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SOME SUMMER 2019 BOOK READINGS



May 04, 2019: Sarah Phillips Casteel (Carleton) on Global Itineraries of Holocaust Memory: The Jewish Caribbean and Nazi Persecution in Literature and Art. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM
May 09, 2019: Shirli Gilbert (Southhampton) on South African Jews, the Holocaust, and Apartheid. UCLA Royce Hall 4PM
JUNE 01, 2019: Eric Silverstein reads from THE PEACHED TORTILLA cookbook. B&N Buckhead Atlanta GA
JUNE 11, 2019: Jennifer WEINER reads from MRS EVERYTHING. B&N Princeton NJ
JUNE 7, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Lynda Cohen Loigman (THE WARTIME SISTER) and Kitty Zeldis (NOT OUR KIND)
JUNE 24, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Linda Meyers (THE TELL: A MEMOIR) and Laurie Gwen Shapiro (THE STOWAWAY)
JULY 01, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Sarah Stern (WE HABE BEEN LUCKY IN THE MIDST OF MISFORTUNE) and Jess Greenbaum (SPILLED AND GONE)
JULY 08, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Jack Hersch (DEATH MARCH ESCAPE) and Sandra Rapoport (THE QUEEN & THE SPYMASTER)
JULY 15, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Lisa Gornick (THE PEACOCK FEAST) and Spencer Wise(THE EMPEROR OF SHOES)
JULY 15, 2019: Daniel Silva reads from his latest Israeli spy thriller, THE NEW GIRL, B&N Union Square NYC JULY 16, 2019: Jennifer WEINER reads from MRS EVERYTHING. B&N Bensalem PA
JULY 22, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Rachel Barenbaum (A BEND IN THE STARS) and Karen Bender (THE NEW ORDER)
JULY 29, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Julie Zuckerman (THE BOOK OF JEREMIAH) and R.L. Maizes (WE LOVE ANDERSEN COOPER)
AUGUST 05, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Carol Zorel (BARREN ISLAND) and Dina Elenbogen (DRAWN FROM WATER)
AUGUST 12, 2019: SCRIBBLERS ON THE ROOF. NYC. UWS. Congregation Ansche Chesed presents Pamela Ryder (PARADISE FIELD) and Ellen Cassedy (ON THE LANDING: STORIES BY YENTA MASH)























SELECTED MAY 2019 BOOKS






[book] The Brisket Chronicles:
How to Barbecue, Braise,
Smoke, and Cure the World's
Most Versatile Cut of Meat
by Steven Raichlen
Workman

Brisket... also known as.. smoked meat, corned beef, pastrami, bbq brisket, ropa vieja, vaca frita, bierfleische, boeuf a la mode, starcotto, carbonnade, nihari gosht, chinese red-cooked brisket, korean sulungtang, pho china nac, and stewed brisket leh.

It all starts with the big kahuna: an authentic Texas barbecued brisket, aka 18 pounds of smoky, fatty, proteinaceous awesomeness. And from this revelation of pure beefy goodness comes burnt ends. Corned beef. Ropa Vieja. Bollito Misto. Pho . . . and slowly it dawns on you: Brisket must be the tastiest, most versatile, and most beloved cut of meat in the world.

In The Brisket Chronicles, Steven Raichlen—“The Julia Child of BBQ” (Los Angeles Times)—shares his 50 best brisket recipes while showing us step-by-foolproof-step how to ’cue it, grill it, smoke it, braise it, cure it, and boil it. This is next-level comfort food:
Texas brisket and Kansas City brisket,
Jamaican Jerk Brisket (or actually brisket with Jerk style seasoning with Scotch bonnet chiles and allspice)
Old School Pastrami (Pastrami Queen, Katz's, plis Prague Powder #1 which can actually kill you),
New School Pastrami (Will Horowitz's Harry & Ida's Meat & Supply Co),
a perfect Passover brisket with dried fruits and sweet wine,
Brisket Ramen,
Kung Pao Pastrami (Mission Chinese's Danny Bowien),
even burgers.
There is Fete Sau's (Brooklyn NY) Coffee-Rubbed Brisket recipe, with Cider Beer BBQ Sauce.
A brisket in the style of Asian fusion KYU (Wynwood Arts District, Miami, FL)
Brisket steaks a la BBQ University at White Sulpher Springs, WV
Jewish Deli Brisket (braised)
Veal Brisket, Braised Venetian style
Wine Country Brisket (French wine country)
Red-Cooked Brisket (Chinese style, red cooking style)
Vaca Frita (Cuban style)

Plus Brisket and Eggs; Brisket Scones, Brisket Poppers, Brisket Tots, Brisket Pockets, Brisket Salad, Brisket Brisket Sloppy Joe (Smokey Joe), Brisket French Dip, uben, and what to do with the leftovers: the ultimate Brisket Hash, Brisket Baked Beans, Brisket Bites. And for total mind-blowing pleasure, Kettle Corn with Crispy Brisket. You heard right.

Includes full-color photographs throughout; complete tips and techniques for choosing the right cuts; handling, prepping, and storing a brisket; and recipes for accompaniments, too, including slaws, salads, and sauces.

Includes an explanation of what brisket is with steer diagrams of his pecs: flat and point. We learn that the first brisket recipe was published in 1769 (but it used bacon to moisten the flat; nutmeg; oysters, and red wine. It was served with pickles.) In 1709, the Tattler wrote that brisket was the fave food of the Black Print, Edward of Woodstock. A Latin dictionary in 1450 mentions brukette(Bris kette). Includes a glossary for burnt ends, deckle, far cao, packer brisket, and THE ALL IMPORTANT “smoke ring.” There are pages on CAMP BRISKET, the annual two day seminar at Foodways Texas lifetime membership is $1000, regular is $75), and the Meat Science Section of the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M (admission only via lottery, it was in early January in 2019)

The book closes with an homage to Aaron Franklin of Austin, TX... a brisket whisperer. As well as a ecipe for Brisket Chocolate Chip Cookies a la Evan LeROy of LeRoy and Lewis, a food truck in Austin














[book] Mensch-Marks:
Life Lessons of a Human
Rabbi-Wisdom for Untethered Times
by Rabbi Joshua Hammerman
HCI

The Talmud states, "In a world that lacks humanity, be human." In a world as untethered as ours has become, simply being human, a good person, is a measure of heroism. At a time when norms of civility are being routinely overwhelmed, it may be the only measure that matters. Mensch-Marks represents Rabbi Joshua Hammerman's personal Torah scroll-the sacred text of his experiences, the life lessons he has learned along his winding, circuitous journey. Mirroring 42 steps Israel wandered in the Wilderness, Hammerman offers 42 brief essays, several of which first appeared in The New York Times Magazine, organized into categories of character, or "mensch-marks," each one a stepping stone toward spiritual maturation. These essays span most of Rabbi Hammerman's life, revealing how he has striven to be a "mensch," a human of character, through every challenge.

He writes, "If by sharing what I've learned, I can add a modicum of generosity, honesty and human connection in a world overflowing with cruelty, loneliness and deceit, then I'll have done my job." The essays cover crucial moments of failure and forgiveness, loving and letting go, finding deeper meaning in one's work, and holiness in the seemingly inconsequential moments of everyday life. Rabbi Hammerman, ever the optimist, believes that we can turn things around, one mensch at a time.


















[book] SHADOW STRIKE:
Inside Israel's Secret Mission
to Eliminate Syrian Nuclear Power
by Yaakov Katz
(The Jerusalem Post, EIC)
May 7, 2019
St. Martin's Press

The never-before-told inside story of how Israel stopped Syria from becoming a global nuclear nightmare-and its far-reaching implications On September 6, 2007, shortly after midnight, Israeli fighters advanced on Deir ez-Zour in Syria. Israel often flew into Syria as a warning to President Bashar al-Assad. But this time, there was no warning and no explanation. This was a covert operation, with one goal: to destroy a nuclear reactor being built by North Korea under a tight veil of secrecy in the Syrian desert.

Shadow Strike tells, for the first time, the story of the espionage, political courage, military might and psychological warfare behind Israel’s daring operation to stop one of the greatest known acts of nuclear proliferation. It also brings Israel’s powerful military and diplomatic alliance with the United States to life, revealing the debates President Bush had with Vice President Cheney and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert as well as the diplomatic and military planning that took place in the Oval Office, the Prime Minister’s Office in Jerusalem, and inside the IDF’s underground war room beneath Tel Aviv.

These two countries remain united in a battle to prevent nuclear proliferation, to defeat Islamic terror, and to curtail Iran’s attempts to spread its hegemony throughout the Middle East. Yaakov Katz's Shadow Strike explores how this operation continues to impact the world we live in today and if what happened in 2007 is a sign of what Israel will need to do one day to stop Iran's nuclear program. It also asks: had Israel not carried out this mission, what would the Middle East look like today?































[book] The Making of a Justice:
Reflections on My First 94 Years
by John Paul Stevens
Retired Justice, U.S. Supreme Court
May 14, 2019
Little. Brown and Company

MY SUMMER BEACH READ. By the late liberal Justice

A masterful and personal account of life on the Supreme Court that offers a unique understanding of American history from one of the most prominent jurists of our time

When Justice John Paul Stevens retired from the Supreme Court of the United States in 2010, he left a legacy of service unequaled in the history of the Court. During his thirty-four-year tenure, Justice Stevens was a prolific writer, authoring in total more than 1000 opinions. In THE MAKING OF A JUSTICE, John Paul Stevens recounts the first ninety-four years of his extraordinary life, offering an intimate and illuminating account of his service on the nation's highest court.

Appointed by President Gerald Ford and eventually retiring during President Obama's first term, Justice Stevens has been witness to, and an integral part of, landmark changes in American society.

With stories of growing up in Chicago, his work as a naval traffic analyst at Pearl Harbor during World War II, and his early days in private practice, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at some of the most important Supreme Court decisions over the last four decades, THE MAKING OF A JUSTICE offers a warm and fascinating account of Justice Stevens' unique and transformative American life.This comprehensive memoir is a must read for those trying to better understand our country and the Constitution.


























[book] The End of the Myth:
From the Frontier to the Border
Wall in the Mind of America
by Greg Grandin
(NYU)
2019
Metropolitan Books

From a Pulitzer Prize finalist, a new and eye-opening interpretation of the meaning of the frontier, from early westward expansion to Trump’s border wall.

Ever since this nation’s inception, the idea of an open and ever-expanding frontier has been central to American identity. Symbolizing a future of endless promise, it was the foundation of the United States’ belief in itself as an exceptional nation-democratic, individualistic, forward-looking. Today, though, America hasa new symbol: the border wall.

In The End of the Myth, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin explores the meaning of the frontier throughout the full sweep of U.S. history-from the American Revolution to the War of 1898, the New Deal to the election of 2016. For centuries, he shows, America’s constant expansion-fighting wars and opening markets-served as a “gate of escape,” helping to deflect domestic political and economic conflicts outward. But this deflection meant that the country’s problems, from racism to inequality, were never confronted directly. And now, the combined catastrophe of the 2008 financial meltdown and our unwinnable wars in the Middle East have slammed this gate shut, bringing political passions that had long been directed elsewhere back home.

It is this new reality, Grandin says, that explains the rise of reactionary populism and racist nationalism, the extreme anger and polarization that catapulted Trump to the presidency. The border wall may or may not be built, but it will survive as a rallying point, an allegorical tombstone marking the end of American exceptionalism.


























[book] Topgun:
An American Story
by Dan Pedersen (Rear Admiral, retired)
Hachette
2019

An homage to the hundreds of graduates of the TOP GUN school for the brotherhood of fighter pilots and tactical aviation.

Before TOP GUN started, US pilots were 2 to 1, shooting down 2 MiGS for each American loss. After TOP GUN it was 24 to 1. Big improvement. Especially after the Pentagon changed the rules of engagement and allowed fighting without visual contact.

It isn't the technology that wins. It is the training of the pilot and flight crew who... sometimes... even overcomes the technology that the Pentagon has given them (like the fighter jet whose engines would seize up in cold wet weather)

On the 50th anniversary of the creation of the "Topgun" Navy Fighter School, its founder shares the remarkable inside story of how he and eight other risk-takers revolutionized the art of aerial combat.

When American fighter jets were being downed at an unprecedented rate during the Vietnam War, the U.S. Navy turned to a young lieutenant commander, Dan Pedersen, to figure out a way to reverse their dark fortune. On a shoestring budget and with little support, Pedersen picked eight of the finest pilots to help train a new generation to bend jets like the F-4 Phantom to their will and learn how to dogfight all over again.

What resulted was nothing short of a revolution -- one that took young American pilots from the crucible of combat training in the California desert to the blistering skies of Vietnam, in the process raising America's Navy combat kill ratio from two enemy planes downed for every American plane lost to more than 22 to 1. Topgun emerged not only as an icon of America's military dominance immortalized by Hollywood but as a vital institution that would shape the nation's military strategy for generations to come.

Pedersen takes readers on a colorful and thrilling ride -- from Miramar to Area 51 to the decks of aircraft carriers in war and peace-through a historic moment in air warfare. He helped establish a legacy that was built by him and his "Original Eight" -- the best of the best -- and carried on for six decades by some of America's greatest leaders. Topgun is a heartfelt and personal testimony to patriotism, sacrifice, and American innovation and daring.

By the way.. what did Pedersen, the founding officer in charge, learn from the Israelis? Not much. But how to select pilots and discover what makes the best ones. How they accelerate the learning curve. Pedersen trained the Israeli pilots who helped turn the tide in the 1973 Middle East War. I think readers will enjoy the chapter of TOP GUN and the 1973 war. Pedersen recounts how, after Kissinger was overruled, U.S. Pilots volunteered to fly F4's to Israel to replenish their arsenal. Dayan and Meir placed atomic missiles on jets at Tel Nof in plain view so that U.S. intelligence satellites would pick them up and send the White House a message that Israel was ready to go nuclear in the war. Also, Pedersen includes stories on the dogfight between two Israeli Phantom F4's (borrowed from the USA and painted in Israel's camo colors) beat back 24 MiGs, downing seven of them. On the other side though, the Israeli jets were surprised and succumbed badly to Soviet SA-6 surface to air missiles. IN one day, Israel lost 40 Skyhawks and Phantoms, 10% of its force. It took the deaths of 4 F-4s just to take out one Syrian mobile SA6 battery. Pedersen also includes recollections of Israel's TOP GUN attack on Mansura's MiGS during the 1973 war, and Nixon's moves DEFCONS3 when the Soviets moved nuclear missiles to Egypt during the war.





















[book] NIRVANA IS HERE:
A Novel
by Aaron Hamburger
May 14, 2019
Three Rooms Press

For Ari Silverman, the past has never really passed.
After 20 years, the trauma from a childhood assault resurfaces as he grapples with the fate of his ex-husband, a colleague accused of sexually harassing a student.
To gain perspective, Ari arranges to reconnect with his high school crush, Justin Jackson, a bold step which forces him to reflect on their relationship in the segregated suburbs of Detroit during the 1990s and the secrets they still share. An honest story about recovery and coping with both past and present, framed by the meteoric rise and fall of the band Nirvana and the wide-reaching scope of the #metoo movement, Nirvana is Here explores issues of identity, race, sex, and family with both poignancy and unexpected humor. Deftly told intertwining stories with rich, real characters are reminiscent of the sensuality and haunting nostalgia of André Aciman’s Call Me By Your Name blended with the raw emotion of Kurt Cobain’s lyrics. Written by award-winning writer Aaron Hamburger, Nirvana Is Here is “a wonder of a book,” according to acclaimed novelist Lauren Grodstein (Our Short History). “As a Jewish Gen-Xer, the novel reminded me exactly of who I once was-and all that I still want to be. . . . a brilliant accomplishment.”


