronomic heritage.
Following his critically acclaimed Preparing the Ghost, renowned essayist Matthew Gavin Frank takes on America’s food. In a surprising style reminiscent of Maggie Nelson or Mark Doty, Frank examines a quintessential dish in each state, interweaving the culinary with personal and cultural associations of each region. From key lime pie (Florida) to elk stew (Montana), The Mad Feast commemorates the unexpected origins of the familiar. Brazenly dissecting the myriad intersections between history and food, Frank, in this gorgeously designed volume, considers politics, sexuality, violence, grief, and pleasure: the cool, creamy whoopie pie evokes toughness in the face of New England winters, while the stewlike perloo serves up an exploration of food and race in the South. Tracing an unpredictable map of our collective appetites, The Mad Feast presents a beguiling flavor profile of the American spirit. 50 illustrations.












[book] Vino Business:
The Cloudy World of
French Wine
by Isabelle Saporta
Translated by Kate Deimling
Grove Press
November 2015
Published in France to huge media attention and great debate within the wine community worldwide, Vino Business exposes big money interests and corruption within the wine industry in France, particularly in Bordeaux.
For centuries a bastion of tradition and excellence, Bordeaux has in recent years become dogged by controversy, particularly regarding the 2012 classification of the wines of St.-Émilion, the most prestigious appellation of Bordeaux’s right bank. St.-Émilion is an area increasingly dominated by big international investors, especially from China, who are keen to speculate on the area’s wines and land, some of whose value has increased tenfold in the last decade alone. In the controversial 2012 classification, as Saporta shows, certain châteaux were promoted to a more prestigious class because of insider deals that altered the scoring system for the classification of wines into premier crus and grand crus. This system now takes into account the facilities of each château’s tasting room, the size of its warehouse, and even the extent of its parking lot. The quality of the wine counts for just 30% of the total score for the wines of the top ranking, those deemed premier grand cru classé A.
In Vino Business, Saporta shows how backroom deals with wine distributors, multinational investors like the luxury company LVMH, and even wine critics, have fundamentally changed this ancient business in the course of a decade. Saporta also investigates issues of wine labeling and the use of pesticides, and draws comparisons to Champagne, Burgundy and the rest of the wine world. Based on two years of research and reporting, Vino Business draws back the curtain on the secret world of Bordeaux, a land ever more in thrall to the grapes of wealth.















[book] The Art of Grace
On Moving Well Through Life
by Sarah L. Kaufman
Norton
Fall 2015
A Pulitzer Prize–winning dance critic teaches us to appreciate-and enact-grace in every dimension, from the physical to the emotional.
We are naturally drawn to smooth, harmonious movement. Both social and physical graces have been taught since the dawn of civilization. Yet grace seems forgotten in our pushy, hectic modern world. Sarah L. Kaufman argues that we bring it back. She celebrates grace in the way bodies move, exploring how to stand, walk, and dress well. She deplores the rarity of grace among public figures and glories in it where found (Beyoncé at a fashion show). She singles out grace in sports and in the arts, from tennis and football to sculpture, pop music, and, of course, dance, and in the everyday ways people interact, from the grace of a good host to the unexpected kindness of strangers.
Cary Grant is this book’s muse. His uncanny ease flowed from training as an acrobat but, equally, from his wit, humility, and genuine concern for others. So too, Kaufman suggests, we might unearth the potential for grace in ourselves.















[book] The Burdens of Brotherhood:
Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France
by Ethan B. Katz
Harvard University Press
November 2015
Headlines from France suggest that Muslims have renewed an age-old struggle against Jews and that the two groups are once more inevitably at odds. But the past tells a different story. The Burdens of Brotherhood is a sweeping history of Jews and Muslims in France from World War I to the present. Here Ethan Katz introduces a richer and more complex world that offers fresh perspective for understanding the opportunities and challenges in France today.
Focusing on the experiences of ordinary people, Katz shows how Jewish-Muslim relations were shaped by everyday encounters and by perceptions of deeply rooted collective similarities or differences. We meet Jews and Muslims advocating common and divergent political visions, enjoying common culinary and musical traditions, and interacting on more intimate terms as neighbors, friends, enemies, and even lovers and family members. Drawing upon dozens of archives, newspapers, and interviews, Katz tackles controversial subjects like Muslim collaboration and resistance during World War II and the Holocaust, Jewish participation in French colonialism, the international impact of the Israeli-Arab conflict, and contemporary Muslim anti-Semitism in France.
We see how Jews and Muslims, as ethno-religious minorities, understood and related to one another through their respective relationships to the French state and society. Through their eyes, we see colonial France as a multiethnic, multireligious society more open to public displays of difference than its postcolonial successor. This book thus dramatically reconceives the meaning and history not only of Jewish-Muslim relations but ultimately of modern France itself.















