MyJewishBooks.com
Your online discount Jewish Bookstore
Books for the People of the Book

Our Shelves

SUMMER 2016 JEWISH BOOKS
Home

BOOKS BY
Season
Winter 2017
Fall 2016
Summer 2016
Spring 2016
Winter 2016
Fall 2015
Summer 2015
Spring 2015
Winter 2015
Fall 2014
Summer 2014
Spring 2014
Winter 2014
Fall 2013
Summer 2013
Spring 2013
Winter 2013
Fall 2012
Summer 2012
Spring 2012
Winter 2012
Fall 2011
Summer 2011
Spring 2011
Winter 2011
Fall 2010
Summer 2010
Spring 2010
Winter 2010
Fall 2009
Summer 2009
Spring 2009
Winter 2009
Fall 2008
Summer 2008
Spring 2008
Winter 2008
Fall 2007
Summer 2007
Spring 2007
Winter 2007
More Fall 2006
Fall 2006
Summer 2006
Spring 2006
Winter 2006
Fall 2005
Summer 2005
Spring 2005
Winter 2005
Late Fall 2004
Fall 2004
Summer 2004
Spring 2004
Winter 2004
Late Fall 2003
Fall 2003
Summer 2003
Spring 2003
Winter 2003
FALL 2002
Summer 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
Winter 2002
Dec 2001
Nov 2001
Oct 2001
Sept 2001
Fall 2001
Summer 2001
May 2001 Books
April 2001 Books
March 2001 Books
February 2001 Books
January 2001 Books
December 2000 Books
Hanukkah Books
November 2000 Books
October 2000 Books
September 2000 Books
August 2000 Books
July 2000 Books
June 2000 Books
Spring 2000 Books
April 2000 Books
March 2000 Books
More March 2000
Winter2000 Books

Special Topics
Jewish Audio

Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, 2011


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, 2010


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, ‘09


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, ‘08


Jewish Book Award Winners

OFRAH's BookClub
Jewish Book of the Week
SEARCH

CHAT About Books
Novels
Cookbooks
Yiddish Culture
THE MAD DANCERS

Jewish Themes in Classical Music
Jewish Mysteries and Science Fiction
Wrabbis Rite Books
Holocaust Studies
Jewish Bio's
Jewish Biz
Jewish Travel
Must Reads
Israel

Israel Travel
Jewish Renewal
Theology
Bibles Torah
Kabbalah

Jewish MUSEUMS

Jewish SEX
Gay & Lesbian
Jewish Weddings
Parenting
Health
Children's Books
Bar Bat Mitzvah
BarBat Mitzvah Gifts
Mourning
Art Books
Jewish Business
More Business
Sociology
Asian Jewry
Miscellaneous Cholent

Jewish Textbooks

Sephardic Jewry
Southern Jewry
South American Jewry
French Jewry
Black-Jewish Relations


More Seasons
Fall99 Books
More Fall99 Books
Summer 99
Spring 99
Jan/Feb 99
Fall98 Books

f Holidays
HighHoliday Books
Shavuot Books
Passover Books


More Holidays
Purim Books
Tu B'Shvat Books
Jewish MLKing,Jr Day Books
Sukkah 2000 Project
Haggadahs
HighHolyDay Books
Hanukkah Books
Passover


Special
50% OFF NYT Best Sellers
CHAI-BO (TM)
jewish bedtime stories

Music/CD's

Piano Music

Hollywood and Films

The Jewish Best Sellers

Our partner Amazon.com's Top 100 Books

Amazon.com's Top 100 Music

Top Klezmer CD's
Top Israel Best Selling CD's


Search

Email us at: Admin@myjewishbooks.com



SOME LINKS
Jewish Book Council

JewLicious.com

NYTimes.com

NYTimes in Mandarin

NYT in Chinese

JewishFilm.com

Our NEWS Links Page

Our films page on Facebook

Our books page on Facebook

Sefer Safari and Myjewishbooks.com are online Jewish bookstores. Orders are fulfilled by Amazon.com Net proceeds are donated to tzedakah

Visit our Tzedakah Page

Tzedaka.ORG
penny harvest

Siddur Audio

heeb magazine
bar mitzvah disco
the Hasidic rebel blog about his dislikes in the Hasidic world
Yeshiva Univ Library Blog
Matt Messinger Casting

American Jewish World Service
Lend For Peace – West Bank Microfinance
Dry Bones
Urban Kvetch
Jewish Council on Urban Affairs
Elat Chayim
New Shul Scottsdale
Shalom Center
Tikkun Leil Shabbat
Times Fool
Association of Jewish Librarians Jewish Values site
Avhana.co.il
Avodah
Beach Hillel
Assoc of Jewish Libraries
Bikkurim - Jewish incubator
Cambridge Minyan
Workmen's Circle/Arbiter Ring
Tehillah Riverdale
DC Minyan
Darkhei Noam
Gawker.com
gizmodo
Hazon
IKAR
Isabella Freedman
JCRC Boston
Jdub Records
Jewish Alliance for Law and Social Action
Jewish Community Action
SchmoozeDance 2005
SchmoozeDance 2006
schmoozedance 2007
Jewish Funds for Justice
Selah Cohorts
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish Organizing Initiative
JewLicious
JewSchool
Jews for Racial and Economic Justice
Jewish Social Policy Action Network
Jspot- Jewish Justice spot
Jews United for Justice
Kavana Seattle
Moishe/Kavod House Boston
Hadar
Kol HaKfar
Kol Tzedek West Philly
Kol Zimrah
Mazon
Minyan Tehillah Cambridge
Mitziut Chicago
Nashuva LA
network 2020
PANIM
Panim Hadashot DC
Park Slope Minyan
Progressive Jewish Alliance
Rabbis for Human Rights - North America
Riverway Project Boston
Storahtelling
Synagogue 3000
Tekiah
Tikkun Ha-Ir
wonkette
delete
Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies
JEWISH LITERARY REVIEW
South Jerusalem Blog by Gorenberg and Watzman

JEWISH TWITTER LIST
Jewlicious
Jewlicious
Panim Institute
Volunteers for Israel
Jewish Teen Funders Network
Jewish Heart Africa
Jewschool
Jcrc NY
Lisa Klug Cool Jew
Judios Latino
Israel Films
Israeli Films
Masa Israel
Birthright Israel Next
JTA News
Hazon
Jewish Dly Forward
Jewish Book Council
JB Books
MyJewishBooks
Jewishfilms
Jewishfilm
NY Jewish Week
Jewishfood
WJFF
Jewish Camps Fdtn
Jewishfilm



Welcome to our pages of Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, Fall 2015, Summer 2015, Spring 2015, Winter 2015, Fall 2014, and oh so many more Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME SUMMER 2016 BOOK READINGS



May 22, 2016 (Sunday): Book Launch Party for Rhapsody in Schmaltz (St. Martin's Press, 2016) by Michael Wex - in conversation with Jayne Cohen. Museum of Jewish Heritage, NYC Battery Park City.
May 22, 2016: Greek Jewish Festival. NYC’s congregation of Romaniote Jews celebrate Greek food and their Jewish culture. Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue on Broom Street in NYC (kkjfestival.com)
May 23, 2016: Pulitzer Prize winner and Professor Stacy Schiff With Ciaran Hinds and Brenda Wehle from Broadway's The Crucible discuss Witches and Salem. B&N UES Lex/86th
May 24, 2016: Book launch for Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. By Jeffrey Rosen (Yale Press) Harvard Bookstore Cambridge Mass.
May 24, 2016: Join the NYPL Public Library for "After They Closed the Gates: Jewish Illegal Immigration to the United States (1921-1965)" with Professor Libby Garland. http://www.nypl.org
May 25, 2016: Avivah Zornberg discusses Abraham and Lech Lecha / Temple Emanuel Skirball NYC.
May 26, 2016: The Harbin China Jewish Experience, sort of. Yale Strom and Hot Pstromi perform with the EastRiver Ensemble at Eldridge Street synagogue/museum in NYC $25.
May 31, 2016: Eddie Huang (Fresh Off The Boat) reads from his memoir Double Cup Love: On the Trail of Family, Food, and Broken Hearts in China (you’ll never imagine him or his brothers as sweet guys again). B&N Union Square NYC
May 31, 2016: Meg Wolitzer in conversation with Emma Straub (Modern Lovers). B&N UWS 82nd/Broadway
June 01, 2016: Book launch for Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. By Jeffrey Rosen. National Constitution Center Philadelphia, PA
June 02, 2016: Book launch for Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. By Jeffrey Rosen. 92nd St Y, New York, NY UES
June 03, 2016: Book launch for Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. By Jeffrey Rosen. Politics and Prose, Washington, DC
June 11, 2016: Tikkun Leil Shavuot. Worldwide. Also JCC UWS NYC
June 19: 2016: AJL 51st Annual Conference. Association of Jewish Libraries. Charleston South Carolina.
June 19, 2016: Acclaimed journalist Walter Shapiro will discuss and sign copies of Hustling Hitler: The Jewish Vaudevillian Who Fooled the Fuhrer - the true story of his great-uncle B&N Westport CT
June 19, 2016: Egg Rolls, Egg Creams and Empanadas Festival. Eldridge Street NYC
June 22, 2016: Book launch for Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. By Jeffrey Rosen. Sixth & Eye Historic Synagogue, Washington, DC
June 22: 2016: Author David Duchovny reads from Bucky F*cking Dent. B&N The Grove Los Angeles Farmers’ Market
June 27, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Amy Gottlieb “The Beautiful Possible” and Ben Nadler “Sea Beach Express” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM

July 11, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Elizabeth Poliner “As Close To Us As Breathing” and Matthew Futterman “Players…” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
July 11, 2016: Daniel Silva reads from Black Widow: A Novel. B&N Union Square NYC
July 18, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Eileen Pollock “A Perfect Life” and Shaloch Manot (nom de plume) “His Hundred Years; A Tale” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
July 25, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Beth Kissileff “Questioning Return” and Joshua Halberstam “The Blind Angel: New Old Chassidic Tales” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM

August 01, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Lynda Cohen Loigman “Two-Family House” and Jay Neugoboren “Max Baer and the Star of David” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
August 08, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Janice Weizman “The Wayward Moon” and Judith Claire Mitchell “A Reunion of Ghosts” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
August 16, 2016: Amy Schumer reads from THE GIRL WITH THE LOWER BACK TATTOO. B&N NYC Union Square 6PM
August 22, 2016: Andrew Gross Reads from THE ONE MAN. B&N NYC Upper West Side 7PM






JUNE 2016 BOOKS




[book] LOUIS D. BRANDEIS
American Prophet
By Jeffrey Rosen
June 2016
Jewish Lives Series
Yale University Press
According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was “the Jewish Jefferson,” the greatest critic of what he called “the curse of bigness,” in business and government, since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century. In addition to writing the most famous article on the right to privacy, he also wrote the most important Supreme Court opinions about free speech, freedom from government surveillance, and freedom of thought and opinion. And as the leader of the American Zionist movement, he convinced Woodrow Wilson and the British government to recognize a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Combining narrative biography with a passionate argument for why Brandeis matters today, Rosen explores what Brandeis, the Jeffersonian prophet, can teach us about historic and contemporary questions involving the Constitution, monopoly, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, and Zionism.






















[book] Diane Arbus:
Portrait of a Photographer
by Arthur Lubow
June 2016
Ecco
The definitive biography of the beguiling Diane Arbus, one of the most influential and important photographers of the twentieth century, a brilliant and absorbing exposition that links the extraordinary arc of her life to her iconic photographs.
Diane Arbus brings to life the full story of one of the greatest American artists of the twentieth century, a visionary who revolutionized photography and altered the course of contemporary art with her striking, now iconic images. Arbus comes startlingly to life on these pages, a strong-minded child of unnerving originality who grew into a formidable artist and forged an intimacy with her subjects that has inspired generations of artists. Arresting, unsettling, and poignant, her photographs stick in our minds. Why did these people fascinate her? And what was it about her that captivated them?
It is impossible to understand the transfixing power of Arbus’s photographs without understanding her life story. Arthur Lubow draws on exclusive interviews with Arbus’s friends, lovers, and colleagues, on previously unknown letters, and on his own profound critical understanding of photography, to explore Arbus’s unique perspective. He deftly traces Arbus’s development from a wealthy, sexually precocious free spirit into first a successful New York fashion photographer, and then a singular artist who coaxed hidden truths from her subjects. Lubow reveals that Arbus’s profound need not only to see her subjects but to be seen by them drove her to forge unusually close bonds with these people, helping her discover the fantasies, pain, and heroism within each of them.
Diane Arbus is the definitive biography of this unique, hugely influential artist. This magnificently absorbing, sensitive treatment of a singular personality brushes aside the clichés that have long surrounded Arbus and her work to capture a brilliant portrait of this seminal artist whose work has immeasurably shaped art and modern culture.
Lubow’s Diane Arbus finally does justice to Arbus, and brings to life the story and art of one of the greatest American artists in history.
Diane Arbus includes a 16-page black-and-white photo insert.






















[book] Judenstaat
by Simone Zelitch
June 21, 2016
Tor
An alternate history that makes sense
What if, in 1948, a Jewish state was created in Germany
The very place we faced our deaths is where we will build our lives
The flag is made from an Auscwitz striped uniform with a yellow Jewish star in the middle
What happens when you lose everything, but have to go on living, What will you become and do to live?

On April 4th, 1948 the sovereign state of Judenstaat was created in the territory of Saxony, bordering Germany, Poland, and Czechoslovakia .

Forty years later, Jewish historian Judit Klemmer is making a documentary portraying Judenstaat's history from the time of its founding to the present. She is haunted by the ghost of her dead husband, Hans, a Saxon, shot by a sniper as he conducted the National Symphony. With the grief always fresh, Judit lives a half-life, until confronted by a mysterious, flesh-and-blood ghost from her past who leaves her controversial footage on one of Judenstaat's founding fathers--and a note:
"They lied about the murder."

Judit's research into the footage, and what really happened to Hans, embroils her in controversy and conspiracy, collective memory and national amnesia, and answers far more horrific than she imagined.






















Feuchtwanger is on a speaking tour of the USA in June 2016
[book] Hitler, mon voisin:
Souvenirs dún enfant juif
HITLER MY NEIGHBOR
BY Edgar Feuchtwanger
Âgé de 5 ans, Edgar Feuchtwanger, fils unique d un éditeur juif, a une enfance heureuse dans la ville de Munich. C est un petit Allemand insouciant, choyé par ses parents et sa nounou, lorsque Adolf Hitler, chef du Parti national socialiste, s installe dans l immeuble d en face.
En 1933 se brise le bonheur de cette vie sans nuage. Hitler est nommé chancelier. Les parents d Edgar, déchus de leurs droits de citoyens ordinaires, tentent de le protéger des humiliations. À l école, sa maîtresse lui fait dessiner des croix gammées, ses camarades rejoignent les jeunesses hitlériennes.
Depuis sa fenêtre, en regardant de l autre côté de la rue, Edgar va assister à la préparation de la Nuit des longs couteaux, de l Anschluss et de la Nuit de Cristal. Les Juifs sont arrêtés, son père est enfermé à Dachau où il connaîtra la peur, le froid et la faim. En 1939, Edgar est envoyé seul en Grande-Bretagne. Il y fera sa vie, sa carrière, fondera une famille et s efforcera d oublier le cauchemar de son passé. Un passé qui a soudain rejailli lorsqu il a voulu, à 88 ans, raconter cette enfance enfouie.






















[book] Ratf**ked:
How the Democrats Won the
Presidency But Lost America
by David Daley
June 2016
Liveright
With Barack Obama’s historic election in 2008, pundits proclaimed the Republicans as dead as the Whigs of yesteryear. Yet even as Democrats swooned, a small cadre of Republican operatives, including Karl Rove, Ed Gillespie, and Chris Jankowski began plotting their comeback with a simple yet ingenious plan. These men had devised a way to take a tradition of dirty tricks-known to political insiders as “ratf**king”-to a whole new, unprecedented level. Flooding state races with a gold rush of dark money made possible by Citizens United, the Republicans reshaped state legislatures, where the power to redistrict is held. Reconstructing this never- told-before story, David Daley examines the far-reaching effects of this so-called REDMAP program, which has radically altered America’s electoral map and created a firewall in the House, insulating the party and its wealthy donors from popular democracy. Ratf**ked pulls back the curtain on one of the greatest heists in American political history. 5 maps






















VOLUME TEN IS OUT
[book] THE ZOHAR
The Pritzker Edition,
Volume Ten
Translation and Commentary
By Nathan Wolski
Spring 2016
Stanford University Press
Sefer ha-Zohar (The Book of Radiance) has amazed readers ever since it emerged in Spain over seven hundred years ago. Written in a lyrical Aramaic, the Zohar, a masterpiece of Kabbalah, features mystical interpretation of the Torah, from Genesis to Deuteronomy.

The tenth volume of The Zohar: Pritzker Edition presents Midrash ha-Ne'lam on the Torah, the earliest texts of the Zoharic corpus and first fruits of the Zoharic world. In contrast to the main body of the Zohar, Midrash ha-Ne'lam is composed in both Aramaic and Hebrew; its style combines philosophical allegory and kabbalistic midrash.

Particularly noteworthy is the extended allegorical interpretation of the patriarchal narratives. They are read as an account of the descent of the soul, its adventures on earth, and its wandering journey after death, finally culminating in its reunion with the perfected body following resurrection. Quintessential Zoharic motifs such as "walking on the way" and the "nocturnal delight in the Garden of Eden" make their first appearances here. The volume also includes many short narratives featuring the "Masters of Mishnah," a group of sages possessing esoteric knowledge of the soul and the cosmos, the forerunner of the Zoharic fellowship.













See also: [book] [book]




































































[book] HITLER’S SOLDIERS
The German Army in the Third Reich
By Ben H. Shepherd
June 2016
Yale University Press
For decades after 1945, it was generally believed that the German army, professional and morally decent, had largely stood apart from the SS, Gestapo, and other corps of the Nazi machine. Ben Shepherd draws on a wealth of primary sources and recent scholarship to convey a much darker, more complex picture. For the first time, the German army is examined throughout the Second World War, across all combat theaters and occupied regions, and from multiple perspectives: its battle performance, social composition, relationship with the Nazi state, and involvement in war crimes and military occupation.
This was a true people’s army, drawn from across German society and reflecting that society as it existed under the Nazis. Without the army and its conquests abroad, Shepherd explains, the Nazi regime could not have perpetrated its crimes against Jews, prisoners of war, and civilians in occupied countries. The author examines how the army was complicit in these crimes and why some soldiers, units, and higher commands were more complicit than others. Shepherd also reveals the reasons for the army’s early battlefield successes and its mounting defeats up to 1945, the latter due not only to Allied superiority and Hitler’s mismanagement as commander-in-chief, but also to the failings—moral, political, economic, strategic, and operational—of the army’s own leadership.






















[book] A Hero of France:
A Novel
by Alan Furst
June 1, 2016
Random House
From the bestselling master espionage writer, hailed by Vince Flynn as “the best in the business,” comes a riveting novel about the French Resistance in Nazi-occupied Paris.
1941. The City of Light is dark and silent at night. But in Paris and in the farmhouses, barns, and churches of the French countryside, small groups of ordinary men and women are determined to take down the occupying forces of Adolf Hitler. Mathieu, a leader of the French Resistance, leads one such cell, helping downed British airmen escape back to England.
Alan Furst’s suspenseful, fast-paced thriller captures this dangerous time as no one ever has before. He brings Paris and occupied France to life, along with courageous citizens who outmaneuver collaborators, informers, blackmailers, and spies, risking everything to fulfill perilous clandestine missions. Aiding Mathieu as part of his covert network are Lisette, a seventeen-year-old student and courier; Max de Lyon, an arms dealer turned nightclub owner; Chantal, a woman of class and confidence; Daniel, a Jewish teacher fueled by revenge; Joëlle, who falls in love with Mathieu; and Annemarie, a willful aristocrat with deep roots in France, and a desire to act.
As the German military police heighten surveillance, Mathieu and his team face a new threat, dispatched by the Reich to destroy them all.
Shot through with the author’s trademark fine writing, breathtaking suspense, and intense scenes of seduction and passion, Alan Furst’s A Hero of France is at once one of the finest novels written about the French Resistance and the most gripping novel yet by the living master of the spy thriller.




























[book] Food and the City:
New York's Professional Chefs,
Restaurateurs, Line Cooks, Street
Vendors, and Purveyors Talk About
What They Do and Why They Do It
by Ina Yalof
June 1, 2016
Putnam
An unprecedented behind-the-scenes tour of New York City’s dynamic food culture, as told through the voices of the chefs, line cooks, restaurateurs, waiters, and street vendors who have made this industry their lives.
In Food and the City, Ina Yalof takes us on an insider’s journey into New York’s pulsating food scene alongside the men and women who call it home. Dominique Ansel declares what great good fortune led him to make the first cronut. Lenny Berk explains why Woody Allen’s mother would allow only him to slice her lox at Zabar’s. Ghaya Oliveira, who came to New York as a young Tunisian stockbroker, opens up about her hardscrabble yet swift trajectory from dishwasher to executive pastry chef at Daniel.
Restaurateur Eddie Schoenfeld describes his journey from Nice Jewish Boy from Brooklyn to New York’s Indisputable Chinese Food Maven.

From old-schoolers such as David Fox, third-generation owner of Fox’s U-bet syrup, and the outspoken Upper West Side butcher “Schatzie,” to new kids on the block including Patrick Collins, sous chef at The Dutch, and Brooklyn artisan Lauren Clark of Sucre Mort Pralines, Food and the City is a fascinating oral history with an unforgettable gallery of New Yorkers who embody the heart and soul of a culinary metropolis.

Also chats with Mohamed Abouelenein about Halal Guys; Jalena Pasic (Harlem Shake); Noe Baltazar; Wilson Tang (Nom Wah Tea Parlor); Bobby Weiss (blue Ribbon Fish); Amy Rubenstein i(Peter Luger) Alexander Puolos (Papaya King); Carmen Melendez (Tom Cat Bakery); Justo Thomas; Sandy Ingber (Grand Central Oyster); Burt Leventhal; Sylvia Weinstock; Ed Schoenfeld; Miriam Tsionov; Bryce Schuman; and Connie McDOnald and Pam Weeks from Levain Bakery; and many more.


























[book] The Book of Esther
A Novel
by Emily Barton
June 14, 2016
Tim Duggan Books
What if an empire of Jewish warriors that really existed in the Middle Ages had never fallen—and was the only thing standing between Hitler and his conquest of Russia?
Eastern Europe, August 1942. The Khazar kaganate, an isolated nation of Turkic warrior Jews, lies between the Pontus Euxinus (the Black Sea) and the Khazar Sea (the Caspian). It also happens to lie between a belligerent nation to the west that the Khazars call Germania—and a city the rest of the world calls Stalingrad.
After years of Jewish refugees streaming across the border from Europa, fleeing the war, Germania launches its siege of Khazaria. Only Esther, the daughter of the nation’s chief policy adviser, sees the ominous implications of Germania's disregard for Jewish lives. Only she realizes that this isn’t just another war but an existential threat. After witnessing the enemy warplanes’ first foray into sovereign Khazar territory, Esther knows she must fight for her country. But as the elder daughter in a traditional home, her urgent question is how.
Before daybreak one fateful morning, she embarks on a perilous journey across the open steppe. She seeks a fabled village of Kabbalists who may hold the key to her destiny: their rumored ability to change her into a man so that she may convince her entire nation to join in the fight for its very existence against an enemy like none Khazaria has ever faced before.
The Book of Esther is a profound saga of war, technology, mysticism, power, and faith. This novel—simultaneously a steampunk Joan of Arc and a genre-bending tale of a counterfactual Jewish state by a writer who invents worlds “out of Calvino or Borges” (The New Yorker)—is a stunning achievement. Reminiscent of Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Union and Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America, The Book of Esther reaffirms Barton’s place as one of her generation’s most gifted storytellers.






















[book] How God Became God:
What Scholars Are Really
Saying About God and the Bible
by Richard M. Smoley (Gnosis)
June 2016
Penguin Random House Tarcher Perigree
This epic, thrilling journey through Bible scholarship and ancient religion shows how much of Scripture is historically false--yet the ancient writings also resound with theologies that crisscrossed the primeval world and that direct us today toward a deep, inner, authentic experience of the truly sacred.
From a historical perspective, the Bible is shockingly, provably wrong--a point supported by today's best archaeological and historical scholarship but not well understood by (or communicated to) the public. Yet this emphatically does not mean that the Bible isn't, in some very real measure, true, argues scholar of mysticism Richard Smoley.
Smoley reviews the most authoritative historical evidence to demonstrate that figures such as Moses, Abraham, and Jesus are not only unlikely to have existed, but bear strong composite resemblances to other Near Eastern religious icons. Likewise, the geopolitical and military events of Scripture fail to mesh with the largely settled historical time line and social structures. Smoley meticulously shows how our concepts of the Hebrew and Christian God, and the creation of Christ himself, are an assemblage of ideas that were altered, argued over, and edited--until their canonization. This process, to a large degree, gave Western civilization its consensus view of God.
But these conclusions are not cause for nihilism or disbelief. Rather, beneath the metaphorical figures and mythical historicism of Scripture appears an extraordinary, truly transcendent theology born from the most sacred and fully realized spiritual and human insights of the antique Eastern world. Far from being "untrue," the Bible is remarkably, extraordinarily true as it connects us to the sublime insights of our ancient ancestors and points to a unifying ethic behind many of the world's faiths.






















[book] HITLER’S COMPROMISES
Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany
By Nathan Stoltzfus
June 2016
Yale University Press
History has focused on Hitler’s use of charisma and terror, asserting that the dictator made few concessions to maintain power. Nathan Stoltzfus, the award-winning author of Resistance of Heart: Intermarriage and the Rosenstrasse Protest in Germany, challenges this notion, assessing the surprisingly frequent tactical compromises Hitler made in order to preempt hostility and win the German people’s complete fealty.
As part of his strategy to secure a “1,000-year Reich,” Hitler sought to convince the German people to believe in Nazism so they would perpetuate it permanently and actively shun those who were out of step with society. When widespread public dissent occurred at home—which most often happened when policies conflicted with popular traditions or encroached on private life—Hitler made careful calculations and acted strategically to maintain his popular image. Extending from the 1920s to the regime’s collapse, this revealing history makes a powerful and original argument that will inspire a major rethinking of Hitler’s rule.

























[book] THE FALLOUT
A novel
By Tamar Cohen
June 2016 (USA)
Mira
Dan and Sasha are Josh and Hannah's closest friends, and lately they all seem to spend more time with each other than they do apart. But cozy weekends together quickly dissolve into a bitter game of tug-of-war when Dan utters three treacherous little words: I'm leaving her.
Dan fully expects Josh to defend his choices—and that includes welcoming the sexy young model he's suddenly dating. Meanwhile, Dan's soon-to-be-ex-wife Sasha is devastated—dangerously so—by his betrayal, and she leans heavily on Hannah for support. Though Josh and Hannah try desperately to avoid the fallout of their friends' battle, they're quickly engulfed by the poisonous fog of attack lawyers, ugly accusations and untimely revelations. Soon they're suffocating in Dan and Sasha's secrets…and their own.
Darkly witty and utterly chilling, The Fallout exposes the volatile nature of divorce—and the new lovers, obsessions and broken relationships that are left in its wake.
























[book] FAMOUS NATHAN
A Family Saga of Coney Island
The American Dream
And the Search for the Perfect Hot Dog
By Lloyd Handwerker
June 21, 2016… the first day of Summer, of course
Flatiron
Beginning with just five feet of counter space on Coney Island in 1916, Nathan’s Famous - based on the basic principles of quality ingredients, hard work and a price everyone could afford -soon stretched across the globe, launching the hotdog as an American food staple and Nathan Handwerker to national fame. But the story behind the dog is even tastier...
Fleeing Eastern Europe as the shadow of WWI looms large with nothing but twenty dollars in his socks, Nathan arrives in New York with the insatiable desire to make a better life, and within two years he sets up a shop of his own, hawking frankfurters for five cents at the sleepy little beach retreat of Coney Island. As New York booms, pushing trains and patrons to the shore, so too do Nathan's humble hotdogs. Within ten years he has the whole corner, and a brand as recognizable as Coca-Cola and Cracker Jack. Nathan's is famous.
But with success comes difficulties, and as Nathan's two sons vie to inherit the family dynasty a story of Biblical proportions plays out, mirroring the corporatization of the American food industry.
Written by Nathan's own grandson, and at once a portrait of a man, a family and the changing face of a nation through a century of promise and progress, Famous Nathan is a dog's tale that snaps and satisfies with every page.




















[book] GRUNT
The Curious Science of Humans at War
by Mary Roach
June 2016
Norton
Best-selling author Mary Roach explores the science of keeping human beings intact, awake, sane, uninfected, and un-infested in the bizarre and extreme circumstances of war.
Grunt tackles the science behind some of a soldier’s most challenging adversaries?panic, exhaustion, heat, noise?and introduces us to the scientists who seek to conquer them. Mary Roach dodges hostile fire with the U.S. Marine Corps Paintball Team as part of a study on hearing loss and survivability in combat. She visits the fashion design studio of U.S. Army Natick Labs and learns why a zipper is a problem for a sniper. She visits a repurposed movie studio where amputee actors help prepare Marine Corps medics for the shock and gore of combat wounds.
At Camp Lemmonier, Djibouti, in East Africa, we learn how diarrhea can be a threat to national security.
The author samples caffeinated meat, sniffs an archival sample of a World War II stink bomb, and stays up all night with the crew tending the missiles on the nuclear submarine USS Tennessee.
She answers questions not found in any other book on the military: Why is DARPA interested in ducks? How is a wedding gown like a bomb suit? Why are shrimp more dangerous to sailors than sharks? Take a tour of duty with Roach, and you’ll never see our nation’s defenders in the same way again.




















[book] FIGURES OF MEMORY
The Rhetoric of Displacement
At the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum
By Michael Bernard-Donals
University of Wisconsin
June 2016
SUNY Press
"Figures of Memory" examines how the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC, uses its space and the design of its exhibits to move its visitors to memory. From the objects and their placement to the architectural design of the building and the floor plan, the USHMM was meant to teach visitors about the Holocaust. But what Michael Bernard-Donals found is that while they learn, and remember, the Holocaust, visitors also call to mind other, sometimes unrelated memories. Partly this is because memory itself works in multidirectional ways, but partly it is because of decisions made in the planning that led to the creation of the museum.


