NOTE TO FILE: Award winning author Aaron Hamburger grew up in Detroit's suburbs. His father was so worried about anti-Semitism that Aaron was sent to a Jewish day school as a teen, one that worshiped Holocaust education and remembrance more than theology. Hamburger was viciously bullied and even sexually assaulted by a classmate for being considered a fag. He eventually transferred to a secular high school where he was tolerated and at least not bullied.

























[book] Strangers and Cousins:
A Novel
by Leah Hager Cohen
May 14, 2019
Riverhead Books

A novel about what happens when an already sprawling family hosts an even larger and more chaotic wedding: an entertaining story about family, culture, memory, and community. Walter and Bennie Blumenthal host the wedding of their eldest child. They have a big family… but the influx of haredi families are bringing even larger ones.

In the seemingly idyllic town of Rundle Junction, Bennie and Walter are preparing to host the wedding of their eldest daughter Clem. A marriage ceremony at their beloved, rambling home should be the happiest of occasions, but Walter and Bennie have a secret. A new community has moved to Rundle Junction, threatening the social order and forcing Bennie and Walter to confront uncomfortable truths about the lengths they would go to to maintain harmony.

Meanwhile, Aunt Glad, the oldest member of the family, arrives for the wedding plagued by long-buried memories of a scarring event that occurred when she was a girl in Rundle Junction. As she uncovers details about her role in this event, the family begins to realize that Clem's wedding may not be exactly what it seemed. Clever, passionate, artistic Clem has her own agenda. What she doesn't know is that by the end, everyone will have roles to play in this richly imagined ceremony of familial connection-a brood of quirky relatives, effervescent college friends, ghosts emerging from the past, a determined little mouse, and even the very group of new neighbors whose presence has shaken Rundle Junction to its core.

With Strangers and Cousins, Leah Hager Cohen delivers a story of pageantry and performance, hopefulness and growth, and introduces a winsome, unforgettable cast of characters whose lives are forever changed by events that unfold and reverberate across generations.




























[book] JERUSALEM
CITY OF THE BOOK
by Merav Mack and Benjamin Balint
Frederic Brenner (Photographer)
May 14, 2019
Yale University Press

A captivating journey through the hidden libraries of Jerusalem, where some of the world’s most enduring ideas were put into words

In this enchanting book, Merav Mack and Benjamin Balint explore Jerusalem’s libraries to tell the story of this city as a place where some of the world’s most enduring ideas were put into words. The writers of Jerusalem, although renowned the world over, are not usually thought of as a distinct school; their story as Jerusalemites has never before been woven into a single narrative. Nor have the stories of the custodians, past and present, who safeguard Jerusalem’s literary legacies.

By showing how Jerusalem has been imagined, safeguarded, and shelved in libraries, Mack and Balint tell the untold history of how the peoples of the book have populated the city with texts. In their hands, Jerusalem itself—perched between East and West, antiquity and modernity, violence and piety—comes alive as a kind of labyrinthine library.

















[book] THE GUEST BOOK
A NOVEL
BY SARAH BLAKE
May 2019
Flatiron Books

No. It is a simple word, uttered on a summer porch in 1936. And it will haunt Kitty Milton for the rest of her life. Kitty and her husband, Ogden, are both from families considered the backbone of the country. But this refusal will come to be Kitty’s defining moment, and its consequences will ripple through the Milton family for generations. For while they summer on their island in Maine, anchored as they are to the way things have always been, the winds of change are beginning to stir.

In 1959 New York City, two strangers enter the Miltons’ circle. One captures the attention of Kitty’s daughter, while the other makes each of them question what the family stands for. This new generation insists the times are changing. And in one night, everything does.

So much so that in the present day, the third generation of Miltons doesn’t have enough money to keep the island in Maine. Evie Milton’s mother has just died, and as Evie digs into her mother’s and grandparents’ history, what she finds is a story as unsettling as it is inescapable, the story that threatens the foundation of the Milton family myth.

Moving through three generations and back and forth in time, The Guest Book asks how we remember and what we choose to forget. It shows the untold secrets we inherit and pass on, unknowingly echoing our parents and grandparents. Sarah Blake’s triumphant novel tells the story of a family and a country that buries its past in quiet, until the present calls forth a reckoning.


















[book] THE FLIGHT PORTFOLIO
A NOVEL
BY JULIE ORRINGER
May 2019
KNOPF

In 1940, Varian Fry traveled to Marseille carrying three thousand dollars and a list of imperiled artists and writers he hoped to help escape within a few weeks. Instead, he stayed more than a year, working to procure false documents, amass emergency funds, and arrange journeys across Spain and Portugal, where the refugees would embark for safer ports. His many clients included Hannah Arendt, Max Ernst, Marcel Duchamp, and Marc Chagall, and the race against time to save them is a tale of forbidden love, high-stakes adventure, and unimaginable courage.

“Masterfully crafted and impossible to put down, The Flight Portfolio offers a testament to the enduring power of art, and love, in any form.” —Entertainment Weekly






















[book] THE DAUGHTER’S TALE
A novel
By Armando Lucas Correa
May 7, 2019
Atria Books

BERLIN, 1939. The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their beloved family bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward the south of France, where the widow of an old friend of her husband’s has agreed to take her in. Along the way, a refugee ship headed for Cuba offers another chance at escape and there, at the dock, Amanda is forced to make an impossible choice that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Once in Haute-Vienne, her brief respite is interrupted by the arrival of Nazi forces, and Amanda finds herself in a labor camp where she must once again make a heroic sacrifice.

NEW YORK, 2015. Eighty-year-old Elise Duval receives a call from a woman bearing messages from a time and country that she forced herself to forget. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise is shocked to discover that the letters were from her mother, written in German during the war. Despite Elise’s best efforts to stave off her past, seven decades of secrets begin to unravel.

Based on true events, The Daughter’s Tale chronicles one of the most harrowing atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis during the war. Heartbreaking and immersive, it is a beautifully crafted family saga of love, survival, and redemption.
























[book] MASADA:
From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth
by Jodi Magness
May 14, 2019
Princeton Univ Press

A new account of the famous site and story of the last stand of a group of Jewish rebels who held out against the Roman Empire

Two thousand years ago, 967 Jewish men, women, and children-the last holdouts of the revolt against Rome following the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Second Temple-reportedly took their own lives rather than surrender to the Roman army. This dramatic event, which took place on top of Masada, a barren and windswept mountain overlooking the Dead Sea, spawned a powerful story of Jewish resistance that came to symbolize the embattled modern State of Israel. The first extensive archaeological excavations of Masada began in the 1960s, and today the site draws visitors from around the world. And yet, because the mass suicide was recorded by only one ancient author-the Jewish historian Josephus-some scholars question if the event ever took place.

Jodi Magness, an archaeologist who has excavated at Masada, explains what happened there, how we know it, and how recent developments might change understandings of the story. Incorporating the latest findings, she integrates literary and historical sources to show what life was like for Jews under Roman rule during an era that witnessed the reign of Herod and Jesus’s ministry and death.

Featuring numerous illustrations, this is an engaging exploration of an ancient story that continues to grip the imagination today.


















[book] AUSCHWITZ:
NOT LONG AGO
NOT FAR AWAY
By Robert Jan Van Pelt
May 2019
Abbeville Press

A book issued to coincide with the exhibit of the same name at New York City's Museum of Jewish Heritage which will feature over 600 items that have never left the Auschwitz Birkenau museum in Poland.


This book tells a story to shake the conscience of the world.

It is the catalogue of the first-ever traveling exhibition about the Auschwitz concentration camp, where 1.1 million people-mostly Jews, but also non-Jewish Poles, Roma, and others-lost their lives.

More than 280 objects and images from the exhibition are illustrated herein. Drawn from the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and other collections around the world, they range from the intimate (such as victims’ family snapshots and personal belongings) to the immense (an actual surviving barrack from the Auschwitz III–Monowitz satellite camp); all are eloquent in their testimony.

An authoritative yet accessible text weaves the stories behind these artifacts into an encompassing history of Auschwitz-from a Polish town at the crossroads of Europe, to the dark center of the Holocaust, to a powerful site of remembrance. Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away. is an essential volume for everyone who is interested in history and its lessons.




























[book] DOTTORESSA
AN AMERICAN DOCTOR IN ROME
By Susan Liverstein
May 2019
Paul Dry Books

After completing her medical training in New York, Susan Levenstein set off for a one year adventure in Rome. Forty years later, she is still practicing medicine in the Eternal City. In Dottoressa: An American Doctor in Rome Levenstein writes, with love and exasperation, about navigating her career through the renowned Italian tangle of brilliance and ineptitude, sexism and tolerance, rigidity and chaos.

Part memoir-starting with her epic quest for an Italian medical license-and part portrait of Italy from a unique point of view, Dottoressa is packed with vignettes that illuminate the national differences in character, lifestyle, health, and health care between her two countries. Levenstein, who has been called “the wittiest internist on earth,” covers everything from hookup culture to neighborhood madmen, Italian hands-off medical training, bidets, the ironies of expatriation, and why Italians always pay their doctor’s bills.



























[book] A Forgotten Hero:
Folke Bernadotte, the Swedish
Humanitarian Who Rescued 30,000
People from the Nazis
by Shelley Emling
May 2019
ECW Press

The true story of Folke Bernadotte’s heroic rescue of 30,000 prisoners during WWII

In one of the most amazing rescues of WWII, the Swedish head of the Red Cross rescued more than 30,000 people from concentration camps in the last three months of the war. Folke Bernadotte did so by negotiating with the enemy - shaking hands with Heinrich Himmler, the head of the Gestapo. Time was of the essence, as Hitler had ordered the destruction of all camps and everyone in them. A Forgotten Hero chronicles Folke’s life and extraordinary journey, from his family history and early years to saving thousands of lives during WWII and his untimely assassination in 1948. A straightforward and compelling narrative, A Forgotten Hero sheds light on this important and heroic historical figure.



























[book] Spinoza’s Challenge to Jewish Thought:
Writings on His Life,
Philosophy, and Legacy
Edited by Daniel B. Schwartz
2019
JEWISH PUBLICATION SoCIETY

Arguably, no historical thinker has had as varied and fractious a reception within modern Judaism as Baruch (Benedict) Spinoza (1632–77), the seventeenth-century philosopher, pioneering biblical critic, and Jewish heretic from Amsterdam. Revered in many circles as the patron saint of secular Jewishness, he has also been branded as the worst traitor to the Jewish people in modern times. Jewish philosophy has cast Spinoza as marking a turning point between the old and the new, as a radicalizer of the medieval tradition and table setter for the modern. He has served as a perennial landmark and point of reference in the construction of modern Jewish identity. This volume brings together excerpts from central works in the Jewish response to Spinoza. True to the diversity of Spinoza’s Jewish reception, it features a mix of genres, from philosophical criticism to historical fiction, from tributes to diary entries, providing the reader with a sense of the overall historical development of Spinoza’s posthumous legacy.



























[book] The Organs of Sense:
A Novel
by Adam Ehrlich Sachs
May 21, 2019
FS&G

In 1666, an astronomer makes a prediction shared by no one else in the world: at the stroke of noon on June 30 of that year, a solar eclipse will cast all of Europe into total darkness for four seconds. This astronomer is rumored to be using the longest telescope ever built, but he is also known to be blind-and not only blind, but incapable of sight, both his eyes having been plucked out some time before under mysterious circumstances. Is he mad? Or does he, despite this impairment, have an insight denied the other scholars of his day?

These questions intrigue the young Gottfried Leibniz-not yet the world-renowned polymath who would go on to discover calculus, but a nineteen-year-old whose faith in reason is shaky at best. Leibniz sets off to investigate the astronomer’s claim, and over the three hours remaining before the eclipse occurs-or fails to occur-the astronomer tells the scholar the haunting and hilarious story behind his strange prediction: a tale that ends up encompassing kings and princes, family squabbles, obsessive pursuits, insanity, philosophy, art, loss, and the horrors of war.

Written with a tip of the hat to the works of Thomas Bernhard and Franz Kafka, The Organs of Sense stands as a towering comic fable: a story about the nature of perception, and the ways the heart of a loved one can prove as unfathomable as the stars.

























JUNE 2019 BOOKS


[book] In This Hour:
Heschel's Writings in Nazi
Germany and London Exile
by Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel
Stephen Lehmann (Translator)
Marion Faber (Translator)
Foreword by Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth)
June 2019
JPS: Jewish Publication Society

In 1937 Martin Buber appointed Heschel, 30 years of age, as his successor at the central organization for Jewish adult education in Frankfurt am Main. This was a year before 1938, when he fled to England and then to America. In time he became one of the most influential modern philosophers of religion in the United States. He formulated an original philosophy of Judaism, expressed in such foundational books as Man Is Not Alone (1951) and God in Search of Man (1955).

In This Hour offers the first English translations of selected German writings by Abraham Joshua Heschel from his tumultuous years in Nazi-ruled Germany and months in London exile, before he found refuge in the United States.

Several of the works have, moreover, never been published in any language. Composed during a time of intense crisis for European Jewry, these writings both argue for and exemplify a powerful vision of spiritually rich Jewish learning and its redemptive role in the past and the future of the Jewish people.

The collection opens with the text of a speech in which Heschel laid out with passion his vision for Jewish education. Then it goes on to present his teachings: a set of essays about the rabbis of the Mishnaic period, whose struggles paralleled those of his own time; the biography of the medieval Jewish scholar and leader Don Yitzhak Abravanel; reflections on the power and meaning of repentance written for the High Holidays in 1936; and a short story on Jewish exile written for Hanukkah 1937. The collection closes with a set of four recently discovered meditations—on suffering, prayer, and spirituality—in which Heschel grapples with the horrors unfolding around him. Taken together, these essays and story fill a significant void in Heschel’s bibliography: his Nazi Germany and London exile years.

These translations convey the spare elegance of Heschel’s prose, and the introduction and detailed notes make the volume accessible to readers of all knowledge levels.

As Heschel teaches history, his voice is more than that of a historian: the old becomes new, and the struggles of one era shed light on another. Even as Heschel quotes ancient sources, his words address the issues of his own time and speak urgently to ours.

“This collection of early writings by Abraham Joshua Heschel significantly expands our awareness of his full oeuvre. Readers of Heschel will want to see these prior confrontations with key issues and Heschel’s earliest stages as an activist in response to Nazi persecution.”—Rabbi Arthur Green, coeditor of A New Hasidism: Roots and A New Hasidism: Branches














[book] City of Girls:
A Novel
by Elizabeth Gilbert
June 4, 2019
Riverhead Books

Beloved author Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction with a unique love story set in the New York City theater world during the 1940s. Told from the perspective of an older woman – aged 95 - as she looks back on her youth with both pleasure and regret (but mostly pleasure), City of Girls explores themes of female sexuality and promiscuity, as well as the idiosyncrasies of true love.