[book] Why Torture Doesn't Work
The Neuroscience of Interrogation
by Shane O'Mara
Harvard University Press
November 2015
Torture is banned because it is cruel and inhumane. But as Shane O’Mara writes in this account of the human brain under stress, another reason torture should never be condoned is because it does not work the way torturers assume it does.
In countless films and TV shows such as Homeland and 24, torture is portrayed as a harsh necessity. If cruelty can extract secrets that will save lives, so be it. CIA officers and others conducted torture using precisely this justification. But does torture accomplish what its defenders say it does? For ethical reasons, there are no scientific studies of torture. But neuroscientists know a lot about how the brain reacts to fear, extreme temperatures, starvation, thirst, sleep deprivation, and immersion in freezing water, all tools of the torturer’s trade. These stressors create problems for memory, mood, and thinking, and sufferers predictably produce information that is deeply unreliable-and, for intelligence purposes, even counterproductive. As O’Mara guides us through the neuroscience of suffering, he reveals the brain to be much more complex than the brute calculations of torturers have allowed, and he points the way to a humane approach to interrogation, founded in the science of brain and behavior.
Torture may be effective in forcing confessions, as in Stalin’s Russia. But if we want information that we can depend on to save lives, O’Mara writes, our model should be Napoleon: “It has always been recognized that this way of interrogating men, by putting them to torture, produces nothing worthwhile.”















[book] Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science
Edited by Ronald L. Numbers and Kostas Kampourakis
Harvard University Press
November 2015
A falling apple inspired Isaac Newton’s insight into the law of gravity-or so the story goes. Is it true? Perhaps not. But the more intriguing question is why such stories endure as explanations of how science happens. Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of great scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.
Among the myths refuted in this volume is the idea that no science was done in the Dark Ages, that alchemy and astrology were purely superstitious pursuits, that fear of public reaction alone led Darwin to delay publishing his theory of evolution, and that Gregor Mendel was far ahead of his time as a pioneer of genetics. Several twentieth-century myths about particle physics, Einstein’s theory of relativity, and more are discredited here as well. In addition, a number of broad generalizations about science go under the microscope of history: the notion that religion impeded science, that scientists typically adhere to a codified “scientific method,” and that a bright line can be drawn between legitimate science and pseudoscience.
Edited by Ronald Numbers and Kostas Kampourakis, Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science debunks the widespread belief that science advances when individual geniuses experience “Eureka!” moments and suddenly comprehend what those around them could never imagine. Science has always been a cooperative enterprise of dedicated, fallible human beings, for whom context, collaboration, and sheer good luck are the essential elements of discovery.















[book] JFK's Forgotten Crisis:
Tibet, the CIA, and Sino-Indian War
by Bruce Riedel
Brookings Institution Press
November 2015
Bruce Riedel provides new perspective and insights into Kennedy's forgotten crisis in the most dangerous days of the cold war.
The Cuban Missile Crisis defined the presidency of John F. Kennedy. But during the same week that the world stood transfixed by the possibility of nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union, Kennedy was also consumed by a war that has escaped history's attention, yet still significantly reverberates today: the Sino-Indian conflict.
As well-armed troops from the People's Republic of China surged into Indian-held territory in October 1962, Kennedy ordered an emergency airlift of supplies to the Indian army. He engaged in diplomatic talks that kept the neighboring Pakistanis out of the fighting. The conflict came to an end with a unilateral Chinese cease-fire, relieving Kennedy of a decision to intervene militarily in support of India.
Bruce Riedel, a CIA and National Security Council veteran, provides the first full narrative of this crisis, which played out during the tense negotiations with Moscow over Cuba. He also describes another, nearly forgotten episode of U.S. espionage during the war between India and China: secret U.S. support of Tibetan opposition to Chinese occupation of Tibet. He details how the United States, beginning in 1957, trained and parachuted Tibetan guerrillas into Tibet to fight Chinese military forces. The United States did not abandon this covert support until relations were normalized with China in the 1970s.
Riedel tells this story of war, diplomacy, and covert action with authority and perspective. He draws on newly declassified letters between Kennedy and Indian leader Jawaharlal Nehru, along with the diaries and memoirs of key players and other sources, to make this the definitive account of JFK's forgotten crisis. This is, Riedel writes, Kennedy's finest hour as you have never read it before.