[book] THE WISDOM OF SOLOMON AND US
The Quest for Meaning, Morality and a
Deeper Relationship with God
BY RABBI MARC D. ANGEL, PhD
Jewish Lights Press
June 2016
From Seattle bred Rabbi Emeritus of Congregation Shearith Israel in Manhattan, now leader of jewishideas.org
A profound examination of the evolution of King Solomon's wisdom-from philosophical to moralistic to spiritual-and its meaning for our own searching spirits.
The modern age is characterized by radical change, spiritual malaise and societal turmoil. We are barraged by more information and misinformation than earlier generations and although we seem to have access to more data, we also seem to feel less comfortable about the meaning of our lives. We sometimes do not take the time to ponder the really important questions of life: Why are we here? What is the purpose of our lives? How can we attain genuine wisdom? What are the basic foundations of morality? How can we come closer to God?
In this fascinating search for answers, Rabbi Marc D. Angel, PhD, draws on the teachings of the Hebrew Bible’s model of wisdom, King Solomon. Beginning with passages from Ecclesiastes, Rabbi Angel probes the questions of life’s meaning and mission, the significance of each human being in the vastness of space and eternity of time. Using Proverbs, he offers reflections on ethics and righteousness. He concludes with passages from Song of Songs, with meditations on love, spirituality and relationship with God.
More than biblical commentary, Rabbi Angel offers a series of intriguing contemporary reflections inspired by the issues raised in the wisdom texts attributed to the ancient King Solomon. Readers who seek a thoughtful, challenging and spiritually vibrant approach to life will find this book to be a valuable guide, a book to be read again and again.




















[book] Grace Without God
The Search for Meaning,
Purpose, and Belonging in a Secular Age
by Katherine Ozment
Harper Wave
June 2016
Meet “the Nones”—In this thought-provoking exploration of secular America, celebrated journalist Katherine Ozment takes readers on a quest to understand the trends and ramifications of a nation in flight from organized religion. Studies show that religion makes us happier, healthier and more giving, connecting us to our past and creating tight communal bonds. Most Americans are raised in a religious tradition, but in recent decades many have begun to leave religion, and with it their ancient rituals, mythic narratives, and sense of belonging.
So how do the nonreligious fill the need for ritual, story, community, and, above all, purpose and meaning without the one-stop shop of religion? What do they do with the space left after religion? With Nones swelling to one-fourth of American adults, and more than one-third of those under thirty, these questions have never been more urgent.
Writer, journalist, and secular mother of three Katherine Ozment came face-to-face with the fundamental issue of the Nones when her son asked her the simplest of questions: “what are we?” Unsettled by her reply—“Nothing”—she set out on a journey to find a better answer. She traversed the frontier of American secular life, sought guidance in science and the humanities, talked with noted scholars, and wrestled with her own family’s attempts to find meaning and connection after religion.
Insightful, surprising, and compelling, Grace Without God is both a personal and critical exploration of the many ways nonreligious Americans create their own meaning and purpose in an increasingly secular age.
























[book] Modern Lovers
A novel
by Emma Straub
Riverhead
2016
Friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring.
Back in the band's heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed.
Straub packs wisdom and insight and humor together in a satisfying book about neighbors and nosiness, ambition and pleasure, the excitement of youth, the shock of middle age, and the fact that our passions—be they food, or friendship, or music—never go away, they just evolve and grow along with us.
























[book] Kanye West Owes Me $300:
And Other True Stories from a
White Rapper Who Almost Made It Big
by Jensen Karp
Penguin Random House
June 2016
also known as
And Other True Stories from a
Jewish Rapper Who Almost Made It Big
After Vanilla Ice, but before Eminem, there was "Hot Karl," the Jewish kid from the L.A. suburbs who became a rap battling legend—and then almost became a star.
When 12-year old Jensen Karp got his first taste of rapping for crowds at his friend's bar mitzvah in 1991, little did he know that he was taking his first step on a crazy journey—one that would end with a failed million-dollar recording and publishing deal with Interscope Records when he was only 19. Now, in Kanye West Owes Me $300, Karp finally tells the true story of his wild ride as "Hot Karl," the most famous white rapper you've never heard of.
On his way to (almost) celebrity, Jensen shares his childhood run-ins with rock-listening, southern California classmates, who tell him that "rap is for black people," and then recounts his record-breaking rap battling streak on popular radio contest “The Roll Call”—a run that caught the eye of a music industry hungry for new rap voices in the early ‘00s. He also introduces his rap partner, Rickye, who constitutes the second half of their group XTra Large; his supportive mom, who performs with him onstage; and the soon-to-be-household-name artists he records with, including Kanye West, Redman, Fabolous, Mya, and will.i.am. Finally, he reveals why his album never saw the light of day (two words: Slim Shady), the downward spiral he suffered after, and what he found instead of rap glory.
Full of rollicking stories from his close brush with fame, Karp’s hilarious memoir is the ultimate fish-out-of-water story about a guy who follows an unlikely passion—trying to crack the rap game—despite what everyone else says. It’s 30 Rock for the rap set; 8 Mile for the suburbs; and quite the journey for a white kid from the valley.

























[book] The Drone Eats with Me
A Gaza Diary
by Atef Abu Saif, PhD
Beacon Press
July 5, 2016
An ordinary Gazan's (if a Phd in political and social studies is ordinary) chronicle of the surviving during Israel’s 2014 invasion of Gaza.
The fifty-day Israel-Gaza conflict that began in early July of 2014 left over 2,100 dead. Over 13,000 were wounded, and 17,200 homes/apartments/flats in Gaza were demolished during the fighting.
These statistics are sadly familiar, as is the political rhetoric from Israeli and Palestinian authorities alike
Atef Abu Saif, a writer and teacher from Jabalia refugee camp, whose eyewitness accounts (published in the Guardian, New York Times, and elsewhere) offered a window into the conflict for Western readers. Here, Abu Saif’s complete diaries of the war allow us to witness the events of 2014 from the perspective of a young father, fearing for his family’s safety. In The Drone Eats with Me, Abu Saif brings readers a glimpse of life during wartime, as he, his wife, and his two young children attempt to live their lives with a sense of normalcy, in spite of the ever-present danger and carnage that is swallowing the place they call home.





















[book] Barons of the Beltway:
Inside the Princely World of Our
Washington Elite--and
How to Overthrow Them
by Michelle Fields
June 21, 2016
Crown Forum

On March 8, 2016, the author of this book was covering the Donald Trump campaign for Breitbart when Trump's campaign manager accosted her and grabbed her. The campaign denied it. But videos showed it was true. Assault charges against Corey Lewandowski were dropped (don't forget he isnt some country bumpkin campaign manager.... just google his name with convicted felon Jack Abramoff). Breitbart was wishywashy, so Fields quit their wussy organization. The incident only reinforced the scams and entitlements of campaigns, politicians and media personalities and organizations.
Which is the thesis of her book

From reporter and Fox News contributor Michelle Fields, a revelation of how the corruption and waste in American politics begins with our elected politicians, and how to take the country back from those that extort its values for personal gain.
Our Founding Fathers rejected the notion of royalty and fought against extravagance, pomp, and circumstance. But today in Washington, members of the United States government enjoy lifestyle perks that would make Marie Antoinette envious. Our public servants are chauffeured to their Capitol Hill offices by town cars even when they live only two blocks away. They enjoy their own taxpayer-subsidized Senate Hair Care Services, vacation with their families in exotic locations for free, and exempt themselves and their friends from the laws that they create.
In Barons of the Beltway, Fox News contributor Michelle Fields exposes the hidden perks, the freebies, and the ego stroking that define life for a political class that is out of touch and out to lunch. Put under the spotlight are figures such as Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, and Vice President Joe Biden, who continue to abuse their power, build their personal fortunes, and climb up the Washington ladder. And, while our Founding Fathers started a revolution to break away from a monarchy, it's clear that America is beginning to have one of its own.
Barons of the Beltway reveals how to overthrow our political class in order to return to the principles the Founding Fathers originally envisioned for America—a country of greater opportunity that we can pass onto the next generations.




























[book] Enchanted Islands:
A Novel
by Allison Amend
2016
Nan A. Talese
From the finalist for a Sami Rohr Prize in Jewish Literature.
Inspired by the midcentury memoirs of Frances Conway, Enchanted Islands is the dazzling story of an independent American woman whose path takes her far from her native Minnesota when she and her husband, an undercover intelligence officer, are sent to the Galápagos Islands at the brink of World War II.

Galapagos? Is this a story of EVOLUTION and Jewish Adaptation?

Frances Conway??
Born in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1882 to poor, immigrant parents, Frances Frankowski covets the life of her best friend, Rosalie Mendel, who has everything Fanny could wish for — money, parents who value education, and an effervescent and winning personality. But Roslaie is moody, filled with outbursts and secrets. When, at age fifteen, Rosalie decides they should run away to Chicago, Fanny jumps at the chance to escape her unexceptional life.
While still in their teens, the girls run away to Chicago. Desperate to find a place to stay, they have the genius idea to seek out Jewish synagogues whose members may be willing to help them. In a comedy-inflected women’s auxiliary board scene circa 1900, Rosalie succeeds in playing up their plight to find temporary lodging with a family. They’re given room and board in exchange for Rosalie taking care of one synagogue matron’s ailing, aged mother. Meanwhile, Fanny finds a job in an office where everyone appears equally comfortable conversing in English or Yiddish — and discovers romance with a nice Jewish boy who teaches her about Herzl and Zionism.
But, within a year, Rosalie commits an unforgivable betrayal, inciting Frances to strike out on her own. She changes her name and erases her Jewish past; she lives the life of a spinster… perfect for intelligence work.

Decades later, the women reconnect in San Francisco and realize how widely their lives have diverged. While Rosalie is a housewife and mother, Frances works as a secretary for the Office of Naval Intelligence. There she is introduced to Ainslie Conway, an intelligence operator ten years her junior. When it’s arranged for Frances (nee Frank) and Ainslie to marry and carry out a mission on the Galápagos Islands, the couple’s identities—already hidden from each other—are further buried under their new cover stories. No longer a lonely spinster, Frances is about to begin the most fascinating and intrigue-filled years of her life.
Amid active volcanoes, forbidding wildlife and flora, and unfriendly neighbors, Ainslie and Frances carve out a life for themselves. But the secrets they harbor from their enemies and from each other may be their undoing.
Drawing on the rich history of the early twentieth century and set against a large, colorful canvas, Enchanted Islands boldly examines the complexity of female friendship, the universal pursuit of a place to call home, and the reverberations of secrets we keep from others and from ourselves.



























[book] The Way to the Spring:
Life and Death in Palestine
by Ben Ehrenreich
June 2016
Penguin
Ehrenreich immerses himself into the everyday life of some Palestinian families
Over the past three years, American writer Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to and living in the West Bank of the Jordan, staying with Palestinian families in its largest cities and its smallest villages. Along the way he has written major stories for American outlets, including a New York Times Magazine cover story. Now comes the new work that has always been his ultimate goal, The Way to the Spring.
In Ehrenreich’s POV and his personal world view, Palestine is ruled by the Israeli military and Israeli settlers harass Palestinians daily; fences are suffocating; as are checkpoints, which create barriers in life and limit access to fields, homes, schools, stores, families. Many stories ae anecdoatal and try to make a larger point. But he also shows that some people act strategically to fit their national narrative.
Ehrenreich also doesn't seem to call events terrorism, even the Sbarro pizza attack that killed children. He likes to say fighting occupation and resistance. He also enjoys using the word apartheid. The New York Times review said it was a love letter to Palestine. It also says it is NOT a polemic. Well, okay, if you say so.
The book blurb says that the author is “brave and empathetic.” You can be the judge. Ben Ehrenreich, by placing us in the footsteps of ordinary Palestinians, tells a story with grace.



























[book] Deathbed Wisdom of
the Hasidic Masters:
The Book of Departure and Caring
for People at the End of Life
Translated by Rabbi Joel H Baron and
Rabbi Sara Paasche-Orlow
Foreword by Dr. Arthur Green
2016
Jewish Lights

From two Boston area rabbis who work with death and illness on a daily basis, we learn that death is a time of life that holds meaning for the dying, their families and friends, their community - and us.
Students of the Hasidic masters wrote down the stories of the last months, days, hours and moments of the lives of their rebbes. A compilation of their experiences, called The Book of Departure (Sefer haHistalkut), first published in Hebrew in 1930, brings together the rich end-of-life stories of forty-two holy men who died between 1760 and 1904, as well as their philosophical forebearer, Isaac Luria.
Featuring new pastoral commentary in a unique facing-page format, this English presentation of heart-touching deathbed tales sheds light on Jewish traditions about death, the afterlife and how to care for people in their final days

"Most of Torah's teaching is about how to live. But there is a special section within its wisdom that also speaks to us about how to die. Since we are all mortals, our lives fashioned somehow around the awareness that death is inevitably to come, this is one of the important lessons…. There is something profound to be learned about the way of dying, and it is best learned from the wisdom and stories of those who have gone before us." -from the Foreword






























[book] Becoming a Soulful Educator:
How to Bring Jewish Learning
from Our Minds, to Our Hearts,
to Our Souls and Into Our Lives
by Rabbi Aryeh Ben David
Foreword by Dr. Erica Brown
June 2016
Jewish Lights
The time has come for a new GPS in education. The goal is no longer to teach a good class, to convey information or even to have the students enjoy the learning. Soulful education is about enabling another-child, adolescent, adult-to discover how to become his or her best self through learning.
In this bold revisioning of effective education, renowned educator Rabbi Aryeh Ben David recalibrates the focus of teaching from the acquisition of knowledge to the transformation of the soul. He presents six steps to help educators of all kinds teach to the heart, engage students in knowledge gathering without preaching or controlling, and enable students to authentically and personally integrate Jewish wisdom into their lives. He offers guidance for how teachers can share their own vulnerabilities and yearnings to become a better force of harmony to help students gain new clarity on their own infinite potential for positive change.
This is the essential guidebook for everyone from educators and rabbis to parents and grandparents-anyone working in formal or informal education, whether for children, teens, emerging adults, adults or seniors.



















[book] About the Night
by Anat Talshir
Translated from Hebrew by Evan Fallenberg
June 2016
AmazonCrossing paperback
Anat Talshir has been one of Israel’s most distinguished investigative journalists for over thirty years. She has hosted a television show on current affairs and taught creative writing at the College of Management Academic Studies. Talshir has written and produced several documentaries, including the award-winning program Israel’s Next War? In 2002 she was awarded the Nahum Sokolov Prize for best journalism (the Israeli Pulitzer).

On a hot summer day in 1947, on a grandstand overlooking Jerusalem, Elias and Lila fall deeply, irrevocably in love.
Tragically, they come from two different worlds. Elias is a Christian Arab living on the eastern side of the newly divided city, and Lila is a Jew living on the western side. A growing conflict between their cultures casts a heavy shadow over the region and their burgeoning relationship. Between them lie not only a wall of stone and barbed wire but also the bitter enmity of two nations at war.
Told in the voice of Elias as he looks back upon the long years of his life, About the Night is a timely story of how hope can nourish us, loss can devastate us, and love can carry us beyond the boundaries that hold human beings apart.



















[book] Broken Angels
by Gemma Liviero
2016
Lake Union Books
From an Australian novelist. A Nazi doctor. A Jewish rebel. A little girl. Each one will fight for freedom—or die trying. Imprisoned in the Lodz Ghetto, Elsi discovers her mother’s desperate attempt to end her pregnancy and comes face-to-face with the impossibility of their situation. Risking her own life, Elsi joins a resistance group to sabotage the regime.
Blonde, blue-eyed Matilda is wrenched from her family in Romania and taken to Germany, where her captors attempt to mold her into the perfect Aryan child. Spirited and brave, she must inspire hope in the other stolen children to make her dreams of escape a reality. Willem, a high-ranking Nazi doctor, plans to save lives when he takes posts in both the ghetto and Auschwitz. After witnessing unimaginable cruelties, he begins to question his role and the future of those he is ordered to destroy.
While Hitler ransacks Europe in pursuit of a pure German race, the lives of three broken souls—thrown together by chance—intertwine. Only love and sacrifice might make them whole again.



















[book] Encountering God:
El Rachum V'chanunGod
Merciful and Gracious
(Prayers of Awe Series)
Edited by Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman PhD
June 2016
Jewish Lights
It is time to recover rabbinic lessons of late antiquity: God is a God of grace and love; human beings can aspire to goodness and promise; on Yom Kippur the two of them meet God's love energizes human potential and the world is reborn with hope restored.
The God of Jewish tradition is far from the strict God of justice commonly understood to be the God of the Hebrew Bible. God s self-introduction to Moses atop Mount Sinai does indeed conclude with the image of punishment throughout the generations but begins with "God merciful and gracious," the imagery that finds its way into rabbinic liturgy and lore as solely the God of grace and compassion, pardon and love.
To arrive at this selective perception of biblical tradition, the Rabbis of the Talmud deliberately misread the biblical text, and then fashioned a myth of God who dresses up as a leader of prayer and promises pardon if Israel will only repeat these merciful attributes as part of its prayer ritual on that day. Ever since, the Thirteen Attributes as the list comes to be known becomes central to Jewish prayer, accompanying the liturgy for holidays generally, and framing the opening and closing services of the holiest day in the Jewish year, Yom Kippur, the Day of Judgment itself.
In this seventh volume in the Prayers of Awe Series, contributors men and women, rabbis and laypeople, scholars and artists from across the spectrum of Jewish life, and representing the US, Israel, the UK, Germany, France, Canada, and Australia chart the importance of these Thirteen Attributes of God. They explore the kind of God Jews meet in prayer and the consequent self-reflection about the human condition that Judaism recommends on the basis of its idealized image of God as, above all, merciful and gracious.






















[book] JudaismS:
A Twenty-First-Century Introduction
to Jews and Jewish Identities
by Aaron J. Hahn Tapper, PhD
June 2016
University of California
A Textbook
What does it mean to be a Jew in the twenty-first century? Exploring the multifaceted and intensely complicated characteristics of this age-old, ever-changing community, Judaisms examines how Jews are a culture, ethnicity, nation, nationality, race, religion, and more. With each chapter revolving around a single theme (Narratives, Sinais, Zions, Messiahs, Laws, Mysticisms, Cultures, Movements, Genocides, Powers, Borders, and Futures) this introductory textbook interrogates and broadens readers’ understandings of Jewish communities. Written for a new mode of teaching—one that recognizes the core role that identity formation plays in our lives—this book weaves together alternative and marginalized voices to illustrate how Jews have always been in the process of reshaping their customs, practices, and beliefs. Judaisms is the first book to assess and summarize Jewish history from the time of the Hebrew Bible through today using multiple perspectives.

Ideal for classroom use, Judaisms provides a synthetic and coherent alternative understanding of Jewish identity for students of all backgrounds;
focuses on both the history of and potential futures for physical and ideological survival;
includes an array of engaging images, many in color;
offers extensive online resources including notes, key terms, a timeline of major texts, and chapter-by-chapter activities for teaching.



















[book] Chaos Monkeys
Obscene Fortune and Random
Failure in Silicon Valley
by Antonio Garcia Martinez
June 2016
Harper
Life in the Silicon Valley for a high flyer
Antonio García Martínez, a former Twitter advisor, Facebook product manager and startup founder/CEO.
Marketing is like sex: only losers pay for it.
Imagine a chimpanzee rampaging through a datacenter powering everything from Google to Facebook. Infrastructure engineers use a software version of this “chaos monkey” to test online services’ robustness—their ability to survive random failure and correct mistakes before they actually occur. Tech entrepreneurs are society’s chaos monkeys, disruptors testing and transforming every aspect of our lives, from transportation (Uber) and lodging (AirBnB) to television (Netflix) and dating (Tinder). One of Silicon Valley’s most audacious chaos monkeys is Antonio García Martínez.
After stints on Wall Street and as CEO of his own startup, García Martínez joined Facebook’s nascent advertising team, turning its users’ data into profit for COO Sheryl Sandberg and chairman and CEO Mark “Zuck” Zuckerberg. Forced out in the wake of an internal product war over the future of the company’s monetization strategy, García Martínez eventually landed at rival Twitter. He also fathered two children with a woman he barely knew, committed lewd acts and brewed illegal beer on the Facebook campus (accidentally flooding Zuckerberg's desk), lived on a sailboat, raced sport cars on the 101, and enthusiastically pursued the life of an overpaid Silicon Valley wastrel.
Now, this smug contrarian unravels the chaotic evolution of social media and online marketing and reveals how it is invading our lives and shaping our future. Weighing in on everything from startups and credit derivatives to Big Brother and data tracking, social media monetization and digital “privacy,” García Martínez shares his scathing observations and outrageous antics, taking us on a humorous, subversive tour of the fascinatingly insular tech industry. Chaos Monkeys lays bare the hijinks, trade secrets, and power plays of the visionaries, grunts, sociopaths, opportunists, accidental tourists, and money cowboys who are revolutionizing our world.






















[book] Altruism:
The Power of Compassion to Change
Yourself and the World
by Matthieu Ricard
NOW IN PAPERBACK
June 2016
Little, Brown and Company
A genius for our times – Daniel Goleman
"A careful, detailed, hard-nosed assessment of what is needed both for individual happiness and for the welfare of the planet.... This book is so rich, so diverse...that it is best kept as an inspiring resource to be consulted over many years." Wall Street Journal
Matthieu Ricard, author of the international bestseller Happiness, makes the passionate case for altruism-genuine concern for the well-being of others. Presenting a vision based on decades of firsthand experience and scientific studies, Matthieu Ricard illuminates how altruism can answer the main challenges of our time: economic inequality, life satisfaction, and environment sustainability. In this riveting book, he champions the cultivation of altruistic love as the best means for simultaneously benefitting ourselves and our global society, and offers readers practical and inspiring ways to develop





























[book] The Nordic Theory of Everything:
In Search of a Better Life
By Anu Partanen
June 2016
Harper
A Finnish journalist, now a naturalized American citizen, asks Americans to draw on elements of the Nordic way of life to nurture a fairer, happier, more secure, and less stressful society for themselves and their children.

She has some anecdotes, and glosses over that sales tax in some Nordic countries is 25%
The WSJ writes: “her confrontation with the American health-care apparatus produces so much heavy breathing that one fears she might pass out. After trying to navigate the tangle of private health insurance, the author looked outside and “no longer saw Brooklyn. All I saw was Burkina Faso.””

Moving to America in 2008, Finnish journalist Anu Partanen quickly went from confident, successful professional to wary, self-doubting mess who needed anti anxiety medication. She found that navigating the basics of everyday life—from buying a cell phone and filing taxes to education and childcare—was much more complicated and stressful than anything she encountered in her homeland. At first, she attributed her crippling anxiety to the difficulty of adapting to a freewheeling new culture. But as she got to know Americans better, she discovered they shared her deep apprehension. To understand why life is so different in the U.S. and Finland, Partanen began to look closely at both.
In The Nordic Theory of Everything, Partanen compares and contrasts life in the United States with life in the Nordic region, focusing on four key relationships—parents and children, men and women, employees and employers, and government and citizens. She debunks criticism that Nordic countries are socialist “nanny states,” revealing instead that it is we Americans who are far more enmeshed in unhealthy dependencies than we realize. As Partanen explains step by step, the Nordic approach allows citizens to enjoy more individual freedom and independence than we do.
Partanen wants to open Americans’ eyes to how much better things can be—to show her beloved new country what it can learn from her homeland to reinvigorate and fulfill the promise of the American dream—to provide the opportunity to live a healthy, safe, economically secure, upwardly mobile life for everyone. Offering insights, advice, and solutions, The Nordic Theory of Everything makes a convincing argument that we can rebuild our society, rekindle our optimism, and restore true freedom to our relationships and lives.

The author forgets to mention that youth unemployment in Finland is 20%. She praises Spotify and Skype as innovative firms, but doesnt mention that they threatened to leave Scandanavia due to high taxes.. haha.
Yet, a fun read.





























[book] They May Not Mean To,
But They Do:
A Novel
by Cathleen Schine
2016
Sarah Crichton Books
From one of America’s greatest comic novelists, a hilarious new novel about aging, family, loneliness, and love
The Bergman clan has always stuck together, growing as it incorporated in-laws, ex-in-laws, and same-sex spouses. But families don’t just grow, they grow old, and the clan’s matriarch, Joy, is not slipping into old age with the quiet grace her children, Molly and Daniel, would have wished. When Joy’s beloved husband dies, Molly and Daniel have no shortage of solutions for their mother’s loneliness and despair, but there is one challenge they did not count on: the reappearance of an ardent suitor from Joy’s college days. And they didn’t count on Joy herself, a mother suddenly as willful and rebellious as their own kids.
The New York Times–bestselling author Cathleen Schine has been called “full of invention, wit, and wisdom that can bear comparison to [ Jane] Austen’s own” (The New York Review of Books), and she is at her best in this intensely human, profound, and honest novel about the intrusion of old age into the relationships of one loving but complicated family. They May Not Mean To, But They Do is a radiantly compassionate look at three generations, all coming of age together.






























[book] Operation Whisper:
The Capture of Soviet Spies
Morris and Lona Cohen
by Barnes Carr
2016
ForeEdge/UPNE
Meet Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living on a teacher’s salary in a nondescript building on the East Side of New York City. On a hot afternoon in the autumn of 1950, a trusted colleague knocked at their door, held up a finger for silence, then began scribbling a note: Go now. Leave the lights on, walk out, don’t look back.
Born and raised in the Bronx and recruited to play football at Mississippi State, Morris Cohen fought for the Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War and with the U.S. Army in World War II. He and his wife, Lona, were as American as football and fried chicken, but for one detail: they’d spent their entire adult lives stealing American military secrets for the Soviet Union. And not just any military secrets, but a complete working plan of the first atomic bomb, smuggled direct from Los Alamos to their Soviet handler in New York. Their associates Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who accomplished far less, had just been arrested, and the prosecutor wanted the death penalty. Did the Cohens wish to face the same fate? Federal agents were in the neighborhood, knocking on doors, getting close. So get out. Take nothing. Tell no one.
In Operation Whisper, Barnes Carr tells the full, true story of the most effective Soviet spy couple in America, a pair who vanished under the FBI’s nose only to turn up posing as rare book dealers in London, where they continued their atomic spying. The Cohens were talented, dedicated, worldly spies—an urbane, jet-set couple loyal to their service and their friends, and very good at their work. Most people they met seemed to think they represented the best of America. The Soviets certainly thought so.




























JULY 2016 BOOKS




[book] Critics, Monsters, Fanatics,
and Other Literary Essays
by Cynthia Ozick
July 2016
HMH
In a collection that includes new essays written explicitly for this volume, one of our sharpest and most influential critics confronts the past, present, and future of literary culture.
If every outlet for book criticism suddenly disappeared — if all we had were reviews that treated books like any other commodity — could the novel survive? In a gauntlet-throwing essay at the start of this brilliant assemblage, Cynthia Ozick stakes the claim that, just as surely as critics require a steady supply of new fiction, novelists need great critics to build a vibrant community on the foundation of literary history. For decades, Ozick herself has been one of our great critics, as these essays so clearly display. She offers models of critical analysis of writers from the mid-twentieth century to today, from Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, and Kafka, to William Gass and Martin Amis, all assembled in provocatively named groups: Fanatics, Monsters, Figures, and others. Uncompromising and brimming with insight, these essays are essential reading for anyone facing the future of literature in the digital age.






















[book] The Black Widow
(A Gabriel Allon Spy Thriller)
by Daniel Silva
July 12, 2016
Harper
#1 New York Times bestselling author Daniel Silva delivers another spellbinding international thriller—one that finds the legendary Gabriel Allon grappling with an ISIS mastermind.

Gabriel Allon, the art restorer, spy, and assassin described as the most compelling fictional creation "since Ian Fleming put down his martini and invented James Bond" (Rocky Mountain News), is poised to become the chief of Israel’s secret intelligence service. But on the eve of his promotion, events conspire to lure him into the field for one final operation. ISIS has detonated a massive bomb in the Marais district of Paris, and a desperate French government wants Gabriel to eliminate the man responsible before he can strike again.

Acclaimed novelist Daniel Silva has thrilled, entertained and educated readers with eighteen thoughtful and gripping spy novels featuring a diverse cast of compelling characters and ingenious plots that have taken them around the globe and back—from the United States to Europe, Russia to the Middle East. From its shocking opening to its explosive denouement in Washington, D.C., The Black Widow reveals itself as Silva’s most timely and powerful novel yet. Following the success of his smash hit The English Spy, this electrifying thriller showcases Silva’s consummate skill and brilliant imagination, and is sure to be a must read for his multitude of current and future fans.
























[book] The Last Woman Standing:
A Novel –
based on the life of Mrs. Wyatt Earp
by Thelma Adams
July 2016
Lake Union Press
Two decades after the Civil War, Josephine Marcus, the teenage daughter of Jewish immigrants, is lured west with the promise of marriage to Johnny Behan, one of Arizona’s famous lawmen. She leaves her San Francisco home to join Behan in Tombstone, Arizona, a magnet for miners (and outlaws) attracted by the silver boom. Though united by the glint of metal, Tombstone is plagued by divided loyalties: between Confederates and Unionists, Lincoln Republicans and Democrats.

But when the silver-tongued Behan proves unreliable, it is legendary frontiersman Wyatt Earp who emerges as Josephine’s match. As the couple’s romance sparks, Behan’s jealousy ignites a rivalry destined for the history books…

At once an epic account of an improbable romance and a retelling of an iconic American tale, The Last Woman Standing recalls the famed gunfight at the O.K. Corral through the eyes of a spunky heroine who sought her happy ending in a lawless outpost—with a fierce will and an unflagging spirit.





























[book] BUSH
BY JEAN EDWARD SMITH
July 5, 2016
Simon & Schuster

See page 205 for the part about Bush, Barak, Sharon, Brent Scowcroft as a proxy for Bush Senior, and the Saudis…

The first sentence is “Rarely in the history of the United States has the nation been so ill-served as during the presidency of George W. Bush.” By the book’s last sentence, the author is predicting a long debate over whether Bush “was the worst president in American history,” and his decision to invade Iraq was easily the worst foreign policy decision ever made by an American president.
Distinguished presidential biographer Jean Edward Smith offers a critical biography of President George W. Bush, showing how he ignored his advisors to make key decisions himself — most disastrously in invading Iraq — and how these decisions were often driven by the President’s deep religious Christian, even swaggering messianic piety and faith.
Smith seems to rely on other books, some of them gossip books, and not extensive interviews. Plus the structure of the book skips over important issues since the author liks to deal with issues in hindsight – once the become an issue in the news. So, for example, Iran and nukes is not dealt with since is became an issue with Obama, even though Bush laid the groundwork for the problem.