In 1940, nineteen-year-old Vivian Morris has just been kicked out of Vassar College, owing to her lackluster freshman-year performance.. and her choice not to attend classes. Her affluent parents send her to Manhattan to live with her Aunt Peg, who owns a flamboyant, crumbling midtown theater called the Lily Playhouse. There Vivian is introduced to an entire cosmos of unconventional and charismatic characters, from the fun-chasing showgirls to a sexy male actor, a grand-dame actress, a lady-killer writer, no-nonsense stage manager, glamorous scoundrel of an ex-husband, the highly individualistic teenage daughter of a Jewish SCHMATTE family, and a playboy from Hell’s Kitchen who’s highly skilled in the art of lovemaking.

But when Vivian makes a personal mistake that results in professional scandal, it turns her new world upside down in ways that it will take her years to fully understand. Ultimately, though, it leads her to a new understanding of the kind of life she craves - and the kind of freedom it takes to pursue it. It will also lead to the love of her life, a love that stands out from all the rest.

Now eighty-nine years old and telling her story at last, Vivian recalls how the events of those years altered the course of her life - and the gusto and autonomy with which she approached it. "At some point in a woman's life, she just gets tired of being ashamed all the time," she muses. "After that, she is free to become whoever she truly is." Written with a powerful wisdom about human desire and connection, City of Girls is a love story like no other.

























[book] An Innocent Bystander:
The Killing of Leon Klinghoffer
by Julie Salamon
June 11, 2019
Little, Brown & Company

AN interesting read if you can get past her even handed humanizing of both terrorst murderers and victims.

On October 3, 1985, Mr. Leon Klinghoffer, a disabled Jewish New Yorker, and his wife boarded the Achille Lauro to celebrate their 36th wedding anniversary with a Mediterranean cruise. Four days later, four Palestinian terrorists hijacked the Italian luxury liner and took the passengers and crew hostage. Leon Klinghoffer, who kept practicing walking so he could walk his daughter down the aisle at her wedding was shot in the head by a terrorist, his body and wheelchair thrown overboard. His murder became a flashpoint in the intractable struggle between Israelis and Arabs and gave Americans a horrifying preview of what it means when terrorism hits home.

In this richly reported book, drawing on multiple perspectives, Julie Salamon, a former NYT critic, dispels the mythology that has grown around that shattering moment. What transpired on the Achille Lauro left the Klinghoffer family in the grip of irredeemable sorrow, while precipitating tragic reverberations for the wives and sons of Abu al-Abbas, the Palestinian mastermind behind the hijacking, and the family of Alex Odeh, a Palestinian-American murdered in Los Angeles in a brutal act of retaliation. She writes that Klinghoffer was not murdered because he was Jewish, but because he had a US passport. She writes how Lt Col. Oliver North sought to redeem himself over Iran-Contra by getting the White House to force down the jet carrying the hijackers in Italy and bring them to trial.

Through intimate interviews with almost all living participants, including one of the hijackers, Julie Salamon brings alive the moment-by-moment saga of the hijacking and the ensuing U.S.-led international manhunt; the diplomatic wrangling between the United States, Egypt, Italy, and Israel; and the long agonizing search for justice.

The book also reveals the back story of the controversial modern opera about the Klinghoffer tragedy that provoked a culture war.

An Innocent Bystander is a masterful work of journalism that moves between the personal and the global with the pace of a geopolitical thriller and the depth of a psychological drama. Throughout lies the tension wrought by terrorism and its repercussions today.


























[book] You're It:
Crisis, Change, and How to
Lead When It Matters Most
by Leonard Marcus, Eric McNulty,
Joseph M. Henderson, Barry C. Dorn
(Harvard)
June 11, 2019
PublicAffairs

Today, in an instant, any leader can find themselves face-to-face with crisis. In You're It, the faculty of the National Preparedness Leadership Inititative at Harvard University distill their extensive research and experience to show you to be a better leader through crisis and change.

The NPLI team has shadowed and interviewed the leaders who have forged through some of the most complex, high stakes disasters: the Boston Marathon bombings, the H1N1 pandemic, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the devastating string of 2017 hurricanes, and more. They also went inside the tough decision-making of the world's largest companies, the hottest startups, and leading not-for-profit organizations.

Here, the reader sits alongside, learning from these rich experiences and integrating their lessons into your leadership repertoire. Full of practical tools for routine practice, this is a guide for complex problem-solving and systemic transformation.With true life stories of today's watershed challenges and opportunities, You're It is an essential read for anyone preparing to lead an adaptive team through crisis and change.

The NPLI is a joint program of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government.

























BEST SELLER
[book] Mrs. Everything:
A Novel
by Jennifer Weiner
June 11, 2019
ATRIA

From Jennifer Weiner, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Who Do You Love and In Her Shoes comes a smart, thoughtful, and timely exploration of two sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places—and be true to themselves—in a rapidly evolving world. Mrs. Everything is an ambitious, richly textured journey through history—and herstory—as these two sisters navigate a changing America over the course of their lives.

Do we change or does the world change us?

Jo and Bethie Kaufman were born into a world full of promise.

Growing up in 1950s Detroit, they live in a perfect “Dick and Jane” house, where their roles in the family are clearly defined. Jo is the tomboy, the bookish rebel with a passion to make the world more fair; Bethie is the pretty, feminine good girl, a would-be star who enjoys the power her beauty confers and dreams of a traditional life.

But the truth ends up looking different from what the girls imagined. Jo and Bethie survive traumas and tragedies. As their lives unfold against the background of free love and Vietnam, Woodstock and women’s lib, Bethie becomes an adventure-loving wild child who dives headlong into the counterculture and is up for anything (except settling down). Meanwhile, Jo becomes a proper young mother in Connecticut, a witness to the changing world instead of a participant. Neither woman inhabits the world she dreams of, nor has a life that feels authentic or brings her joy. Is it too late for the women to finally stake a claim on happily ever after?

In her most ambitious novel yet, Jennifer Weiner tells a story of two sisters who, with their different dreams and different paths, offer answers to the question: How should a woman be in the world?

























[book] Radical Inclusion:
Engaging Interfaith Families
for a Thriving Jewish Future
by Edmund Case
(Harvard Law)
2019

After living an interfaith family life personally and working with interfaith families professionally, I firmly believe that engaging in liberal Jewish life can be a source of deep value and meaning not only for Jews, but equally for their partners from other faith traditions, and most importantly for the children of interfaith couples. It's a tradition that helps Jews and their partners and children live better lives and make the world a better place - one that can flourish in an age of widespread intermarriage.

But while most Jews are choosing love with partners who are not Jewish - almost three-quarters of non-Orthodox Jews are marrying someone from a different faith background - many are not choosing to engage with Jewish tradition. At a time when the liberal Jewish community is swimming in an ocean of interfaith marriage, instead of maximizing efforts to encourage interfaith families to engage, many Jews and Jewish leaders and institutions still question whether Jews can choose both to love someone from a different faith background and to engage with Jewish tradition. I say, yes, they can. Moreover, if liberal Judaism is to be vibrant and thrive into the future, yes they must, in increasing numbers.

Drawing on historical context, statistics, personal narratives and practical guidance, this unique book is for everyone interested in seeing more interfaith families becoming more engaged in Jewish life and community, and particularly for Jewish lay and professional leaders. It describes three invitations that can be extended to interfaith couples to help them live lives of meaning, raise grounded children, and fulfill their needs for spiritual expression and community, and three high-level road maps for what Jews, Jewish leaders and Jewish organizations can do to facilitate their Jewish engagement.

My central proposition is that the liberal Jewish world needs to adopt radically inclusive attitudes towards interfaith couples and partners from different faith traditions, treating them as equal to inmarried couples and Jews; adopt radically inclusive policies that embrace full participation by interfaith families including partners from different faith traditions; and implement a massive, concerted programmatic response designed to engage interfaith families.

Paradoxically, to maintain distinctive Jewish traditions, we need to be radically inclusive of partners from different faiths and the children of interfaith families. I hope this book will lead to an opening of hearts and minds for Jews, Jewish leaders and Jewish organizations, towards embracing a radically inclusive approach - and to a Judaism revitalized by the engagement of interfaith families embracing a beautiful tradition.
























[book] Four Rabbis at Lunch:
Candid Conversations Among
American Clergy
by Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins
2019
KTAV

Many people want to know what rabbis talk about when they know that no layperson is listening. Four Rabbis At Lunch provides a fictional attempt at replicating some of these intimate - no laypersons present - conversations by listening in on four rabbis as they meet for their weekly lunch.





























NOW IN PAPERBACK
[book] Global Jewish Foodways:
A History (At Table)
Edited by Hasia R. Diner
and Simone Cinotto
Carlo Petrini (Foreword)
June 2019
University of Nebraska Press

The history of the Jewish people has been a history of migration. Although Jews invariably brought with them their traditional ideas about food during these migrations, just as invariably they engaged with the foods they encountered in their new environments. Their culinary habits changed as a result of both these migrations and the new political and social realities they encountered. The stories in this volume examine the sometimes bewildering kaleidoscope of food experiences generated by new social contacts, trade, political revolutions, wars, and migrations, both voluntary and compelled.

This panoramic history of Jewish food highlights its breadth and depth on a global scale from Renaissance Italy to the post–World War II era in Israel, Argentina, and the United States and critically examines the impact of food on Jewish lives and on the complex set of laws, practices, and procedures that constitutes the Jewish dietary system and regulates what can be eaten, when, how, and with whom. Global Jewish Foodways offers a fresh perspective on how historical changes through migration, settlement, and accommodation transformed Jewish food and customs.



























I pity my cousin Shlomy who was also asked by Harvey Milk to create a flag in San Francisco, but his design came in second place....

[book] Rainbow Warrior:
My Life in Color
by the late Gilbert Baker
June 4, 2019
Chicago Review Press

Gilbert Baker was an active member of Congregation Beth Simchat Torah in Manhattan. Although not Jewish, he became active in the congregation in 2011 after a stroke. Just weeks before he passed away in 2017, he was sewing flags in the synagogue for a protest. His friends put together this book from his writings

After leaving Kansas for the Army and finding safety and comfort in San Franscisco, he became an artist, designer (Radar Jeans) and performer (Sister Chanel 2001 of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence). In 1978, Harvey Milk, a friend of over 3 years, asked Gilbert Baker to create a unifying symbol for the growing gay rights movement, and on June 25 of that year (1978), Baker’s Rainbow Flag debuted at San Francisco’s Gay Liberation Day parade. He wanted a unifying flag that did not use the pink triangle.

Baker had no idea his creation would become an international emblem of freedom, forever cementing his place and importance in helping to define the modern LGBTQ+ movement. He never charged a dime for the flag; he never got a royalty. The rainbow, he wrote was a symbol of hope and is found in many cultures

Rainbow Warrior is Baker’s passionate personal chronicle, from a repressive childhood in 1950s Kansas to a harrowing stint in the US Army, and finally his arrival in San Francisco, where he bloomed as both a visual artist and social justice activist. His fascinating story weaves through the early years of the struggle for LGBTQ+ rights, where he worked closely with Milk, Cleve Jones, and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Baker continued his flag-making, street theater and activism through the Reagan years and the AIDS crisis. And in 1994, Baker spearheaded the effort to fabricate a mile-long Rainbow Flag—at the time, the world’s longest—to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City. Gilbert and parade organizers battled with the newly elected Mayor Giuliani for the right to carry it up Fifth Avenue, past St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Today, the Rainbow Flag has become a worldwide symbol of LGBTQ+ diversity and inclusiveness, and its rainbow hues have illuminated landmarks from the White House to the Eiffel Tower to the Sydney Opera House. Gilbert Baker often called himself the “Gay Betsy Ross,” and readers of his colorful, irreverent and deeply personal memoir will find it difficult to disagree.





















[book] LEAN OUT
The Truth About Women, Power,
and the Workplace
by Marissa Orr
June 11, 2019
Harper

Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook write LEAN IN
Marissa Orr writes to LEAN OUT
Both Sheryl and Marissa work(ed) at Facebook and Google.
Both women are from the same town in South Florida's Dade County

LEAN OUT attempts to answer the question: What have we gotten wrong about women at work?
Orr was and is disenchanted with the advice other women wrote for women in the workplace.

Based on her research and personal experiences, Marissa Orr, a single mother of three in New Jersey, writes about what she sees as a systemic dysfunction at the heart of today’s most powerful corporations and how their pursuit to close the gender gap has come at the expense of female well-being.

“Fewer women at the top is a clear signal that the system is broken,” says Orr. “With female-dominant strengths such as empathy and consensus-building being the future of business, the headlines forecast that women will dominate the future generations of corporate leaders. But that won’t happen until prescriptions for success stop requiring women to act more like men, mistaking traits such as empathy as signals of weakness.”

Lean Out provides a new and candid perspective on what it’s really like for today’s corporate underdogs, while challenging what she writes is modern feminist rhetoric and debunking the belief that she writes that people think that everyone has to be the same in order to be equal. Offering compelling new arguments for the reasons more women don’t make it to the top, Lean Out presents a revolutionary path forward, to change the life trajectories of women in the corporate world and beyond.

Read the first three chapters for free on leanoutthebook.com











[book] The Hidden Power of F*cking Up
by The Try Guys
Keith Habersberger,
Zach Kornfeld,
Eugene Lee Yang,
and Ned Fulmer
June 18, 2019

The Try Guys – famous for their former affiliation with BuzzFeed Videos - deliver their first book — an inspirational self-improvement guide that teaches you that the path to success is littered with humiliating detours, embarrassing mistakes, and unexpected failures.

To be our best selves, we must become secure in our insecurities. In The Hidden Power of F*cking Up, The Try Guys - Keith, Ned, Zach, and Eugene - reveal their philosophy of trying: how to fully embrace fear, foolishness, and embarrassment in an effort to understand how we all get paralyzed by a fear of failure. They’ll share how four shy, nerdy kids … (the Jewish kid from Scarsdale, the tall guy from wherever, the Asian guy from Texas and France, and obsessed married guy from Yale – have dealt with their most poignant life struggles by attacking them head-on and reveal their - ahem – sure-fail(read again.. sure-fail) strategies for achieving success.

But they’re not just here to talk; they’re actually going to put their advice to work. To demonstrate their unique self-improvement formula, they’ll each personally confront their deepest insecurities. A die-hard meat-lover goes vegan for the first time. A straight-laced father transforms into a fashionista. A perpetually single sidekick becomes the romantic lead. A child of divorce finally grows more intimate with his family. Through their insightful, emotional journeys and surprising, hilarious anecdotes, they’ll help you overcome your own self-doubt to become the best, most f*cked up version of yourself you can be!
























[book] The Tenth Muse:
A Novel
by Catherine Chung
June 18, 2019
ECCO

From childhood, Katherine knows she is different, and that her parents are not who they seem to be. With Jewish and Chinese parents, she confronts racism and sexism in university math departments. Becoming a mathematician, she must face the most human of problems—who is she? What is the cost of love, and what is the cost of ambition?