[book] Vladimir Jabotinsky's
Story of My Life
by Vladimir Jabotinsky
Edited by Brian Horowitz (Tulane)
Wayne State University Press
December 2015
Vladimir Jabotinsky is well remembered as a militant leader and father of the right-wing Revisionist Zionist movement, but he was also a Russian-Jewish intellectual, talented fiction writer, journalist, playwright, and translator of poetry into Russian and Hebrew. His autobiography, Sippur yamai, Story of My Life-written in Hebrew and published in Tel Aviv in 1936-gives a more nuanced picture of Jabotinsky than his popular image, but it was never published in English. In Vladimir Jabotinsky's Story of My Life, editors Brian Horowitz and Leonid Katsis present this much-needed translation for the first time, based on a rough draft of an English version that was discovered in Jabotinsky's archive at the Jabotinsky Institute in Tel Aviv.
Jabotinsky's volume mixes true events with myth as he offers a portrait of himself from his birth in 1880 until just after the outbreak of World War I. He describes his personal development during childhood and early adult years in Odessa, Rome, St. Petersburg, Vienna, and Istanbul, during Russia's Silver Age, a period known for spiritual searching, but also political violence, radicalism, and pogroms. He tells of his escape to Rome as a youth, his return to Odessa, and his eventual adoption of Zionism. He also depicts struggles with rivals and colleagues in both politics and journalism. The editors introduce the full text of the autobiography by discussing Jabotinsky's life, legacy, and writings in depth.
As Jabotinsky is gaining a reputation for the quality of his fictional and semi-fictional writing in the field of Israel studies, this autobiography will help reading groups and students of Zionism .















[book] Too Much of a Good Thing:
How Four Key Survival Traits Are Now Killing Us by Lee Goldman, MD
Little, Brown and Company
December 2015
Dr. Lee Goldman is dean of the medical school at Columbia University. An internationally renowned cardiologist, he developed the Goldman Criteria (a set of guidelines for healthcare professionals to determine which patients with chest pain require hospital admission) and the Goldman Index (which predicts which patients will have heart problems after surgery). He's the author of more than 480 medical articles and also the lead editor of Goldman-Cecil Medicine, the oldest continuously published medical textbook in the U.S.

Dr. Goldman explains that the traits that let humans survive and thrive are now killing us. We love high calorie carbs. We are living twice as long as in the past. But we are developing more heart disease and diabetes
Dean Goldman explains why our bodies are out of sync with today's environment and how we can correct this to save our health. Over the past 200 years, human life-expectancy has approximately doubled. Yet we face soaring worldwide rates of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, mental illness, heart disease, and stroke. In his fascinating new book, Dr. Lee Goldman presents a radical explanation: The key protective traits that once ensured our species' survival are now the leading global causes of illness and death. Our capacity to store food, for example, lures us into overeating, and a clotting system designed to protect us from bleeding to death now directly contributes to heart attacks and strokes. A deeply compelling narrative that puts a new spin on evolutionary biology, TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING also provides a roadmap for getting back in sync with the modern world.



















[book] Groucho Marx
The Comedy of Existence
by Lee Siegel
Yale University Press
Jewish Lives series
January 2016
Born Julius Marx in 1890, the brilliant comic actor who would later be known as Groucho was the most verbal of the famed comedy team, the Marx Brothers, his broad slapstick portrayals elevated by ingenious wordplay and double entendre. In his spirited biography of this beloved American iconoclast, Lee Siegel views the life of Groucho through the lens of his work on stage, screen, and television. The author uncovers the roots of the performer’s outrageous intellectual acuity and hilarious insolence toward convention and authority in Groucho’s early upbringing and Marx family dynamics.