George W. Bush, the 43rd president of the United States, almost singlehandedly decided to invade Iraq. It was possibly the worst foreign-policy decision ever made by a president. The consequences dominated the Bush Administration and still haunt us today.
In this book, “America’s greatest living biographer” (George Will), Jean Edward Smith, demonstrates that it was not Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, or Condoleezza Rice, but President Bush himself who took personal control of foreign policy. Bush drew on his deep religious conviction that important foreign-policy decisions were simply a matter of good versus evil. Domestically, he overreacted to 9/11 and endangered Americans’ civil liberties. Smith explains that it wasn’t until the financial crisis of 2008 that Bush finally accepted expert advice, something that the “Decider,” as Bush called himself, had previously been unwilling to do. As a result, he authorized decisions that saved the economy from possible collapse, even though some of those decisions violated Bush’s own political philosophy.
Bush is a comprehensive evaluation of the Bush presidency—including Guantanamo, Katrina, No Child Left Behind, and other important topics. Controversial, incisive, and compelling, it is thoroughly researched and sure to add to the debate over Bush’s presidential legacy.





























[book] Comparing Judaism and Christianity:
Common Judaism, Paul, and the
Inner and the Outer in Ancient Religion
by E. P. Sanders
Summer 2016
Fortress
Few scholars have so shaped the contemporary debate on the relation of early Christianity to early Judaism as E. P. Sanders, and no one has produced a clearer or more distinctive vision of that relationship" as it was expressed in the figures of Jesus of Nazareth and Paul the apostle. Gathered for the first time within one cover, here Sanders presents formative essays that show the structure of his approach and the insights it produces into Paul's relationship to Judaism and the Jewish law. Sanders addresses matters of definition ("common Judaism," "covenantal nomism"), diversity (the Judaism of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Diaspora), and key exegetical and historical questions relative to Jesus, Paul, and Christian origins in relationship to early Judaism. These essays show a leading scholar at his most erudite as he carries forward and elaborates many of the insights that have become touchstones in New Testament interpretation.






















[book] The Book of Harlan
A novel
by Bernice L. McFadden
Summer 2016
Akashic paperback
The author learned of blacks during the Nazi Holocaust at the US Holocaust museum in Washington DC, and this was the kernel of the idea for this novel
The Book of Harlan opens with the courtship of Harlan's parents and his 1917 birth in Macon, Georgia. After his prominent minister grandfather dies, Harlan and his parents move to Harlem, where he eventually becomes a professional musician. When Harlan and his best friend, trumpeter Lizard Robbins, are invited to perform at a popular cabaret in the Parisian enclave of Montmartre--affectionately referred to as "The Harlem of Paris" by black American musicians--Harlan jumps at the opportunity, convincing Lizard to join him.
But after the City of Light falls under Nazi occupation, Harlan and Lizard are thrown into Buchenwald--the notorious concentration camp in Weimar, Germany--irreparably changing the course of Harlan's life. Based on exhaustive research and told in McFadden's mesmeric prose, The Book of Harlan skillfully blends the stories of McFadden's familial ancestors with those of real and imagined characters.

"Simply miraculous...As her saga becomes ever more spellbinding, so does the reader's astonishment at the magic she creates. This is a story about the triumph of the human spirit over bigotry, intolerance and cruelty, and at the center of The Book of Harlan is the restorative force that is music.” --Washington Post





















[book] Seinfeldia
How a Show About Nothing
Changed Everything
by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
July 2016
Simon & Schuster
The hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld—the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world, altering the lives of everyone it touched.
Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly forty million Americans were tuning in weekly.
In Seinfeldia, acclaimed TV historian and entertainment writer Jennifer Keishin Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!”, Joe Davola gets questioned every day about his sanity, Kenny Kramer makes his living giving tours of New York sights from the show, and fans dress up in Jerry’s famous puffy shirt, dance like Elaine, and imagine plotlines for Seinfeld if it were still on TV.
























[book] Bradstreet Gate:
A Novel
by Robin Kirman
July 2016
Crown
Kirman resides in Tel Aviv and NYC> She is a graduate of Yale and Columbia. This novel is highly rated and a tour de force about three friends affected by a campus murder, for readers of Donna Tartt, Meg Wolitzer, and Jeffrey Eugenides.
Georgia, Charlie and Alice each arrive at Harvard with hopeful visions of what the future will hold. But when, just before graduation, a classmate is found murdered on campus, they find themselves facing a cruel and unanticipated new reality. Moreover, a charismatic professor who has loomed large in their lives is suspected of the crime. Though his guilt or innocence remains uncertain, the unsettling questions raised by the case force the three friends to take a deeper look at their tangled relationship. Their bond has been defined by the secrets they’ve kept from one another—Charlie’s love and Alice’s envy, Georgia’s mysterious affair—and over the course of the next decade, as they grapple with the challenges of adulthood and witness the unraveling of a teacher's once-charmed life, they must reckon with their own deceits and shortcomings, each desperately in search of answers and the chance to be forgiven.




















[book] The Burning Bush:
Writings on Jews and Judaism
by Vladimir Solovyov
Edited and Translated by Gregory Yuri Glazov
July 31, 2016
University of Notre Dame
Vladimir Solovyov, one of nineteenth-century Russia's greatest Christian philosophers, was renowned as the leading defender of Jewish civil rights in tsarist Russia in the 1880s. The Burning Bush: Writings on Jews and Judaism presents an annotated translation of Solovyov's complete oeuvre on the Jewish question, elucidating his terminology and identifying his references to persons, places, and texts, especially from biblical and rabbinic writings. Many texts are provided in English translation by Gregory Yuri Glazov for the first time, including Solovyov's obituary for Joseph Rabinovitch, a pioneer of modern Messianic Judaism, and his letter in the London Times of 1890 advocating for greater Jewish civil rights in Russia, printed alongside a similar petition by Cardinal Manning.
Glazov's introduction presents a summary of Solovyov's life, explains how the texts in this collection were chosen, and provides a survey of Russian Jewish history to help the reader understand the context and evaluate the significance of Solovyov's work. In his extensive commentary in Part II, which draws on key memoirs from family and friends, Glazov paints a rich portrait of Solovyov's encounters with Jews and Judaism and of the religious-philosophical ideas that he both brought to and derived from those encounters. The Burning Bush explains why Jews posthumously accorded Solovyov the accolade of a "righteous gentile," and why his ecumenical hopes and struggles to reconcile Judaism and Christianity and persuade secular authorities to respect conscience and religious freedom still bear prophetic vitality.




















[book] HARMFUL AND UNDESIRABLE:
BOOK CENSORSHIP IN NAZI GERMANY
By Guenter Lewy (UMass-Amherst)
July 2016
Oxford University Press
Like every authoritarian regime in history, Nazi Germany tried to control intellectual freedom through book censorship. Between 1933 and 1945, Hitler's party orchestrated a massive campaign to take control of all forms of communication in the nation. Book burnings abounded - in 1933 alone, there were 93 book burnings in 70 German cities. Indeed, Werner Schlegel, an official in the Ministry of Propaganda, called the book burnings "a symbol of the revolution." Bookstores, libraries, and universities were pillaged, while German authors were targeted by the regime. Yet surprisingly, Nazi book censorship has been largely overlooked by modern historians.
In Harmful and Undesirable, Guenter Lewy analyzes the various strategies that the Nazis employed to enact censorship and the people, including Martin Bormann, Philipp Bouhler, Joseph Goebbels, and Alfred Rosenberg, who led the attack on intellectual life. The Propaganda Ministry played a leading role in the censorship campaign, supported by an array of organizations at both the local and state levels. Because of the many overlapping jurisdictions and organizations, censorship was disorderly and erratic.
Beyond the implementation of censorship, Lewy also describes the plight of authors, publishers, and bookstores who clashed with the Nazi regime. Some authors were imprisoned, tortured, and even killed. Meanwhile others, such as Gottfried Benn, Gerhart Hauptmann, Ernst Jünger, Jochen Klepper, and Ernst Wiechert became controversial "inner emigrants" who chose to remain in Germany and criticize the Nazi regime through allegories and parables. Ultimately, Lewy paints a fascinating portrait of intellectual life under the Nazi dictatorship, revealing the fate of those who were caught in the wheels of censorship.




















[book] The Mixed-Up Truck
by Stephen Savage
July 5, 2016
Roaring Brook Press
Ages 2 - 6
It's Cement Mixer's first day on the job and he doesn't want to make any mistakes. How can he help the other trucks on the construction site? By mixing some powdery white cement, of course!
He mixes it up, adds a little water, and presto . . . a cake?! He must have mixed flour instead of cement.
Not to worry, he'll try again . . . and presto! Frosting?! He'll keep trying until he gets it just right and it's time for one more mixing: a bubble

PW writes: It’s a cement mixer’s first day on the job, and with his bright eyes and peppermint-stripe drum, he’s ready to make a good impression on the no-nonsense trucks on site. But things go downhill quickly. Told to get “some powdery white cement,” he goes first to a flour factory, then to a sugar factory, and ends up building a huge, multi-tiered frosted cake that nobody wants. Third time’s the charm, though—he gets the right white powder at the cement factory and “presto! A building!” Savage (Supertruck) creates a sunny cast of vehicular characters, and his brief text is equally upbeat, punctuated by fun repetition (“presto!” is also used ironically to herald the cement mixer’s mishaps), and a play on words involving mix-up and mixed up. It’s a sweet lesson in managing employees and seeing a job through to the end. The cement mixer’s colleagues are miffed but stay calm, even when they’re being swallowed up by pink frosting; they know the new guy will get it right eventually, and he does.


















[book] To the Secretary:
Leaked Embassy Cables and America's
Foreign Policy Disconnect
by Mary Thompson-Jones
July 2016
Career diplomats – the ones on the ground – have great insights, and they send them up the hierarchy. What happens to them? Who knows. Some are used in policy. Much must be ignored, since politics takes precedence.

A former American diplomat – now a professor at Northeastern - reveals a disconnect between Washington policymakers and those who work in US embassies.
When the world awoke on November 28, 2010, and read the first of the 251,287 State Department cables made public by WikiLeaks, Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini warned, “It will be the September 11th of world diplomacy.” The WikiLeaks scandal certainly stirred tempers around the world, but it was not the implosion that many leaders expected: rather, it shed a new spotlight on the work of the U.S. foreign service. In To the Secretary, Mary Thompson-Jones explores the most fascinating and overlooked of these cables to offer an unparalleled window into the day-to-day work of U.S. diplomats, demystifying the lives of those who implement America’s foreign policy across the globe.
From the story of Bulgaria’s Aleksi “the Tractor” Petrov to disappearing ballot ink in Ukraine, a Honduran coup d’état, or disaster relief for a devastated Haiti, To the Secretary depicts the work of ambassadors and foreign service officers through their firsthand narratives dealing with crises, corruption, and testy world leaders.
Negotiating distinctly un-American customs and corridors of power, these shrewd brokers in embassies from Argentina to Zimbabwe worked tirelessly to promote American diplomacy in a world frequently hostile to the United States.
To the Secretary also reveals the disconnect that diplomats face at home, guided by conflicting approaches from multiple Washington stakeholders intent on their own agenda, often unaware of realities on the ground. In an honest assessment of America’s foreign policy challenges, Thompson-Jones describes the deepening gulf between decision makers in Washington and their diplomats in the field. From misinterpreted analyses of anti-Americanism to Washington’s unwillingness to send resources to support diplomatic activities that could make a difference, To the Secretary shows what policymakers can learn from diplomats abroad-and how this can strengthen America’s place in an unstable world.





























[book] You'll Grow Out of It
by Jessi Klein
(head writer of Inside Amy Schumer)
July 2016
Grand Central Publishing
Does the Victoria's Secret catalog make you feel diqualified from being a woman in America? Does the store make you feel like you are walking into someone else's vagina? Do you obsess over your wedding dress and feel that as a owman you must know how to use the ballet barre
YOU'LL GROW OUT OF IT hilariously, and candidly, explores the journey of the twenty-first century woman. As both a tomboy and a late bloomer, comedian Jessi Klein (who wrote for SNL) grew up feeling more like an outsider than a participant in the rites of modern femininity.
In YOU'LL GROW OUT OF IT, Klein offers-through an incisive collection of real-life stories-a relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond. These include her "transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man," attempting to find watchable porn, and identifying the difference between being called "ma'am" and "miss" ("Miss sounds like you weigh ninety-nine pounds").
Raw, relatable, and consistently hilarious, YOU'LL GROW OUT OF IT is a one-of-a-kind book by a singular and irresistible comic voice.


EIGHTEEN THINGS I LEARNED FROM HER INTERVIEW AND THE BOOK
1. The book opens with a letter to her vagina. She apologizes for yeast infections and letting some men mistreat it, but adds that there were some fun times also. Right? High Five.
2. Life on the road might be considered glamorous, but it isn’t. She only had one one night stand hookup, with a British redheaded military man that she sat next to on a flight to Tampa. It was so great that she purposely never met him again, since it could only ruin the memory or be a letdown.
3. Her Jewish father started a business that imported European, luxury, baby furniture and cribs in New York. Called Louis of London, to give it that certain panache, it allowed the family to have a great Long Island house and Porsche, and Amy had a birthday party with live chicks and farm animals. This faded away by the time Amy became a preteen, and the family lost the car, downsized, and downsized more and fell into financial difficulty…. a perfect foundation to comedy. Her father also became ill with MS.
5. Schumer’s lower back tattoo, visible from the book’s back cover photo, was an example of Schumer “trying to be hard.” But she is more vulnerable than hard in real life.
6. Schumer is an introvert. She needs her alone time. Visiting the family of a boyfriend, she would happily just stay in his room or take a walk alone. Other people sap her of energy. She is great when you are in the field of entertainment, where you need to interact with lots of people. This was evident, as a fellow INTJ, during the book signing, where Schumer was happier just signing and moving the line along quickly, than having to speak to any of the fans.
7. Amy hates small talk, especially in elevators. This is why when I had my book signed by her, I didn’t say a word other than “Thanks” and quickly moved down the line. If I had red hair and served in the army, maybe she would have high-fived me.
8. One of the 28 men she “slept with,” was abusive. She remained in the abusive relationship, even though she knew she should escape. She would leave the apartment and go to Starbucks, lock herself in the bathroom, and sit on the floor and cry. She hoped she would not make him so mad. But when she realized it could end in her death, after being chased by him with a knife in his hand, she left. She shares this story since it shows her fans that even a strong woman can be abused and think that no one else will ever love her as much as the abuser.
9. As a teen, Amy was arrested (with her sister) for shoplifting at Bloomingdale’s. She and her sister stole Seven (brand) jeans, a fedora, a bejeweled tank top, and a onesie with a leopard print.
10. She was tattooed at age 20. This has nothing to do with her fear at age nine that she would be churned into butter or that tapeworms would eat her from the inside out.
11. One day, Amy came home and found her mother upset. Her mother, a teacher of deaf students, treated Amy like her therapist and explained that she was in love with the father of Amy’s best friend and planned to leave Amy’s father. But she signed a lot of it in ASDL, signing ‘I am leaving your father.” Her parents divorced. Amy can still sign.
12. Amy lost her virginity to a boyfriend who thought she was asleep… as in she lost it without her consent.
13. Never get drunk and run into your mother’s bed and get naked without paying the cab driver, since he will come to the door and demand payment from your half naked mother. (Reminds me of, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.” Speaking of a mouse, Amy maintains a collection of stuffed animals and is devoted to them. One is named Mouser, and has been with Amy since age 10 (Amy’s age was ten, not the stuffed animal))
14. Amy is currently dating a man that she met on an online dating app for creative people (even money is that it was Raya). She only had her profile up for 48 hours. He is Ben Hanisch who makes furniture in Chicago (but not baby cribs, like her father sold, more like furniture like Aidan in Sex And The City). On the app, Schumer put a hiking picture of herself, as well as a pic of Sophia from ‘The Golden Girls’ and Claire Danes making her cry face on ‘Homeland. She matched to Ben in under an hour. Ben, a Utah grad, is Hanisch but not Hamisch. On his profile, his song was ‘LSD’ by ASAP Rocky, which was Amy’s favorite song on that album. Amy writes, “He wasn’t an actor or photographer by trade like all the other guys — and he didn’t live in L.A. or New York. He was a Chicago guy. We sent each other very simple hellos and short, funny messages…. he had heard of my name but had not seen… “Trainwreck,” my stand-up act or … “Inside Amy Schumer.” They met at her pad in NYC a few weeks later. Amy writes, “The night I first met Ben in person … it was raining. I’d just had acupuncture, so there was oil in my hair and there were deep red lines on my cheeks from being face down on the table, but I put on jeans instead of sweatpants and walked downstairs to meet him outside. I got out into the rain, and Ben was standing there, no umbrella or hood, with a soggy paper bag with a bottle of wine in it. We smiled at each other and in that moment, everything felt right.”
15. To this date, drunk men who smell of scotch remind her of her father…. and she cuddles closer.
16. Amy is New Money (Rock a Fella) and not Old Money (Rockefeller), and blows money on things, like filling the dressing room of friends with lots of bouquets of flowers. She rented a Ferrari just to drive it around (but see, she is frugal enough to just rent it for an hour and not buy one); and rented a boat because it was sunny out. She sent a clown to her shy agent’s office to make balloon animals for him during a meeting. But she always remembers that she used to sell her clothes to a second hand shop to get enough to pay for an open mic slot; or how one big tip as a waitress could change her whole day or week.
17. A pet peeve. #12 on Page 186. Also she doesn’t like The Big Bang Theory (The TV show, not the theory).
17.5 Her mother and father have been married three times each. Amy writes that she had UTI’s that lasted longer than some marriages. Plus there were countless brief boyfriends and girlfriends, like the cokehead or crackhead who Amy’s mother dated for a while. Amy’s mother’s third husband was Moshe, a Persian Jew from Israel who owned an auto body shop in Queens, NY. Unfortunately they divorced and after 9/11, Moshe went back to Israel and wasn’t able to return to the USA. Amy;s mother… well here is an example. His girlfriend worshiped him. She visited his penthouse with her parents, but in the lobby, in front of the parents, Amy’s father seduced a stranger and took her up to his apartment for BDSM sex. That is what you call screwed up.
18. In the Chapter titled “Officially A Woman,” Amy recalls her Bat Mitzvah, and the horror of Hebrew School where she was sent to the principal for asking Mr. Fischer the meaning of a Hebrew passage she had just read (she just wanted to know, and was not being provocative or rude). She became a woman on the day of her Bat Mitzvah, not due to her chanting of the Torah portion, but because she cracked her voice on her last note and brought the solemn congregation down in laughter. There at 13 she discovered that she would be a comedian. (She mentions you also become a woman the first time you fart in front of a BF, and the first time you get fitted for a bra and discover you have been wearing the wrong size prior to that, and the first time a friend dies, or the first time you break someone’s heart) After the reception, she took her friends to Medieval Times in New Jersey, “Just as God and Golda Meir intended.”











[book] The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo
by Amy Schumer
Summer 2016
Gallery Books
The Emmy Award-winning comedian, actress, writer, and star of Inside Amy Schumer and the acclaimed film Trainwreck has taken the entertainment world by storm with her winning blend of smart, satirical humor. Now, Amy Schumer has written a refreshingly candid and uproariously funny collection of (extremely) personal and observational essays.
In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy mines her past for stories about her teenage years, her family, relationships, and sex and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is—a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh.
Ranging from the raucous to the romantic, the heartfelt to the harrowing, this highly entertaining and universally appealing collection is the literary equivalent of a night out with your best friend—an unforgettable and fun adventure that you wish could last forever. Whether she’s experiencing lust-at-first-sight while in the airport security line, sharing her own views on love and marriage, admitting to being an introvert, or discovering her cross-fit instructor’s secret bad habit, Amy Schumer proves to be a bighearted, brave, and thoughtful storyteller that will leave you nodding your head in recognition, laughing out loud, and sobbing uncontrollably—but only because it’s over.

























[book] Me, Myself and God:
A Theology of Mindfulness
by Rabbi Jeff Roth
Elat Chayyim, Co-Founder
July 2016
Jewish Lights
Heal from the sense of separation that pervades human consciousness and awaken to the true oneness of all things.
Many of our human existential struggles stem from the sense of disconnection, alienation and loneliness that comes from a fragmented view of reality. The typical concept of "self" creates a profound sense of isolation from other beings, leaving us feeling lost and hopeless. But the practice of mindfulness, combined with the teachings of Torah, offer a direct path to liberate ourselves from alienation, awaken to the truth of the present moment and create a new relationship with God.
Drawing on the insight and audacity of Jewish mystics, and rooted in a rich understanding of Torah, Rabbi Jeff Roth helps readers overcome this sense of separation and reconnect with a more harmonious flow of life. He equips spiritual seekers of all faiths?or none?with powerful techniques rooted in Jewish mystical practices: using the raw material of sacred texts as building blocks for the construction of new worlds, and experiencing the present through mindfulness meditation and loving attention to each moment. By letting go of our old notions of reality, we can recognize the undivided nature of the world and enter into a transformative divine awareness.






















[book] NiNE WOMEN, ONE DRESS
A novel
By Jane L. Rosen
July 2016
Doubleday
A charming, hilarious, irresistible romp of a novel that brings together nine unrelated women, each touched by the same little black dress that weaves through their lives, bringing a little magic with it.

Natalie is a Bloomingdale's salesgirl mooning over her lawyer ex-boyfriend who's engaged to someone else after just two months. Felicia has been quietly in love with her boss for seventeen years and has one night to finally make the feeling mutual. Andie is a private detective who specializes in gathering evidence on cheating husbands — a skill she unfortunately learned from her own life — and lands a case that may restore her faith in true love.

For these three women, as well as half a dozen others in sparkling supporting roles — a young model fresh from rural Alabama, a diva Hollywood star making her Broadway debut, an overachieving, unemployed Brown grad who starts faking a fabulous life on social media, a Holocaust survivor who is a pattern maker, to name just a few — everything is about to change, thanks to the dress of the season, the perfect little black number everyone wants to get their hands on . . .
























[book] THE BURNING BUSH
Writings on Jews and Judaism
By Vladimir Soloyyov
Translation and commentary by GY Glazov
July 2016
University of Notre Dame Press
Vladimir Solovyov, one of nineteenth-century Russia's greatest Christian philosophers, was renowned as the leading defender of Jewish civil rights in tsarist Russia in the 1880s. The Burning Bush: Writings on Jews and Judaism presents an annotated translation of Solovyov's complete oeuvre on the Jewish question, elucidating his terminology and identifying his references to persons, places, and texts, especially from biblical and rabbinic writings. Many texts are provided in English translation by Gregory Yuri Glazov for the first time, including Solovyov's obituary for Joseph Rabinovitch, a pioneer of modern Messianic Judaism, and his letter in the London Times of 1890 advocating for greater Jewish civil rights in Russia, printed alongside a similar petition by Cardinal Manning.

Glazov's introduction presents a summary of Solovyov's life, explains how the texts in this collection were chosen, and provides a survey of Russian Jewish history to help the reader understand the context and evaluate the significance of Solovyov's work. In his extensive commentary in Part II, which draws on key memoirs from family and friends, Glazov paints a rich portrait of Solovyov's encounters with Jews and Judaism and of the religious-philosophical ideas that he both brought to and derived from those encounters. The Burning Bush explains why Jews posthumously accorded Solovyov the accolade of a "righteous gentile," and why his ecumenical hopes and struggles to reconcile Judaism and Christianity and persuade secular authorities to respect conscience and religious freedom still bear prophetic vitality.




















[book] USES AND ABUSES OF MOSES
LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS
Since The Enlightenment
By Theodore Ziolkowski (Princeton)
2016
University of Notre Dame Press
Comparative Literature
In Uses and Abuses of Moses, Theodore Ziolkowski surveys the major literary treatments of the biblical figure of Moses since the Enlightenment. Beginning with the influential treatments by Schiller and Goethe, for whom Moses was, respectively, a member of a mystery cult and a violent murderer, Ziolkowski examines an impressive array of dramas, poems, operas, novels, and films to show the many ways in which the charismatic figure of Moses has been exploited—the “uses and abuses” of the title—to serve a variety of ideological and cultural purposes.

Ziolkowski’s wide-ranging and in-depth study compares and analyzes the attempts by nearly one hundred writers to fill in the gaps in the biblical account of Moses’ life and to explain his motivation as a leader, lawgiver, and prophet. As Ziolkowski richly demonstrates, Moses’ image has been affected by historical factors such as the Egyptomania of the 1820s, the revolutionary movements of the mid-nineteenth century, the early move toward black liberation in the United States, and critical biblical scholarship of the late nineteenth century before, in the twentieth century, being appropriated by Marxists, Socialists, Nazis, and Freudians. The majority of the works studied are by Austro-German and Anglo-American writers, but Ziolkowski also includes significant examples of works from Hungary, Sweden, Norway, the Ukraine, Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy, and France.
The figure of Moses becomes an animate seismograph, in Ziolkowski’s words, through whose literary reception we can trace many of the shifts in the cultural landscape of the past two centuries.



















[book] Leaving Lucy Pear
A novel
by Anna Solomon
July 26, 2016
Viking
Set in 1920s New England, the story of two women who are both mothers to the same unforgettable girl—a big, heartrending novel from award-winning writer Anna Solomon
One night in 1917 Beatrice Haven sneaks out of her uncle's house on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, leaves her newborn baby at the foot of a pear tree, and watches as another woman claims the infant as her own. The unwed daughter of wealthy Jewish industrialists and a gifted pianist bound for Radcliffe, Bea plans to leave her shameful secret behind and make a fresh start. Ten years later, Prohibition is in full swing, post-WWI America is in the grips of rampant xenophobia, and Bea's hopes for her future remain unfulfilled. She returns to her uncle’s house, seeking a refuge from her unhappiness. But she discovers far more when the rum-running manager of the local quarry inadvertently reunites her with Emma Murphy, the headstrong Irish Catholic woman who has been raising Bea's abandoned child—now a bright, bold, cross-dressing girl named Lucy Pear, with secrets of her own.
In mesmerizing prose, award-winning author Anna Solomon weaves together an unforgettable group of characters as their lives collide on the New England coast. Set against one of America's most turbulent decades, Leaving Lucy Pear delves into questions of class, freedom, and the meaning of family, establishing Anna Solomon as one of our most captivating storytellers.



















[book] OUTSIDERS
The Humanity and Inhumanity
Of Giants in Medeival French
Prose Romance
By Sylvia Huot (Cambridge)
July 2016
University of Notre Dame Press
Giants are a ubiquitous feature of medieval romance. As remnants of a British prehistory prior to the civilization established, according to the Historium regum Britannie, by Brutus and his Trojan followers, giants are permanently at odds with the chivalric culture of the romance world. Whether they are portrayed as brute savages or as tyrannical pagan lords, giants serve as a limit against which the chivalric hero can measure himself. In Outsiders: The Humanity and Inhumanity of Giants in Medieval French Prose Romance, Sylvia Huot argues that the presence of giants allows for fantasies of ethnic and cultural conflict and conquest, and for the presentation—and suppression—of alternative narrative and historical trajectories that might have made Arthurian Britain a very different place.

Focusing on medieval French prose romance and drawing on aspects of postcolonial theory, Huot examines the role of giants in constructions of race, class, gender, and human subjectivity. She selects for study the well-known prose Lancelot and the prose Tristan, as well as the lesser known Perceforest, Le Conte du papegau, Guiron le Courtois, and Des Grantz Geants. By asking to what extent views of giants in Arthurian romance respond to questions that concern twenty-first-century readers, Huot demonstrates the usefulness of current theoretical concepts and the issues they raise for rethinking medieval literature from a modern perspective.



















[book] Life Moves Pretty Fast:
The Lessons We Learned from
Eighties Movies (and Why We Don't
Learn Them from Movies Anymore)
by Hadley Freeman
Now In Paperback
Summer 2016
Simon & Schuster
From Vogue contributor and Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman, a personalized guide to eighties movies that describes why they changed movie-making forever—featuring exclusive interviews with the producers, directors, writers and stars of the best cult classics.
For Hadley Freeman, movies of the 1980s have simply got it all. Comedy in Three Men and a Baby, Hannah and Her Sisters, Ghostbusters, and Back to the Future; all a teenager needs to know in Pretty in Pink, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Say Anything, The Breakfast Club, and Mystic Pizza; the ultimate in action from Top Gun, Die Hard, Beverly Hills Cop, and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom; love and sex in 9 1/2 Weeks, Splash, About Last Night, The Big Chill, and Bull Durham; and family fun in The Little Mermaid, ET, Big, Parenthood, and Lean On Me.
In Life Moves Pretty Fast, Hadley puts her obsessive movie geekery to good use, detailing the decade’s key players, genres, and tropes. She looks back on a cinematic world in which bankers are invariably evil, where children are always wiser than adults, where science is embraced with an intense enthusiasm, and the future viewed with giddy excitement. And, she considers how the changes between movies then and movies today say so much about society’s changing expectations of women, young people, and art—and explains why Pretty in Pink should be put on school syllabuses immediately.
From how John Hughes discovered Molly Ringwald, to how the friendship between Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi influenced the evolution of comedy, and how Eddie Murphy made America believe that race can be transcended, this is a “highly personal, witty love letter to eighties movies, but also an intellectually vigorous, well-researched take on the changing times of the film industry” (The Guardian).
































[book] Cousin Joseph:
A Graphic Novel
by Jules Feiffer
July 26, 2016
Livernight
Meet Big Sam Hannigan. Tough, righteous, a man on a mission. Only problem is, it's the wrong mission.
With the New York Times bestseller Kill My Mother, legendary cartoonist Jules Feiffer began an epic saga of American noir fiction. With Cousin Joseph, a prequel that introduces us to bare-knuckled Detective Sam Hannigan, head of the Bay City's Red Squad and patriarch of the Hannigan family featured in Kill My Mother, Feiffer brings us the second installment in this highly anticipated graphic trilogy.
Our story opens in Bay City in 1931 in the midst of the Great Depression. Big Sam sees himself as a righteous, truth-seeking patriot, defending the American way, as his Irish immigrant father would have wanted, against a rising tide of left-wing unionism, strikes, and disruption that plague his home town. At the same time he makes monthly, secret overnight trips on behalf of Cousin Joseph, a mysterious man on the phone he has never laid eyes on, to pay off Hollywood producers to ensure that they will film only upbeat films that idealize a mythic America: no warts, no injustice uncorrected, only happy endings.
But Sam, himself, is not in for a happy ending, as step by step the secret of his unseen mentor's duplicity is revealed to him. Fast-moving action, violence, and murder in the noir style of pulps and forties films are melded in the satiric, sociopolitical Feifferian style to dig up the buried fearmongering of the past and expose how closely it matches the headlines, happenings, and violence of today.
With Cousin Joseph, Feiffer builds on his late-life conversion to cinematic noir, bowing, as ever, to youthful heroes Will Eisner and Milton Caniff, but ultimately creating a masterpiece that through his unique perspective and comic-strip noir style illuminates the very origins of Hollywood and its role in creating the bipolar nation we've become.




