On her quest to conquer the Riemann Hypothesis, the greatest unsolved mathematical problem of her time, she turns to a theorem with a mysterious history that holds both the lock and key to her identity, and to secrets long buried during World War II in Germany. Forced to confront some of the most consequential events of the twentieth century and rethink everything she knows of herself, she strives to take her place in the world of higher mathematics and finds kinship in the stories of the women who came before her—their love of the language of numbers connecting them across generations.

In The Tenth Muse, Catherine Chung offers a gorgeous, sweeping tale about legacy, identity, and the beautiful ways the mind can make us free.






















[book] Jewish Theology for a Postmodern Age
by Miriam Feldmann Kaye
June 27,2019
Liverpool University Press

In the postmodern, relativist world-view with its refutation of a single, objective, and ultimate truth, it has become difficult if not impossible to argue in favour of one's own beliefs as preferable to those of others. Miriam Feldmann Kaye's pioneering study is one of the first English-language books to address Jewish theology from a postmodern perspective, probing the question of how Jewish theology has the potential to survive the postmodern onslaught that some see as heralding the collapse of religion. Basing her arguments on both philosophical and theological scholarship, Feldmann Kaye shows how postmodernism might actually be a resource for rejuvenating religion.

Her response to the conception of theology and postmodernism as competing systems of thought is based on a close critical study of Rav Shagar (Shimon Gershon Rosenberg) and Tamar Ross. Rather than advocating postmodern ideas, she analyses their writings through the lens of the most radical of continental postmodern philosophers and cultural critics in order to offer a compelling theology compatible with that world-view. Whether the reader considers postmodernism to be inherently problematic or merely inconsequential, this study demonstrates why reconsidering these preconceptions is one of the most pressing issues in contemporary Jewish thought.























[book] Fleishman Is in Trouble:
A Novel
by Taffy Brodesser-Akner
June 2019
Random House


Dr. Toby Fleishman, 41, a liver specialist, thought he knew what to expect when he and his wife of almost fifteen years separated: weekends and every other holiday with the kids, some residual bitterness, the occasional moment of tension in their co-parenting negotiations.

He could not have predicted that one day, in the middle of his summer of sexual emancipation on online apps and new women to sleep with every night (even though he is 5'5”, and his entire life he was made to feel like an unworthy nerd by women), that his ex-wife Rachel would just drop their two children off at his place and simply not return.

He had been working so hard to find equilibrium in his single life. The winds of his optimism, long dormant, had finally begun to pick up. Now this.

The story is narrated by Libby Epstein, Dr. Toby's friend of two decades. They met as college students in Israel. Libby is a journalist, just like the author of this funny Summer must read novel (but now a stay at home parent in the burbs of NJ). Libby is at times like an anthropologist, observing from a distance.

As Toby tries to figure out where Rachel (a talent agent) went, all while juggling his patients at the hospital, his never-ending parental duties, and his new app-assisted sexual popularity, his tidy narrative of the spurned husband with the too-ambitious wife is his sole consolation. But don't resent Rachel so quickly; maybe Toby is not that saintly a doctor. If Toby ever wants to truly understand what happened to Rachel and what happened to his marriage, he is going to have to consider that he might not have seen things ALL THAT CLEARLY in the first place.

A searing, utterly unvarnished debut, Fleishman Is in Trouble is an insightful, unsettling, often hilarious exploration of a culture trying to navigate the fault lines of an institution that has proven to be worthy of our great wariness and our great hope.

“Blisteringly funny, feverishly smart, heartbreaking, and true, Fleishman Is in Trouble is an essential read for anyone who’s wondered how to navigate loving (and hating) the people we choose.”—Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, author of The Nest

“From its opening pages, Fleishman Is in Trouble is shrewdly observed, brimming with wisdom, and utterly of this moment. Not until its explosive final pages are you fully aware of its cunning ferocity. Taffy Brodesser-Akner’s debut is that rare and delicious treat: a page-turner with heft.”—Maria Semple

“This is a remarkable debut from one of the most distinctive writers around.”—Tom Perrotta


























[book] Strangers and Cousins:
A Novel
by Leah Hager Cohen
May 14, 2019
Riverhead Books

A novel about what happens when an already sprawling family hosts an even larger and more chaotic wedding: an entertaining story about family, culture, memory, and community. Walter and Bennie Blumenthal host the wedding of their eldest child. They have a big family… but the influx of haredi families are bringing even larger ones.

In the seemingly idyllic town of Rundle Junction, Bennie and Walter are preparing to host the wedding of their eldest daughter Clem. A marriage ceremony at their beloved, rambling home should be the happiest of occasions, but Walter and Bennie have a secret. A new community has moved to Rundle Junction, threatening the social order and forcing Bennie and Walter to confront uncomfortable truths about the lengths they would go to to maintain harmony.

Meanwhile, Aunt Glad, the oldest member of the family, arrives for the wedding plagued by long-buried memories of a scarring event that occurred when she was a girl in Rundle Junction. As she uncovers details about her role in this event, the family begins to realize that Clem's wedding may not be exactly what it seemed. Clever, passionate, artistic Clem has her own agenda. What she doesn't know is that by the end, everyone will have roles to play in this richly imagined ceremony of familial connection-a brood of quirky relatives, effervescent college friends, ghosts emerging from the past, a determined little mouse, and even the very group of new neighbors whose presence has shaken Rundle Junction to its core.

With Strangers and Cousins, Leah Hager Cohen delivers a story of pageantry and performance, hopefulness and growth, and introduces a winsome, unforgettable cast of characters whose lives are forever changed by events that unfold and reverberate across generations.




























[book] The Liar
a novel
by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen
2019

Frustrated, lonely 17-year-old Nofar has spent an uneventful summer serving ice-cream to indifferent customers. She extends her break moping about her drab life, unwittingly irritating the bitter ex-reality TV star Avishai Milner, who is waiting to be served. When Nofar corrects his language after he complains about his wait, he insults and humiliates her. Deeply offended, Nofar rushes out to the backyard, and Avishai - who is still waiting for his change - chases after her. "Leave me alone!" she cries with all of her accumulated rage and hurt. Her screams quickly draw a crowd to the scene, and to her surprise everyone is convinced that Avishai trued to sexually assault her.

Now, for the first time in her life, Nofar finds herself the centre of attention. She is lavished with support from the community and the media, who rally round her as the victim of a scandalous attempted assault. Nofar, giddy with newfound power and acceptance, finds that lies slip easily from her tongue, trapping her in a moral dilemma with devastating consequences.


























[book] DRIVE-THRU DREAMS
A Journey Through the Heart of
America's Fast-Food Kingdom
By Adam Chandler
June 2019
Flatiron Books

You may recall Chandler's work for Esquire, The Atlantic, or even TABLET, where he wrote of Texas and Jews. He opens this work on American Fast-Food with a quote from Shemot/Exodus, about the Hebrews not tarrying in their flight from Mitzrayim and their need for fast-food.

Most any honest person can own up to harboring at least one fast-food guilty pleasure. In Drive-Thru Dreams, Adam Chandler explores the inseparable link between fast food and American life for the past century. The dark underbelly of the industry’s largest players has long been scrutinized and gutted, characterized as impersonal, greedy, corporate, and worse. But, in unexpected ways, fast food is also deeply personal and emblematic of a larger than life image of America.

With wit and nuance, Chandler reveals the complexities of this industry through heartfelt anecdotes and fascinating trivia as well as interviews with fans, executives, and workers. He traces the industry from its roots in Wichita, where White Castle became the first fast food chain in 1921 and successfully branded the hamburger as the official all-American meal, to a teenager's 2017 plea for a year’s supply of Wendy’s chicken nuggets, which united the internet to generate the most viral tweet of all time.

Drive-Thru Dreams by Adam Chandler tells an intimate and contemporary story of America-its humble beginning, its innovations and failures, its international charisma, and its regional identities-through its beloved roadside fare.



















[book] War over Peace:
One Hundred Years of Israel's
Militaristic Nationalism
by Uri Ben-Eliezer (Univ of Haifa)
Shaul Vardi (Translator)
June 14, 2019
Univ of California Press

When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. When your thesis is that Israel poicy and leadership is militaristic... then your books see it all through this lens

Violence and war have raged between Zionists and Palestinians for over a century, ever since Zionists, trying to establish a nation-state in Palestine, were forced to confront the fact that the country was already populated. Covering every conflict in Israel’s history, War over Peace reveals that Israeli nationalism was born ethnic and militaristic and has embraced these characteristics to this day. In his sweeping and original synthesis, Uri Ben-Eliezer shows that this militaristic nationalism systematically drives Israel to find military solutions for its national problems, based on the idea that the homeland is sacred and the territory is indivisible. When Israelis opposed to this ideology brought about change during a period that led to the Oslo Accords in the 1990s, cultural and political forces, reinforced by religious and messianic elements, prevented the implementation of the agreements, which brought violence back in the form of new wars. War over Peace is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the role of ethnic nationalism and militarism in Israel as well as throughout the world.

























[book] VC: An American History
by Tom Nicholas
(Harvard B School)
June 3, 2019
Harvard University Press

A major exploration of venture financing, from its origins in the whaling industry to Silicon Valley, that shows how venture capital created an epicenter for the development of high-tech innovation.

VC tells the riveting story of how the industry arose from the United States’ long-running orientation toward entrepreneurship. Venture capital has been driven from the start by the pull of outsized returns through a skewed distribution of payoffs-a faith in low-probability but substantial financial rewards that rarely materialize. Whether the gamble is a whaling voyage setting sail from New Bedford or the newest startup in Silicon Valley, VC is not just a model of finance that has proven difficult to replicate in other countries. It is a state of mind exemplified by an appetite for risk-taking, a bold spirit of adventure, and an unbridled quest for improbable wealth through investment in innovation.

Tom Nicholas’s history of the venture capital industry offers readers a ride on the roller coaster of setbacks and success in America’s pursuit of financial gain.






















[book] Zionism and Melancholy:
The Short Life of Israel Zarchi
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Nitzan Lebovic
June 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

Nitzan Lebovic claims that political melancholy is the defining trait of a generation of Israelis born between the 1960s and 1990s. This cohort came of age during wars, occupation and intifada, cultural conflict, and the failure of the Oslo Accords. The atmosphere of militarism and conservative state politics left little room for democratic opposition or dissent. Lebovic and others depict the failure to respond not only as a result of institutional pressure but as the effect of a long-lasting "left-wing melancholy." In order to understand its grip on Israeli society, Lebovic turns to the novels and short stories of Israel Zarchi. For him, Zarchi aptly describes the gap between the utopian hope present in Zionism since its early days and the melancholic reality of the present. Through personal engagement with Zarchi, Lebovic develops a philosophy of melancholy and shows how it pervades Israeli society.


























[book] Shanghai in 12 Dishes:
How to eat like you live there
(Culinary travel guide)
by Antony Suvalko, Leanne Kitchen
June 2019
Red Pork Press

From a couple based in NZ and Australia, the fourth in a series of culinary travel guides. Shanghai In 12 Dishes helps you cut to the chase, culinarily speaking. Aimed at travelling food lovers, this book assumes you're visiting Shanghai for a limited period and don't have time to waste. You don't need to be overwhelmed with endless listings, options and recommendations; you just want a reliable entree into the local dining scene so you can cut right to the chase. You want authenticity. You want dining experiences that are meaningful. You want to rub shoulders with locals. Focusing squarely on Shanghainese cuisine, the emphasis here is as much on what to eat, as it is on where to eat. Structured around 12 iconic dishes, it features meaty information on each dish, guiding you to places you can find them. Dishes such as sheng jian bao (pan fried pork buns), xiao long bao (soup dumplings), lion's head meatballs, red cooked pork, squirrel-shaped mandarin fish and tofu braised crab. These define Shanghai and you'd be nuts to leave town without discovering them. The restaurants listed represent so much more than these essential dishes- this book merely gives you starting points for making your own culinary finds. All you need is a sharpened sense of adventure and to throw yourself into Shanghai's incredible world of food.























[book] Good Enough
The Tolerance for Mediocrity
in Nature and Society
by Daniel S. Milo
June 2019
Harvard University Press

ONLY THE FITTEST SURVIVE
WELL... maybe the GOOD ENOUGH survive as well

In this spirited and irreverent critique of Darwin’s long hold over our imagination, a distinguished philosopher of science makes the case that, in culture as well as nature, not only the fittest survive: the world is full of the “good enough” that persist too.

Why is the genome of a salamander forty times larger than that of a human? Why does the avocado tree produce a million flowers and only a hundred fruits? Why, in short, is there so much waste in nature? In this lively and wide-ranging meditation on the curious accidents and unexpected detours on the path of life, Daniel Milo argues that we ask these questions because we’ve embraced a faulty conception of how evolution-and human society-really works.

Good Enough offers a vigorous critique of the quasi-monopoly that Darwin’s concept of natural selection has on our idea of the natural world. Darwinism excels in accounting for the evolution of traits, but it does not explain their excess in size and number. Many traits far exceed the optimal configuration to do the job, and yet the maintenance of this extra baggage does not prevent species from thriving for millions of years. Milo aims to give the messy side of nature its due-to stand up for the wasteful and inefficient organisms that nevertheless survive and multiply.

But he does not stop at the border between evolutionary theory and its social consequences. He argues provocatively that the theory of evolution through natural selection has acquired the trappings of an ethical system. Optimization, competitiveness, and innovation have become the watchwords of Western societies, yet their role in human lives-as in the rest of nature-is dangerously overrated. Imperfection is not just good enough: it may at times be essential to survival.



















[book] When We Were Arabs:
A Jewish Family’s Forgotten History
by Massoud Hayoun
June 25, 2019
The New Press

The stunning debut of a brilliant nonfiction writer whose vivid account of his grandparents’ lives in Egypt, Tunisia, Palestine, and Los Angeles reclaims his family’s Jewish Arab identity There was a time when being an “Arab” didn’t mean you were necessarily Muslim. It was a time when Oscar Hayoun, a Jewish Arab, strode along the Nile in a fashionable suit, long before he and his father arrived at the port of Haifa to join the Zionist state only to find themselves hosed down with DDT and then left unemployed on the margins of society.

In that time, Arabness was a mark of cosmopolitanism, of intellectualism. Today, in the age of the Likud and ISIS, Oscar’s son, the Jewish Arab journalist Massoud Hayoun whom Oscar raised in Los Angeles, finds his voice by telling his family’s story.

To reclaim a worldly, nuanced Arab identity is, for Hayoun, part of the larger project to recall a time before ethnic identity was mangled for political ends. It is also a journey deep into a lost age of sophisticated innocence in the Arab world; an age that is now nearly lost.

When We Were Arabs showcases the gorgeous prose of the Eppy Award–winning writer Massoud Hayoun, bringing the worlds of his grandparents alive, vividly shattering our contemporary understanding of what makes an Arab, what makes a Jew, and how we draw the lines over which we do battle.


























[book] Places and Names:
On War, Revolution,
and Returning
by Elliot Ackerman
June 11, 2019
Penguin Press

From a decorated Marine war veteran and National Book Award Finalist, an astonishing reckoning with the nature of combat and the human cost of the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria.