The first critical biography of Groucho Marx to approach his work analytically, this fascinating study draws unique connections between Groucho’s comedy and his life, concentrating primarily on the brothers’ classic films as a means of understanding and appreciating Julius the man. Unlike previous uncritical and mostly reverential biographies, Siegel’s “bio-commentary” makes a distinctive contribution to the field of Groucho studies by attempting to tell the story of his life in terms of his work, and vice versa.















[book] GERMAN JEWRY AND THE
ALLURE OF THE SEPHARDIC
BY JOHN M. EFRON (Berkeley)
January 2016
Princeton

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as German Jews struggled for legal emancipation and social acceptance, they also embarked on a program of cultural renewal, two key dimensions of which were distancing themselves from their fellow Ashkenazim in Poland and giving a special place to the Sephardim of medieval Spain. Where they saw Ashkenazic Jewry as insular and backward, a result of Christian persecution, they depicted the Sephardim as worldly, morally and intellectually superior, and beautiful, products of the tolerant Muslim environment in which they lived. In this elegantly written book, John Efron looks in depth at the special allure Sephardic aesthetics held for German Jewry.
Efron examines how German Jews idealized the sound of Sephardic Hebrew and the Sephardim's physical and moral beauty, and shows how the allure of the Sephardic found expression in neo-Moorish synagogue architecture, historical novels, and romanticized depictions of Sephardic history. He argues that the shapers of German-Jewish culture imagined medieval Iberian Jewry as an exemplary Jewish community, bound by tradition yet fully at home in the dominant culture of Muslim Spain. Efron argues that the myth of Sephardic superiority was actually an expression of withering self-critique by German Jews who, by seeking to transform Ashkenazic culture and win the acceptance of German society, hoped to enter their own golden age.




















[book] CALYPSO JEWS
Jewishness in the Caribbean Literary Imagination
(Literature Now)
by Sarah Phillips Casteel
January 2016
Columbia University Press
With what may seem surprising frequency, Caribbean writers have turned to Jewish Caribbean experiences of exodus and reinvention, from the arrival of Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain and Portugal in the 1490s to the flight of European Jewish refugees to Trinidad and elsewhere in the 1930s. Examining this historical migration through the lens of postwar Caribbean fiction and poetry, Sarah Phillips Casteel conducts the first major study of representations of Jewishness in Caribbean literature. Bridging the gap between postcolonial and Jewish studies, Calypso Jews enriches crosscultural investigations of Caribbean creolization.

Caribbean writers invoke both the 1492 expulsion and the Holocaust as part of their literary archaeology of slavery and its legacies. Despite the unequal and sometimes fraught relations between Blacks and Jews in the Caribbean before and after emancipation, Black-Jewish literary encounters reflect sympathy and identification more than antagonism and competition. Proposing an alternative to U.S.-based critical narratives of Black-Jewish relations, Casteel reads Derek Walcott, Maryse Condé, Michelle Cliff, Jamaica Kincaid, Caryl Phillips, David Dabydeen, and Paul Gilroy, among others, to reveal a distinctive inter-diasporic relationship refracted through the creative innovations of two resilient cultures.














[book] Israel's Edge
The Story of Talpiot,
the IDF's Most Elite Unit
by Jason Gewirtz
January 2016
Gefen
Instead of being trained only to fight, the few soldiers each year selected for Talpiot are taught how to think. In order to join this unit they have to commit to being in the army for ten years, rather than the three years a normal soldier serves. Talpiots are educated in the military applications for computer science, physics and math and they have an enormous influence on the weapons Israel develops and on the Israeli economy, through the businesses they establish after leaving the army.
The book contains dozens of interviews with Talpiot graduates and some of the early founders of the program. It explains Talpiot's highly successful recruiting methods and discloses many of the secrets of the program's success. The book also profiles some of the most successful businesses founded by Talpiot graduates including CheckPoint, Compugen, Anobit, recently bought by Apple, and XIV, recently bought by IBM.
No other military unit has had more of an impact on the State of Israel. The soldiers of Talpiot are truly unsung heroes.