[book] SINAI
Egypt's Linchpin,
Gaza's Lifeline,
Israel's Nightmare
by Mohannad Sabry
American University Cairo Press
Enclosed by the Suez Canal and bordering Gaza and Israel, Egypt's rugged Sinai Peninsula has been the cornerstone of the Egyptian-Israeli peace accords, yet its internal politics and security have remained largely under media blackout. While the international press descended on the capital Cairo in January 2011, Sinai's armed rebellion was ignored. The regime lost control of the peninsula in a matter of days and, since then, unprecedented chaos has reigned and the Islamist insurgency has gathered pace.

In this crucial analysis, Mohannad Sabry argues that Egypt's shortsighted security approach has continually proven to be a failure. Decades of flawed policies have exacerbated immense social and economic problems, and maintained a superficial stability under which arms trafficking, the smuggling tunnels, and militancy could silently thrive-and finally prevail following the overthrow of Mubarak.

Sinai is vital reading for scholars, journalists, policy makers, and all those concerned by the plunge of one of the Middle East's most critical regions into turmoil.




























[book] Zionism:
The Birth and Transformation
of an Ideal
by Milton Viorst
American University Cairo Press
July 19, 2016
Thomas Dunne Books
From serving as the Middle East correspondent for The New Yorker to penning articles for the New York Times, Milton Viorst has dedicated his career to studying the Middle East. Now, in this new book, Viorst examines the evolution of Zionism, from its roots by serving as a cultural refuge for Europe's Jews, to the cover it provides today for Israel's exercise of control over millions of Arabs in occupied territories.
Beginning with the shattering of the traditional Jewish society during the Enlightenment, Viorst covers the recent history of the Jews, from the spread of Jewish Emancipation during the French Revolution Era to the rise of the exclusionary anti-Semitism that overwhelmed Europe in the late nineteenth century. Viorst examines how Zionism was born and follows its development through the lives and ideas of its dominant leaders, who all held only one tenet in common: that Jews, for the first time in two millennia, must determine their own destiny to save themselves. But, in regards to creating a Jewish state with a military that dominates the region, Viorst argues that Israel has squandered the goodwill it enjoyed at its founding, and thus the country has put its own future on very uncertain footing.
With the expertise and knowledge garnered from decades of studying this contentious region, Milton Viorst deftly exposes the risks that Israel faces today.

























AUGUST 2016 BOOKS




[book] The Southern Education of a Jersey Girl:
Adventures in Life and Love
in the Heart of Dixie
by Jaime Primak Sullivan
with Eve Adamson
August 2, 2016
Touchstone
Mrs. Jaime Primak Sullivan, outspoken star of Bravo TV’s Jersey Belle, offers no-nonsense Southern-spun advice for navigating life and love with her signature charismatic Jersey charm in this winning fish-out-of-water – knish out of water - tale.

Jamie Primak Sullivan, a Jersey-bred, tough-as-nails PR maven—and unlikely transplant in an upscale suburb of Birmingham, Alabama—has spent her entire life crossing the line: whether she’s pushing the boundaries of what proper Southern ladies consider to be “polite behavior” or literally traversing the Mason-Dixon line in the name of love. Jaime is one of four kids born to a Jewish Dad and an Italian Catholic (Jewish converted) mother. Jaime had a carnival themed Bat Mitzvah and can still recite her Torah portion. She even did a year of graduate work at university on History of Jewish Studies. She is not a “practicing Jew” today, but she is Jewish in her soul and worldview.

She isn’t afraid to say what everyone is thinking when it comes to love, sex, friendship, and many other topics that are all-too-often sugar-coated in polite Southern company. But when a meet-cute scenario right out of a Nora Ephron movie upends her life, Jaime finds herself a reluctant “knish out of water,” smack-dab in the Deep South starting a life with her new husband, Mr. Michael Sullivan, the perfect Southern gentleman, who reminds her of her late father, who died at 53 when the author was 16.

In The Southern Education of a Jersey Girl, Jaime shares hard-learned lessons on Southern etiquette, deep-fried foods, college football, and matters of the heart while living in the heart of Dixie, with her quintessential ball-busting, bullsh*t free, and side-splitting Jersey twist.
























[book] WAR PORN
By Roy Scranton
August 2, 2016
SoHo Press
Roy Scranton has an issue with verterans, people who worship veterans, and himself, since he is a veterans and given book contracts due to his status
“War porn,” a noun. Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification. Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes.
War porn is also, in Roy Scranton’s searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of war in the age of the War on Terror, the fracturing and fragmentation of perspective, time, and self that afflicts soldiers and civilians alike, and the global networks and face-to-face moments that suture our fragmented lives together.
In War Porn three lives fit inside one another like nesting dolls: a restless young woman at an end-of-summer barbecue in Utah; an American soldier in occupied Baghdad; and Qasim al-Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor, who faces the US invasion of his country with fear, denial, and perseverance.
As War Porn cuts from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, we come to see America through the eyes of the occupied, even as we see Qasim become a prisoner of the occupation. Through the looking glass of War Porn, Scranton reveals the fragile humanity that connects Americans and Iraqis, torturers and the tortured, victors and their victims.
























[book] The Israel Warrior:
Fighting Back for the Jewish State
from Campus to Street Corner
by Shmuley Boteach (Rabbi)
August 2, 2016
Are you fed up with the nonstop attacks on Israel that reek of double standards and hatred? With the foul moral equivalency of Jews dying as targets of terrorists and Palestinians dying undertaking acts of terrorism? With the United Nations continuous condemnation of the only democracy in the Middle East, while overlooking the ghastly human rights abuses of its Arab neighbors? With the duplicity of the Western media, which cares more when Israelis add rooms to apartments in East Jerusalem than when over 470,000 Arabs are killed in Syria? There comes a point when we stop and say, Enough. We will no longer tolerate anti-Israel lies. We will stand up for Israel and truth.
The goal of this book is to give you the information and the tools you need so that together, we can accomplish this important and urgent task. You will use your knowledge and your wits to fight back in debate, discussion, and dialogue to publicize the justice of Israel s cause. This book is dedicated to the proposition that Israel can and will win the argument in the marketplace of ideas because her greatest commodity is the minds and souls of those who care enough to learn the truth and then, armed with that truth, the courage to take a stand.
Become a warrior for Israel.

























[book] Israel's Edge:
The Story of The IDF's Most
Elite Unit - Talpiot
by Jason Gewirtz
2016
Gefen Publishing
How will Israel keep its strategic edge over an increasingly dangerous Iran? Israel has been preparing for this day by creating a special and secretive IDF unit called Talpiot.

Instead of being trained to fight, the few soldiers each year selected for Talpiot are taught how to think. In order to join this unit they have to commit to being in the army for ten years, rather than the three years a normal soldier serves.

Talpiots are taught advanced level physics, math and computer science as they train with soldiers from every other branch of the IDF. The result: young men and women become research and development machines. Talpiots have developed battle ready weapons that only Israel's top military officers and political leaders know about. They have also dramatically improved much of the weapons already in Israel's arsenal.

Talpiot has been tasked with keeping Israel a generation ahead of a rapidly strengthening and technologically capable Iran. Talpiots contribute to all of the areas that will be most important to the IDF as Iran becomes even more powerful including missile technology, anti-missile defense, cyber-warfare, intelligence, satellite technology and high powered imaging. Talpiot soldiers have also been a major factor in the never ending fight against Israel's other enemies and many have left the R&D lab to fly fighter planes, serve in the field as commanders of elite army ground units and at sea commanding Israel's fleet of naval ships.

After leaving the army, Talpiots have become a major force in the Israeli economy, developing some of Israel's most famous and powerful companies.

Israel's Edge contains dozens of interviews with Talpiot graduates and some of the early founders of the program. It explains Talpiot's highly successful recruiting methods and discloses many of the secrets of the program's success. The book also profiles some of the most successful businesses founded by Talpiot graduates including CheckPoint, Compugen, Anobit, recently bought by Apple, and XIV, recently bought by IBM. No other military unit has had more of an impact on the State of Israel and no other unit will have more of an impact in the years ahead. The soldiers of Talpiot are truly unsung heroes.























[book] I Contain Multitudes:
The Microbes Within Us and
a Grander View of Life
by Ed Yong
August 9, 2016
Ecco
Joining the ranks of popular science classics like The Botany of Desire and The Selfish Gene, a groundbreaking, wondrously informative, and vastly entertaining examination of the most significant revolution in biology since Darwin—a “microbe’s-eye view” of the world that reveals a marvelous, radically reconceived picture of life on earth.
Every animal, whether human, squid, or wasp, is home to millions of bacteria and other microbes. Ed Yong, whose humor is as evident as his erudition, prompts us to look at ourselves and our animal companions in a new light—less as individuals and more as the interconnected, interdependent multitudes we assuredly are.
The microbes in our bodies are part of our immune systems and protect us from disease. In the deep oceans, mysterious creatures without mouths or guts depend on microbes for all their energy. Bacteria provide squid with invisibility cloaks, help beetles to bring down forests, and allow worms to cause diseases that afflict millions of people.
Many people think of microbes as germs to be eradicated, but those that live with us—the microbiome—build our bodies, protect our health, shape our identities, and grant us incredible abilities. In this astonishing book, Ed Yong takes us on a grand tour through our microbial partners, and introduces us to the scientists on the front lines of discovery. It will change both our view of nature and our sense of where we belong in it.
























[book] HOW EVERYTHING BECAME
WAR AND THE MILITARY BECAME
EVERYTHING
Tales from the Pentagon
By Rosa Brooks
(Georgetown Law)
August 2016
Simon & Schuster
The first serious book to examine what happens when the ancient boundary between war and peace is erased.
Once, war was a temporary state of affairs—a violent but brief interlude between times of peace. Today, America’s wars are everywhere and forever: our enemies change constantly and rarely wear uniforms, and virtually anything can become a weapon. As war expands, so does the role of the US military. Today, military personnel don’t just “kill people and break stuff.” Instead, they analyze computer code, train Afghan judges, build Ebola isolation wards, eavesdrop on electronic communications, develop soap operas, and patrol for pirates. You name it, the military does it.
Rosa Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war from an unconventional perspective—that of a former top Pentagon official who is the daughter of two anti-war protesters and a human rights activist married to an Army Green Beret. Her experiences lead her to an urgent warning: When the boundaries around war disappear, we risk destroying America’s founding values and the laws and institutions we’ve built—and undermining the international rules and organizations that keep our world from sliding towards chaos. If Russia and China have recently grown bolder in their foreign adventures, it’s no accident; US precedents have paved the way for the increasingly unconstrained use of military power by states around the globe. Meanwhile, we continue to pile new tasks onto the military, making it increasingly ill-prepared for the threats America will face in the years to come.
By turns a memoir, a work of journalism, a scholarly exploration into history, anthropology and law, and a rallying cry, How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything transforms the familiar into the alien, showing us that the culture we inhabit is reshaping us in ways we may suspect, but don’t really understand. It’s the kind of book that will leave you moved, astonished, and profoundly disturbed, for the world around us is quietly changing beyond recognition—and time is running out to make things right.
























[book] Brazillionaires:
Wealth, Power, Decadence,
and Hope in an American Country
by Alex Cuadros
August 2016
Spiegel & Grau
For readers of Michael Lewis comes an engrossing tale of global financial inequality—intertwined with the story of Brazil’s wealthiest citizen, Eike Batista—that begins to answer the question: Who exactly are our new hyperwealthy plutocrats, and should we welcome or fear them?
When Bloomberg News invited the young American journalist Alex Cuadros to report on Brazil’s emerging class of billionaires at the height of the historic Brazilian boom, he was poised to cover two of the biggest business stories of our time: how the giants of the developing world were triumphantly taking their place at the center of global capitalism, and how wealth inequality was changing societies everywhere. The billionaires of Brazil and their massive fortunes resided at the very top of their country’s economic pyramid, and whether they quietly accumulated exceptional power or extravagantly displayed their decadence, they formed a potent microcosm of the world’s richest .001 percent.
Eike Batista, a flamboyant and charismatic evangelist for the country’s new gospel of wealth, epitomized much of this rarefied sphere: In 2012, Batista ranked as the eighth-richest person in the world, was famous for his marriage to a beauty queen, and was a fixture in the Brazilian press. His constantly repeated ambition was to become the world’s richest man and to bring Brazil along with him to the top.
But by 2015, Batista was bankrupt, his son Thor had been indicted for manslaughter, and Brazil—its president facing impeachment, its provinces combating an epidemic, and its business and political class torn apart by scandal—had become a cautionary tale of a country run aground by its elites.
Over the four years Cuadros was on the billionaire beat, he reported on media moguls and televangelists, energy barons and shadowy figures from the years of military dictatorship, soy barons who lived on the outskirts of the Amazon, and new-economy billionaires spinning money from speculation. He learned just how deeply they all reached into Brazilian life. They held sway over the economy, government, media, and stewardship of the environment; they determined the spiritual fates and populated the imaginations of their countrymen. Cuadros’s zealous reporting takes us from penthouses to courtrooms, from favelas to extravagant art fairs, from scenes of unimaginable wealth to desperate, massive street protests. Within a business narrative that deftly explains and dramatizes the volatility of the global economy, Cuadros offers us literary journalism with a grand sweep: a universal story of hubris and tragedy that uncovers the deeper meaning of this era of billionaires for us all.
























[book] The Chosen Ones:
A Novel
by Steve Sem-Sandberg
Translated from German by Anna Paterson
August 2016
FS&G
The Am Spiegelgrund clinic, in glittering Vienna, masqueraded as a well-intentioned reform school for wayward boys and girls and a home for chronically ill children. The reality, however, was very different: in the wake of Germany's annexation of Austria on the eve of World War II, its doctors, nurses, and teachers created a monstrous parody of the institution's benign-sounding brief. The Nazi regime's euthanasia program would come to determine the fate of many of the clinic's inhabitants.
Through the eyes of a child inmate, Adrian Ziegler, and a nurse, Anna Katschenka, Steve Sem-Sandberg, the author of the award-winning The Emperor of Lies, explores the very meaning of survival. An absorbing, emotionally overwhelming novel, rich in incident and character, The Chosen Ones is obliquely illuminated by the author's sharp sense of the absurd. Passionately serious, meticulously researched, and deeply profound, this extraordinary and dramatic novel bears witness to oppression and injustice, and offers invaluable and necessary insight into an intolerable chapter in Austria’s past.
























FROM ONE OF OUR MOST FAVE WRITERS FOR THE FORWARD... A MEMOIR...
[book] I'm Supposed to Protect
You from All This:
A Memoir
by Nadja Spiegelman
August 2, 2016
Riverhead Books
Art Spiegelman’s MAUS was based on his interviews with his father.
Nadja Spiegelman’s MEMOIR is initially based on interviews with her mother.

A memoir of mothers and daughters — and mothers as daughters — traced through four generations, from Paris to New York and back again.

It took opposite journeys for a mother and daughter to each find themselves at the start of their adult lives: one needed to leave France to discover herself; the other needed to return to Paris to discover her family—the side that “didn’t have dealings with the Nazis. They occasionally traded goods with the Nazis,” as her grandmother insists.

For a long time, Nadja Spiegelman believed her mother was a fairy. More than her famous father, Maus creator Art Spiegelman, and even more than most mothers, hers—French-born New Yorker art director Françoise Mouly—exerted a force over reality that was both dazzling and daunting. As Nadja’s body changed and “began to whisper to the adults around me in a language I did not understand,” their relationship grew tense. Unwittingly, they were replaying a drama from her mother’s past, a drama Nadja sensed but had never been told. Then, after college, her mother suddenly opened up to her. Françoise recounted her turbulent adolescence caught between a volatile mother (a capricious narcissist) and a distant philandering playboy father, one of the first plastic surgeons in France. The weight of the difficult stories she told her daughter shifted the balance between them.

It had taken an ocean to allow Françoise the distance to become her own person. At about the same age, Nadja made the journey in reverse, moving from Brooklyn to Paris, determined to get to know the woman her mother had fled.

Her grandmother’s memories contradicted her mother’s at nearly every turn, but beneath them lay a difficult history of her own. Nadja emerged with a deeper understanding of how each generation reshapes the past in order to forge ahead, their narratives both weapon and defense, eternally in conflict. Every reader will recognize herself and her family in this gorgeous and heartbreaking memoir, which helps us to see why sometimes those who love us best hurt us most.
























"Men of my generation have always had Spain in our hearts. There we learned that you could be right but still be defeated, that courage was not its own reward." A. Camus
[book] Spain in Our Hearts:
Americans in the Spanish
Civil War, 1936-1939
by Adam Hochschild
(Berkeley, Mother Jones)
2016
HMH
From the acclaimed, best-selling author Adam Hochschild, a sweeping history of the Spanish Civil War, told through a dozen characters, including Ernest Hemingway and George Orwell: a tale of idealism, heartbreaking suffering, and a noble cause that failed

Did you know that half of the American volunteers in the Spanish Civil War to fight Franco and the fascists were Jewish. – People like Delmar berg, the last survivor, who died in March 2016 at the age of 100. -- One young New Yorker, Maury Colow, said later, "For us, it was never about Franco. It was always about Hitler." Another young American, Hyman Katz, who was actually a 23-year-old rabbi, wrote to his mother from Spain shortly before he was killed, saying if he hadn’t come to Spain, he said, "for the rest of my life, I never could have forgiven myself for not waking up when the alarm clock rang."
When asked why so many Jews participated, the author replaied that he thought that above all, the fact that Hitler was rapidly rising motivated Jews to go to Spain. Hitler had come to power in Germany in 1933, was making no secret that life was going to be very, very tough for the Jews. The full extent of the Holocaust, of course, nobody could imagine at that time, but it was clear terrible things were coming. Jews were also heavily overrepresented in the left wing in the United States. And the organization of most of these volunteers who went to Spain was orchestrated by the Communist Party, in this country and in the other countries the volunteers came from.

Some 2,800 Americans went to Spain as volunteers in the fight against fascism, and nearly a quarter of them perished there. The Americans were known as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. After two-and-a-half years of fighting, the fascists were able to declare victory on April 1, 1939. World War II began shortly afterward.

For three crucial years in the 1930s, the Spanish Civil War dominated headlines in America and around the world, as volunteers flooded to Spain to help its democratic government fight off a fascist uprising led by Francisco Franco and aided by Hitler and Mussolini. Today we're accustomed to remembering the war through Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls and Robert Capa’s photographs. But Adam Hochschild has discovered some less familiar yet far more compelling characters who reveal the full tragedy and importance of the war: a fiery nineteen-year-old Kentucky woman who went to wartime Spain on her honeymoon, a Swarthmore College senior who was the first American casualty in the battle for Madrid, a pair of fiercely partisan, rivalrous New York Times reporters who covered the war from opposites sides, and a swashbuckling Texas oilman (TEXaco) with Nazi sympathies who sold Franco almost all his oil — at reduced prices, and on credit. It was in many ways the opening battle of World War II, and we still have much to learn from it. Spain in Our Hearts is Adam Hochschild at his very best.

























[book] The Secret Book of Kings:
A Novel
by Yochi Brandes
Translated Yardenne Greenspan
August 23, 2016
St. Martin's Press
Stories are deadlier than swords. Swords kill only those who stand before them, stories decide who will live and die in generations to come.
Shlom'am, a young man from the tribe of Ephraim, has grown up in the shadow of several secrets. He wonders why his father is deathly afraid of the King's soldiers, and why his mother has lied to him about the identities of those closest to him. Knowing his parents won't divulge more than they have to, Shlom'am sets out on his own to unearth his mysterious past.
At the height of his journey, Shlom'am encounters the Crazed Princess. Princess Michal, daughter of the ill-fated King Saul and discarded wife of the illustrious, dangerous King David, seems doomed by the annals of history; hellbent on seizing the throne, David wiped out her father's line and left her isolated...and plotting. Only Michal knows the shocking circumstances of Shlom'am's birth. Only she can set into motion his destiny to become Jerobaam, the fourth king of Israel.
The Secret Book of Kings is a sweeping biblical epic filled with court intrigue, romance, and rebellion. It engages with the canonized stories of the Israel's foundation and turns them on their heads. Brandes, known for her profound familiarity with Jewish sources, uncovers vibrant, adversarial men and woman buried deep in the scriptures and asks the loaded question: to what extent can we really know our past when history is written by the victors?
























[book] Company Confessions:
Secrets, Memoirs, and the CIA
by Christopher R. Moran
Foreword by Tony Mendez
August 2016
Thomas Dunne
Spies are supposed to keep quiet, never betraying their agents nor discussing their operations. Somehow, this doesn’t apply to the CIA, which routinely vets, and approves, dozens of books by former officers. Many of these memoirs command huge advances and attract enormous publicity.

Although… what if it is all fake to throw off the truth. Haha

Take Valerie Plame, the CIA officer whose identity was leaked by the Bush White House in 2003 and who reportedly received $2 million for her book Fair Game. Or former CIA director George Tenet whose 2007 memoir reached #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. If the CIA director is allowed to publish his story, it is little wonder that regular agents are choosing to tell theirs.
Company Confessions delves into the motivations those spies that write memoirs as well as the politics and policies of the CIA Publication Review Board. Astonishing facts include: the steps taken by the agency to counter such leaks including breaking into publishing houses, putting authors on trial, and secretly authorizing pro-agency "memoirs" to repair damage to its reputation.
Based on interviews, private correspondence, and declassified files, Christopher Moran examines why America’s spies are so happy to spill the beans and looks at the damage done when they leak the nation’s secrets.
























[book] The Angel
The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel
by Uri Bar-Joseph
(University of Haifa)
August 2016
Harper
A gripping feat of reportage that exposes—for the first time in English—the sensational life and mysterious death of Ashraf Marwan, an Egyptian senior official who spied for Israel, offering new insight into the turbulent modern history of the Middle East.
As the son-in-law of Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser and a close advisor to his successor, Anwar Sadat, Ashraf Marwan had access to the deepest secrets of the country’s government. But Marwan himself had a secret: He was a spy for the Mossad, Israel’s intelligence service. Under the codename “The Angel,” Marwan turned Egypt into an open book for the Israeli intelligence services—and, by ALERTING the Mossad in advance of the joint Egyptian-Syrian attack on Yom Kippur in 1973, saved Israel from a devastating defeat.

Drawing on meticulous research and interviews with many key participants, Uri Bar Joseph pieces together Marwan’s story. In the process, he sheds new light on this volatile time in modern Egyptian and Middle Eastern history, culminating in 2011’s Arab Spring.
Professor Bay-Joseph also chronicles the discord within the Israeli government that brought down Prime Minister Golda Meir.
However, this nail-biting narrative doesn’t end with Israel’s victory in the Yom Kippur War. Marwan eluded Egypt’s ruthless secret services for many years, but then somebody talked. Five years later, in 2007, his body was found in the garden of his London apartment building. Was it suicide in London? Did the people whom he swindled in business deals kill him? Was it Egyptian spies who killed him?
Scotland Yard suspected he had been thrown from his fifth-floor balcony, and thanks to explosive new evidence, Bar-Joseph can finally reveal who, how, and why (or does he?).























Transcend the Cult of Personality and Understand the Structure of His Investments
[book] Inside the Investments
of Warren Buffett:
Twenty Cases
(Columbia Business School Publishing)
by Yefei Lu
August 2016
Columbia University Press
Since the 1950s, Warren Buffett and his partners have backed some of the twentieth century's most profitable, trendsetting companies. But how did they know they were making the right investments? What did Buffet and his partners look for in an up-and-coming company, and how can others replicate their approach?

A gift to Buffett followers who have long sought a pattern to the investor's success, Inside the Investments of Warren Buffett presents the most detailed analysis to date of Buffet's long-term investment portfolio. Ms. Yefei Lu, an experienced investor, starts with Buffett's interest in the Sanborn Map Company in 1958 and tracks nineteen more of his major investments in companies like See's Candies, the Washington Post, GEICO, Coca-Cola, US Air, Wells Fargo, and IBM. Accessing partnership letters, company documents, annual reports, third-party references, and other original sources, Lu pinpoints what is unique about Buffett's timing, instinct, use of outside knowledge, and postinvestment actions, and he identifies what could work well for all investors in companies big and small, domestic and global. His substantial chronology accounts for broader world events and fluctuations in the U.S. stock market, suggesting Buffett's most important trait may be the breadth of his expertise.


























[book] Trump Revealed:
An American Journey of Ambition,
Ego, Money, and Power
by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher
(The Washington Post)
August 23, 2016
Scribner
NO Matter The Crisis, Donald Trump Can prevail. It is a lesson he learned at 13.
As a 5-year-old, the boy followed his babysitter on an urban safari, descending into a sewer that was under construction beneath New York City. The light fading, the sitter grew concerned that the boy would panic. But little Donny Trump kept walking into the gathering darkness.
In elementary school, Donny impressed classmates with his athleticism, shenanigans and refusal to acknowledge mistakes, even one so trivial as misidentifying a popular professional wrestler. No matter his pals’ ridicule, one recalled, he doubled down, insisting wrestler Antonino Rocca’s name was “Rocky Antonino.”
At the military academy where he attended high school, Donny grew taller, more muscular and tougher. Struck with a broomstick during a fight, he tried to push a fellow cadet out a second-floor window, only to be thwarted when two other students intervened.
Long before he attained vast wealth and far-reaching fame, Donald J. Trump left an indelible impression in the prosperous Queens neighborhood where he evolved from a mischievous, incorrigible boy into a swaggering young man. He was Trump in miniature, an embryonic version of the bombastic, flamboyant candidate who has dominated the 2016 presidential race, more than three dozen of his childhood friends, classmates and neighbors said in interviews. Even Trump has acknowledged the similarities between himself as an adult and when he was the boy whom friends alternately referred to as “Donny,” “The Trumpet” and “Flat Top” (for his hair).
“When I look at myself in the first grade and I look at myself now, I’m basically the same,” the 70-year-old presumptive Republican nominee once told a biographer. “The temperament is not that different.”
His face crowned by a striking blond pompadour, young Donald commanded attention with his playground taunts, classroom disruptions and distinctive countenance, even then his lips pursed in a way that would inspire future mimics. Taller than his classmates, he exuded an easy confidence and independence. “Who could forget him?” said Ann Trees, 82, who taught at Kew-Forest School, where Trump was a student through seventh grade. “He was headstrong and determined. He would sit with his arms folded with this look on his face — I use the word surly — almost daring you to say one thing or another that wouldn’t settle with him.”
A fierce competitor, Trump could erupt in anger, pummeling another boy or smashing a baseball bat if he made an out, two childhood neighbors said. In school, he misbehaved so often that his initials became his friends’ shorthand for detention.
This is a comprehensive biography of Donald Trump, the Republican front-runner in the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign. Trump Revealed will be reported by a team of award-winning Washington Post journalists and co-authored by investigative political reporter Michael Kranish and senior editor Marc Fisher.
Trump Revealed will offer the most thorough and wide-ranging examination of Donald Trump’s public and private lives to date, from his upbringing in Queens and formative years at the New York Military Academy, to his turbulent careers in real estate and entertainment, to his astonishing rise as the front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination.
The book will be based on the investigative reporting of more than two dozen Washington Post reporters and researchers who will leverage their expertise in politics, business, legal affairs, sports, and other areas. The effort will be guided by a team of editors headed by Executive Editor Martin Baron, who joined the newspaper in 2013 after his successful tenure running The Boston Globe, which included the “Spotlight” team’s investigation of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.













[book] ONE OF THESE THINGS FIRST
A MEMOIR
BY STEVEN GAINES
August 2016
Delphinium
HarperCollins
One of These Things First is a wry and poignant reminiscence of a 15 year old gay Jewish boy in Brooklyn in the early sixties, and his unexpected trajectory from a life behind a rack of dresses in his grandmother’s bra and girdle store, to Manhattan’s fabled Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, a fashionable Charenton for wealthy neurotics and Ivy League alcoholics, whose famous alumni include writers, poets, madmen, Marilyn Monroe, and bestselling author Steven Gaines.
With a gimlet eye and a true gift for storytelling, Gaines captures his childhood shtetl in Brooklyn like an Edward Hopper tableau, with all its dramas and secrets: his philandering grandfather with his fleet of Cadillacs and Corvettes; a trio of harpy saleswomen; a giant, empty movie theater, his portal to the outside world; a shirtless teenage boy pushing a lawnmower in front of a house on Long Island; and a pair of tormenting bullies who own the corner candy store whose taunts drive him to a suicide attempt.
Steven Gaines also takes the reader behind the walls of Payne Whitney, the “Harvard of psychiatric clinics,” as Time magazine called it, populated by a captivating group of neurasthenics who subtly begin to change him in unexpected ways. The cast of characters includes a famous Broadway producer who becomes his unlikely mentor, an elegant woman who claimed to be the ex-mistress of newly elected president John F. Kennedy, a snooty, suicidal Harvard architect, and a seductive young Contessa. At the center of the story is a brilliant young psychiatrist who promises to cure a young boy of his homosexuality and give him the normalcy he so longs for. Through it all, Gaines weaves a tale that delights and disturbs with his trademark raconteur panache.























[book] Praying the Bible:
Finding Personal Meaning in the Siddur,
Ending Boredom &
Making Each Prayer Experience Unique
by Rabbi Mark H. Levin
Overland Park, Kansas
August 2016
Jewish Lights
The Jewish prayer book, the siddur, nourishes a vibrant interface connecting the praying person, Jewish history and redemptive contemporary living.

What is the mystery of the Jewish people? How has Jewish spirituality triumphed over times of persecution as well as the enticements of assimilation? Out of the depths of Jewish despair, the rabbis of the first century and after developed a restorative prayer tradition that has invigorated the Jewish people for two thousand years, in both flourishing environments like the Golden Age of Spain and times of persecution like the Nazi Holocaust. Relying on biblical quotations hidden in each prayer, they developed a poetic interaction squarely placing each praying person in God's redemptive history. The problem is that most contemporary Jews are unaware of the power residing in their spiritual treasure chest.