Toward the beginning of Places and Names, Elliot Ackerman sits in a refugee camp in southern Turkey, across the table from a man named Abu Hassar, who fought for Al Qaeda in Iraq, and whose connections to the Islamic State are murky. At first, Ackerman pretends to have been a journalist during the Iraq War, but after establishes a rapport with Abu Hassar, he takes a risk by revealing to him that in fact he was a Marine special operation officer. Ackerman then draws the shape of the Euphrates River on a large piece of paper, and his one-time adversary quickly joins him in the game of filling in the map with the names and dates of where they saw fighting during the war. They had shadowed each other for some time, it turned out, a realization that brought them to a strange kind of intimacy.

The rest of Elliot Ackerman's extraordinary memoir is in a way an answer to the question of why he came to that refugee camp and what he hoped to find there. By moving back and forth between his recent experiences on the ground as a journalist in Syria and its environs and his deeper past in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, he creates a work of astonishing atmospheric pressurization. Ackerman shares extraordinarily vivid and powerful stories of his own experiences in battle, culminating in the events of the Second Battle of Fallujah, the most intense urban combat for the Marines since Hue in Vietnam, where Ackerman's actions leading a rifle platoon saw him awarded the Silver Star. He weaves these stories into the latticework of a masterful larger reckoning, with contemporary geopolitics through his vantage as a journalist in Istanbul and with the human extremes of both bravery and horror.

At once an intensely personal book about the terrible lure of combat and a brilliant meditation on the larger meaning of the past two decades of strife for America, the region and the world, Places and Names bids fair to take its place among our greatest books about modern war.


























[book] Der Nister's Soviet Years:
Yiddish Writer as Witness
to the People
by Mikhail Krutikov
(University of Michigan)
June 2019
Indiana University Press

In Der Nister's Soviet Years, author Mikhail Krutikov focuses on the second half of the dramatic writing career of Soviet Yiddish writer Der Nister, pen name of Pinhas Kahanovich (1884–1950). Krutikov follows Der Nister's painful but ultimately successful literary transformation from his symbolist roots to social realism under severe ideological pressure from Soviet critics and authorities. This volume reveals how profoundly Der Nister was affected by the destruction of Jewish life during WWII and his own personal misfortunes. While Der Nister was writing a history of his generation, he was arrested for anti-government activities and died tragically from a botched surgery in the Gulag. Krutikov illustrates why Der Nister's work is so important to understandings of Soviet literature, the Russian Revolution, and the catastrophic demise of the Jewish community under Stalin.































[book] Stalingrad
by Vasily Grossman
June 2019
Translated by Russian by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler
NY Review Book

The prequel to Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate, the War and Peace of the 20th Century, now in English for the first time.

Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate has been hailed as a twentieth-century War and Peace. However, Life and Fate is only the second half of a two-part work, the first half of which was published in 1952. Grossman wanted to call this earlier work Stalingrad--as it will be in this first English translation--but it was published as For a Just Cause. The characters in both novels are largely the same and so is the story line; Life and Fate picks up where Stalingrad ends, in late September 1942. The first novel is in no way inferior to Life and Fate; the chapters about the Shaposhnikov family are both tender and witty, and the battle scenes are vivid and moving. One of the most memorable chapters of Life and Fate is the last letter written from a Jewish ghetto by Viktor Shtrum's mother--a powerful lament for East European Jewry. The words of this letter do not appear in Stalingrad, yet the letter's presence makes itself powerfully felt and it is mentioned many times. We learn who carries it across the front lines, who passes it on to whom, and how it eventually reaches Viktor. Grossman describes the difficulty Viktor experiences in reading it and his inability to talk about it even to his family. The absence of the letter itself is eloquent--as if its contents are too awful for anyone to take in.


























[book] Vasily Grossman
and the Soviet Century
by Alexandra Popoff
2019
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS

THE DEFINITIVE biography of Soviet Jewish dissident writer Vasily Grossman

If Vasily Grossman’s 1961 masterpiece, Life and Fate, had been published during his lifetime, it would have reached the world together with Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago and before Solzhenitsyn’s Gulag. But Life and Fate was seized by the KGB. When it emerged posthumously, decades later, it was recognized as the War and Peace of the twentieth century.

Always at the epicenter of events, Grossman (1905–1964) was among the first to describe the Holocaust and the Ukrainian famine. His 1944 article “The Hell of Treblinka” became evidence at Nuremberg. Grossman’s powerful anti-totalitarian works liken the Nazis’ crimes against humanity with those of Stalin. His compassionate prose has the everlasting quality of great art. Because Grossman’s major works appeared after much delay we are only now able to examine them properly. Alexandra Popoff’s authoritative biography illuminates Grossman’s life and legacy.


"Alexandra Popoff has produced a magnificent biography of the great Soviet Jewish writer and journalist Vasily Grossman. Vasily Grossman and the Soviet Century does justice to Grossman's outspoken eloquence and defiance as one of the twentieth century's foremost witnesses to the twin evils of Nazism and Stalinism." --Joshua Rubenstein, author of The Last Days of Stalin

THE NEW YORK TIMES: – - - On Feb. 14, 1961, Vasily Grossman’s novel “Life and Fate” was arrested. K.G.B. agents confiscated several copies of the manuscript in Grossman’s Moscow apartment, as well as others in his friends’ apartments and the editorial offices of two journals. Grossman himself, a famous war correspondent and author of other celebrated novels, was not arrested. But “Life and Fate” was not published in the Soviet Union until 1988 , 24 years after Grossman died at the age of 58, and even then only in an abridged version.Presenting a vast panorama of World War II centered on the story of several individual heroes, “Life and Fate” has been compared to Tolstoy’s “War and Peace.” It is not a literary masterpiece; Boris Pasternak regarded only “60 pages” in Grossman’s earlier 600-page novel, “For the Right Cause” (which foreshadowed the first part of “Life and Fate”), as “genuine.” The Russian poet Polina Barskova, who has written about Grossman, reports that Anna Akhmatova apparently did not bother to read “For the Right Cause.” But “Life and Fate” was a political bombshell. It was the first Soviet work to equate Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, the two totalitarian regimes that confronted each other as enemies in the war. The pairing of late Stalinist anti-Semitism with Hitler’s extermination of the Jews was devastating. Mikhail Suslov, the Kremlin’s gray cardinal in charge of ideology, told Grossman: “Your book contains direct parallels between us and Hitlerism. … Your book speaks positively about religion, God, Catholicism. Your book defends Trotsky. Your book is filled with doubts about the legitimacy of our Soviet system. … Your book is incomparably more dangerous to us than ‘Doctor Zhivago.’” The official Soviet Writers Union informed Grossman that his novel might someday be considered publishable, but “perhaps not for 250 years.” The story of “Life and Fate,” as told in “Vasily Grossman and the Soviet Century” by Alexandra Popoff, a former Soviet journalist, is gripping. Equally revealing is the rest of Grossman’s biography: He was a celebrated Soviet writer who turned against the Soviet regime but tried to express his doubts within the limits it allowed. He was neither an apologist nor a dissident; like so many Soviet intellectuals, he led an often tormented “double” life.





















[book] The Volunteer:
One Man, an Underground Army,
and the Secret Mission
to Destroy Auschwitz
by Jack Fairweather
June 25, 2019
Custom House

“Superbly written and breathtakingly researched, The Volunteer smuggles us into Auschwitz and shows us—as if watching a movie—the story of a Polish agent who infiltrated the infamous camp, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out. We are squarely confronted with the other human truth: ordinary people will happily risk their lives to help others. Fairweather has dug up a story of incalculable value and delivered it to us in the most compelling prose I have read in a long time.” —Sebastian Junger, bestselling author of The Perfect Storm and Tribe

The incredible true story of a Polish resistance fighter’s infiltration of Auschwitz to sabotage the camp from within, and his death-defying attempt to warn the Allies about the Nazis’ plans for a “Final Solution” before it was too late.

To uncover the fate of the thousands being interred at a mysterious Nazi camp on the border of the Reich, a thirty-nine-year-old Polish resistance fighter named Witold Pilecki volunteered for an audacious mission: assume a fake identity, intentionally get captured and sent to the new camp, and then report back to the underground on what had happened to his compatriots there. But gathering information was not his only task: he was to execute an attack from inside—where the Germans would least expect it.

The name of the camp was Auschwitz.

Over the next two and half years, Pilecki forged an underground army within Auschwitz that sabotaged facilities, assassinated Nazi informants and officers, and gathered evidence of terrifying abuse and mass murder. But as he pieced together the horrifying truth that the camp was to become the epicenter of Nazi plans to exterminate Europe’s Jews, Pilecki realized he would have to risk his men, his life, and his family to warn the West before all was lost. To do so, meant attempting the impossible—an escape from Auschwitz itself.

Completely erased from the historical record by Poland’s post-war Communist government, Pilecki remains almost unknown to the world. Now, with exclusive access to previously hidden diaries, family and camp survivor accounts, and recently declassified files, Jack Fairweather offers an unflinching portrayal of survival, revenge and betrayal in mankind’s darkest hour. And in uncovering the tragic outcome of Pilecki’s mission, he reveals that its ultimate defeat originated not in Auschwitz or Berlin, but in London and Washington.



















[book] A Long Night in Paris
a ystery thriller
by Dov Alfon
2019
MacLehose Press

The clock has been set. And this could be a long night in the City of Lights.

When an Israeli tech entrepreneur disappears from Charles de Gauille airport with a woman in red, logic dictates youthful indiscretion. But Israel is on a state of high alert nonetheless. Colonel Zeev Abadi, the new head of Unit 8200's autonomous Special Section, who just happens to be in Paris, also just happens to have arrived on the same flight.

For Commissaire Legar of the Paris Police coincidences have their reasons, and most are suspect. When a second young Israeli is kidnapped soon after arriving on the same flight, this time at gunpoint from his hotel room, his suspicions are confirmed--and a diplomatic incident looms.

Back in Tel Aviv, Lieutenant Oriana Talmor, Abadi's deputy, is his only ally, applying her sharp wits to the race to identify the victims and the reasons behind their abduction. In Paris a covert Chinese commando team listens to the investigation unfurl and watches from the rooftops. While by the hour the morgue receives more bodies from the river and the city's arrondissements.


























[book] Jewish-Christian Dialogues
on Scripture in Late Antiquity:
Heretic Narratives of
the Babylonian Talmud by Michal Bar-Asher Siegal
(Ben Gurion University of the Negev)
June 30, 2019
Cambridge University Press

Stories portraying heretics ('minim') in rabbinic literature are a central site of rabbinic engagement with the 'other'. These stories typically involve a conflict over the interpretation of a biblical verse in which the rabbinic figure emerges victorious in the face of a challenge presented by the heretic. In this book, Michal Bar-Asher Siegal focuses on heretic narratives of the Babylonian Talmud that share a common literary structure, strong polemical language and the formula, 'Fool, look to the end of the verse'. She marshals previously untapped Christian materials to arrive at new interpretations of familiar texts and illuminate the complex relationship between Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity. Bar-Asher Siegal argues that these Talmudic literary creations must be seen as part of a boundary-creating discourse that clearly distinguishes the rabbinic position from that of contemporaneous Christians and adds to a growing understanding of the rabbinic authors' familiarity with Christian traditions.

























[book] Hebrew Roots, Jewish Routes
A Tribal Language in a Global World
by Jeremy Benstein, Phd
(Hebrew University)
June 5, 2019
Behrman House

Why does Hebrew matter?

In an eloquent answer to this question, Hebrew Roots, Jewish Routes addresses the many ways engagement with Hebrew enriches Jewishness culturally, religiously, ethnically.

Whether you know Hebrew or not, linguist and cultural anthropologist Jeremy Benstein takes us on a journey into the deeper significance of Hebrew in the life of Jews and Judaism. Rather than striving for fluency or even facility in the language, Benstein shows us another approach: engaging with Hebrew by focusing on the three-letter Hebrew roots that are the building blocks of the language, seeing these nuggets of knowledge as a vehicle to enriching our connection to Judaism and its values.

For example, the words seder, the Passover meal, and siddur, the Hebrew word for prayer book come from the same root. Why? Turns out that both have to do with an underlying idea of order. And the word translated as charity actually relates to notions of justice and responsibility, not acts of generosity. More than just a book about a language, this is a book about the Jewish people and culture and the challenges we face as seen through our shared language, Hebrew. As Professor Gil Troy said, Highly recommended for all, but especially for teachers ready to launch a grassroots revolution bringing Jews back to their language and culture.

Dr. Jeremy Benstein is an educator, author, and Hebrew lover. He holds a BA in linguistics from Harvard, a master's degree in Judaic studies from the Schechter Institute in Jerusalem, and a PhD in cultural anthropology from the Hebrew University. Born in Detroit and raised in Ohio, he has lived in Israel since 1983. Along the way, he helped found the Heschel Center for Sustainability in Tel Aviv. He lives in Zichron Yaakov with his wife, five children, two cats, and many books.


















I CAN'T BELIEVE I LIVED THE WHOLE THING
A MEMOIR FROM THE GOLDEN AGE OF ADVERTISING
BY HOWIE COHEN
2019
RED RASCAL PRESS

His famous Alka Seltzer commercials had the whole world saying, "I can't believe I ate the whole thing" and "Try it, you'll like it."

In this fun, fast-paced and often hilarious memoir, Howie Cohen gives us a front row seat to those amazing revolutionary times: how pot and the pill opened the doors to sexual and creative freedom; the creative takeover by mensh-y Jewish copywriters and macho Italian art directors; the disruption of ad campaigns like "the dumb shoe" and "the exploding clown"; the madness of Hollywood movie moguls; the sacrifices, the struggles, the wins and the losses.

I Can't Believe I Lived the Whole Thing chronicles Howie's personal journey from The Bronx to the Clio Hall of Fame in an era that changed the look and the language of American pop culture.










[book] Inside the Five-Sided Box:
Lessons from a Lifetime of
Leadership in the Pentagon
by Ash Carter
June 11, 2019
Dutton

The twenty-fifth Secretary of Defense takes readers behind the scenes to reveal the inner workings of the Pentagon, its vital mission, and what it takes to lead it.

The Pentagon is the headquarters of the single largest institution in America: the Department of Defense. The D.O.D. employs millions of Americans. It owns and operates more real estate, and spends more money, than any other entity. It manages the world’s largest and most complex information network and performs more R&D than Apple, Google, and Microsoft combined. Most important, the policies it carries out, in war and peace, impact the security and freedom of billions of people around the globe.

Yet to most Americans, the dealings of the D.O.D. are a mystery, and the Pentagon nothing more than an opaque five-sided box that they regard with a mixture of awe and suspicion.

In this new book, former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter demystifies the Pentagon and sheds light on all that happens inside one of the nation’s most iconic, and most closely guarded, buildings. Drawn from Carter’s thirty-six years of leadership experience in the D.O.D., this is the essential book for understanding the challenge of defending America in a dangerous world – and imparting a trove of incisive lessons that can guide leaders in any complex organization.

In these times of great disruption and danger, the need for Ash Carter’s authoritative and pragmatic account is more urgent than ever.




