[book] "How Come Boys Get to Keep Their Noses?":
Women and Jewish American Identity
in Contemporary Graphic Memoirs
(Gender and Culture Series)
by Tahneer Oksman
February 2, 2016
Columbia University Press
American comics reflect the distinct sensibilities and experiences of the Jewish American men who played an outsized role in creating them, but what about the contributions of Jewish women? Focusing on the visionary work of seven contemporary female Jewish cartoonists, Tahneer Oksman draws a remarkable connection between innovations in modes of graphic storytelling and the unstable, contradictory, and ambiguous figurations of the Jewish self in the postmodern era.

Oksman isolates the dynamic Jewishness that connects each frame in the autobiographical comics of Aline Kominsky Crumb, Vanessa Davis, Miss Lasko-Gross, Lauren Weinstein, Sarah Glidden, Miriam Libicki, and Liana Finck. Rooted in a conception of identity based as much on rebellion as identification and belonging, these artists' representations of Jewishness take shape in the spaces between how we see ourselves and how others see us. They experiment with different representations and affiliations without forgetting that identity ties the self to others. Stemming from Kominsky Crumb's iconic 1989 comic "Nose Job," in which her alter ego refuses to assimilate through cosmetic surgery, Oksman's study is an arresting exploration of invention in the face of the pressure to disappear.
























[book] THE YID
A NOVEL
BY PAUL GOLDBERG
February 2, 2016
Picador
In is February 1953. We are in Moscow under Stalin. Stalin will be dead in a week. But his final pogrom and purge against Jews is in full swing. Three USSR agents arrive at the flat of Solomon ShimonoVich Levinson in order to arrest him. He is an actor from the defunct State Jewish Theater. Levinson is old, retred, and a veteran of Soviet wars. His reponse to the goons sets in motion a zany series of events. He has a plot. To assassinate a tyrant with a ragtag group. Of heroes that includes Dr. Aleksandr Kogan, one of Moscow's top surgeons but a former machine gunner; Kima Petrova; and an Africa American woman who came to the USSR to build smelters but stayed as an engineer.. It is Inglorious Basterds meets Moscow and Chagall and Paul Robeson. Violent and intellectual.
















[book] SOUTH AFRICAN JEWS IN ISRAEL
ASSIMILATION IN MULTIGENERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
BY REBECA RAIJMAN (Haifa)
February 2016
University of Nebraska
Despite consensus about the importance of multigenerational analysis for studying the long-term impact of immigration, most studies in Israel have focused on the integration of first-generation migrants, neglecting key changes (in economic, social, linguistic, and identity outcomes) that occur intergenerationally. Rebeca Raijman tackles this important but untold story with respect to Jewish South African immigration in Israel. By collecting data from three generational cohorts, Raijman analyzes assimilation from a comparative multigenerational perspective. She also combines both quantitative and qualitative evidence with in-depth interviews and participant observation, thereby providing a rich and more complete picture of the complex process of migrant assimilation.
While the migrant subpopulation of South Africa has not received the attention that immigrant populations from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia have, as English-speaking migrants they are a powerful and significant group. Given the status of English as an international language, this study has important implications for understanding the expected assimilation trajectories of Anglophone immigrants in Israel as well as in other non-English-speaking societies. South African Jews in Israel not only contributes empirical material concerning immigrants in Israeli society but also articulates theoretical understanding of the social mechanisms underlying the integration of various generations of immigrants into a variety of societal domains.
















[book] STOLEN WORDS
The Nazi Plunder of Jewish Books
by Mark Glickman
February 2016
Jewish Publication Society / Nebraska
Stolen Words is an epic story about the largest collection of Jewish books in the world—tens-of millions of books that the Nazis looted from European Jewish families and institutions. Nazi soldiers and civilians emptied Jewish communal libraries, confiscated volumes from government collections, and stole from Jewish individuals, schools, and synagogues. Early in their regime, the Nazis burned some books in spectacular bonfires, but most they saved, stashing the literary loot in castles, abandoned mine shafts, and warehouses throughout Europe. It was the largest and most extensive book-looting campaign in history.

After the war, Allied forces discovered these troves of stolen books but quickly found themselves facing a barrage of questions. How could the books be identified? Where should they go? Who had the authority to make such decisions? Eventually, the army turned the books over to an organization of leading Jewish scholars called Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, Inc.—whose chairman was the acclaimed historian Salo Baron, and whose on-the-ground director was the philosopher Hannah Arendt—with the charge to establish restitution protocols.