Praying the Bible is the key to opening the treasure chest. It explores and explains the prayers we read?over and over again?and gives those prayers new meaning. It illuminates the Jewish prayer book as churning with the existential realities of human life and the struggles of the Jewish people. It places the praying person in the living covenant with God, showing how the prayer book can address individual life circumstances with reference to both parallel historical events and daily realities. It provides insights that resonate equally with lay people eager to add depth and meaning to their prayer lives and rabbis looking for engaging sermon material.






















[book] The Senility of Vladimir P.
A Novel
by Michael Honig
August 2016
Pegasus
A biting satire of a particular despot and a deeply humane allegory of the fragility of goodness and the contagion of unchecked power.
Set twenty-odd years from now, it opens on Patient Number One-Vladimir Putin, largely forgotten in his presidential dacha, serviced by a small coterie of house staff, drifting in and out of his memories of the past. His nurse, charged with the twenty-four-hour care of his patient, is blissfully unaware that his colleagues are using their various positions to skim money, in extraordinarily creative ways, from the top of their employer’s seemingly inexhaustible riches. But when a family tragedy means that the nurse suddenly needs to find a fantastical sum of money fast, the dacha’s chef lets him in on the secret world of backhanders and bribes going on around him, and opens his eyes to a brewing war between the staff and the new housekeeper, the ruthless new sheriff in town.
A brilliantly cast modern-day Animal Farm, The Senility of Vladimir P. is a coruscating political fable that shows, through an honest man slipping his ethical moorings, how Putin has not only bankrupted his nation economically, but has also diminished it culturally and spiritually. It is angry, funny, page-turning, and surprisingly moving.























[book] The English Teacher
A Novel
by Yiftach Reicher Atir
Translated by Philip Simpson
August 30, 2016
Penguin
For readers of John Le Carré and viewers of Homeland, a slow-burning psychological spy-thriller by a former brigadier general of intelligence in the Israeli army
After attending her father’s funeral, former Mossad agent Rachel Goldschmitt empties her bank account and disappears. But when she makes a cryptic phone call to her former handler, Ehud, the Mossad sends him to track her down. Finding no leads, he must retrace her career as a spy to figure out why she abandoned Mossad before she can do any damage to Israel. But he soon discovers that after living under cover for so long, an agent’s assumed identity and her real one can blur, catching loyalty, love, and truth between them. In the midst of a high-risk, high-stakes investigation, Ehud begins to question whether he ever knew his agent at all.
In The English Teacher, Yiftach R. Atir drew on his own experience in intelligence to weave a psychologically nuanced thriller that explores the pressures of living under an assumed identity for months at a time.
Yiftach Reicher Atir was born in 1949 on Kibbutz Shoval, in the south of Israel. As a young commando officer, he participated in Operation Entebbe and other military and intelligence operations before retirement with the rank of Brigadier General (Intelligence). The English Teacher is his third novel.















[book] Tastes Like Chicken:
A History of America's Favorite Bird
by Emelyn Rude
August 2, 2016
Pegasus
From the domestication of the bird nearly ten thousand years ago to its current status as our go-to meat, the history of this seemingly commonplace bird is anything but ordinary.
How did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today? It’s hard to imagine, but there was a point in history, not terribly long ago, that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds of chicken per year. Today, those numbers are strikingly different: we consumer nearly twenty-five times as much chicken as our great-grandparents did.
Collectively, Americans devour 73.1 million pounds of chicken in a day, close to 8.6 billion birds per year. How did chicken rise from near-invisibility to being in seemingly "every pot," as per Herbert Hoover's famous promise?
Emelyn Rude explores this fascinating phenomenon in Tastes Like Chicken. With meticulous research, Rude details the ascendancy of chicken from its humble origins to its centrality on grocery store shelves and in restaurants and kitchens. Along the way, she reveals startling key points in its history, such as the moment it was first stuffed and roasted by the Romans, how the ancients’ obsession with cockfighting helped the animal reach Western Europe, and how slavery contributed to the ubiquity of fried chicken today.





























[book] THE GOLDEN AGE
By Joan London
August 2016
PRH, Europa Editions
Winner of the 2015 Prime Minister's Award for Fiction. Perth native, Joan London, author of Gilgamesh, gives her readers an immensely satisfying and generous-hearted story about displacement, recovery, resilience, and love with The Golden Age.
Thirteen-year-old Frank Gold’s family, Hungarian jews, escape the perils of World War II to the safety of Australia in the 1940s. But not long after their arrival Frank is diagnosed with polio. He is sent to a sprawling children’s hospital called The Golden Age, where he meets Elsa, the most beautiful girl he has ever seen, a girl who radiates pure light. Frank and Elsa fall in love, fueling one another’s rehabilitation, facing the perils of polio and adolescence hand in hand, and scandalizing the prudish staff of The Golden Age.
Meanwhile, Frank and Elsa’s parents must cope with their changing realities. Elsa’s mother Margaret, who has given up everything to be a perfect mother, must reconcile her hopes and dreams with her daughter’s sickness. Frank’s parents, transplants to Australia from a war-torn Europe, are isolated newcomers in a country that they do not love and that does not seem to love them. Frank’s mother Ida, a renowned pianist in Hungary, refuses to allow the western deserts of Australia to become her home. But her husband, Meyer, slowly begins to free himself from the past and integrate into a new society.
With tenderness and humor, The Golden Age tells a deeply moving story about illness and recovery. It is a book about learning to navigate the unfamiliar, about embracing music, poetry, death, and, most importantly, life.
Winner of the New South Wales Premier's People's Choice Award



























[book] The One Man:
A Novel
by Andrew Gross
August 2016
Minotaur
“As moving as it is gripping. A winner on all fronts.”-Booklist (starred review)
“Heart-pounding…This is Gross’s best work yet, with his heart and soul imprinted on every page.”-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
Poland. 1944. Alfred Mendl and his family are brought on a crowded train to a Nazi concentration camp after being caught trying to flee Paris with forged papers. His family is torn away from him on arrival, his life’s work burned before his eyes. To the guards, he is just another prisoner, but in fact Mendl-a renowned physicist-holds knowledge that only two people in the world possess. And the other is already at work for the Nazi war machine.
Four thousand miles away, in Washington, DC, Intelligence lieutenant Nathan Blum routinely decodes messages from occupied Poland. Having escaped the Krakow ghetto as a teenager after the Nazis executed his family, Nathan longs to do more for his new country in the war. But never did he expect the proposal he receives from “Wild” Bill Donovan, head of the OSS: to sneak into the most guarded place on earth, a living hell, on a mission to find and escape with one man, the one man the Allies believe can ensure them victory in the war. Bursting with compelling characters and tense story lines, this historical thriller from New York Times bestseller Andrew Gross is a deeply affecting, unputdownable series of twists and turns through a landscape at times horrifyingly familiar but still completely new and compelling.






















[book] Where the Jews Aren't:
The Sad and Absurd Story of
Birobidzhan, Russia's Jewish
Autonomous Region
(Jewish Encounters Series) by Masha Gessen
August 23, 2016
Schocken Books
The previously untold story of the Jews in twentieth-century Russia that reveals the complex, strange, and heart-wrenching truth behind the familiar narrative that begins with pogroms and ends with emigration.
In 1929, the Soviet Union declared the area of Birobidzhan a homeland for Jews. It was championed by a group of intellectuals who envisioned a place of post-oppression Jewish culture, and by the early 1930s, tens of thousands of Jews had moved there from the shtetls. The state-building ended quickly, in the late 1930s, with arrests and purges of the Communist Party and cultural elite, but after the Second World War, the newly named "Jewish Autonomous Region" received an influx of Jews dispossessed from what had once been the Pale, most of whom had lost families in the Holocaust. In the late 1940s, another wave of arrests swept through Birobidzhan, traumatizing the Jews into silence, and effectively making them invisible. Now Masha Gessen gives us a haunting account of the dream of Birobidzhan—and how it became the cracked and crooked mirror in which we can see the true story of the Jews in twentieth-century Russia.


























[book] MAYA PRAYS FOR RAIN
By Susan Tarcov
Illustrated by Ana Ochoa
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4–9. PreK-3
It's a sunny fall day in Maya's neighborhood, and all her neighbors are busy with outdoor activities. But Maya learns that today is Shemini Atzeret, when the Jewish community prays for rain, which puts her in a quandary. Will her neighbor's plans be ruined? Maya rushes to warn them about the rain. Her rabbi explains though, that she need not worry…



























[book] Sky-High Sukkah
by Rachel Packer
Illustrated by Deborah Zemke
August 2016
Apples and Honey Press
Leah lives high up in an apartment building overlooking the city, and dreams of having a sukkah of her own. But there is no place to build it. With some help from the neighbors, Leah and her friend Ari find a way to have their own sukkah on the roof. Especially after Ari wins a sukkah in an art contest. It takes a “village” to build a sukkah, including the grocer.

An author’s note at the end explores the Jewish value of kehilla, community, and invites children to think about why kehilla is important and what activities they can do to build kehilla.



























[book] IS IT SUKKOT YET?

Illustrated by Alessandra Psacharopulo
August 2016
Albert Whitman
The first sights of fall arrive?pumpkins, gourds, and colorful leaves?and that means that Sukkot is almost here. Sukkot is the Jewish holiday celebrating the fall harvest and commemorating the time when the children of Israel spent forty years wandering the desert and living in temporary shelters (rebuilt as a sukkah during Sukkot). Soft illustrations and thoughtful gentle text pair for a charming invitation for children to celebrate the joyful holiday.



























[book] ROSH HASHANAh IS COMING
By Tracy Newman
Illustrated by Viviana Garofoli
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 1-4.
A sweet board book
A family celebrates
The geese call
As golden leaves fall
Lots of counds as
they make their challot round



























[book] Yosef's Dream
by Sylvia Rouss
Illustrated by Tamar Blumenfeld
2016
Apples and Honey Press
Behrman House
Now a young man in Israel, Yosef remembers his past in Ethiopia, and the dream he had as a child, in which he was given a choice. Should he climb mountains with Gazelle, never belonging anywhere? Hide in the shadows, with Hyena? Or grab hold of Eagle s wings and be taken far, far away? Yosef chooses the last, along with his family to fly to Israel, the land of their ancestors fulfilling their long-held dream.
An author s note provides background about the Jews of Ethiopia and the 1991 rescue mission, called Operation Solomon, in which 14,000 Ethiopian Jews were flown to Israel.



























[book] A HANUKKAH WITH MaZEL
By Joel Edward Stein
Illustrated by Elisa Vavouri
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 3-8.
Misha, a poor artist, has no one to celebrate Hanukkah with until he discovers a hungry cat in his barn. The lucky little cat, whom Misha names Mazel, inspires Misha to turn each night of Hanukkah into something special. He doesn't have money for Hanukkah candles, but he can use his artistic skills to bring light to his home - as Mazel brings good luck to his life.



























[book] Babel
by Marc Lumer, Chaim Burston
and DovBer Naiditch
2016
Apples and Honey Press
Where do children play tower games with tower pieces, wear tower hats and eat tower cakes? In the city of Babel, of course! There, the people are building a tower that will reach up to the heavens. The tower is the most important thing in the world to them. But what will happen when they realize that a tower is just tower? In this contemporary retelling of the biblical Tower of Babel story, the people of Babel are presented though the lens of a very relatable family and their neighborhood. Illustrated with a fantastic attention to detail, each corner of the city and tower are filled with new discoveries that will delight every reader.






























[book] POTATOES AT TURTLE ROCK
By Susan Schnur and Anna Schnur-Fishman
Illustrated by Alex Steele-Morgan
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 5-9.
Annie leads her family on a nighttime journey around their farm to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah. At each stop along the way Annie uses riddles (and potatoes) to mark old traditions and start new ones. At each stop along the way (the Old log, Squeezy Cave, Billy Goat Bridge… Annie shares a riddle. At Turtle Rock Creek, they give thanks for the light, warmth, and potaoes, and for each other





























[book] HANUKKAH DELIGHT
By Leslea Newman
Illustrated by Amy Husband
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 1-4.
Bunnies and their friends celebrate Hanukkah in a rhyming board book describing many rituals of the holiday, like chocolate gelt and dreidels.





























[book] Avi the Ambulance to the Rescue
by Claudia Carlson
Illustrated by CB Decker
2016
Apples and Honey Press
he second book in the Avi the Ambulance series!
Avi want to help people like the other rescue vehicles, such as Hila the helicopter and Motti the medicycle. But his Mom, the command car, has assigned him and his medic Zach to restock supplies. But along the way to delivering them, there is an emergency...and it is Avi to the rescue! Our favorite ambulance gets to help someone that he never expected would need him.
The story touches on several Jewish values, including caring for animals, Tza'ar Baalei Chaim, (yes, that someone Avi helps is a cute cat named Yoffi!) and helping the injured, P’ikuach Nefesh,..






























[book] L’DOR VADOR
GENERATION TO GENERATION
A KEEPSAKE COLORING BOOK
By Judy Freeman
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 6 and up
A keepsake collection of beautiful black-and-white coloring pages for parents, children and grandparents to color together and share, featuring Hebrew letters and Judaica images by well-known ketubah artist Judy Freeman. Lay-flat binding for easy coloring.





























[book] GABRIELS’S HORN
By Eric A. Kimmel
Illustrated by Maria Surducan
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4 – 9
A mysterious soldier appears at the door hands Gabriel a tarnished horn. As the years go by, Gabriel's family prospers and they, in turn, help their neighbors. Could their good luck have something to do with the horn?

























[book] Little Red Rosie
by Eric Kimmel
Illustrated by Monica Gutierrez
2016
Apples and Honey Press
In this playful version of The Little Red Hen, a young girl enlists her animal friends to help make the challah for Rosh Hashanah. With humorous, lively illustrations, this story captures the values of imagination, responsibility, and welcoming guests.






























[book] THE FLOWER GIRL WORE CELERY
By Meryl G. Gordon
Illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Emma can't wait for her cousin Hannah's wedding. She's going to be the flower girl. That means she'll wear a celery dress and walk down the aisle with the ring bear, leading the way for the happy bride and groom. Or at least, that's what Emma assumes. But nothing turns out to be quite what she's expecting (cuz it is another bride).

























[book] Oy Vey, Life in a Shoe
by Bonnie Grubman
Illustrated by Dave Mottram
2016
Apples and Honey Press
Follow Lou as he appeals to the Rabbi for answers on how to solve his overcrowding problem!
A contemporary mash-up of the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe with the traditional Jewish folktale about a family getting unexpected wisdom from the Rabbi, this high-energy adventure is chock-full of animals, kids, humor, whimsy and silliness. Mottram s illustrations add another level of fun as the animals wear Lou s glasses, gnaw on the furniture, and add to the clutter and mischief.
A laugh-out-loud romp, this tale serves as a fun reminder that sometimes things have to go from bad to worse, before you realize they were wonderful all along!































[book] SAMMY SPIDER’S FIRST BAR MITZVAH
By Sylvia A. Rouss
Illustrated by Katherine Janus Kahn
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Josh's cousin Ben is having his bar mitzvah, and Sammy Spider ends up coming along! He gets a view of the Torah readings, the blessings . . . and one tradition that gets this silly little spider into even more trouble than usual.
(Can you throw a spider instead of hard candy??)



























Why do they make grandmother’s look like they are over 70, when most grandmother’s I know are in their mid fifties?
[book] Chicken Soup, Chicken Soup
By Pamela Mayer
Illustrated by Deborah Melman
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Two grandmas. Two delicious recipes. Sophie loves Bubbe's Jewish chicken soup, made with kreplach. She also loves Nai Nai's Chinese chicken soup, with wonton. But don't tell Bubbe and Nai Nai that their soups are the same!




























[book] The Cricket and the Ant
A Shabbat Story
By Naomi Ben-Gur
Illustrated by Shahar Kober
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 3-8
The fun-loving Cricket neglects his Shabbat tasks while the industrious Ant does hers, but Cricket surprises her by coming to the rescue just in time to save her Shabbat celebration. Originally published in Hebrew



























[book] JOSEPH THE DREAMER
By Becky LAFF
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 5-9
Joseph is his father's favorite son, and he has amazing dreams unlike anyone else's. But when Joseph's jealous brothers decide enough is enough, Joseph finds himself a prisoner in a foreign land, where he must draw strength from within. The well-known Bible story told in graphic novel format!



























[book] WHO STOLE MY RELIGION?
REVITALIZING JUDAISM AND
APPLYING JEWISH VALUES
TO HELP HEAL OUR
IMPERILED PLANET
By Richard H. Schartz, PhD
with Rabbi Yonassan Gershom
Foreword by Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz, PhD
August 2016
URIM PUBLICATIONS
If Rabbi Arthur Ocean Waskow likes it, then I like it.
Who Stole My Religion? is a wake up call to Jews to apply Judaism’s powerful teachings on justice, peace, compassion, kindness, and environmental sustainability to help shift our imperiled planet onto a sustainable path. It extols Judaism, arguing that Judaism is a radical, transformative religion, but many Jews, especially Orthodox Jews, are in denial about climate change and are supporting conservative politicians and policies that are inconsistent with Jewish values. Richard Schwartz provides a thought-provoking read, and he demonstrates that the future of humanity depends on Jews applying Judaism’s highest values in response to today’s crises.









































[book] Parachuting Cats into Borneo:
And Other Lessons from
the Change Café
by Axel Klimek and Alan AtKisson
August 2016
Chelsea Green
A toolkit of proven strategies and practices for building capacity and creating transformation
Recent years have seen a proliferation of information on how to make change-in business, in social and environmental movements, and on a more personal scale. But, even with all this attention, two out of three change efforts fail to achieve their desired result. How can you make your own effort buck this trend?
In Parachuting Cats into Borneo, change-management experts Axel Klimek and Alan AtKisson offer crisp, concise, and targeted advice for success. They expose the most significant impediments-helping readers recognize their habitual patterns of thinking and perceiving a situation, critique their own beliefs regarding change, and then move beyond these unhelpful patterns using improved systems thinking.
Named after a classic tale of unintended consequences, Parachuting Cats into Borneo delivers tools that help leaders and others keep their change initiatives on track. The advice imparted will help you move away from agonizing over immediate problems toward stoking action, identifying collaborators, focusing at the right level for your cause, and aiding others in pursuing their change.
Klimek and AtKisson draw from their decades of helping corporations, networks, governments, and NGOs reach their change goals to demonstrate how to use system-based change tools to their maximum advantage.
A closing section is devoted to change making in the realm of sustainability, where complexity abounds but the right tools, used well, can help us tackle some of the most significant challenges of our time.































[book] Makers of Jewish Modernity:
Thinkers, Artists, Leaders,
and the World They Made
Edited by Jacques Picard, Jacques M Revel,
Michael P. Steinberg, and Idith Zertal
August 2016
Princeton University
This superb collection presents more than forty incisive portraits of leading Jewish thinkers, artists, scientists, and other public figures of the last hundred years who, in their own unique ways, engaged with and helped shape the modern world.
Makers of Jewish Modernity features entries on political figures such as Walther Rathenau, Rosa Luxemburg, and David Ben-Gurion; philosophers and critics such as Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Jacques Derrida, and Judith Butler; and artists such as Mark Rothko. The book provides fresh insights into the lives and careers of novelists like Franz Kafka, Saul Bellow, and Philip Roth; the filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen; social scientists such as Sigmund Freud; religious leaders and thinkers such as Avraham Kook and Martin Buber; and many others. Written by a diverse group of leading contemporary scholars from around the world, these vibrant and frequently surprising portraits offer a global perspective that highlights the multiplicity of Jewish experience and thought.
A reference book like no other, Makers of Jewish Modernity includes an informative general introduction that situates its subjects within the broader context of Jewish modernity as well as a rich selection of photos.































NOT SINCE the 1973 war’s SECRET CONVERSATIONS OF HENRY KISSINGER has there been such an exciting behind the scenes book ~ Me.
[book] THE IRAN WARS
Spy Games, Bank Battles,
and the Secret Deals That
Reshaped the Middle East
by Jay Solomon, Wall Street Journal
Summer 2016
From the Wall Street Journal reporter who’s been breaking news on the historic and potentially disastrous Iran nuclear deal comes a deeply reported exploration of the country’s decades-long power struggle with the United States—for readers of Steve Coll’s Ghost Wars and Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Tower
For more than a decade, the United States has been engaged in a war with Iran as momentous as any other in the Middle East—a war all the more significant as it has largely been hidden from public view. Through a combination of economic sanctions, global diplomacy, and intelligence work, successive U.S. administrations have struggled to contain Iran’s aspirations to become a nuclear power and dominate the region—what many view as the most serious threat to peace in the Middle East. Meanwhile, Iran has used regional instability to its advantage to undermine America’s interests. The Iran Wars is an absorbing account of a battle waged on many levels—military, financial, and covert.
Jay Solomon’s book is the product of extensive in-depth reporting and interviews with all the key players in the conflict—from high-ranking Iranian officials to Secretary of State John Kerry and his negotiating team. With a reporter’s masterly investigative eye and the narrative dexterity of a great historian, Solomon shows how Iran’s nuclear development went unnoticed for years by the international community only to become its top security concern. He catalogs the blunders of both the Bush and Obama administrations as they grappled with how to engage Iran, producing a series of both carrots and sticks. And he takes us inside the hotel suites where the 2015 nuclear agreement was negotiated, offering a frank assessment of the uncertain future of the U.S.-Iran relationship.
This is a book rife with revelations, from the secret communications between the Obama administration and the Iranian government to dispatches from the front lines of the new field of financial warfare. For readers of Steve Coll’s Ghost Wars and Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Tower, The Iran Wars exposes the hidden history of a conflict most Americans don’t even realize is being fought, but whose outcome could have far-reaching geopolitical implications.
Gordon shares riotous anecdotes and outrageous accounts of his free-wheeling, globe-trotting experiences with some of the biggest celebrities of the past five decades, including his first meeting with Janice Joplin in 1968, when the raspy singer punched him in the face. Told with incomparable humor and heart, They Call Me Supermensch is a sincere, hilarious behind-the-scenes look at the worlds of music and entertainment from the consummate Hollywood insider.






















OH ARTISTS!... Lucien Freud declined a wedding invitation since he found himself in the UNUSUAL position “of having been involved sexually not only with the bride but also the groom and the groom’s mother…”
[book] The Art of Rivalry:
Four Friendships, Betrayals,
and Breakthroughs in Modern Art
by Sebastian Smee
August 16, 2016
Pulitzer Prize–winning art critic Sebastian Smee tells the fascinating story of four pairs of artists —
Manet and Degas,
Picasso and Matisse,
Pollock and de Kooning, and
Freud and Bacon —
whose fraught, competitive friendships spurred them to new creative heights.

Rivalry is at the heart of some of the most famous and fruitful relationships in history. The Art of Rivalry follows eight celebrated artists, each linked to a counterpart by friendship, admiration, envy, and ambition. All eight are household names today. But to achieve what they did, each needed the influence of a contemporary—one who was equally ambitious but possessed sharply contrasting strengths and weaknesses.

Edouard Manet and Edgar Degas were close associates whose personal bond frayed after Degas painted a portrait of Manet and his wife. Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso swapped paintings, ideas, and influences as they jostled for the support of collectors like Leo and Gertrude Stein and vied for the leadership of a new avant-garde. Jackson Pollock’s uninhibited style of “action painting” triggered a breakthrough in the work of his older rival, Willem de Kooning. After Pollock’s sudden death in a car crash, de Kooning assumed Pollock's mantle and became romantically involved with his late friend’s mistress. Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon met in the early 1950s, when Bacon was being hailed as Britain’s most exciting new painter and Freud was working in relative obscurity. Their intense but asymmetrical friendship came to a head when Freud painted a portrait of Bacon, which was later stolen.

Each of these relationships culminated in an early flashpoint, a rupture in a budding intimacy that was both a betrayal and a trigger for great innovation. Writing with the same exuberant wit and psychological insight that earned him a Pulitzer Prize for art criticism, Sebastian Smee explores here the way that coming into one’s own as an artist—finding one’s voice—almost always involves willfully breaking away from some intimate’s expectations of who you are or ought to be.

















[book] The Accidental Life:
An Editor's Notes on Writing and Writers
by Terry McDonell
August 2, 2016
Knopf
A celebration of the writing and editing life, as well as a look behind the scenes at some of the most influential magazines in America (and the writers who made them what they are).
  You might not know Terry McDonell, but you certainly know his work. Among the magazines he has top-edited: Outside, Rolling Stone, Esquire, and Sports Illustrated. In this revealing memoir, McDonell talks about what really happens when editors and writers work with deadlines ticking (or drinks on the bar). His stories about the people and personalities he’s known are both heartbreaking and bitingly funny—playing “acid golf” with Hunter S. Thompson, practicing brinksmanship with David Carr and Steve Jobs, working the European fashion scene with Liz Tilberis, pitching TV pilots with Richard Price.
Here, too, is an expert’s practical advice on how to recruit—and keep—high-profile talent; what makes a compelling lede; how to grow online traffic that translates into dollars; and how, in whatever format, on whatever platform, a good editor really works, and what it takes to write well.
Taking us from the raucous days of New Journalism to today’s digital landscape, McDonell argues that the need for clear storytelling from trustworthy news sources has never been stronger. Says Jeffrey Eugenides: “Every time I run into Terry, I think how great it would be to have dinner with him. Hear about the writers he's known and edited over the years, what the magazine business was like back then, how it's changed and where it's going, inside info about Edward Abbey, Jim Harrison, Annie Proulx, old New York, and the Swimsuit issue. That dinner is this book.”
















[book] The Family Fletcher Takes Rock Island
A novel for Grade 4 – 6 and above
by Dana Alison Levy
2016
Dealcorte
Love the TV show Modern Family? Wait until you meet the family Fletcher! With two dads, four adopted brothers, two cats, and one pug, the Fletchers will have you laughing out loud!
Welcome to Rock Island, Where Time Stands Still!
The Fletchers are back on Rock Island, home of all their best summer memories. But from their first day on vacation, it’s clear that this year, things have changed. Their favorite lighthouse is all boarded up‘ and the Fletcher boys can’t figure out why or how to save it. Add a dose of Shakespeare, a very tippy kayak, a video camera, (maybe, possibly, or not) a swimming cat, and some new neighbors, and the recipe for a crazy vacation is complete.
Over the course of the summer, the Fletchers will learn that sometimes, even in a place where time stands still, the wildest, weirdest, and most wonderful surprises await.






















SEPTEMBER 2016 BOOKS


[book] They Call Me Supermensch LP:
They Call Me Super mensch LP: My Amazing Adventures in Rock 'n' Roll,
Hollywood, and Haute Cuisine
by Shep Gordon
September 2016
ecco
An eye-popping peek into entertainment industry from the magnetic force who has worked with an impeccable roster of stars throughout his storied career.
In the course of his legendary career as a manager, agent, and producer, Shep Gordon has worked with, and befriended, some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry, from Alice Cooper to Bette Davis, Raquel Welch to Groucho Marx, Blondie to Jimi Hendrix, Sylvester Stallone to Salvador Dali, Luther Vandross to Teddy Pendergrass. He is also credited with inventing the "celebrity chef," and has worked with Nobu Matsuhisa, Emeril Lagasse, Wolfgang Puck, Roger Vergé, and many others, including his holiness the Dalai Lama.
In this wonderfully engaging memoir, the charismatic entertainment legend recalls his life, from his humble beginnings as a "shy, no self-esteem, Jewish nebbisher kid with no ambition" in Oceanside, Long Island, to his unexpected rise as one of the most influential and respected personalities in show business, revered for his kindness, charisma—and fondness for a good time.
Gordon shares riotous anecdotes and outrageous accounts of his free-wheeling, globe-trotting experiences with some of the biggest celebrities of the past five decades, including his first meeting with Janice Joplin in 1968, when the raspy singer punched him in the face. Told with incomparable humor and heart, They Call Me Supermensch is a sincere, hilarious behind-the-scenes look at the worlds of music and entertainment from the consummate Hollywood insider.






















[book] Next Generation Judaism:
How College Students and Hillel
Can Help Reinvent Jewish Organizations
by Rabbi Mike Uram
Preface by Eric Fingerhut
Foreword by Dr. Ron Wolfson
September 2016
Jewish Lights
What we're learning on campus can help the Jewish community build better, smarter and faster synagogues, Federations and JCCs.

The Jewish world is changing before our eyes. The traditional notions of what it means to be a Jew, what Jewish organizations look like and what Jewish leadership means are no longer working, leaving many Jewish organizations in a struggle for survival. Many Jewish leaders are afraid that this will only get worse as the millennials the "my way, right away, why pay" generation begin to enter adulthood.

But college campuses are incubators of new and vibrant expressions of Jewish life. With motivation and entrepreneurial spirit, and without the limitations of cynicism or institutional history, students are inventing and reinventing Jewish community, Jewish prayer, Jewish service and Jewish learning, and Hillel is right there with them. Each chapter of this book explores innovations developed on the University of Pennsylvania campus and the entire Hillel system in order to show how they can be applied to synagogues, Federations and JCCs to help them reinvent themselves so that they are better able to meet the changing needs of American Jews.

This is an essential resource for lay leaders, rabbis, cantors and anyone who wants to build a brighter Jewish future for all Jews and the institutions that support them.
























[book] Mischling
by Affinity Konar
September 2016
Lee Boudreaux
Pearl is in charge of: the sad, the good, the past. Stasha must care for: the funny, the future, the bad. It's 1944 when the twin sisters arrive at Auschwitz with their mother and grandfather. In their benighted new world, Pearl and Stasha Zagorski take refuge in their identical natures, comforting themselves with the private language and shared games of their childhood.
As part of the experimental population of twins known as Mengele's Zoo, the girls experience privileges and horrors unknown to others, and they find themselves changed, stripped of the personalities they once shared, their identities altered by the burdens of guilt and pain.
That winter, at a concert orchestrated by Mengele, Pearl disappears. Stasha grieves for her twin, but clings to the possibility that Pearl remains alive. When the camp is liberated by the Red Army, she and her companion Feliks--a boy bent on vengeance for his own lost twin--travel through Poland's devastation. Undeterred by injury, starvation, or the chaos around them, motivated by equal parts danger and hope, they encounter hostile villagers, Jewish resistance fighters, and fellow refugees, their quest enabled by the notion that Mengele may be captured and brought to justice within the ruins of the Warsaw Zoo. As the young survivors discover what has become of the world, they must try to imagine a future within it.
A superbly crafted story, told in a voice as exquisite as it is boundlessly original, MISCHLING defies every expectation, traversing one of the darkest moments in human history to show us the way toward ethereal beauty, moral reckoning, and soaring hope.





