[book] The Death of Politics:
How to Heal Our Frayed
Republic After Trump
by Peter Wehner
June 4, 2019
HarperOne

I was drawn to this book after the Young Israel organization had red Trump hats at its annual benefit and seemed to ejaculate at the mention of Trump policies. It is a must read for those who try to wear their religious piety on their sleeves yet support hate in DC

In this book, Wehner, a New York Times opinion writer, media commentator, outspoken Christian Republican critic of the Trump presidency offers a spirited defense of politics and its virtuous and critical role in maintaining our democracy and what we must do to save it before it is too late.

“Any nation that elects Donald Trump to be its president has a remarkably low view of politics.”

Frustrated and feeling betrayed, Americans have come to loathe politics with disastrous results, argues Peter Wehner. In this timely manifesto, the veteran of three Republican administrations and man of faith offers a reasoned and persuasive argument for restoring “politics” as a worthy calling to a cynical and disillusioned generation of Americans.

Wehner has long been one of the leading conservative critics of Donald Trump and his effect on the Republican Party. In this impassioned book, he makes clear that unless we overcome the despair that has caused citizens to abandon hope in the primary means for improving our world—the political process—we will not only fall victim to despots but hasten the decline of what has truly made America great. Drawing on history and experience, he reminds us of the hard lessons we have learned about how we rule ourselves—why we have checks and balances, why no one is above the law, why we defend the rights of even those we disagree with.

Wehner believes we can turn the country around, but only if we abandon our hatred and learn to appreciate and honor the unique and noble American tradition of doing “politics.” If we want the great American experiment to continue and to once again prosper, we must once more take up the responsibility each and every one of us as citizens share.
















[book] Sea Stories:
My Life in Special Operations
by William H. McRaven
(Admiral, 4 stars, retired, US Navy, Seal)
2019
Grand Central Publishing

Meet the author on May 23 2019 in Washington DC at the Sixth & I synagogue where he will discuss his memoir

Following the success of his #1 New York Times bestseller Make Your Bed, which has sold over one million copies, Admiral William H. McRaven is back with amazing stories of adventure during his career as a Navy SEAL and commander of America's Special Operations Forces.

Admiral William H. McRaven is a part of American military history, having been involved in some of the most famous missions in recent memory, including the capture of Saddam Hussein, the rescue of Captain Richard Phillips, and the raid to kill Osama bin Laden.

Sea Stories begins in 1960 at the American Officers' Club in France, where Allied officers and their wives gathered to have drinks and tell stories about their adventures during World War II -- the place where a young Bill McRaven learned the value of a good story. Sea Stories is an unforgettable look back on one man's incredible life, from childhood days sneaking into high-security military sites to a day job of hunting terrorists and rescuing hostages.

Action-packed, inspiring, and full of thrilling stories from life in the special operations world, Sea Stories is a remarkable memoir from one of America's most accomplished leaders.


Watch the Admiral with former Israeli PM and Chief of Staff Ehud Barak:
https://www.achievement.org/achiever/admiral-william-h-mcraven/



In the opening of William H. McRaven’s book, “Sea Stories: My Life in Special Operations,” the retired four-star admiral who served as the commander of all U.S. Special Operations Forces offers a more classical definition of sea stories: “Tales of epic adventures recounted by sailors returning home from a long voyage; usually told over a bottle of rum with good friends and intentions.” His definition of sea stories is certainly more fitting for his book, as Adm. McRaven doesn’t need to embellish his dramatic 37-year Navy SEAL career, nor does he necessarily brag, as he shares credit with his team mates and superior officers for the successes of the historical missions he recounts in the book. Adm. McRaven commanded the special operators who captured Saddam Hussein after the war in Iraq, and he commanded the Navy SEALs who took out the Somalian pirates who boarded a commercial ship off Africa and kidnapped the ship’s captain, Richard Philips. And near the end of his most distinguished career, he commanded the Navy SEALs and other special operators who raided the compound in Pakistan and killed Osama bin Laden, the al Qaeda leader who planned and executed the horrific 9/11 terrorist attack on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. In one chapter he writes of having to choose between being a hard disciplinarian and being compassionate while disciplining an officer for a DUI, which he knows will hurt the officer’s career. He harkens back briefly to a low time in 1983. “Since graduating from training, I had done just about everything expected of a SEAL officer. I had served two tours with our SEAL Delivery Vehicles, commanded a SEAL platoon in South America, deployed to Desert Shield and Desert Storm as a SEAL Task Unit commander, and worked in the Pentagon, overseas in the Philippines and on various SEAL staffs,” Adm. McRaven writes. He then tells of being relieved of his command as the squadron commander of an elite East Coast SEAL. “It was a jarring, confidence-crushing, hard-to-swallow moment, and I seriously considered leaving the Navy,” Adm. McRaven recalls. He is referring to being fired by Richard Marcinko, the founder and first commanding officer of the Naval Special Warfare Development Group, more commonly known as SEAL Team Six. The best parts of the book are his telling of the three most dramatic missions in his career — the capture of Saddam Hussein, the rescue of Capt. Philips and the killing of bin Laden.















[book] A WOMAN OF WAR
THE GERMAN MIDWIFE
A Paperback novel
by Mandy Robotham
June 18, 2019
AVON Books

I am not keen on novels of the Holocaust.. but for those who enjoy them...

A fictional tale of courage, betrayal and survival in the hardest of circumstances that readers of The Tattooist of Auschwitz, The Secret Orphan and The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz will enjoy.

Germany, 1944. Anke Hoff, a German christian woman has been imprisoned in a death camp. The Gestapo arrested and convicted her for aiding a pregnant Jewish woman in Berlin as a midwife. A prisoner in the camps, Anke Hoff is doing what she can to keep her pregnant campmates and their newborns alive.

But when Anke’s work is noticed, she is chosen for a task more dangerous than she could ever have imagined. Eva Braun is pregnant with the Führer’s child, and Anke is assigned as her midwife.

Before long, Anke is faced with an impossible choice. Does she serve the Reich she loathes and keep the baby alive? Or does she sacrifice an innocent child for the good of a broken world?

























[book] The Joy of Judaism:
A practical guide to spiritual
living using Judaism's
timeless teachings
by Sam Glaser
June 4, 2019
SHEFA Press

The Joy of Judaism is an engaging overview of Jewish spiritual practice by globe-trotting composer-performer-lecturer Sam Glaser. Filled with humor, insight and “large world, well-managed” adventures, this guided tour of Jewish life illuminates theology, prayer, holidays, rituals, lifecycle events, affiliation, creativity and parenting.



























[book] Anne Frank:
The Collected Works
by Anne Frank
June 25, 2019
Bloomsbury

“A magisterial edition ... one of the virtues of The Collected Works is that it allows readers to track the evolution of the diary across its different incarnations … The Complete Works thus gives a greatly enriched picture, and, as one reads its pages, one cannot help thinking of what Anne might have become.”



























[book] Dutch Girl:
Audrey Hepburn and World War II
by Robert Matzen
Luca Dotti (Foreword)
2019
GoodKnight

Twenty-five years after her passing, Audrey Hepburn remains the most beloved of all Hollywood stars, known as much for her role as UNICEF ambassador as for films like Roman Holiday and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Several biographies have chronicled her stardom, but none has covered her intense experiences through five years of Nazi occupation in the Netherlands. According to her son, Luca Dotti, “The war made my mother who she was.” Audrey Hepburn’s war included participation in the Dutch Resistance, working as a doctor’s assistant during the “Bridge Too Far” battle of Arnhem, the brutal execution of her uncle, and the ordeal of the Hunger Winter of 1944. She also had to contend with the fact that her father was a Nazi agent and her mother was pro-Nazi for the first two years of the occupation.

But the war years also brought triumphs as Audrey became Arnhem’s most famous young ballerina. Audrey’s own reminiscences, new interviews with people who knew her in the war, wartime diaries, and research in classified Dutch archives shed light on the riveting, untold story of Audrey Hepburn under fire in World War II. Also included is a section of color and black-and-white photos. Many of these images are from Audrey’s personal collection and are published here for the first time.



























[book] Israel Denial:
Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism,
& the Faculty Campaign Against
the Jewish State
by Cary Nelson
June 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

Israel Denial is the first book to offer detailed analyses of the work faculty members have published-individually and collectively--in support of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement; it contrasts their claims with options for promoting peace. The faculty discussed here have devoted a significant part of their professional lives to delegitimizing the Jewish state. While there are beliefs they hold in common-including the conviction that there is nothing good to say about Israel-they also develop distinctive arguments designed to recruit converts to their cause in novel ways. They do so both as writers and as teachers; Israel Denial is the first to give substantial attention to anti-Zionist pedagogy. No effort to understand the BDS movement’s impact on the academy and public policy can be complete without the kind of understanding this book offers.



























[book] The Bible, the Talmud,
and the New Testament:
Elijah Zvi Soloveitchik's
Commentary to the Gospels
by Elijah Zvi Soloveitchik
Edited by Shaul Magid et al
June 7, 2019
University of Pennsylvania Press

Born in Slutzk, Russia, in 1805, Elijah Zvi Soloveitchik is a largely forgotten member of the prestigious Soloveitchik rabbinic dynasty. Before Hayyim Soloveitchik developed the standard Brisker method of Talmudic study, or Joseph Dov Soloveitchik helped to found American Modern Orthodox Judaism, Elijah Soloveitchik wrote Qol Qore, a rabbinic commentary on the Gospels of Matthew and Mark. Qol Qore drew on classic rabbinic literature, and particularly on the works of Moses Maimonides, to argue for the compatibility of Christianity with Judaism. To this day, it remains the only rabbinic work to embrace the compatibility of Orthodox Judaism and the Christian Bible.

In The Bible, the Talmud, and the New Testament, Shaul Magid presents the first-ever English translation of Qol Qore. In his contextualizing introduction, Magid explains that Qol Qore offers a window onto the turbulent historical context of nineteenth-century European Jewry. With violent anti-Semitic activity on the rise in Europe, Elijah Soloveitchik was unique in believing that the roots of anti-Semitism were theological, based on a misunderstanding of the New Testament by both Jews and Christians. His hope was that the Qol Qore, written in Hebrew and translated into French, German, and Polish, would reach Jewish and Christian audiences alike, urging each to consider the validity of the other's religious principles. In an era characterized by fractious debates between Jewish communities, Elijah Soloveitchik represents a voice that called for radical unity amongst Jews and Christians alike.



























[book] The Medallion
a novel by Cathy Gohlke
June 4, 2019
TYNDALE House Press

A paperback novel from a famous Christian books publisher featuring a Jewish couple and the Warsaw ghetto.

Seemingly overnight, the German blitzkrieg of Warsaw in 1939 turns its streets to a war zone and shatters the life of each citizen-Polish, Jewish, or otherwise. Sophie Kumiega, a British bride working in the city’s library, awaits news of her husband, Janek, recently deployed with the Polish Air Force. Though Sophie is determined that she and the baby in her womb will stay safe, the days ahead will draw her into the plight of those around her, compelling her to help, whatever the danger.

Rosa and Itzhak Dunovich never imagined they would welcome their longed-for first child in the Jewish ghetto, or that they would let anything tear their family apart. But as daily atrocities intensify, Rosa soon faces a terrifying reality: to save their daughter’s life, she must send her into hiding. Her only hope of finding her after the war-if any of them survive-is a medallion she cuts in half and places around her neck.

Inspired by true events of Poland’s darkest days and brightest heroes, The Medallion paints a stunning portrait of war and its aftermath, daring us to believe that when all seems lost, God can make a way forward (remember this is published by Tyndale... wink wink).





















[book] Shut Up, I'm Talking!:
Coming Out in Hollywood and
Making It to the Middle
by Jason Stuart and Dan Duffy
Alexandra Paul (Foreword)
June 4, 2019


Shut Up, I'm Talking! chronicles the life and career of actor and comedian Jason Stuart. It's the funny, poignant story of a gay Jewish boy whose life changed after seeing Funny Girl at a second-run movie theatre in Hollywood. "I thought to myself, I'm in love with Omar Sharif - who am I left to be but Barbra Streisand! And I'm a guy... Oy!" It's about surviving a crazy family who survived the Holocaust and clearing up the wreckage of one's past while learning how to become a man. Jason has appeared in over 200 films and TV shows and has had a long and varied career, from his coming out in 1993 on the Geraldo Rivera Show to having a major supporting role in the historical drama The Birth of a Nation playing "Joseph Randall" a white, heterosexual, Christian, slave owner in 1891 while being a gay liberal Jew!

As a comedian he has headlined at all the major comedy clubs, appeared twice at prestigious Just for Laughs comedy festivals and did stand-up on Broadway with Joan Rivers and Sandra Bernhard. He was featured in Comedy Central's groundbreaking special Out There, and his own stand-up comedy special Making It to the Middle. Jason has acted with George Clooney, Faye Dunaway, Angelina Jolie, Angela Lansbury, John Lithgow, Laurie Metcalf, Alexandra Paul, Keanu Reeves, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Marisa Tomei, Jon Voight, Damon Wayans and they are all in the book! His movies include Kindergarten Cop, Lost & Found, Vegas Vacation, Love Is Strange, Tangerine and on some of the most popular TV shows, Love, Sleepy Hollow, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Will & Grace, The Closer, George Lopez, House, Charmed, My Wife & Kids, The Drew Carey Show and Murder, She Wrote. Jason lives alone in Hollywood, takes care of his mom and is still looking for Mr. Right. He wrote the book with Dan Duffy, a filmmaker and author of The Half Book.

When you think of one of the most prolific character actors, who's also an outrageously openly gay stand-up comedian, one name comes to mind: Jason Stuart. He has a major role in The Birth of a Nation by filmmaker Nate Parker. Jason has also appeared in the award winning films Hank, Immortal, Tangerine, Love is Strange, Gia, with Kindergarten Cop and Vegas Vacation among his fan favorites. He has wowed TV audiences with guest roles on such shows as Swedish Dicks, Love, Sleepy Hollow, Real Rob, Entourage, The Closer, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, House, Everybody Hates Chris, George Lopez, Will & Grace, Charmed, and as the wildly popular "Dr. Thomas" on My Wife & Kids. As a stand-up comic, you have laughed with him on Gotham Comedy Life, Red Eye with Tom Shillue, One Night Stand Up, Wisecrack, Comics Unleashed with Byron Allen, Out There In Hollywood and his own comedy special Making It to the Middle. He currently resides in California... alone again.
















[book] Confronting Hate:
The Untold Story of the Rabbi
Who Stood Up for Human
Rights, Racial Justice,
and Religious Reconciliation
by Deborah Hart Strober
and Gerald S. Strober
June 25, 2019
Skyhorse

In this biography, Gerald and Deborah Strober draw from original source materials and numerous interviews to detail the life and career of the esteemed Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, a seminal 20th century figure in interfaith relations in the US and around the world. From his position as Director of Interreligious Affairs at the American Jewish Committee, Rabbi Tanenbaum was deeply involved in the historic Vatican II Council, which promulgated a landmark encyclical on Catholic-Jewish relations. Rabbi Tanenbaum also was one of the few Jewish leaders who worked closely with Reverend Billy Graham and other evangelicals. He worked tirelessly as a civil rights activist and was active in the cause of Soviet Jewry, as well.