Stolen Words is the story of how a free civilization decides what to do with the material remains of a world torn asunder, and how those remains connect survivors with their past. It is the story of Jews struggling to understand the new realities of their post-Holocaust world and of Western society’s gradual realization of the magnitude of devastation wrought by World War II. Most of all, it is the story of people —of Nazi leaders, ideologues, and Judaica experts; of Allied soldiers, scholars, and scoundrels; and of Jewish communities, librarians, and readers around the world.
















[book] The Right Wrong Man:
John Demjanjuk and the Last
Great Nazi War Crimes Trial
by Lawrence Douglas
January 2016
Princeton University Press
In 2009, Harper’s Magazine sent war-crimes expert Lawrence Douglas to Munich to cover the last chapter of the lengthiest case ever to arise from the Holocaust: the trial of eighty-nine-year-old John Demjanjuk. Demjanjuk’s legal odyssey began in 1975, when American investigators received evidence alleging that the Cleveland autoworker and naturalized US citizen had collaborated in Nazi genocide. In the years that followed, Demjanjuk was twice stripped of his American citizenship and sentenced to death by a Jerusalem court as “Ivan the Terrible” of Treblinka—only to be cleared in one of the most notorious cases of mistaken identity in legal history.
Finally, in 2011, after eighteen months of trial, a court in Munich convicted the native Ukrainian of assisting Hitler’s SS in the murder of 28,060 Jews at Sobibor, a death camp in eastern Poland.
An award-winning novelist as well as legal scholar, Douglas offers a compulsively readable history of Demjanjuk’s bizarre case. The Right Wrong Man is both a gripping eyewitness account of the last major Holocaust trial to galvanize world attention and a vital meditation on the law’s effort to bring legal closure to the most horrific chapter in modern history.
















[book] LONELY BUT NOT ALONE
A Spiritual Autobiography
By Nathan Lopes Cardozo
February 2016
URIM
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.
































QUESTION: Dear MyJewishBooks.com – I heard that the It Get’s Better campaign will be a book. Will it be a Jewish book?

ANSWER: I hear that Penguin USA/Dutton (Dan Savage’s publisher and editor) will issue a collection of essay on It Gets Better in Spring 2011. I am sure that several Jewish people will submit essay and be published. So I would answer that yes, it will be a Jewish book and a book of Jewish interest. While you are waiting for the book, may I suggest you check out YouTube for this growing collection of YouTube videos from NYC’s CBST synagogue leaders: Click here, or Click here, or Click here.




QUESTION: Dear MyJewishBooks.com – What can I read after hearing of a new ponzi scheme in Lakewood?

ANSWER: WE RECOMMEND:

[book] Confronting Scandal
How Jews Can Respond When Jews Do Bad Things
Erica Brown
August 2010, Jewish Lights
Jews seem to be in the news today for all of the wrong reasons. Whether it is Bernie Madoff or money laundering by rabbinic leaders, faking appraisals so you can sell assets to friends, smuggling narcotics to benefit yeshivas, the Jewish community has yet to take stock of what these breaches of civil law and Jewish ethical teachings mean for us as a people.
How do we manage collective discomfort and shame?
Should we feel ghetto mentality shame, or be filled with Dershowitz like Chutzpah?
How do we explain rabbis (or cantors) who commit sex offenses (and then ask for ultra kosher food in prison) or other crimes yet stand at the pulpit week after week offering others moral guidance?
And most importantly, how do we restore honor and dignity to our community by raising the ethical bar and adherence to it? This book explores the difficult and thorny issues surrounding scandals: airing dirty laundry in public, coming to terms with criminality among Jews, examining painful stereotypes of Jews and the difficult position of being a minority in society. A call for us to answer to a higher authority, it also addresses practical ways to strengthen ethical behavior and "do good things" to bring pride back, and to engender greater self-respect and the respect of others.
Dr. Erica Brown, a leading voice on subjects of current Jewish interest, consults for Jewish federations and organizations across the country. She is author of Inspired Jewish Leadership: Practical Approaches to Building Strong Communities, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.
Click the book cover to read more.









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