[book] Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law
by Rabbi Ethan Tucker and
Rabbi Micha'el Rosenberg
September 14, 2016
URIM Publications
As gender equality has spread throughout society, including its religiously observant sectors, traditional communities turn to their guiding sources to re-examine old questions. This book opens the reader’s eyes to the wealth of Jewish legal material surrounding gender and prayer, with a particular focus on who can lead the prayers in a traditional service and who can constitute the communal quorum—or minyan—that they require. With honesty, transparency, and rigor, Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law is a powerful resource for grappling with these complex questions. The authors not only explore this specific issue in depth, but they also model how we can mine the Jewish legal tradition for its underlying values, enabling its complex sources to serve as effective guides for contemporary communal decision-making.



























HiNENI
[book] HERE I AM
A NOVEL
By Jonathan Safran Foer
September 6, 2016
FS&G
Not since his book on prostates; Everything Is Illuminated; and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close has a book been so interesting.

In the book of Genesis, when God calls out, “Abraham!” before ordering him to sacrifice his son Isaac, Abraham responds, “Here I am.” Later, when Isaac calls out, “My father!” before asking him why there is no animal to slaughter, Abraham responds, “Here I am.”

How do we fulfill our conflicting duties as father, husband, and son; wife and mother; child and adult? Jew and American? How can we claim our own identities when our lives are linked so closely to others’? These are the questions at the heart of Jonathan Safran Foer’s first novel in eleven years--a work of extraordinary scope and heartbreaking intimacy.

Unfolding over four tumultuous weeks in present-day Washington, D.C. (where Foer is from), “Here I Am” is the story of a fracturing family in a moment of crisis (Foer went through a divorce). As Jacob and Julia and their three sons (Foer is one of 3 sons) are forced to confront the distances between the lives they think they want and the lives they are living, a catastrophic earthquake sets in motion a quickly escalating conflict in the Middle East. Israel is in peril. At stake is the very meaning of home--and the fundamental question of how much aliveness one can bear.

Showcasing the same high-energy inventiveness, hilarious irreverence, and emotional urgency that readers and critics loved in his earlier work, Here I Am is Foer’s most searching, hard-hitting, and grandly entertaining novel yet. It not only confirms Foer’s stature as a dazzling literary talent but reveals a mature novelist who has fully come into his own as one of the most important writers of his generation.

Publishers Weekly: “Great-grandfather Isaac Bloch's voice opens Foer's intensely imagined and richly rewarding novel. What follows is a teeming saga of members of the patriarch's family: Isaac's son, Irv, a xenophobic, self-righteous defender of Israel who claims that "the world will always hate Jews"; his grandson, Jacob, achingly aware that his decade-plus marriage to Julia is breaking down; and Jacob and Julia's son Sam, whose imminent bar mitzvah may be cancelled if he doesn't apologize for the obscene material discovered in his desk at Hebrew school. The Blochs are distinctively upper-middle-class American in their needs, aspirations, and place in the 21st century. Foer excels in rendering domestic conversation: the banter and quips, the anger and recrimination, and Jacob and Julia's deeply felt guilt that their divorce will damage their three sons. Things are bad enough in the Bloch family when world events intervene: a major earthquake levels the Middle East, spreading catastrophic damage among the Arab states and Israel. In an imaginative segment, Foer depicts the reaction of the media when Israel ceases helping its Arab neighbors to save its own people and the Arab states unite and prepare for attack. The irony is evident: Irv, the fearmonger, has been proven correct. Foer (Everything Is Illuminated) fuses these complex strands with his never-wavering hand. Throughout, his dark wit drops in zingers of dialogue, leavening his melancholy assessments of the loneliness of human relationships and a world riven by ethnic hatred. He poses several thorny moral questions, among them how to have religious faith in the modern world, and what American Jews' responsibilities are toward Israel. That he can provide such a redemptive denouement, at once poignant, inspirational, and compassionate, is the mark of a thrillingly gifted writer. “













[book] The Gefilte Manifesto
New Recipes for
Old World Jewish Foods
by Jeffrey Yoskowitz and Liz Alpern
September 13, 2016
Flatiron Books
The founders of the world-famous Gefilteria revitalize beloved old-world foods with ingenious new approaches in their debut cookbook.
Liz Alpern and Jeffrey Yoskowitz are on a mission to reclaim and revolutionize Ashkenazi cuisine. Combining the inventive spirit of a new generation and respect for their culinary tradition, they present more than a hundred recipes pulled deep from the kitchens of Eastern Europe and the diaspora community of North America. Their recipes highlight the best of Ashkenazi home and storefront cuisine, tapping into the enduring Jewish values of resourcefulness and seasonality.
Drawing inspiration from aromatic Jewish bakeries (Classic Challah with a Marble Rye Twist, Seeded Honey Rye Pull-Apart Rolls), neighborhood delis (Home-Cured Corned Beef and Pastrami, Rustic Matzo Balls, and Old World Stuffed Gefilte Fish), old-fashioned pickle shops (Crisp Garlic Dilly Beans, Ashkenazi Kimchi), and, of course, their own childhood kitchens, Yoskowitz and Alpern rediscover old-world food traditions, helping you bring simple and comforting recipes into your home.
Dishes like Spiced Blueberry Soup, Kasha Varnishkes with Brussels Sprouts, and Sweet Lokshen Kugel with Plums celebrate flavors passed down from generation to generation in recipes reimagined for the contemporary kitchen. Other recipes take a playful approach to the Old World, like Fried Sour Pickles with Garlic Aioli and Sour Dill Martinis. The Gefilte Manifesto is more than a cookbook. It’s a call to action, a reclamation of time-honored techniques and ingredients, from the mind-blowingly easy Classic Sour Dill Pickles to the Crispy Honey-Glazed Chicken with Tsimmes. Make a stand. Cook the Manifesto. The results are radically delicious.





















[book] My Halal Kitchen:
Global Recipes, Cooking Tips,
and Lifestyle Inspiration
by Yvonne Maffei
2016
Surrey
Yvonne Maffei is the founder of the hugely popular cooking blog and Islamic lifestyle website My Halal Kitchen. Her new book, My Halal Kitchen: Global Recipes, Cooking Tips, and Lifestyle Inspiration, celebrates halal cooking and shows readers how easy it can be to prepare halal meals. Her cookbook collects more than 100 recipes from a variety of culinary traditions, proving that halal meals can be full of diverse flavors. Home cooks will learn to make classic American favorites and comfort foods, as well as international dishes that previously may have seemed out of reach: Coq without the Vin, Shrimp Pad Thai, Chicken Tamales, and many more.
The book also includes resources that break down the basics of halal cooking and outline common non-halal ingredients, their replacements, and how to purchase (or make) them. As Maffei often says to her million-plus social media followers, halal cooking elegantly dovetails with holistic living and using locally sourced, organic ingredients. In the halal tradition, every part of the farm-to-fork cycle has importance. This book is an ideal resource not only for Muslim home cooks, but also for any home cook looking to find delicious and healthy recipes from around the globe.





















[book] The Scout's Guide to
Wild Edibles:
Learn How To Forage,
Prepare & Eat 40 Wild Foods
by Mike Krebill
Nov 2016
Ingram/St Lynn Press
Ever seen a tasty-looking plant or mushroom in a yard or forest but weren’t sure if it would taste good…or even be edible? In The Scout’s Guide to Wild Edibles, renowned forager Mike Krebill profiles 40 widely-found edible wild plants and mushrooms of North America, in a guide small enough to fit right in a pocket. The author offers clear color photos and positive-ID tips for each plant, along with 15 recipes and 10 DIY activities for all skill levels. The Scout’s Guide will help foragers locate, identify and safely enjoy wild edibles – with the added satisfaction of knowing exactly where their food came from.
































“The is overwhelming evidence that Judaism took root in Roman soil, imbibed it nourishment, and grafted the good and pruned the bad from the Roman Empire, until a vibrant new religion – Judaism – arose from the wreckage of Israelite religion and the Temple cult, nurtured by the very empire that had destroyed it.”
[book] Aphrodite and the Rabbis:
How the Jews Adapted Roman Culture
to Create Judaism As We Know It
by Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky
September 13, 2016
St. Martin’s Books
I knew that the seder is modeled on a Roman/Greco banquet/symposium (but no slaves, no vomitorium), but is there more?

Professor Visotzky teaches us that The Talmud rabbis presented themselves as Stoic philosophers; Synagogue buildings were modeled on Roman basilicas; Hellenistic rhetoric professors educated sons of well-to-do Jews; Zeus-Helios is depicted in synagogue mosaics across ancient Israel; The Jewish courts were named after the Roman political institution, the Sanhedrin; and In Israel there were synagogues where the prayers were recited in ancient Greek.

Historians have long debated the (re)birth of Judaism in the wake of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple cult by the Romans in 70 CE. What replaced that sacrificial cult was at once something new – indebted to the very culture of the Roman overlords – even as it also sought to preserve what little it could of the old Israelite religion. The Greco-Roman culture in which rabbinic Judaism grew in the first five centuries of the Common Era nurtured the development of Judaism as we still know and celebrate it today.

Arguing that its transformation from a Jerusalem-centered cult to a world religion was made possible by the Roman Empire, Rabbi Burton Visotzky presents Judaism as a distinctly Roman religion.

Full of fascinating detail from the daily life and culture of Jewish communities across the Hellenistic world, Aphrodite and the Rabbis will appeal to anyone interested in the development of Judaism, religion, history, art and architecture.
BURTON L. VISOTZKY is Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary.




















[book] THE RYE BAKER
Classic Breads from Europe and America
by Stanley Ginsberg
(The New York Bakers)
September 27, 2016
Norton
To many Americans, rye bread is a bland, store-bought loaf with an oval cross-section and, sometimes, a sprinkling of caraway. But true rye bread? the kind that stands at the center of northern and eastern European food culture?is so much more. In The Rye Baker, Stanley Ginsberg brings this overlooked grain into the culinary limelight, introducing readers to the rich and unimaginably diverse world of rye bread.
Readers will find more than 70 classic recipes that span rye’s regions and terroir, from dark, intense Russian Borodinsky and orange-infused Swedish Gotland Rye to near-black Westphalian Pumpernickel (which gets its musky sweetness from a 24-hour bake), Spiced Honey Rye from France’s Auvergne, and the rye breads of America’s melting-pot, such as Boston Brown Bread and Old Milwaukee Rye. Chapters detailing rye’s history, unique chemistry, and centuries-old baking methods round out The Rye Baker, making it the definitive resource for professional and home bakers alike.

























[book] Two She-Bears
A Novel
by Meir Shalev
Translated from Hebrew by Stuart Schoffman
September 13, 2016
Schocken
One of Israel's most celebrated novelists—the acclaimed author of A Pigeon and a Boy — now gives us a story of village love and vengeance in the early days of British Palestine that is still being played out two generations later.

“In the year 1930, three farmers committed suicide here . . . but contrary to the chronicles of our committee and the conclusions of the British policeman, the people of the moshava knew that only two of the suicides had actually taken their own lives, whereas the third suicide had been murdered.” This is the contention of Ruta Tavori, a high school teacher and independent thinker in this small farming community, writing seventy years later about that murder and about two charismatic men she loves and is trying to forgive—her grandfather and her husband—and her son, whom she mourns and misses. In a story rich with the grit, humor, and near-magical evocation of Israeli rural life for which Meir Shalev is beloved by readers, Ruta weaves a tale of friendship between men, of love and betrayal, that carries us from British Palestine to present-day Israel, where forgiveness, atonement, and understanding can finally happen.



























[book] CHASING PORTRAITS
A Great-Granddaughter’s Quest
For Her Lost Art Legacy
By Elizabeth Rynecki
September 2016
NAL New American Library
The memoir of one woman’s emotional quest to find the art of her Polish-Jewish great-grandfather, lost during World War II.
Moshe Rynecki’s (1881-1943) body of work reached close to eight hundred paintings and sculptures before his life came to a tragic end. It was his great-granddaughter Elizabeth who sought to rediscover his legacy, setting upon a journey to seek out what had been lost but never forgotten…
The everyday lives of the Polish-Jewish community depicted in Moshe Rynecki’s paintings simply blended into the background of Elizabeth Rynecki’s life when she was growing up. But the art transformed from familiar to extraordinary in her eyes after her grandfather, Moshe’s son George, left behind journals detailing the loss her ancestors had endured during World War II, including Moshe’s art. Knowing that her family had only found a small portion of Moshe’s art, and that many more pieces remained to be found, Elizabeth set out to find them.
Before Moshe was deported to the ghetto, he entrusted his work to friends who would keep it safe. After he was killed in the Majdanek concentration camp, the art was dispersed all over the world. With the help of historians, curators, and admirers of Moshe’s work, Elizabeth began the incredible and difficult task of rebuilding his collection.
Spanning three decades of Elizabeth’s life and three generations of her family, this touching memoir is a compelling narrative of the richness of one man’s art, the devastation of war, and one woman’s unexpected path to healing.























[book] Selling Hitler
Propaganda and the Nazi Brand
by Nicholas O'Shaughnessy
September 2016
Hurst
Hitler was one of the few politicians who understood that persuasion was everything, deployed to anchor an entire regime in the confections of imagery, rhetoric and dramaturgy. The Nazis pursued propaganda not just as a tool, an instrument of government, but also as the totality, the raison d'être, the medium through which power itself was exercised. Moreover, Nicholas O'Shaughnessy argues, Hitler, not Goebbels, was the prime mover in the propaganda regime of the Third Reich - its editor and first author.

Under the Reich everything was a propaganda medium, a building-block of public consciousness, from typography to communiqués, to architecture, to weapons design. There were groups to initiate rumours and groups to spread graffiti. Everything could be interrogated for its propaganda potential, every surface inscribed with polemical meaning, whether an enemy city's name, an historical epic or the poster on a neighbourhood wall. But Hitler was in no sense an innovator - his ideas were always second-hand.
Rather his expertise was as a packager, fashioning from the accumulated mass of icons and ideas, the historic debris, the labyrinths and byways of the German mind, a modern and brilliant political show articulated through deftly managed symbols and rituals. The Reich would have been unthinkable without propaganda - it would not have been the Reich.





























[book] TREYF
My Quest for Identity
in a Forbidden World
My Life as an Unorthodoc Outlaw
by Elissa Altman
(Washington Post, columnist)
Winner of the James Bear Award
September 2016
New American Library
From the Washington Post columnist and James Beard Award-winning author of Poor Man’s Feast comes a story of seeking truth, acceptance, and self in a world of contradiction...
Treyf: According to Leviticus, unkosher and prohibited, like lobster, shrimp, pork, fish without scales, the mixing of meat and dairy. Also, imperfect, intolerable, offensive, undesirable, unclean, improper, broken, forbidden, illicit.
A person can eat treyf; a person can be treyf.
In this kaleidoscopic, universal memoir of time and place, Elissa Altman explores the tradition, religion, family expectation, and the forbidden that were the fixed points in her 1970s Queens, New York, childhood. Every part of Altman’s youth was laced with contradiction and hope, betrayal and the yearning for acceptance: synagogue on Saturday and Chinese pork ribs on Sunday; Bat Mitzvahs followed by shrimp-in-lobster-sauce luncheons; her old-country grandparents, whose kindness and love were tied to unspoken rage, and her bell-bottomed neighbors, whose adoring affection hid dark secrets.
While the suburban promise of The Brady Bunch blared on television, Altman searched for peace and meaning in a world teeming with faith, violence, sex, and paradox. Spanning from 1940s wartime Brooklyn to 1960s and '70s Queens to present-day rural New England, Treyf captures the collision of youthful cravings and grown-up identities; it is a vivid tale of what it means to come to yourself both in spite of and in honor to your past.




























[book] SPRINKLE GLITTER ON MY GRAVE
Observations, Rants and Other
Uplifting Thoughts About Life
by Jill Kargman (Jill Kopelman Kargman)
September 6, 2016
Ballantine
The star of Bravo’s breakout scripted comedy Odd Mom Out shares her razor-sharp wit and backhanded wisdom in a deeply observed and outrageously funny collection of musings, lists, essays, and outrages.
From her unique lingo (things don’t simply frighten her, they “M. Night Shyamalan her out”) to her gimlet-eyed view of narrow-mindedness, to her morbid but curiously life-affirming parenting style, Jill Kargman (daughter of Arie Kopelman of Chanel fame) is nothing if not original. In this hilarious new book, the sharp-elbowed mother of three turns her unconventional lens on life and death and everything in between, including
• the politically correct peer pressure she felt from the new moms in her hood, the women who provided the grist for the mill of her hit television show
• the evolution of her aesthetic from Miami Vice vibrant (a very brief flirtation) to Wednesday Addams–meets–rocker chic
• her deep-seated New Yorker’s discomfort with moving vehicles that aren’t taxis and subways (a.k.a. “suburban panic disorder”)
• the family obsession with reading obituaries for their medical revelations and real estate news value
• the reasons why, in a land of tan-orexic baby-oil beach bakers, she chooses to honor the valor of her ghostly pallor

From a hellish visit to the Happiest Place on Earth to her unusual wedding night with Russell Crowe to her adrenaline-pumping Gay Pride parade experience, Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave is as wonderfully indecent and entertaining as a spring break road trip with your best friend. Assuming your best friend is the kind of gal who still wears a motorcycle jacket to pick up the kids at school.




























[book] Incarnations:
India in Fifty Lives
by Sunil Khilnani
(King's College, London)
September 2016
FS&G
The average Israeli knows more about India than the average American or American Jewish person. - - so many young IDF travel to this nation after their initial service.
So why not learn more about India
An entertaining and provocative account of India’s past, written by one of the country’s leading thinkers For all of India's myths, its sea of stories and moral epics, Indian history remains a curiously unpeopled place. In Incarnations, Sunil Khilnani fills that space, recapturing the human dimension of how the world's largest democracy came to be. His trenchant portraits of emperors, warriors, philosophers, film stars, and corporate titans--some famous, some unjustly forgotten--bring feeling, wry humor, and uncommon insight to dilemmas that extend from ancient times to our own. As he journeys across the country and through its past, Khilnani uncovers more than just history. In rocket launches and ayurvedic call centers, in slum temples and Bollywood studios, in California communes and grimy ports, he examines the continued, and often surprising, relevance of the men and women who have made India--and the world--what it is. We encounter the Buddha, “the first human personality”; the ancient Sanskrit linguist who inspires computer programmers today; the wit and guile of India’s Machiavelli; and the medieval poets who mocked rituals and caste. In the twentieth century, Khilnani sets Gandhi and other political icons of the independence era next to actresses, photographers, and entrepreneurs. Incarnations is an ideal introduction to India--and a provocative and sophisticated reinterpretation of its history.


























[book] I Dissent:
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark
by Debbie Levy
Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley
September 2016
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Get to know celebrated Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg—in the first picture book about her life—as she proves that disagreeing does not make you disagreeable.
U.S. Supreme Court SCOTUS Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere.
This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG, tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements.


























[book] The Plot to Kill Hitler
Dietrich Bonhoeffer:
Pastor, Spy, Unlikely Hero
by Patricia McCormick
September 2016
Balzer and Bray
Ages 8 – 13
Perfect for fans of suspenseful nonfiction such as books by Steve Sheinkin, this is a page-turning narrative about Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a pastor and pacifist who became an unlikely hero during World War II and took part in a plot to kill Hitler. Written by two-time National Book Award finalist Patricia McCormick, author of Sold and Never Fall Down and coauthor of the young reader’s edition of I Am Malala.
It was April 5, 1943, and the Gestapo would arrive any minute. Dietrich Bonhoeffer had been expecting this day for a long time. He had put his papers in order—and left a few notes specifically for Hitler’s men to see. Two SS agents climbed the stairs and told the boyish-looking Bonhoeffer to come with them. He calmly said good-bye to his parents, put his Bible under his arm, and left. Upstairs there was proof, in his own handwriting, that this quiet young minister was part of a conspiracy to kill Adolf Hitler.
This compelling, brilliantly researched account includes the remarkable discovery that Bonhoeffer was one of the first people to provide evidence to the Allies that Jews were being deported to death camps. It takes readers from his privileged early childhood to the studies and travel that would introduce him to peace activists around the world—eventually putting this gentle, scholarly pacifist on a deadly course to assassinate one of the most ruthless dictators in history. The Plot to Kill Hitler provides fascinating insights into what makes someone stand up for what’s right when no one else is standing with you. It is a question that every generation must answer again and again.
With black-and-white photographs, fascinating sidebars, and thoroughly researched details, this book should be essential reading.



























[book] TAMIL
A BIOGRAPHY
BY DAVID SHULMAN, PhD
(Professor of Humanistic Studies, Hebrew University.)
September 2016
Harvard University Press / Belknap
Spoken by eighty million people in South Asia and a diaspora that stretches across the globe, Tamil is one of the great world languages, and one of the few ancient languages that survives as a mother tongue for so many speakers. David Shulman presents a comprehensive cultural history of Tamil?language, literature, and civilization?emphasizing how Tamil speakers and poets have understood the unique features of their language over its long history. Impetuous, musical, whimsical, in constant flux, Tamil is a living entity, and this is its biography.
Two stories animate Shulman’s narrative. The first concerns the evolution of Tamil’s distinctive modes of speaking, thinking, and singing. The second describes Tamil’s major expressive themes, the stunning poems of love and war known as Sangam poetry, and Tamil’s influence as a shaping force within Hinduism. Shulman tracks Tamil from its earliest traces at the end of the first millennium BCE through the classical period, 850 to 1200 CE, when Tamil-speaking rulers held sway over southern India, and into late-medieval and modern times, including the deeply contentious politics that overshadow Tamil today.
Tamil is more than a language, Shulman says. It is a body of knowledge, much of it intrinsic to an ancient culture and sensibility. “Tamil” can mean both “knowing how to love”?in the manner of classical love poetry?and “being a civilized person.” It is thus a kind of grammar, not merely of the language in its spoken and written forms but of the creative potential of its speakers.






























[book] SHE MADE ME LAUGH
MY FRIEND NORA EPHRON
By Richard Cohen
(Washington Post, columnist)
September 2016
Simon & Schuster
Nora Ephron, one of the most famous writers, film makers, and personalities of her time is captured by her long-time and dear friend in a hilarious, blunt, raucous, and poignant recollection of their decades-long friendship.
Nora Ephron (1941–2012) was a phenomenal personality, journalist, essayist, novelist, playwright, Oscar-nominated screenwriter, and movie director (Sleepless in Seattle; You’ve Got Mail; When Harry Met Sally; Heartburn; Julie & Julia). She wrote a slew of bestsellers (I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman; I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections; Scribble, Scribble: Notes on the Media; Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women). She was celebrated by Hollywood, embraced by literary New York, and adored by legions of fans throughout the world.
Award-winning journalist Richard Cohen, wrote this about his “third-person memoir”: “I call this book a third-person memoir. It is about my closest friend, Nora Ephron, and the lives we lived together and how her life got to be bigger until, finally, she wrote her last work, the play, Lucky Guy, about a newspaper columnist dying of cancer while she herself was dying of cancer. I have interviewed many of her other friends—Mike Nichols, Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Arianna Huffington—but the book is not a name-dropping star turn, but an attempt to capture a remarkable woman who meant so much to so many other women.”































[book] The Universe Has Your Back:
Transform Fear to Faith
by Gabrielle Bernstein
September 2016
Hay House
In her latest book, The Universe Has Your Back, Gabrielle Bernstein teaches readers how to transform their fear into faith in order to live a divinely guided life. Each story and lesson in the book guides readers to release the blocks to what they most long for: happiness, security and clear direction. The lessons help readers relinquish the need to control so they can relax into a sense of certainty and freedom. Readers will learn to stop chasing life and truly live. Gabrielle says, “My commitment with this book is to wake up as many people as possible to their connection to faith and joy. In that connection, we can be guided to our true purpose: to be love and spread love. These words can no longer be cute buzz phrases that we merely post on social media. Rather, these words must be our mission. The happiness, safety, and security we long for lies in our commitment to love.”

Her message: you can be happy, and you must spread your happiness into the world. Those are the goals, and here's the method: meditation, forgiveness and prayer.
The catchphrase of this friend of Oprah is: "Say thank you for your shit. It brings you to where you are and allows you to change."
At age 25, Bernstein broke down after years of multiple addictions (relationships, work, drink and drugs). She recovered. She realized that she wanted to teach others how to achieve serenity. The Jewish Chronicle wrote, “Bernstein's not religious but her Judaism is still evident. She enjoys regular, "very spiritual" Shabbat dinners with friends. ''I think religion is a gateway for spiritual awakening." One example is her wedding to husband Zach Rocklin, who recently quit his banking career to become his wife's business partner. "My best friend, who's my most religious friend, married us in a standard Jewish format but there was no rabbi. We're not religious so what was most authentic to us was a spiritual wedding." … Bernstein's traditional Judaism was stronger in her youth. "I was very into the religion growing up. I went to Jewish summer camp. I led a youth group, which was very similar to the work I do today - I was leading groups of young people in spiritual conversation. It definitely prepared me for the path I'm on today."
























[book] A Hat for Mrs. Goldman:
A Story About Knitting and Love
by Michelle Edwards
Illustrated by G. Brian Karas
October 2016
Schwartz and Wade
Here’s a heartwarming winter picture book that’s sure to appeal to families who love knitting.
Mrs. Goldman always knits hats for everyone in the neighborhood, and Sophia, who thinks knitting is too hard, helps by making the pom-poms. But now winter is here, and Mrs. Goldman herself doesn’t have a hat—she’s too busy making hats for everyone else! It’s up to Sophia to buckle down and knit a hat for Mrs. Goldman. But try as Sophia might, the hat turns out lumpy, the stitches aren’t even, and there are holes where there shouldn’t be holes. Sophia is devastated until she gets an idea that will make Mrs. Goldman’s hat the most wonderful of all. Readers both young and old will relate to Sophia’s frustrations, as well as her delight in making something special for someone she loves.
A knitting pattern is included in the back of the book.


























[book] The Arab of the Future 2:
A Childhood in the Middle East,
1984-1985: A Graphic Memoir
by Riad Sattouf
September 20, 2016
Metropolitan Books
The highly anticipated continuation of Riad Sattouf’s internationally acclaimed, #1 French bestseller, which was hailed by The New York Times as “a disquieting yet essential read”
In The Arab of the Future: Volume 1, cartoonist Riad Sattouf tells of the first years of his childhood as his family shuttles back and forth between France and the Middle East. In Libya and Syria, young Riad is exposed to the dismal reality of a life where food is scarce, children kill dogs for sport, and his cousins, virulently anti-Semitic and convinced he is Jewish because of his blond hair, lurk around every corner waiting to beat him up.
In Volume 2, Riad, now settled in his father’s hometown of Homs, gets to go to school, where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of the dictator Hafez Al-Assad. Told simply yet with devastating effect, Riad’s story takes in the sweep of politics, religion, and poverty, but is steered by acutely observed small moments: the daily sadism of his schoolteacher, the lure of the black market, with its menu of shame and subsistence, and the obsequiousness of his father in the company of those close to the regime. As his family strains to fit in, one chilling, barbaric act drives the Sattoufs to make the most dramatic of changes.
Darkly funny and piercingly direct, The Arab of the Future, Volume 2 once again reveals the inner workings of a tormented country and a tormented family, delivered through Riad Sattouf’s dazzlingly original talent.
























[book] POWER YOUR HAPPY
WORK HARD,
PLAY NICE, and
BUILD YOUR DREAM LIFE
by Lisa Sugar
September 20, 2016
Dutton
Lisa Sugar is one of six co-founders of PopSugar. She and her husband, serial entrepreneur, Brian Sugar were among the six in 2006. She is now the Editor in Chief and CEO. She lives in San Francisco with Brian and their three daughters... and a picture of Matt Damon. After graduating from George Washington University, Lisa Grimaldi Sugar moved to New York City to begin a career in advertising. Soon after Lisa and her husband married in '99, they headed to San Francisco. In March 2005, she launched her own blog, PopSugar.com, to share stories, reviews and photos.
Lisa Sugar has an amazing job. She spends her days creating content about pop culture, must-have handbags and makeup, healthy recipes, and Instagram-worthy sweets. She manages an enormously successful, growing company with employees who love what they do. And her life is just as great at home. She and her husband have three daughters and she’s the number one soccer mom who loves reading bedtime stories every night.
How did she do it? By figuring out what her dream job was, taking risks, and believing in herself. And now she wants to motivate others to do the same. She wants to show them how to live colorful, interesting lives where every second counts.























[book] REIMAGINED
45 YEARS OF JEWISH ART
BY MARK PODWAL, MD
September 2016
Glitterati
Mark Podwal is today's premiere artist of the Jewish experience, with a prolific portfolio of work lauded by visionaries ranging from Elie Wiesel to Harold Bloom. His paintings and ink-on-paper drawings are not only beautiful but also offer profound and nuanced commentary on Jewish tradition, history, and politics. This unprecedented collection brings together the widest selection of Podwal's work ever published in a single volume in a stunning, lavishly produced, oversized hardcover. With more than 350 works, each beautifully reproduced, Reimagined is a must-have for every Jewish home.



























[book] Do Parents Matter?:
Why Japanese Babies Sleep Soundly,
Mexican Siblings Don’t Fight, and
American Families Should Just Relax
by Robert A. LeVine and Sarah LeVine
(Harvard University professors)
September 2016
Publicaffairs
American parents drive themselves crazy trying to raise perfect children. There is always another news article or scientific finding proclaiming the importance of some factor or other, but it’s easy to miss the bigger picture: that parents can only affect their children so much.
In their decades-long study of global parenting styles, Harvard anthropologists (and grandparents themselves) Robert A. LeVine and Sarah LeVine reveal how culture may affect children more than parents do. Japanese children co-sleep with their parents well into grade school, while women of the Hausa tribe avoid verbal and eye contact with their infants, and yet, they are as likely as any of us to raise happy, well-adjusted children. The LeVines’ fascinating global survey suggests we embrace our limitations as parents, instead of exhausting ourselves by constantly trying to fix them.
Do Parents Matter? is likely the deepest and broadest survey of its kind, with profound lessons for the way we think about our families.



