Confronting Hate details this esteemed career and his interactions with the likes of television legends Norman Lear, Don Hewitt, and Franco Zeffirelli; Jesse Jackson; Martin Luther King, Jr.; and several US presidents, from Dwight D. Eisenhower to George H.W. Bush. This book leaves no stone unturned in covering the public and private aspects of the life of “the human rights rabbi.” The authors bring to light the immense international influence that Rabbi Tanenbaum has even today, more than twenty-five years after his passing.




























[book] The History of Soul 2065
by Barbara Krasnoff
Jane Yolen (Introduction)
June 2019
Delirium

Months before World War I breaks out, two young Jewish girls just on the edge of adolescence—one from a bustling Russian city, the other from a German estate—meet in an eerie, magical forest glade. They are immediately drawn to one another and swear an oath to meet again. Though war and an ocean will separate the two for the rest of their lives, the promise that they made to each other continues through the intertwined lives of their descendants.

This epic tale of the supernatural follows their families from the turn of the 20th Century through the terrors of the Holocaust and ultimately to the wonders of a future they never could have imagined. The History of Soul 2065 encompasses accounts of sorcery, ghosts, time travel, virtual reality, alien contact, and elemental confrontations between good and evil. Understated and epic, cathartic and bittersweet, the twenty connected stories in Nebula Award finalist Barbara Krasnoff’s debut form a mosaic narrative even greater than its finely crafted parts.

Jane Yolen, Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Grand Master, says in her introduction: “If you, like me, love quirky and original fantasy stories, I advise you to dive right in. If you, like me, admire tough writing that’s not afraid of the grit, dive right in. If you, like me, want to hang out a while with characters rich in their own traditions, dive right in. This is storytelling at the top of the heap.”






























[book] THE BOOK OF DISappearance
A novel By Ibtisam Azem
Translated from Arabic
June 30, 2019
Syracuse University Press

What if all the Palestinians in Israel simply disappeared one day? What would happen next? How would Israelis react? These unsettling questions are posed in Azem’s powerfully imaginative novel. Set in contemporary Tel Aviv forty eight hours after Israelis discover all their Palestinian neighbors have vanished, the story unfolds through alternating narrators, Alaa, a young Palestinian man who converses with his dead grandmother in the journal he left behind when he disappeared, and his Jewish neighbor, Ariel, a journalist struggling to understand the traumatic event. Through these perspectives, the novel stages a confrontation between two memories. Ariel is a liberal Zionist who is critical of the military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, but nevertheless believes in Israel’s project and its national myth. Alaa is haunted by his grandmother’s memories of being displaced from Jaffa and becoming a refugee in her homeland. Ariel’s search for clues to the secret of the collective disappearance and his reaction to it intimately reveal the fissures at the heart of the Palestinian question.

The Book of Disappearance grapples with both the memory of loss and the loss of memory for the Palestinians. Presenting a narrative that is often marginalized, Antoon’s translation of the critically acclaimed Arabic novel invites English readers into the complex lives of Palestinians living in Israel.

























[book] Lotharingia:
A Personal History of
Europe's Lost Country
by Simon Winder
Spring 2019
FS&G

Where were Jews given rights
Where were they slaughtered
Following Germania and Danubia, the third installment in Simon Winder’s personal history of Europe

In 843 AD, the three surviving grandsons of the great emperor Charlemagne met at Verdun. After years of bitter squabbles over who would inherit the family land, they finally decided to divide the territory and go their separate ways. In a moment of staggering significance, one grandson inherited the area we now know as France, another Germany and the third received the piece in between: Lotharingia.

Lotharingia is a history of in-between Europe. It is the story of a place between places. In this beguiling, hilarious and compelling book, Simon Winder retraces the various powers that have tried to overtake the land that stretches from the mouth of the Rhine to the Alps and the might of the peoples who have lived there for centuries.

























[book] HOW TO BECOME A FEDERAL CRIMINAL
An Illustrated Handbook for the
Aspiring Offender
By Mike Chase
June 4, 2019
Atria Books

“Somebody with credentials has combed through a mountain of boring literature, highlighted all the ticklish parts and served them up for appreciation. This is an excellent book for people who like to start sentences with ‘Did you know that…’” —The New York Times

Have you ever clogged a toilet in a national forest? That could get you six months in federal prison. Written a letter to a pirate? You might be looking at three years in the slammer. Leaving the country with too many nickels, drinking a beer on a bicycle in a national park, or importing a pregnant polar bear are all very real crimes, and this riotously funny, ridiculously entertaining, and fully illustrated book shows how just about anyone can become—or may already be—a federal criminal.

Whether you’re a criminal defense lawyer or just a self-taught expert in outrageous offenses, How to Become a Federal Criminal is your wonderfully weird window into a criminally overlooked sector of American government.

























[book] RABBITS FOR FOOD
A NOVEL
BY BINNEY KORSHENBAUM
Spring 2019
SOHO PRESS

Master of razor-edged literary humor Binnie Kirshenbaum returns with her first novel in a decade, a devastating, laugh-out-loud funny story of a writer’s slide into depression and institutionalization.

It’s New Year’s Eve, the holiday of forced fellowship, mandatory fun, and paper hats. While dining out with her Jewish husband and their friends, Kirshenbaum’s protagonist— (Bunny)-- an acerbic, mordantly witty, and clinically depressed writer—fully unravels. Her breakdown lands her in the psych ward of a prestigious New York hospital, where she refuses all modes of recommended treatment. Instead, she passes the time chronicling the lives of her fellow “lunatics” and writing a novel about what brought her there. Her story is a brilliant and brutally funny dive into the disordered mind of a woman who sees the world all too clearly.

Propelled by razor-sharp comic timing and rife with pinpoint insights, Kirshenbaum examines what it means to be unloved and loved, to succeed and fail, to be at once impervious and raw. Rabbits for Food shows how art can lead us out of—or into—the depths of disconsolate loneliness and piercing grief. A bravura literary performance from one of our most indispensable writers.























[book] PUTIN’s WORLD
RUSSIAN AGAINST THE WEST
AND WITH THE REST
ANGELA STENT (Georgetown)
2019
Hachette

We all now live in a paranoid and polarized world of Putin's making, and the Russian leader, through guile and disruption, has resurrected Russia's status as a force to be reckoned with. From renowned foreign policy expert Angela Stent comes a must-read dissection of present-day Russian motives on the global stage.

How did Russia manage to emerge resurgent on the world stage and play a weak hand so effectively? Is it because Putin is a brilliant strategist? Or has Russia stepped into a vacuum created by the West's distraction with its own domestic problems and US ambivalence about whether it still wants to act as a superpower? PUTIN'S WORLD examines the country's turbulent past, how it has influenced Putin, the Russians' understanding of their position on the global stage and their future ambitions -- and their conviction that the West has tried to deny them a seat at the table of great powers since the USSR collapsed.

This book looks at Russia's key relationships -- its downward spiral with the United States, Europe, and NATO; its ties to China, Japan, the Middle East; and with its neighbors, particularly the fraught relationship with Ukraine. PUTIN'S WORLD will help Americans understand how and why the post-Cold War era has given way to a new, more dangerous world, one in which Russia poses a challenge to the United States in every corner of the globe -- and one in which Russia has become a toxic and divisive subject in US politics.























[book] Paris, 7 A.M.
A NOVEL
by Liza Wieland
June 11, 2019
Simon and Schuster

The acclaimed, award-winning author of A Watch of Nightingales imagines in a sweeping and stunning novel what happened to the poet Elizabeth Bishop during three life-changing weeks she spent in Paris amidst the imminent threat of World War II.

June 1937. Elizabeth Bishop, still only a young woman and not yet one of the most influential poets of the twentieth century, arrives in France with her college roommates. They are in search of an escape, and inspiration, far from the protective world of Vassar College where they were expected to find an impressive husband, a quiet life, and act accordingly. But the world is changing, and as they explore the City of Light, the larger threats of fascism and occupation are looming. There, they meet a community of upper-crust expatriates who not only bring them along on a life-changing adventure, but also into an underground world of rebellion that will quietly alter the course of Elizabeth’s life forever.

Paris, 7 A.M. imagines 1937—the only year Elizabeth, a meticulous keeper of journals, didn’t fully chronicle—in vivid detail and brings us from Paris to Normandy where Elizabeth becomes involved with a group rescuing Jewish “orphans” and delivering them to convents where they will be baptized as Catholics and saved from the impending horror their parents will face.

Poignant and captivating, Liza Wieland’s Paris, 7 A.M. is a beautifully rendered take on the formative years of one of America’s most celebrated—and mythologized—female poets.


























[book] Voices from the Warsaw Ghetto:
Writing Our History
(Posen Library)
Edited by David G. Roskies
Samuel D. Kassow
Spring 2019
Yale University Press

The powerful writings and art of Jews living in the Warsaw Ghetto.

Hidden in metal containers and buried underground during World War II, these works from the Warsaw Ghetto record the Holocaust from the perspective of its first interpreters, the victims themselves. Gathered clandestinely by an underground ghetto collective called Oyneg Shabes, the collection of reportage, diaries, prose, artwork, poems, jokes, and sermons captures the heroism, tragedy, humor, and social dynamics of the ghetto. Miraculously surviving the devastation of war, this extraordinary archive encompasses a vast range of voices—young and old, men and women, the pious and the secular, optimists and pessimists—and chronicles different perspectives on the topics of the day while also preserving rapidly endangered cultural traditions. Described by David G. Roskies as “a civilization responding to its own destruction,” these texts tell the story of the Warsaw Ghetto in real time, against time, and for all time.


























[book] Alay-Oop
by WILLIAM GROPPER
James Sturm (Introduction)
June 2019 reprint of 1930 classic

A lost, early classic of the graphic novel, now back in print for the first time since 1930.

William Gropper was one of the great American cartoonists and illustrators of the twentieth century. A student of George Bellows and Robert Henri, he was a prolific newspaper cartoonist, WPA muralist, Guggenheim Fellow, and committed political activist--the first visual artist called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, after which he was blacklisted (though he got revenge with his pen).

He was also a master of visual storytelling, best seen in his only full-length narrative work, Alay-Oop. First published in 1930, just as Gropper was coming to the height of his powers, this lost classic of the graphic novel presents an unusual love triangle: two circus acrobats and the honey-tongued schemer who comes between them. In page after page of charming, wordless art, Gropper takes us from the big top to bustling New York streets, from a cramped tenement apartment to the shifting landscape of a dream, as his characters struggle with the conflicting demands of career, family, and romance. A timeless and surprisingly modern yarn--with backflips aplenty.



























[book] Appeasement:
Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill,
and the Road to War
by Tim Bouverie
June 4, 2019
Tim Duggan

On a wet afternoon in September 1938, Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain stepped off an airplane and announced that his visit to Hitler had averted the greatest crisis in recent memory. It was, he later assured the crowd in Downing Street, "peace for our time." Less than a year later, Germany invaded Poland and the Second World War began.

Appeasement is a groundbreaking history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that enabled Hitler's domination of Europe. Drawing on deep archival research and sources not previously seen by historians, Tim Bouverie has created an unforgettable portrait of the ministers, aristocrats, and amateur diplomats who, through their actions and inaction, shaped their country's policy and determined the fate of Europe.

Beginning with the advent of Hitler in 1933, we embark on a fascinating journey from the early days of the Third Reich to the beaches of Dunkirk. Bouverie takes us not only into the backrooms of Parliament and 10 Downing Street but also into the drawing rooms and dining clubs of fading imperial Britain, where Hitler enjoyed surprising support among the ruling class and even some members of the royal family.

Both sweeping and intimate, Appeasement is not only an eye-opening history but a timeless lesson on the challenges of standing up to aggression and authoritarianism--and the calamity that results from failing to do so.


























[book] THE FRIEND
A MYSTERY NOVEL
BY JOAKIM ZANDER (phd)
June 25, 2019
Harper

Zander is Swedish, and a vet of the Swedish Navy; He did a exchange program in the USA in HS. He also lived in Israel for a while.

In November 2015, Jacob Seger arrived in Lebanon eager to make the most of his internship at the Swedish embassy in Beirut. He sort of lied about his knowledge of Arabic. SO be it. At a party in Beirut, he meets the handsome and mysterious Yassim; Jacob is swept up into a passionate, obsessive affair that renders everything else in his life insignificant. But who is Yassim? Is he using Jacob? When terrorist claims against Yassim are brought to light, Jacob must confront his role in a complicated game he is wholly unprepared to play. Unsure who to believe or trust, he knows only that he must flee Beirut — and fast.

Meanwhile in Sweden Klara Walldeen returns to the Stockholm archipelago to bury her beloved grandfather, her best friend Gabriella by her side. What should be a trip of mourning and solitude quickly turns perilous, however, when Gabi is arrested under suspicion of terrorist activity. After finding notes in Gabi’s purse about a clandestine meeting with a young Swedish diplomat, Klara springs into action, determined to clear her friend’s name.

Following Gabi’s trail, Klara comes face-to-face with Jacob, as well as with George Loow, a suave lobbyist from her past to whom she finds herself inexorably drawn. Now Klara, George, and Jacob set off on a race across Europe to stop a pending terrorist attack — and get to the bottom of Yassim’s true identity.
























https://www.sifra-safar.com/online-store
SIFRATNA
By Amjaad
Self Published, 2018

A collection of authentic Yemeni recipes, twists on classic favorites, and Yemeni interpretations of Middle Eastern cuisine. Her recipes for Adas (red lentil breakfast stew) and Hawaayij can be found in the Washington Post online.

Amjaad Al-Hussain writes, --- My style of Yemeni cooking is a reflection of most immigrant and refugee families around the world. Although I have never been to Yemen, a big part of my identity is Yemeni. I speak Yemeni at home with my family, cook and eat Yemeni food, and maintain Yemeni traditions. Although I am neither a professional chef nor food expert, I believe that documenting our Yemeni-influenced home cooking is critical to preserving our culture.


In college, I started writing down my favorite recipes that I've perfected over the years. My mom would laminate those recipes for me and keep them in the kitchen for easy access. I fantasized about making a cook book for years but the pressure to make it absolutely perfect turned me off. Eight years later, in 2018, I decided I would just go for it. And here we are – bringing Yemeni inspiration to your sifra (dining table).

As with all cuisines, we have classics, but cooking methods change as cultures mix, new ingredients become available, and people develop different palates. There are basics you picked up from your mom that you just don’t mess with. Then there are influences from other countries in your region, which you incorporate into your recipes, cooking with a (insert your country or culture) twist. The haters will say: “but, that’s not traditional blah blah blah”. And finally there are dishes you make when you are craving something delicious from a restaurant you’ve tried. Sifratna includes all of the above - and no, I don’t use the word “fusion”.

Funny story: For the introduction, Hussain tells the story of trying to modify a Rachael Ray recipe that required wine. Since a Muslim avoids wine, her mother recommended substituting some vinegar. But Hussain didn’t realize that white wine vinegar and white wine can’t be swapped one measure for one measure. One her father could bear to eat the dish which was horrible. Born in New Jersey and raised from age 2 in Falls Church, Virginia, she lives with her husband in the DC suburbs.