[book] Enough Said:
What's Gone Wrong with
the Language of Politics?
by Mark Thompson
CEO of The New York Times Company, Inc.
Foremer Editor In Chief – BBC News
September 6. 2016
St. Martin’s Press
According to the author, there is a crisis of trust in politics across the western world. Public anger is rising and faith in conventional political leaders and parties is falling. Anti-politics, and the anti-politicians, have arrived. In Enough Said, President and CEO of The New York Times Company Mark Thompson argues that one of most of significant causes of the crisis is the way our public language has changed. Enough Said tells the story of how we got from the language of FDR and Churchill to that of Sarah Palin and Donald Trump.

It forensically examines the public language we’ve been left with: compressed, immediate, sometimes brilliantly impactful, but robbed of most of its explanatory power. It studies the rhetoric (public speech) of western leaders from Reagan and Thatcher to Burlesconi, Blair, and today’s political elites on both sides of the Atlantic. And it charts how a changing public language has interacted with real world events – Iraq, the financial crash, the UK's surprising Brexit from the EU, immigration – and a mutual breakdown of trust between politicians and journalists, to leave ordinary citizens suspicious, bitter, and increasingly unwilling to believe anybody.
Drawing from classical as well as contemporary examples and ranging across politics, business, science, technology, and the arts, Enough Said is a smart and shrewd look at the erosion of language by an author uniquely placed to measure its consequences.


























OCTOBER 2016 BOOKS





[book] DREIDELS ON THE BRAIN
(A STORY IN EIGHT NIGHTS)
By Joel Ben Izzy
(Professional Storyteller, The Beggar King)
October 2016
Dial Press
Ages 10 and up, Grade 5 and up
(I tried reading it, and I think you need to be 12)
A funny, touching novel of growing up Jewish in the 1970s, has the makings of a holiday classic.
One lousy miracle. Is that too much to ask?
Evidently so for Joel, as he tries to survive Hannukah, 1971 in the suburbs of the suburbs of Los Angeles (or, as he calls it, “The Land of Shriveled Dreams”). That’s no small task when you’re a “seriously funny-looking” twelve-year-old magician who dreams of being his own superhero: Normalman. And Joel’s a long way from that as the only Jew at Bixby School, where his attempts to make himself disappear fail spectacularly. Home is no better, with a family that’s not just mortifyingly embarrassing but flat-out broke.
That’s why Joel’s betting everything on these eight nights, to see whether it’s worth believing in God or miracles or anything at all. Armed with his favorite jokes, some choice Yiddish words, and a suitcase full of magic tricks, he’s scrambling to come to terms with the world he lives in—from hospitals to Houdini to the Holocaust—before the last of the candles burns out.
No wonder his head is spinning: He’s got dreidels on the brain. And little does he know that what’s actually about to happen to him and his family this Hanukkah will be worse than he’d feared . . . And better than he could have imagined.


























[book] HOW THE WISE MEN GOT TO CHELM
HOW THE WISE MEN GOT TO CHE?M
The Life and Times of a Yiddish Folk Tradition
by Ruth von Bernuth, Phd
(Assoc Professor, UNC Chapel Hill)
NYU Press

This is an academic book, not a joke book or short story collection.

From the author of “Wunder, Spott und Prophetie: Natürliche Narrheit in den Historien von Claus Narren (The court fool of Saxony in 1572),” which focused on natural folly and natural fools and miracle men, comes a study of the Yiddish men of Chelm. Professor von Bernuth suffers fools gladly. Ashkenazic Jewish writing about a whole society that is foolish – in the tales of the “wise men” of Chelm represent the motif of the foolish town per excellence in Jewish folk tradition. Chelm remains a major archetype of eastern European Jewish identity to the present day. In How the Wise Men Got to Chelm: The Life and Times of a Yiddish Folk Tradition, she unpacks the connection between German and Yiddish literary traditions and in complicating the assumption that the tales were simply transferred from the German via on Old Yiddish translation into modern Yiddish.

When God created the world, so it is said, he sent out an angel with a bag of foolish souls with instructions to distribute them equally all over the world — one fool per town. But the angel’s bag broke and all the souls spilled out onto the same spot. They built a settlement where they landed: the town is known as Chelm.

The collected tales of these fools, or “wise men,” of Chelm constitute the best-known folktale tradition of the Jews of eastern Europe. This tradition includes a sprawling repertoire of stories about the alleged intellectual limitations of the members of this old and important Jewish community. Chelm did not make its debut in the role of the foolish shtetl par excellence until late in the nineteenth century. Since then, however, the town has led a double life—as a real city in eastern Poland and as an imaginary place onto which questions of Jewish identity, community, and history have been projected.

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm is the first in-depth study of Chelm literature and its relationship to its literary precursors. By placing literary Chelm and its “foolish” antecedents in a broader historical context, it shows how they have functioned for over three hundred years as models of society, somewhere between utopia and dystopia. These imaginary foolish towns have enabled writers both to entertain and highlight a variety of societal problems, a function that literary Chelm continues to fulfill in Jewish literature to this day.

























[book] Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary
Bilingual Edition
Edited by Gitl Schaechter-Viswanath
And Paul Glasser
Indiana University Press
Containing nearly 50,000 entries and 33,000 subentries, the Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary emphasizes Yiddish as a living language that is spoken in many places around the world. The late Mordkhe Schaechter collected and researched spoken and literary Yiddish in all its varieties and this landmark dictionary reflects his vision for present-day and future Yiddish usage. The richness of dialect differences and historical developments are noted in entries ranging from "agriculture" to "zoology" and include words and expressions that can be found in classic and contemporary literature, newspapers, and other sources of the written word and have long been used by professionals and tradesmen, in synagogues, at home, in intimate life, and wherever Yiddish-speaking Jews have lived and worked.


























[book] Judaism and the West:
From Hermann Cohen to
Joseph Soloveitchik
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Robert Erlewine
Indiana University Press
Grappling with the place of Jewish philosophy at the margin of religious studies, Robert Erlewine examines the work of five Jewish philosophers?Hermann Cohen, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Joseph Soloveitchik?to bring them into dialogue within the discipline. Emphasizing the tenuous place of Jews in European, and particularly German, culture, Erlewine unapologetically contextualizes Jewish philosophy as part of the West. He teases out the antagonistic and overlapping attempts of Jewish thinkers to elucidate the philosophical and cultural meaning of Judaism when others sought to deny and even expel Jewish influences. By reading the canon of Jewish philosophy in this new light, Erlewine offers insight into how Jewish thinkers used religion to assert their individuality and modernity.


































[book] The Last Rabbi:
Joseph Soloveitchik and
Talmudic Tradition
by William Kolbrener
Indiana University Press
2016
Joseph Soloveitchik (1903–1993) was a major American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist, philosopher, and theologian. In this new work, William Kolbrener takes on Soloveitchik’s controversial legacy and shows how he was torn between the traditionalist demands of his European ancestors and the trajectory of his own radical and often pluralist philosophy. A portrait of this self-professed "lonely man of faith" reveals him to be a reluctant modern who responds to the catastrophic trauma of personal and historical loss by underwriting an idiosyncratic, highly conservative conception of law that is distinct from his Talmudic predecessors, and also paves the way for a return to tradition that hinges on the ethical embrace of multiplicity. As Kolbrener melds these contradictions, he presents Soloveitchik as a good deal more complicated and conflicted than others have suggested. The Last Rabbi affords new perspective on the thought of this major Jewish philosopher and his ideas on the nature of religious authority, knowledge, and pluralism.

































[book] THE JEWS OF HARLEM
The Rise, Decline, and Revival
Of a Jewish Community
By Jeffrey S. Gurock
October 2016
New York University Press NYU
New York Times columnist David W. Dunlap wrote a decade ago that “on the map of the Jewish Diaspora, Harlem Is Atlantis. . . . A vibrant hub of industry, artistry and wealth is all but forgotten. It is as if Jewish Harlem sank 70 years ago beneath waves of memory beyond recall.” During World War I, Harlem was the home of the second largest Jewish community in America. But in the 1920s Jewish residents began to scatter to other parts of Manhattan, to the outer boroughs, and to other cities. Now nearly a century later, Jews are returning uptown to a gentrified Harlem.
The Jews of Harlem follows Jews into, out of, and back into this renowned metropolitan neighborhood over the course of a century and a half. It analyzes the complex set of forces that brought several generations of central European, East European, and Sephardic Jews to settle there. It explains the dynamics that led Jews to exit this part of Gotham as well as exploring the enduring Jewish presence uptown after it became overwhelmingly black and decidedly poor. And it looks at the beginnings of Jewish return as part of the transformation of New York City in our present era. The Jews of Harlem contributes much to our understanding of Jewish and African American history in the metropolis as it highlights the ever-changing story of America’s largest city.
With The Jews of Harlem, the beginning of Dunlap’s hoped-for resurfacing of this neighborhood’s history is underway. Its contemporary story merits telling even as the memories of what Jewish Harlem once was warrants recall.


























[book] Blood and Sand:
Suez, Hungary, and Eisenhower's
Campaign for Peace
by Alex von Tunzelmann
October 2016
A lively, revelatory popular history that tells the story of both the Suez Crisis and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 — a tale of conspiracy and revolutions, spies and terrorists, kidnappings and assassination plots, the fall of the British Empire and the rise of American hegemony under the heroic leadership of President Dwight D. Eisenhower — which shaped the Middle East and Europe we know today.

The year 1956 was a turning point in history. Over sixteen extraordinary days in October and November of that year, the twin crises involving Suez and Hungary pushed the world to the brink of a nuclear conflict and what many at the time were calling World War III. Blood and Sand delivers this story in an hour-by-hour account through a fascinating international cast of characters:
Anthony Eden, the British prime minister, caught in a trap of his own making;
Gamal Abdel Nasser, the bold young populist leader of Egypt;
David Ben-Gurion, the aging Zionist hero of Israel;
Guy Mollet, the bellicose French prime minister; and
Dwight D. Eisenhower, the American president,
torn between an old world order and a new one in the very same week that his own fate as president was to be decided by the American people.

This is a revelatory history of these dramatic events and people, for the first time setting both crises in the context of the global Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the treacherous power politics of imperialism and oil. Blood and Sand resonates strikingly with the problems of oil control, religious fundamentalism, and international unity that face the world today, and is essential reading for anyone concerned with the state of the modern Middle East and Europe.



























[book] THE PEOPLE AND THE BOOKS
18 CLASSICS OF JEWISH LITERATURE
By Adam Kirsch
October 2016
Norton
From a Tablet columnist comes an examination ..
An essential exploration of a rich literary tradition from the Bible to modern times, by a “rare literary authority” (New York Times Book Review).
Jews have long embraced their identity as “the people of the book.” But outside of the Bible, much of the Jewish literary tradition remains little known. The People and the Books shows how central questions and themes of our history and culture are reflected in the Jewish literary canon: the nature of God, the right way to understand the Bible, the relationship of the Jews to their Promised Land, and the challenges of living as a minority in Diaspora.

Adam Kirsch explores eighteen classic texts including the biblical books of Deuteronomy and Esther, the philosophy of Maimonides, the autobiography of the medieval businesswoman Gluckel of Hameln, and the Zionist manifestos of Theodor Herzl. From the Jews of ancient Rome to the mystical devotees of Hasidism in eastern Europe, The People and the Books brings the treasures of Jewish literature to life and offers new ways to think about their enduring power and influence.


























[book] Hungry Heart:
Adventures in Life,
Love, and Writing
by Jennifer Weiner
October 2016
Atria
Jennifer Weiner is many things: a best-selling author, a Twitter phenomenon, and an "unlikely feminist enforcer" (The New Yorker). She's also a mom, a daughter, and a sister, a former rower and current clumsy yogini, a wife, a friend, and a reality-TV devotee. In her first essay collection, she takes the raw stuff of her life and spins it into a collection of tales of modern-day womanhood as uproariously funny and moving as the best of Nora Ephron and Tina Fey. Born in Louisiana, raised in Connecticut, educated at Princeton, Jennifer spent years feeling like an outsider ("a Lane Bryant outtake in an Abercrombie & Fitch world") before finding her people in newsrooms, and her voice as a novelist, activist, and New York Times columnist.
< No subject is off-limits in these intimate and honest stories: sex, weight, envy, money, her mother's coming out of the closet, her estranged father's death. From lonely adolescence to modern childbirth to hearing her six-year-old daughter say the f-word—fat—for the first time, Jen dives deep into the heart of female experience, with the wit and candor that have endeared her to readers all over the world.
Hilarious and moving, Hungry Heart is about yearning and fulfillment, loss and love, and a woman who searched for her place in the world, and found it as a storyteller.


























[book] The Attention Merchants:
The Epic Scramble to Get
Inside Our Heads
by Tim Wu
October 2016
Knopf
From Tim Wu, author of the award-winning The Master Switch and who coined the phrase "net neutrality"--a revelatory look at the rise of "attention harvesting," and its transformative effect on our society and our selves.

Attention merchant: an industrial-scale harvester of human attention. A firm whose business model is the mass capture of attention for resale to advertisers.

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. From the pre-Madison Avenue birth of advertising to TV's golden age to our present age of radically individualized choices, the business model of "attention merchants" has always been the same. He describes the revolts that have risen against these relentless attempts to influence our consumption, from the remote control to FDA regulations to Apple's ad-blocking OS. But he makes clear that attention merchants grow ever-new heads, and their means of harvesting our attention have given rise to the defining industries of our time, changing our nature--cognitive, social, and otherwise--in ways unimaginable even a generation ago.
























[book] The Real Madrid Way:
How Values Created the Most
Successful Sports Team on the Planet
by Steven G. Mandis
October 2016
BenBella
The untold story of Real Madrid. One of the most incredible turnarounds in sports and business history.
Real Madrid is the most successful sports franchise on the planet. The soccer club has more trophies than any other sports franchise, including 10 UEFA Champions League trophies. However, the story behind the triumph lies off the field. Generally unnoticed, in the space of fifteen years, a management team, consisting mostly of outsiders, took the team from near bankruptcy to the most valuable sports franchise in the world.
How did Real Madrid achieve such extraordinary success? Columbia Business School professor Steven Mandis investigates. Given unprecedented behind-the-scenes access, Mandis is the first researcher to rigorously analyze both the on-the-field and business aspects of a sports club. What he learns is completely unexpected and challenges the conventional wisdom that Moneyball-fueled data analytics are the primary instruments of success. Instead of relying primarily on computer-generated analysis, Real Madrid relentlessly focuses on the values and expectations of their fans. Real Madrid’s formula stems from a powerful organizational culture built around satisfying the passions and desires of the fan base.
Employing in-depth analysis, Mandis reveals the impact of the “too tired” and “too much talent” effects, with surprising insights into why sports teams can fall short of expectations, and how Real Madrid overcomes these challenges. Chasing the most talented, and most expensive, players can be a recipe for on-the-field success and financial disaster, as it was for Real Madrid in the late 1990s. Real Madrid found a way around that dilemma by centering their strategy on the fans’ values and expectations. By doing so, they created extraordinary passion and loyalty, which has led to amazing marketing and commercial success. This, in turn, attracts and pays for the best players in the world, with the values the fans expect. The management team tries to ensure the fans’ values are the key drivers to player selection, style of play on the field and business strategies in order to create a sustainable economic-sport model.
The Real Madrid Formula explains how Real Madrid has created and maintains a culture that drives both financial and on-the-field success. The book is the first to comprehensively illuminate similarities and differences both on-the-field and business aspects of European soccer and American sports. Filled with data and analysis, and with detailed accounts of the personalities involved, this book is an engrossing account of the lifetime of one of the greatest clubs in the most popular sport in the world. For business and organization leaders, it’s an invaluable inside look at a roadmap for organizational success at the highest level.
























[book] Hate Spin:
The Manufacture of Religious Offense
and Its Threat to Democracy
by Cherian George
October 2016
MIT Press
In the United States, elements of the religious right fuel fears of an existential Islamic threat, spreading anti-Muslim rhetoric into mainstream politics. In Indonesia, Muslim absolutists urge suppression of churches and minority sects, fostering a climate of rising intolerance. In India, Narendra Modi's radical supporters instigate communal riots and academic censorship in pursuit of their Hindu nationalist vision. Outbreaks of religious intolerance are usually assumed to be visceral and spontaneous. But in Hate Spin, Cherian George shows that they often involve sophisticated campaigns manufactured by political opportunists to mobilize supporters and marginalize opponents. Right-wing networks orchestrate the giving of offense and the taking of offense as instruments of identity politics, exploiting democratic space to promote agendas that undermine democratic values. George calls this strategy "hate spin" -- a double-sided technique that combines hate speech (incitement through vilification) with manufactured offense-taking (the performing of righteous indignation). It is deployed in societies as diverse as Buddhist Myanmar and Orthodox Christian Russia. George looks at the world's three largest democracies, where intolerant groups within India's Hindu right, America's Christian right, and Indonesia's Muslim right are all accomplished users of hate spin. He also shows how the Internet and Google have opened up new opportunities for cross-border hate spin.

George argues that governments must protect vulnerable communities by prohibiting calls to action that lead directly to discrimination and violence. But laws that try to protect believers' feelings against all provocative expression invariably backfire. They arm hate spin agents' offense-taking campaigns with legal ammunition. Anti-discrimination laws and a commitment to religious equality will protect communities more meaningfully than misguided attempts to insulate them from insult.


























[book] The Distracted Mind
Ancient brains in a
High-Tech World
By Adam Gazzaley and Larry D. Rosen
UCSF / Cal State DH
October 2016
MIT Press
Most of us will freely admit that we are obsessed with our devices. We pride ourselves on our ability to multitask -- read work email, reply to a text, check Facebook, watch a video clip. Talk on the phone, send a text, drive a car. Enjoy family dinner with a glowing smartphone next to our plates. We can do it all, 24/7! Never mind the errors in the email, the near-miss on the road, and the unheard conversation at the table. In The Distracted Mind, Adam Gazzaley and Larry Rosen -- a neuroscientist and a psychologist -- explain why our brains aren't built for multitasking, and suggest better ways to live in a high-tech world without giving up our modern technology.
The authors explain that our brains are limited in their ability to pay attention. We don't really multitask but rather switch rapidly between tasks. Distractions and interruptions, often technology-related -- referred to by the authors as "interference" -- collide with our goal-setting abilities. We want to finish this paper/spreadsheet/sentence, but our phone signals an incoming message and we drop everything. Even without an alert, we decide that we "must" check in on social media immediately.
Gazzaley and Rosen offer practical strategies, backed by science, to fight distraction. We can change our brains with meditation, video games, and physical exercise; we can change our behavior by planning our accessibility and recognizing our anxiety about being out of touch even briefly. They don't suggest that we give up our devices, but that we use them in a more balanced way.


























[book] My Brother's Keeper:
Christians Who Risked All to
Protect Jewish Targets of the Nazi Holocaust
by Rod Gragg (Coastal Carolina)
October 2016
Center


Thirty captivating profiles of Christians who risked everything to rescue their Jewish neighbors from Nazi terror during the Holocaust.
MY BROTHER'S KEEPER unfolds powerful stories of Christians from across denominations who gave everything they had to save the Jewish people from the evils of the Holocaust. This unlikely group of believers, later honored by the nation of Israel as "The Righteous Among the Nations," includes ordinary teenage girls, pastors, priests, a German army officer, a former Italian fascist, an international spy, and even a princess.
In one gripping profile after another, these extraordinary historical accounts offer stories of steadfast believers who together helped thousands of Jewish individuals and families to safety. Many of these everyday heroes perished alongside the very people they were trying to protect. There is no doubt that all of their stories showcase the best of humanity--even in the face of unthinkable evil.

















[book] AMONG THE LIVING
A NOVEL
By Jonathan Raab
October 2016
It grabbed me from the first page
A moving novel about a Holocaust survivor's unconventional journey back to a new normal in 1940s Savannah, Georgia.
Think Driving Miss Daisy meets survivorship.
In late summer 1947, two years after the end of WWII, 31 year old Yitzhak Goldah, a Nazi death camp survivor, arrives in Savannah, Georgia at the train station to live with his only remaining relatives. They are Abe and Pearl Jesler, older, childless, and an integral part of the thriving Jewish and commercial community that has been in Georgia since the founding of the colony.
Abe drives Yitzhak to their home, but first shows off the Jewish owned stores as well as his. Black workers are fixing up the front.
In Savannah, Yitzhak discovers a fractured world, where Reform and Conservative Jews live separate lives -- distinctions, to him, that are meaningless given what he has been through. He further complicates things when, much to the Jeslers' dismay, he falls in love with Eva, a young widow within the Reform community. Then, when a woman from Yitzhak's past suddenly appears -- one who is even more shattered by the Holocaust than he is -- Yitzhak must choose between a dark and tortured familiarity and the promise of a bright new life (Didn’t IB Singer have a book like this?).
Set amid the backdrop of America's postwar (and civil rights) South, AMONG THE LIVING (or Among the Loving) grapples with questions of identity and belonging, and steps beyond the Jewish experience as it situates Yitzhak's story during the last gasp of the Jim Crow era.
Yitzhak begins to find echoes of his own experience in the lives of the black family who work for the Jeslers--an affinity he does not share with the Jeslers themselves. This realization both surprises and convinces Yitzhak that his choices are not as clear-cut as he might have thought.





























[book] LAND OF FISH AND RICE
Recipes from the Culinary Heart of China
By Fuchsia Dunlop
October 2016
Norton
Most American and Israeli Jews are familiar with Szechuan, Hunan, Mongolian, and Cantonese/HK cuisines of China. But few known Jiangnan. And even fewer know the coastal cuisine where Technion is building a Chinese campus.
Dunlop’s book is a good introduction.
The lower Yangtze region, or JIANGNAN, with its modern capital Shanghai, has been known since ancient times as a “land of fish and rice.” For centuries, local cooks have harvested the bounty of its lakes, rivers, fields, and mountains to create a cuisine renowned for its delicacy and beauty. In Land of Fish and Rice, Fuchsia Dunlop draws on years of study and exploration to present the recipes, techniques, and ingredients of the Jiangnan kitchen.
You will be inspired to try classic dishes such as Beggar’s Chicken and Clear-Steamed Sea Bass and Fresh Soybeans with Pickled Greens. Evocatively written and featuring stunning recipe photography, this is an important new work celebrating one of China’s most fascinating culinary regions

























[book] DOLCE VITA CONFIDENTIAL
Fellini, Loren, Pucci,
Paparazzi, and the Swingin High Life
Of 1950’s Rome
By Shawn Levy
October 2016
Norton
From Penn grad, author, and former film critic for The Oregonian, comes a romp through the worlds where fashion, film, art, vespas, post-War journalism, and food intersected. In the 1950s, Rome rose from the ashes of World War II to become a movable feast for film, fashion, creative energy, tabloid media, and bold-faced libertinism that made “Italian” a global synonym for taste, style, and flair. Old money, new stars, fast cars, wanton libidos, and brazen news photographers created a way of life captured and exposed in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita. Rome was a playground for film stars (Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Ava Gardner, Sophia Loren), fashionistas, exiles, moguls, and martyrs, all of whom wanted a chance to experience and indulge in the sweet life. It became one of the great cultural capitals of the world?with more than just a trace of the city of the Caesars or the Borgias. Dolce Vita Confidential re-creates Rome’s stunning ascent with vivid and compelling tales of its glitterati and artists, down to every last outrageous detail of the city’s magnificent transformation. Shawn is author of Rat Pack Confidential.

























[book] The Science of Managing Our Digital Stuff
by Ofer Bergman and Steve Whittaker
Bar-Ilan / UC-Santa Cruz
October 2016
MIT Press
Each of us has an ever-growing collection of personal digital data: documents, photographs, PowerPoint presentations, videos, music, emails and texts sent and received. To access any of this, we have to find it. The ease (or difficulty) of finding something depends on how we organize our digital stuff. In this book, personal information management (PIM) experts Ofer Bergman and Steve Whittaker explain why we organize our personal digital data the way we do and how the design of new PIM systems can help us manage our collections more efficiently.
Bergman and Whittaker report that many of us use hierarchical folders for our personal digital organizing. Critics of this method point out that information is hidden from sight in folders that are often within other folders so that we have to remember the exact location of information to access it. Because of this, information scientists suggest other methods: search, more flexible than navigating folders; tags, which allow multiple categorizations; and group information management. Yet Bergman and Whittaker have found in their pioneering PIM research that these other methods that work best for public information management don't work as well for personal information management.
Bergman and Whittaker describe personal information collection as curation: we preserve and organize this data to ensure our future access to it. Unlike other information management fields, in PIM the same user organizes and retrieves the information. After explaining the cognitive and psychological reasons that so many prefer folders, Bergman and Whittaker propose the user-subjective approach to PIM, which does not replace folder hierarchies but exploits these unique characteristics of PIM.






















[book] What’s Wrong With Mindfulness
(and What Isn’t)
Zen Perspectives
Edited by Robert Rosenbaum and Barry Magid
October 18, 2016
Wisdom Books
Mindfulness seems to be everywhere—but are we sure that's a good thing? Teachers Sallie Jiko Tisdale, Gil Fronsdal, Norman Fischer, and more explain how removing mindfulness from Buddhism may set a dangerous precedent.
Mindfulness is in fashion. Oprah loves it, Google teaches it to employees—it has become widespread as a cure-all for stress, health problems and psychological difficulties, interpersonal trouble, and existential anxiety. But when mindfulness is separated from the Buddhist tradition, is something lost?
The Zen teachers gathered here each offer a unique perspective on what “mindfulness” means, its strengths, and the potential pitfalls.
Gil Fronsdal and Max Erdstein thoughtfully explore the rich Pali roots of mindfulness; Barry Magid and Marc Poirier examine the unintended side effects of exposing a spiritual tradition to the demands of capitalism; Norman Fischer demonstrates how mindfulness informs his creative process; Grace Schireson shows how mindfulness allows her to engage fully with the world as a feminist. And more, including essays on mindfulness and environmentalism, science, and psychology. Each chapter offers insights to ground mindfulness in a deeper understanding of both where it comes from, and where it might be headed.

























[book] The Emotionary:
A Dictionary of Words That
Don't Exist for Feelings That Do
by Eden Sher
Illustrated by Julia Wertz
October 2016
Razorbill
From Eden Sher, the award winning actress from THE MIDDLE.
IrrEdependent: Irrational + Independent – unable to ask for help under any circumstances
Contrangst: Control + Angst – anxiety of not being to control..
Losstracize: Loss + Ostracize – pushing others away who try to comfort you after a loss
Disapathy: Disappointed + Apathy
Fauxbration: the feeling that your phone is vibrating even though it is not
Regretrospect: Regret in retrospect

A dictionary of words that don't exist for feelings that do written by The Middle actress Eden Sher and illustrated by acclaimed graphic novelist Julia Wertz.
All her life, Eden Sher has suffered from dyscommunicatia (n. the inability to articulate a feeling through words.). Then, one day, she decided that, whenever she had an emotion for which she had no word, she would make one up.
The result of this is The Emotionary, which lives at the intersection of incredibly funny and very useful. Chock full of words you always wanted/never knew you needed, often accompanied by illustrations of hilarious and all-too-familiar situations, The Emotionary will be a cherished tool for you or the world-class feelings-haver in your life.
At long last, all your complicated feelings can be put into words, so you can recognize them for what they are, speak their names aloud, and move on. Finally!

























[book] Appetites:
A Cookbook
by Anthony Bourdain
October 25, 2016
ecco Press
Anthony Bourdain is man of many appetites. And for many years, first as a chef, later as a world-traveling chronicler of food and culture on his CNN series Parts Unknown, he has made a profession of understanding the appetites of others. These days, however, if he’s cooking, it’s for family and friends.

Appetites, his first cookbook in more than ten years, boils down forty-plus years of professional cooking and globe-trotting to a tight repertoire of personal favorites—dishes that everyone should (at least in Mr. Bourdain’s opinion) know how to cook. Once the supposed "bad boy" of cooking, Mr. Bourdain has, in recent years, become the father of a little girl—a role he has embraced with enthusiasm. After years of traveling more than 200 days a year, he now enjoys entertaining at home. Years of prep lists and the hyper-organization necessary for a restaurant kitchen, however, have caused him, in his words, to have "morphed into a psychotic, anally retentive, bad-tempered Ina Garten."

The result is a home-cooking, home-entertaining cookbook like no other, with personal favorites from his own kitchen and from his travels, translated into an effective battle plan that will help you terrify your guests with your breathtaking efficiency.























Speaking of INA GARTEN...
[book] Cooking for Jeffrey:
A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook
by Ina Garten
October 25, 2016
Clarkson Potter
For America’s bestselling cookbook author Ina Garten there is no greater pleasure than cooking for the people she loves—and particularly for her husband, Jeffrey. She has been cooking for him ever since they were married forty-eight years ago, and the comforting, delicious meals they shared became the basis for her extraordinary career in food.
Ina’s most personal cookbook yet, Cooking for Jeffrey is filled with the recipes Jeffrey and their friends request most often as well as charming stories from Ina and Jeffrey’s many years together. There are traditional dishes that she’s updated, such as Brisket with Onions and Leeks, and Tsimmes, a vegetable stew with carrots, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, and prunes, and new favorites, like Skillet-Roasted Lemon Chicken and Roasted Salmon Tacos. You’ll also find wonderful new salads, including Maple-Roasted Carrot Salad and Kale Salad with Pancetta and Pecorino. Desserts range from simple Apple Pie Bars to showstoppers like Vanilla Rum Panna Cotta with Salted Caramel. For the first time, Ina has included a chapter devoted to bread and cheese, with recipes and tips for creating the perfect cheese course. With options like Fig and Goat Cheese Bruschettas and Challah with Saffron, there’s something everyone will enjoy.
From satisfying lunches to elegant dinners, here are the recipes Ina has tested over and over again, so you too can serve them with confidence to the people you love.























[book] Mozza at Home:
More than 150 Crowd-Pleasing
Recipes for Relaxed, Family-Style Entertaining
by Nancy Silverton and Carolynn Carreno
October 25, 2016
Knopf
Nancy Silverton is the co-owner of Osteria Mozza, Pizzeria Mozza, Chi Spacca, and Mozza2Go, in Los Angeles, Singapore, and Newport Beach, California. She is the founder of the La Brea Bakery and is the only chef ever to be awarded both the Outstanding Chef and Outstanding Pastry Chef awards from the James Beard Foundation. She is active in the LA Jewish community. As an award-winning chef and the owner of six busy restaurants across two continents, Nancy Silverton was so consumed by her life in the professional kitchen that for years she almost never cooked at home. With her intense focus on the business of cooking, Nancy had forgotten what made her love to cook in the first place: fabulous ingredients at the height of their season, simple food served family style, and friends and loved ones gathered around the dinner table. Then, on a restorative trip to Italy—with its ripe vegetables, magnificent landscapes, and long summer days—Nancy began to cook for friends and family again, and rediscovered the great pleasures (and great tastes!) of cooking and eating at home.
Now, in Mozza at Home, Nancy shares her renewed passion and provides nineteen menus packed with easy-to-follow recipes that can be prepared in advance (with no fancy restaurant equipment needed!) and are perfect for entertaining. Organized by meal, each menu provides a main dish along with a complementary selection of appetizers and side dishes. Under Nancy’s guidance you can mix and match all the options depending on the size of your gathering. Make a few sides for a small dinner party with friends, or make them all for a delicious family feast! And don’t forget dessert—there’s an entire chapter dedicated to end-of-meal treats such as Devil’s Food Rings with Spiced White Mountain Frosting and Dario’s Olive Oil Cake with Rosemary and Pine Nuts that can be prepared hours before serving so that the host gets to relax during the event too.
Whether it’s Marinated Olives and Fresh Pecorino and other appetizers that can be put out while you’re assembling the rest of the meal . . . salads, such as Endive Salad with Date Anchovy Dressing, composed of sturdy lettuces that won’t wilt . . . simple sides, such as Roasted Carrots and Chickpeas with Cumin Vinaigrette, that are just as delicious served at room temperature as they are warm . . . or show-stopping mains such as the Flattened Chicken Thighs with Charred Lemon Salsa Verde—there is something here for everyone and every occasion. With clever tips on how to organize your table and your time when serving many guests, Mozza at Home helps you throw the perfect dinner party—one that’s positively stress-free and delicious!























[book] Land of Fish and Rice:
Recipes from the Culinary Heart of China
by Fuchsia Dunlop
October 18, 2016
Norton
The lower Yangtze region, or Jiangnan, with its modern capital Shanghai, has been known since ancient times as a “land of fish and rice.” For centuries, local cooks have harvested the bounty of its lakes, rivers, fields, and mountains to create a cuisine renowned for its delicacy and beauty. In Land of Fish and Rice, Fuchsia Dunlop draws on years of study and exploration to present the recipes, techniques, and ingredients of the Jiangnan kitchen. You will be inspired to try classic dishes such as Beggar’s Chicken and sumptuous Dongpo Pork, as well as fresh, simple recipes such as Clear-Steamed Sea Bass and Fresh Soybeans with Pickled Greens. Evocatively written and featuring stunning recipe photography, this is an important new work celebrating one of China’s most fascinating culinary regions.




























[book] Everything I Want to Eat
SQIRL and the New California Cooking
by Jessica Koslow
October 2016
Abrams
The debut cookbook from Jessica Koslow, award-winning chef of LA’s popular restaurant Sqirl, featuring more than 100 fresh, market-driven, healthy, and flavorful recipes.
Jessica Koslow and her restaurant, Sqirl, are at the forefront of the California cooking renaissance, which is all about food that surprises us and engages all of our senses—it looks good, tastes vibrant, and feels fortifying yet refreshing. In Everything I Want to Eat, Koslow shares 100 of her favorite recipes for health-conscious but delicious dishes, all of which always use real foods—no fake meat or fake sugar here—that also happen to be suitable for vegetarians, vegans, or whomever you’re sharing your meal with.
The book is organized into seven chapters, each featuring a collection of recipes centered on a key ingredient or theme. Expect to find recipes for dishes Sqirl has become known for, as well as brand-new seasonal flavor combinations, including:

Raspberry and vanilla bean jam
Sorrel-pesto rice bowl
Burnt brioche toast with house ricotta and seasonal jam
Butternut squash latkes with crème fraîche and applesauce
Lamb merguez, cranberry beans, roasted tomato, and yogurt cheese
Valrhona chocolate fleur de sel cookies
Almond hazelnut milk


Koslow lives in LA, where everyone is known to be obsessively health-conscious and where dietary restrictions are the norm. People come into Sqirl and order dishes with all sorts of substitutions and modifications—hold the feta, please, add extra kale. They are looking to make their own healthy adventures. Others may tack breakfast sausage, cured bacon, or Olli’s prosciutto on to their order. So Koslow has had to constantly think about ways to modify dishes for certain diets, which in a way has made her a better, more adaptable cook.
Throughout this book, Koslow provides notes and thought bubbles that show how just about any dish can be modified for specific tastes and dietary needs, whether it needs to be gluten-free or vegan.
Everything I Want to Eat captures the excitement of the food at Sqirl—think of a classic BLT sandwich turned playful with the substitution of chicken skin “bacon”—while also offering accessible recipes, like tangerine and rosewater semolina cake, that can be easily made in the home kitchen. Moreover, it’s an entirely new kind of cookbook and approach to how we are all starting to think about food, allowing readers to play with the recipes, combining and shaping them to be nothing short of everything you want to eat.























[book] The Saffron Tales:
Recipes from the Persian Kitchen
by Yasmin Khan
Fall 2016
Bloomsbury
Page 109: A trip to Jewish Isfahan
Armed with little more than a notebook and a bottle of pomegranate molasses, and fueled by memories of her family's farm in the lush seaside province of Gilan, British-Iranian cook Yasmin Khan traversed Iran in search of the most delicious recipes.
Her quest took her from the snowy mountains of Tabriz to the cosmopolitan cafés of Tehran and the pomegranate orchards of Isfahan, where she was welcomed into the homes of artists, farmers, electricians, and teachers. Through her travels, she gained a unique insight into the culinary secrets of the Persian kitchen, and the lives of ordinary Iranians today.
In The Saffron Tales, Yasmin weaves together a tapestry of stories from Iranian home kitchens with exclusive photography and fragrant, modern recipes that are rooted in the rich tradition of Persian cooking. All fully accessible for the home cook, Yasmin's recipes range from the inimitable fesenjoon (chicken with walnuts and pomegranates) to kofte berenji (lamb meatballs stuffed with prunes and barberries) and ghalyieh maygoo (prawn, coriander, and tamarind stew). She also offers a wealth of vegetarian dishes, including tahcheen (baked saffron and aubergine rice) and domaj (mixed herb, flatbread, and feta salad), as well as sumptuous desserts such as rose and almond cake, and sour cherry and dark chocolate cookies.
With stunning photography from all corners of Iran and gorgeous recipe images, this lavish cookbook rejoices in the land, life, flavors, and food of an enigmatic and beautiful country.























[book] Dorie's Cookies
by Dorie Greenspan with Davide Luciano
October 2016
All-new collection from a "revered icon" and "culinary guru" (New York Times).
Over the course of her baking career, Dorie Greenspan has created more than 300 cookie recipes. Yet she has never written a book about them—until now. To merit her “three purple stars of approval,” every cookie had to be so special that it begged to be made again and again. Cookies for every taste and occasion are here. There are company treats like Portofignos, with chocolate dough and port-soaked figs, and lunch-box Blueberry Buttermilk Pie Bars. They Might Be Breakfast Cookies are packed with goodies—raisins, dried apples, dried cranberries, and oats— while Almond Crackle Cookies have just three ingredients. There are dozens of choices for the Christmas cookie swaps, including Little Rascals (German jam sandwich cookies with walnuts), Italian Saucissons (chocolate log cookies studded with dried fruit), and Snowy-Topped Brownie Drops. And who but America’s favorite baker could devise a cookie as intriguing as Pink-Peppercorn Thumbprints or as popular as the World Peace Cookie, with its 59 million Internet fans?




























[book] The Adventures of Fat Rice:
Recipes from the Chicago
Restaurant Inspired by Macau
by Abraham Conlon, Adrienne Lo, Hugh Amano
October 2016
Ten Speed Press
With 100 recipes, this is the first book to explore the vibrant food culture of Macau—an east-meets-west melting pot of Chinese, Portuguese, Malaysian, and Indian foodways—as seen through the lens of the cult favorite Chicago restaurant, Fat Rice.
An hour’s ferry ride from Hong Kong, on the banks of the Pearl River in China, lies Macau—a modern, cosmopolitan city with an unexpected history. For centuries, Macau was one of the world’s greatest trading ports: a Portuguese outpost and crossroads along the spice route, where travelers from Europe, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and mainland China traded resources, culture, and food. The Adventures of Fat Rice is the story of how two Chicago chefs discovered and fell in love with this fascinating and, at least until now, unheralded cuisine. With dishes like Minchi (a classic Macanese meat hash), Po Kok Gai (a Portuguese-influenced chicken curry with chouriço and olives), and Arroz Gordo (if paella and fried rice had a baby), now you, too, can bring the eclectic and wonderfully unique—yet enticingly familiar—flavors of Macau into your own kitchen.
























[book] Cuba!:
Recipes and Stories from
the Cuban Kitchen
by Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn,
and Jody Eddy
October 2016
Ten Speed Press
Cuba continues to captivate visitors with its vibrant culture, colorful cities, and incredible cuisine. Cuba! explores the magic of this country through recipes and stories that will set taste buds on fire and delight even the most well-seasoned traveler.
Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visiting this magnetic country, capturing its passion and vibrancy, for the past five years. Dan, an award-winning photographer and Andrea, an acclaimed prop stylist and art director, along with renowned food writer Jody Eddy, bring the best of Cuban food to home kitchens with more than 75 meticulously tested recipes. From Cuban-Style Fried Chicken and Tostones Stuffed with Lobster and Conch, to Squid-ink Empanadas and Mojito Cake with Rum-Infused Whipped Cream, this book offers a unique opportunity to bring a little slice of Cuba into your home and onto your plate.




























[book] FILTHY RICH
A Powerful Billionaire, the Sex Scandal
that Undid Him, and All the Justice
that Money Can Buy: The Shocking True
Story of Jeffrey Epstein
by James Patterson, and
John Connolly and Tim Malloy
October 2016
Little Brown
A shocking true crime tale of money, power, and sex from the world's most popular thriller writer.
Jeffrey Epstein rose from humble origins to the rarefied heights of New York City's financial elite. A college dropout with an instinct for numbers--and for people--Epstein amassed his wealth through a combination of access and skill. But even after he had it all, Epstein wanted more. And that unceasing desire--especially a taste for young girls--resulted in his stunning fall from grace. From Epstein himself, to the girls he employed as masseuses at his home, to the cops investigating the appalling charges against him, FILTHY RICH examines all sides of a case that scandalized one of America's richest communities. An explosive true story, FILTHY RICH is a riveting account of wealth, power and the influence they bring to bear on the American justice system.




























[book] Homeward Bound:
The Life of Paul Simon
by Peter Ames Carlin
October 2016
Henry Holt
A revelatory account of the life of beloved American music icon, Paul Simon, by the bestselling rock biographer Peter Ames Carlin
To have been alive during the last sixty years is to have lived with the music of Paul Simon. The boy from Queens scored his first hit record in 1957, just months after Elvis Presley ignited the rock era. As the songwriting half of Simon & Garfunkel, his work helped define the youth movement of the '60s. On his own in the '70s, Simon made radio-dominating hits. He kicked off the '80s by reuniting with Garfunkel to perform for half a million New Yorkers in Central Park. Five years later, Simon’s album “Graceland” sold millions and spurred an international political controversy. And it doesn’t stop there.
The grandchild of Jewish immigrants from Hungary, the nearly 75-year-old singer-songwriter has not only sold more than 100 million records, won 15 Grammy awards and been installed into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame twice, but has also animated the meaning-and flexibility-of personal and cultural identity in a rapidly shrinking world.
Simon has also lived one of the most vibrant lives of modern times; a story replete with tales of Carrie Fisher, Leonard Bernstein, Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Shelley Duvall, Nelson Mandela, the Grateful Dead, drugs, depression, marriage, divorce, and more. A life story with the scope and power of an epic novel, Carlin’s Homeward Bound is the first major biography of one of the most influential popular artists in American history.



























NOVEMBER 2016 BOOKS




[book] Have I Got a Story for You
More Than a Century of Fiction
from the Forward
Edited by Ezra Glinter
Intro by Dara Horn
November 1, 2016
Norton
Forty-two stories from America’s most famous Yiddish newspaper, published in English for the first time.
The Forward is the most renowned Yiddish newspaper in the world. It welcomed generations of immigrants to the United States, brought them news of Europe and the Middle East, and provided them with everything from comic strips to noodle kugel recipes. It also published some of the most acclaimed Yiddish fiction writers of all time, including Nobel Prize laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer, Forward editor Abraham Cahan, and novelists Sholem Asch and Chaim Grade. Ezra Glinter and the Forward staff have combed through the archives to find the best stories published during the newspaper’s 120-year history, from wartime novellas to avant-garde fiction to satirical sketches about immigrant life in New York. These stories, now in English for the first time, expressed the concerns of Yiddish writers and their millions of readers, including the challenges of immigration, both World Wars, and changing forms of Jewish identity.

























[book] The Murderous History
of Bible Translations:
Power, Conflict, and the
Quest for Meaning
by Harry Freedman, PhD
November 15, 2016
Bloomsbury
In 1535, William Tyndale, the first man to produce an English version of the Bible in print, was captured and imprisoned in Belgium. A year later he was strangled and then burned at the stake. His co-translator was also burned. In that same year the translator of the first Dutch Bible was arrested and beheaded. These were not the first, nor were they the last instances of extreme violence against Bible translators. The Murderous History of Bible Translations tells the remarkable, and bloody, story of those who dared translate the word of God.
The Bible has been translated far more than any other book. To our minds it is self-evident that believers can read their sacred literature in a language they understand. But the history of Bible translations is far more contentious than reason would suggest. Bible translations underlie an astonishing number of religious conflicts that have plagued the world.
Harry Freedman describes brilliantly the passions and strong emotions that arise when deeply held religious convictions are threatened or undermined. He tells of the struggle for authority and orthodoxy in a world where temporal power was always subjugated to the divine, a world in which the idea of a Bible for all was so important that many were willing to give up their time, security, and even their lives.

























[book] Where Memory Leads:
My Life
by Professor Saul Friedländer
November 8, 2016
Other Press
Imagine decided to embark on a memory when you have a Senior moment and cant remember the Hebrew for eggplant salad while in a Paris hotel…

A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian's return to memoir, a tale of intellectual coming-of-age on three continents, published in tandem with his classic work of Holocaust literature, When Memory Comes
Forty years after his acclaimed, poignant first memoir, Friedländer returns with WHEN MEMORY COMES: THE LATER YEARS, bridging the gap between the ordeals of his childhood and his present-day towering reputation in the field of Holocaust studies. After abandoning his youthful conversion to Catholicism, he rediscovers his Jewish roots as a teenager and builds a new life in Israeli politics.
Friedländer's initial loyalty to Israel turns into a lifelong fascination with Jewish life and history. He struggles to process the ubiquitous effects of European anti-Semitism while searching for a more measured approach to the Zionism that surrounds him. Friedländer goes on to spend his adulthood shuttling between Israel, Europe, and the United States, armed with his talent for language and an expansive intellect. His prestige inevitably throws him up against other intellectual heavyweights. In his early years in Israel, he rubs shoulders with the architects of the fledgling state and brilliant minds such as Gershom Scholem and Carlo Ginzburg, among others.
Most importantly, this memoir led Friedländer to reflect on the wrenching events that induced him to devote sixteen years of his life to writing his Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945.

























[book] Thinking about the Torah:
A Philosopher Reads the Bible
(JPS Essential Judaism)
In paperback
by Kenneth Seeskin Ph.D.
Northwestern University, Professor
Klutznick Professor of Jewish Civilization
November 1, 2016
JPS Jewish Publication Society
The Bible is an enduring source of inspiration for the human heart and mind, and readers of Thinking about the Torah will be rewarded with an enhanced understanding of this great work’s deeper meanings. Drawing on Western philosophy and particularly Jewish philosophy, Kenneth Seeskin delves into ten core biblical verses and the powerful ideas that emerge from them. He speaks to readers on every page and invites conversation about topics central to human existence: how finite beings can relate to the infinite, what love is, the role of ethics in religion, and the meaning of holiness.
Seeskin raises questions we all ask and responds to them with curiosity and compassion, weaving into his own perceptive commentary insights from great Jewish thinkers such as Maimonides, Spinoza, Buber, Rosenzweig, and Levinas, as well as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Luther, Kant, and Kierkegaard.
The Bible is concerned with how we think as well as how we follow the commandments, rituals, and customs. Seeskin inspires us to read the Torah with an open mind and think about the lessons it teaches us.























[book] MOONGLOW
A NOVEL
BY MICHAEL CHABON
November 2016
Harper

Ever since Michael Chabon severely criticized the State of Israel and its policies, and embarked on a collection of critical writings, his popularity among Jewish readers has diminished. But here is his latest novel. Will it be rejected by several Jewish book clubs? The keeping of secrets and the telling of lies; sex and desire and ordinary love; existential doubt and model rocketry - all feature in the new novel from the author of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay and The Yiddish Policeman's Union. Moonglow unfolds as a deathbed confession. An old man, tongue loosened by powerful painkillers, memory stirred by the imminence of death, tells stories to his grandson, uncovering bits and pieces of a history long buried. From the Jewish slums of prewar South Philadelphia to the invasion of Germany, from a Florida retirement village to the penal utopia of a New York Prison, from the heyday of the space program to the twilight of "the American Century," Moonglow collapses an era into a single life and a lifetime into a single week. A lie that tells the truth, a work of fictional non-fiction, an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir, Moonglow is Chabon at his most daring and his most moving.






















[book] Innovating:
A Doer's Manifesto for Starting
from a Hunch, Prototyping Problems,
Scaling Up, and Learning to Be
Productively Wrong
by Luis Perez-Breva
Illustrated by Nick Fuhrer
Foreword by Edward Roberts
December 2016
MIT Press
Innovation is the subject of countless books and courses, but there's very little out there about how you actually innovate. Innovation and entrepreneurship are not one and the same, although aspiring innovators often think of them that way. They are told to get an idea and a team and to build a show-and-tell for potential investors. In Innovating, Luis Perez-Breva describes another approach -- a doer's approach developed over a decade at MIT and internationally in workshops, classes, and companies. He shows that to start innovating it doesn't require an earth-shattering idea; all it takes is a hunch. Anyone can do it. By prototyping a problem and learning by being wrong, innovating can be scaled up to make an impact. Perez-Breva shows at the outset of what we later celebrate as "innovations" nothing is new.
In Innovating, the process -- illustrated by unique and dynamic artwork -- is shown to be empirical, experimental, nonlinear, and incremental. You give your hunch the structure of a problem. Anything can be a part. Your innovating accrues other people's knowledge and skills. Perez-Breva describes how to create a kit for innovating, and outlines questions that will help you think in new ways. Finally, he shows how to systematize what you've learned: to advocate, communicate, scale up, manage innovating continuously, and document -- "you need a notebook to converse with yourself," he advises. Everyone interested in innovating also needs to read this book.






















[book] Overcrowded:
Designing Meaningful Products in a World Awash with Ideas
(Design Thinking, Design Theory)
by Roberto Verganti
December 2016
MIT Press
The standard text on innovation advises would-be innovators to conduct creative brainstorming sessions and seek input from outsiders -- users or communities. This kind of innovating can be effective at improving products but not at capturing bigger opportunities in the marketplace. In this book Roberto Verganti offers a new approach -- one that does not set out to solve existing problems but to find breakthrough meaningful experiences. There is no brainstorming -- which produces too many ideas, unfiltered -- but a vision, subject to criticism. It does not come from outsiders but from one person's unique interpretation.
The alternate path to innovation mapped by Verganti aims to discover not how things work but why we need things. It gives customers something more meaningful -- something they can love. Verganti describes the work of companies, including Nest Labs, Apple, Yankee Candle, and Philips Healthcare, that have created successful businesses by doing just this. Nest Labs, for example, didn't create a more advanced programmable thermostat, because people don't love to program their home appliances. Nest's thermostat learns the habits of the household and bases its temperature settings accordingly. Verganti discusses principles and practices, methods and implementation. The process begins with a vision and proceeds through developmental criticism, first from a sparring partner and then from a circle of radical thinkers, then from external experts and interpreters, and only then from users.
Innovation driven by meaning is the way to create value in our current world, where ideas are abundant but novel visions are rare. If something is meaningful for both the people who create it and the people who consume it, business value follows.





















The Rabbi’s Athiest Daughter
Ernestine Rose, International Feminist Pioneer
By Bonnie S. Anderson January 2017
Oxford University Press
Ernestine Rose was once the most famous feminist in the world. She is forgotten to History. Born the only child to a Polish rabbi and his wife in 1810, Rose rejected religion. At the age of 15, Rose’s mother passed away and left her an inheritance. Her father betrothed her to a man she did not want to marry. She pleased her case to the court to stop the engagement and she won. She then left her father and family, religion, and Poland. She met an English radical thinker, married him, and emigrated to New York City in 1836 from England. In America, she lectured widely on feminism, athieism, and the abolition of slavery. She was branded a with “infidelism” by some. By 1920, maybe due to her atheism and status as an immigrant, she was forgotten. In this biography, professor emerita Anderson restores her.









[book] If You're in a Dogfight,
Become a Cat!:
Strategies for Long-Term Growth
(Columbia Business School Publishing)
by Leonard Sherman
January 2017
Columbia University Press
When Yellow Tail wines launched in 2001, they battled 6,500 other wineries for a share of the American market. By 2007, Yellow Tail sales in the United States exceeded the sales of all French wineries combined. How did this new business enter such a crowded market and succeed?
If You're in a Dogfight, Become a Cat! explains how businesses such as Yellow Tail survive and thrive in industries embroiled in "dogfights"-intense competition among established companies for a small piece of the market. Leonard Sherman, a longtime business consultant and faculty member at Columbia Business School, has developed a three-part strategy based on years of consulting for such companies as Audi, Toyota, and United Technologies. His advice: compete on different terms to attract new customers. FedEx, Apple, Southwest Airlines, and Starbucks have thrived as cats by differentiating their businesses, aligning their goals and practices, and continuously innovating their products. Rather than compete head-on with other PC manufacturers, Apple introduced a new category of tablet devices to unlock latent demand for mobile computing. Yellow Tail turned beer- and liquor-lovers on to casual, inexpensive, drinkable wines through youthful packaging. In this book, managers of companies big and small encounter dozens of model strategies for product design and forward-thinking organization that have resulted in real long-term, profitable growth.




















[book] Own It:
The Power of Women at Work
by Sallie Krawcheck
January 2017
Crown Business
Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level….by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths.

So much advice for women talks about how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world is rapidly changing, and these changes are empowering women in unprecedented ways. Because in the increasingly complex, connected, and technology-driven world of tomorrow where communication and collaboration rule the day the skills and qualities needed for success are ones that women inherently possess: in spades.
By owning those qualities – qualities that make women amazing collaborators, extraordinary leaders and invaluable assets in the business world - you have more power and potential than you realize.
Here Krawcheck draws on her experiences at the highest levels of business, both as one of the lone women at the top rungs of the biggest boys club in the world, and as an entrepreneur, to show how women can tap into these skills – and their enormous economic power – to elevate their careers: everything from getting the raise, to new takes on networking and mentoring, to navigating career breaks and curveballs and forging non-traditional career paths, to how to initiate the “courageous conversations” about true flexibility and diversity in the workplace. We can have a more significant role than ever in shaping our companies – and building new companies – into places we want to work.
Lighting the path to complete the revolution ignited by Gloria Steinem, Krawcheck shows how each one of us can leverage our growing power to own our careers and our futures.




















The Mediocrity of the Suit and Tie
[book] The Valley of the Gods:
A Silicon Valley Story
by Alexandra Wolfe
January 2017
Simon & Schuster
Some coddled and on coddled Ivy League grads come to Manhattan and work in banking and consulting. Others venture to the Bay Area to strike it rich another way. In a riveting, hilarious account, Wall Street Journal reporter and East Hampton habitue Alexandra Wolfe exposes a world that is not flat but bubbling — the men and women of Silicon Valley, whose hubris and ambition are changing the world.

Each year, young people from around the world go to Silicon Valley to hatch an idea, start a company, strike it rich, and become powerful and famous. In The Valley of the Gods, Wolfe follows three of these upstarts who have “stopped out” of college and real life to live and work in Silicon Valley in the hopes of becoming the next Mark Zuckerberg or Elon Musk.
She documents the battle for the brightest kids, (unlike the TV series, Silicon Valley) kids whose goals are no less than making billions of dollars—and the fight they wage in turn to make it there. They embody an American cultural transformation: A move away from the East Coast hierarchy of Ivy Leagues and country clubs toward the startup life and a new social order.
Meet the billionaires who go to training clubs for thirty-minute “body slams” designed to fit in with the start-up schedule; attend parties where people devour peanut butter-and-jelly sushi rolls; and date and seduce in a romantic culture in which thick glasses, baggy jeans, and a t-shirt is the costume of any sex symbol (and where a jacket and tie symbolize mediocrity). Through Wolfe’s eyes, we discover how they date and marry, how they dress and live, how they plot and dream, and how they have created a business world and an economic order that has made us all devotees of them.
A blistering, brilliant, and hysterical examination of this new ruling class, The Valley of the Gods presents tomorrow’s strange new normal where the only outward signs of tech success are laptops and ideas.

If you enjoyed her VF profile of Thursday Night Cougar Night at the Rosewood in Menlo Park, you'll enjoy this





























[book] Confessions of a Wall Street Insider
A Cautionary Tale of Rats, Feds, and Banksters
by Michael Kimelman
January 2017
Skyhorse
Although he was a suburban husband and father, living a far different life than the “Wolf of Wall Street,” Michael Kimelman had a good run as the cofounder of a hedge fund. He had left a cushy yet suffocating job at a law firm to try his hand at the high-risk life of a proprietary trader — and he did pretty well for himself. But it all came crashing down in the wee hours of November 5, 2009, when the Feds came to his door—almost taking the door off its hinges. While his wife and children were sequestered to a bedroom, Kimelman was marched off in embarrassment in view of his neighbors and TV crews who had been alerted in advance. He was arrested as part of a huge insider trading case, and while he was offered a “sweetheart” no-jail probation plea, he refused, maintaining his innocence.

The lion’s share of Confessions of a Wall Street Insider was written while Kimelman was an inmate at Lewisburg Penitentiary. In nearly two years behind bars, he reflected on his experiences before incarceration—rubbing elbows and throwing back far too many cocktails with financial titans and major figures in sports and entertainment (including Leonardo DiCaprio, Alex Rodriguez, Ben Bernanke, and Alan Greenspan, to drop a few names); making and losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in daily gambles on the Street; getting involved with the wrong people, who eventually turned on him; realizing that none of that mattered in the end. As he writes: “Stripped of family, friends, time, and humanity, if there’s ever a place to give one pause, it’s prison . . . Tomorrow is promised to no one.” In Confessions of a Wall Street Insider, he reveals the triumphs, pains, and struggles, and how, in the end, it just might have made him a better person.

























[book] Needles and Haystacks:
Smart Thinking in the
Age of New Data
by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz
February 2017
Morrow – Dey Street
Seth is an Op-Ed contributor for The New York Times and former data scientist for Google. He has his PhD from Harvard and another degree from Stanford. This is a story of finding or uncovering insights in big data.

In 2013, as a PhD student in economics at Harvard, he wrote a dissertation claiming that Google searches could improve measurements of racism and child abuse and predict voter turnout. Based on these insights, Google hired him. Dr. Stephens-Davidowitz has used Google searches to measure son preference, self-induced abortion, sexual insecurity, depression, and therapy usage. He has also used Google searches to estimate how many men are gay; explore why we tell jokes; and learn how politicians can successfully calm an angry mob. He used Facebook likes to measure the key ages in child development; scraped Wikipedia to find what cities are best for producing superstars; analyzed the demographics of America's largest hate site; and studied ancestry.com data to learn what it really takes to make the NBA. He also knows how to juggle and has a passion for the Mets and Leonard Cohen.

























[book] High Noon:
The Hollywood Blacklist and
the Making of an American Classic
by Glenn Frankel
February 2017
Bloomsbury USA
Many politicians cite HIGH NOON as their favorite film. It was difficult to produce and was made for a very low budget. It starred Gary Cooper and Grace Kelley. For 1953, it won four Academy Awards. It became a quintessential post-War American film. It celebrated moral fortitude and American moral strength.
What is overlooked and forgotten is that it was written by a blacklisted writer who would NOT name names. He was exiled from Hollywood and America (and co-wrote The Bridge of the River Kwai, 1957 (uncredited)
This is the story of Carl Foreman (the son of Fanny (Rozin) and Isidore Foreman), and the film, and its producers, and how it evolved from idea to draft to final script, and its allegorical weight in light of the McCarthy hunt for Communist influence in Hollywood.




















[book] Confronting Scandal
How Jews Can Respond When Jews Do Bad Things
Erica Brown
August 2010, Jewish Lights
Jews seem to be in the news today for all of the wrong reasons. Whether it is Bernie Madoff or money laundering by rabbinic leaders, faking appraisals so you can sell assets to friends, smuggling narcotics to benefit yeshivas, the Jewish community has yet to take stock of what these breaches of civil law and Jewish ethical teachings mean for us as a people.
How do we manage collective discomfort and shame?
Should we feel ghetto mentality shame, or be filled with Dershowitz like Chutzpah?
How do we explain rabbis (or cantors) who commit sex offenses (and then ask for ultra kosher food in prison) or other crimes yet stand at the pulpit week after week offering others moral guidance?
And most importantly, how do we restore honor and dignity to our community by raising the ethical bar and adherence to it? This book explores the difficult and thorny issues surrounding scandals: airing dirty laundry in public, coming to terms with criminality among Jews, examining painful stereotypes of Jews and the difficult position of being a minority in society. A call for us to answer to a higher authority, it also addresses practical ways to strengthen ethical behavior and "do good things" to bring pride back, and to engender greater self-respect and the respect of others.
Dr. Erica Brown, a leading voice on subjects of current Jewish interest, consults for Jewish federations and organizations across the country. She is author of Inspired Jewish Leadership: Practical Approaches to Building Strong Communities, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.
Click the book cover to read more.









[book]



PLEASE CLICK HERE
TO TRANSFER TO OUR HOME PAGE:










USE THE "SEARCH" FUNCTION BELOW to find any other books that interest you, or click the top frame to see the other books that Sefer Safari can offer.

Books Music Enter keywords...


Amazon.com
                     logo





6


http://www.myJewishBooks.com – Revised: 2/1/2016, 5/14/2012, 3/19/2013, 1/29/2015, 07/22/2016
Copyright © 1996-2016 MyJewishBooks.com

Admin@MyJewishBooks.com


LE FastCounter

Disclaimer: We provide this data as a service to readers. We are not responsible for the results of the use or misuse of the data and/or the review of the works above. Amazon.com fulfills book orders