JULY 2019 BOOKS


[book] Seeking Sanctuary:
125 Years of Synagogues on Long Island
by Brad Kolodny
July 2019

Do you follow Brad's Instagram IG account of pics of Long Island synagogues?

Now you can read the inside scoops in book form

Brad Kolodny provides an important history, inventory, and photo archive of the synagogues of Long Island. He has identified 219 active synagogues on Long Island (not counting Brooklyn and Queens), of which 166 are in Nassau County and 53 in Suffolk County. Additionally, there are 67 still-standing former synagogue buildings, 44 in Nassau and 23 in Suffolk. This volume offers a look at all these synagogues and in so doing traces the history of Long Island’s Jewish religious life.

Brad Kolodny has photographed nearly 600 synagogues in 12 countries over the last 30+ years. A Long Islander since 1997, he has visited and photographed every current and former synagogue building in Nassau and Suffolk counties. Brad's passion for local history and uncovering the past has led to the discovery of many little-known or long-forgotten facts about the history of the Jewish community on Long Island.

In these buildings we see the variation in American synagogue design for functional and aesthetic reasons. We also track the trajectory of popular styles throughout the 20th century and see how styles reflect changes in Jewish community organization and Jewish identity. Through synagogue design we see how Jews have viewed themselves and presented themselves to others. Different branches of Judaism and different budgets explain some changes. But so, too, do different eras, as the American Jewish experience has played out on Long Island and continues to develop and evolve.
























[book] Covenant & Conversation:
Deuteronomy:
Renewal of the Sinai Covenant
by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks
July 1, 2019
Maggid

This collection makes Rabbi Jonathan Sacks' brilliant essays on the weekly Torah portion available in book form for the first time. Rabbi Sacks fuses Jewish tradition, Western philosophy and literature to present a highly developed understanding of the human condition under God's sovereignty.

The 5th and final installation of the series is “Deuteronomy: Renewal of the Sinai Covenant”. Here, Rabbi Sacks writes: “With the book of Deuteronomy, the entire biblical project becomes lucid and reaches its culmination. Deuteronomy is the last act of the Jewish people’s drama before becoming a nation in its own land, and it forms the context of all that follows… [it] is in essence a programme for the creation of a moral society in which righteousness is the responsibility of all. The good society was to be, within the limits of the world as it was thirty-three centuries ago, an inclusive if not an entirely egalitarian one. Time and again we are told that social joy must embrace the widow, the orphan, the stranger, and the Levite, people without independent status or means. It is to be one nation under God.”

The Covenant & Conversation series consists of multiple essays on every Torah portion. Like the preceding volumes, “Deuteronomy: Renewal of the Sinai Covenant” fuses Jewish tradition, Western philosophy and literature to explore the biblical narrative as it relates to universal concerns of freedom, love, responsibility, identity and destiny. The collection has been described by critics as “profound,” “poetic,” “masterful,” “perfect reading for the lay person or scholar.” Volume I: Genesis was awarded the 2009 National Jewish Book Award.

Matthew Miller, Publisher of Maggid Books, says, “We are thrilled that this series is now complete. Since the release of Genesis, we have heard from people around the globe how Rabbi Sacks’ writings have deepened their appreciation of the Jewish Bible and of Judaism as a whole. Now every Shabbat can be inspired by Rabbi Sacks’ brilliant insights.”

Rabbi Sacks says, “I am delighted to have finished this work on the Covenant & Conversation series. I called this series Covenant & Conversation because this, for me, is the essence of what Torah learning is – throughout the ages, and for us, now. The text of Torah is our covenant with God, our written constitution as a nation under His sovereignty. The interpretation of this text has been the subject of an ongoing conversation that began at Sinai thirty-three centuries ago and has not ceased since. Every age has added its commentaries, and so must ours. I hope by reading this series, people are inspired to participate in that conversation, because that is a major part of what it is to be a Jew.”

SEE ALSO: Covenant & Conversation: NUMBERS by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks

Covenant & Conversation: LEVITICUS by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks

Covenant & Conversation: EXODUS by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks

Covenant & Conversation: GENESIS by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks

LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP – WEEKLY PORTIONS by Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks














[book] The Children of the Ghetto:
My Name is Adam
A Novel
by Elias Khoury
Humphrey Davies (Translator)
July 23, 2019
8 Archipelago Books

Polemic much? As Louis B. Mayer may have said, if you want to send a message, call Western Union…

First in a trilogy.

Adam’s friends thinks he means the Warsaw Ghetto when he talks of the Ghetto.
But he means the ghetto of Lydda, where he writes that the Jews placed Palestinians in the town in 1948, and his people were forced to bury their dead in mass graves.
He writes that silence is more eloquent than words. So his people’s silence speak volumes.
Long exiled in New York, Palestinian ex-pat Adam Dannoun – who left Palestine in 1948 - thought he knew himself. But an encounter with Blind Mahmoud, a father figure from his childhood, changes everything. As he investigates exactly what occurred in 1948 in Lydda, the city of his birth, he gathers stories that speak to his Palestinian people's bravery, ingenuity, and resolve in the face of hardship.




























[book] Social Change and Halakhic Evolution
in American Orthodoxy
Paperback Reprint Edition
by Chaim I. Waxman
July 1, 2019
8 University of Liverpool Press

Chaim Waxman, the pre-eminent sociologist of contemporary Orthodoxy, is one of the keenest observers of American Jewish society. Having written on various aspects of this subject over the past forty years, he now revisits his earlier work in the light of recent developments. His familiarity with the entire spectrum of the Orthodox world combined with his deep knowledge of halakhah and his rigorous command of statistical and demographic data enables him to articulate distinctive perspectives on the issues that he addresses. His focus is not only on the various directions in which Orthodox practice is moving but also on how this affects the community as a whole.

Waxman's range is wide. After reviewing the socio-economic changes in American Orthodox communities and examining the reasons for them, he goes on to consider the political patterns of contemporary American Orthodox Jews. Demographic changes are also explored, particularly those relating to family life. Moving to the communal level, he discusses the increasing Americanization of Orthodox Jews, taking special note of how developments in Orthodoxy in Israel are having an increasing impact on American norms as contact between the two communities grows. In illustration of how Orthodoxy is adapting to modernity, he then presents a detailed discussion of halakhic developments, particularly regarding women's greater participation in ritual practices and other areas of communal life. He shows that the direction of change is not uniform: there is both greater stringency and greater leniency, and he discusses the many reason for this both in the Jewish community and in the wider society. Relations between the various sectors of American Orthodoxy over the past several decades are also considered.

The result is a comprehensive analysis from an acknowledged expert that will be of interest to everyone concerned with developments within American Orthodoxy and with the sociology of religion more generally.


























[book] The New Girl:
A Novel (Gabriel Allon Thriller)
by Daniel Silva
July 16, 2019
HARPER

NOW YOU SEE HER
NOW YOU DON’T
THE NEW GIRL

A stunning new novel of intrigue, betrayal, and revenge from #1 New York Times bestselling author Daniel Silva.

She was covered from head to toe in expensive wool and plaid, the sort of stuff one saw at the Burberry boutique in Harrods. She carried a leather bookbag rather than a nylon backpack. Her patent leather ballet slippers were glossy and bright. She was proper, the new girl, modest. But there was something else about her …

At an exclusive private school in Switzerland, mystery surrounds the identity of the beautiful raven-haired girl who arrives each morning in a motorcade fit for a head of state. She is said to be the daughter of a wealthy international businessman. In truth, her father is Khalid bin Mohammed, the much-maligned crown prince of Saudi Arabia. Once celebrated for his daring social and religious reforms, he is now reviled for his role in the murder of a dissident journalist. And when his only child is brutally kidnapped, he turns to the one man he can trust to find her before it is too late.

What’s done cannot be undone …

Gabriel Allon, the legendary chief of Israeli intelligence, has spent most of his life fighting terrorists, including the murderous jihadists financed by Saudi Arabia. Prince Khalid—or KBM, as he is known—has pledged to finally break the bond between the Kingdom and radical Islam. For that reason alone, Gabriel regards him as a valuable if flawed partner. Together they will become unlikely allies in a deadly secret war for control of the Middle East. The life of a child, and the throne of Saudi Arabia, hang in the balance. Both men have made their share of enemies. And both have everything to lose.

Filled with dark humor, breathtaking twists of plot, and an unforgettable cast of characters, The New Girl is both a thrilling, page-turning tale of entertainment and a sophisticated study of political alliances and great-power rivalries in a dangerous world. And it is once again proof that Gabriel Allon is “one of fiction’s greatest spies” (Kirkus) and Daniel Silva is “quite simply the best” (Kansas City Star) writer of foreign intrigue and suspense at work today.




























[book] The Bastard Brigade:
The True Story of the Renegade
Scientists and Spies Who Sabotaged
the Nazi Atomic Bomb
by Sam Kean
July 9, 2019
8 Little, Brown and Company

From New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean comes the gripping, untold story of a renegade group of scientists and spies determined to keep Adolf Hitler from obtaining the ultimate prize: a nuclear bomb Scientists have always kept secrets. But rarely have the secrets been as vital as they were during World War II. In the middle of building an atomic bomb, the leaders of the Manhattan Project were alarmed to learn that Nazi Germany was far outpacing the Allies in nuclear weapons research. Hitler, with just a few pounds of uranium, would have the capability to reverse the entire D-Day operation and conquer Europe. So they assembled a rough and motley crew of geniuses - dubbed the Alsos Mission - and sent them careening into Axis territory to spy on, sabotage, and even assassinate members of Nazi Germany's feared Uranium Club.

The details of the mission rival the finest spy thriller, but what makes this story sing is the incredible cast of characters-both heroes and rogues alike-including:

Moe Berg the major league catcher who abandoned the game for a career as a multilingual international spy; the strangest fellow to ever play professional baseball.
Werner Heisenberg the Nobel Prize-winning physicist credited as the discoverer of quantum mechanics; a key contributor to the Nazi's atomic bomb project and the primary target of the Alsos mission.
Colonel Boris Pash a high school science teacher and veteran of the Russian Revolution who fled the Sovit Union with a deep disdain for Communists and who later led the Alsos mission.
Joe Kennedy Jr. the charismatic, thrill-seeking older brother of JFK whose need for adventure led him to volunteer for the most dangerous missions the Navy had to offer.
Samuel Goudsmit a washed-up physics prodigy who spent his life huntinh Nazi scientist-and his parents, who had been swept into a concentration camp-across the globe.
Irène and Frederic Joliot-Curie a physics Nobel-Prize winning power couple who used their unassuming status as scientists to become active members of the resistance.

Thrust into the dark world of international espionage, these scientists and soldiers played a vital and largely untold role in turning back one of the darkest tides in human history.


























[book] Lady in the Lake:
A Novel
by Laura Lippman
July 23, 2019
William Morrow

The revered New York Times bestselling author returns with a novel set in 1960s Baltimore that combines modern psychological insights with elements of classic noir, about a middle-aged housewife turned aspiring reporter who pursues the murder of a forgotten young woman.

In 1966, Baltimore is a city of secrets that everyone seems to know—everyone, that is, except Madeline “Maddie” Schwartz. Last year, she was a happy, even pampered housewife. This year, she’s bolted from her marriage of almost twenty years, determined to make good on her youthful ambitions to live a passionate, meaningful life.

Maddie wants to matter, to leave her mark on a swiftly changing world. Drawing on her own secrets, she helps Baltimore police find a murdered girl—assistance that leads to a job at the city’s afternoon newspaper, the Star. Working at the newspaper offers Maddie the opportunity to make her name, and she has found just the story to do it: a missing woman whose body was discovered in the fountain of a city park lake.

Cleo Sherwood was a young African-American woman who liked to have a good time. No one seems to know or care why she was killed except Maddie—and the dead woman herself. Maddie’s going to find the truth about Cleo’s life and death. Cleo’s ghost, privy to Maddie’s poking and prying, wants to be left alone.

Maddie’s investigation brings her into contact with people that used to be on the periphery of her life—a jewelry store clerk, a waitress, a rising star on the Baltimore Orioles, a patrol cop, a hardened female reporter, a lonely man in a movie theater. But for all her ambition and drive, Maddie often fails to see the people right in front of her. Her inability to look beyond her own needs will lead to tragedy and turmoil for all sorts of people—including the man who shares her bed, a black police officer who cares for Maddie more than she knows.



























[book] LOVE DRONES
a novel
BY NOAM DORR
(PhD, University of Utah)
July 2, 2019
Sarabande Books

In Love Drones, Noam Dorr explores the troubling relationship between our desire for intimacy and the world of military action, state violence, and intelligence surveillance. Born and raised on a kibbutz in Israel, Dorr served a compulsory military term as an intelligence analyst, tapped for his skill with translation. This is reflected in the book with form-bending interwoven essays that retrace the fragments of a bomb that never explodes, grenades concealed as oranges, and drones that are simultaneously sound, insect, and lethal aircraft-essays searching for human connection within a landscape of violent conflict. It is a deeply intimate and unsettling book.


























[book] Fighting Auschwitz:
The Resistance Movement
in the Concentration Camp
by Jozef Garlinski
Antony Polonsky (Introduction)
M. R. D. Foot (Foreword)
July 3, 2019
Aquila Polinca

The definitive study of the topic.” -Prof. Antony Polonsky, Emeritus Professor of Holocaust Studies, Brandeis University, and Chief Historian, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

Winner of the SILVER AWARD for HISTORY at the 2019 Benjamin Franklin Awards.

The incredible story of underground resistance among the prisoners at the infamous Auschwitz concentration camp.

When the Germans opened Auschwitz in June 1940, it was a concentration camp for political prisoners, who were told on arrival that they would live no longer than three months-expanding two years later to also become a death camp for Jews.

Underground resistance appeared at Auschwitz very quickly, spearheaded in 1940 by one of the bravest men ever to live, Polish army officer Captain Witold Pilecki.

In this meticulously researched and highly readable work, Józef Garli?ski traces the evolution and operations of the principal resistance organizations among the prisoners (including communist as well as non-communist groups). He delves into the relationships among these groups, as well as their relationships with the various political and multinational factions in the prisoner population, including both male and female, and with the underground outside the camp. He describes their efforts against the brutal SS men and informers. In parallel, he documents the growth and evolution of Auschwitz itself, and the horrors of the industrialized death factory for Jews created by the Germans.

First published in English in 1975, but out of print for decades, this seminal book is now being released in a new 2nd edition with more than 200 photos and maps, and a new introduction by Prof. Antony Polonsky.

Garli?ski, a member of the Polish underground during WWII, was himself a prisoner at Auschwitz.

With more than 200 photos and maps, five Appendices, extensive Bibliography and detailed Indexes.


























[book] The Day the World Stopped Turning
by Michael Morpurgo
July 9, 2019
Ages 10-14
Feiwel and Friends Publishings

Michael Morpurgo's The Day the World Stopped Turning is a middle-grade novel about an extraordinary boy who sees the world differently.

In the unique landscape of the Camargue (France) during World War II, Lorenzo lives among the salt flats and the flamingos. There are lots of things he doesn't understand–but he does know how to heal animals, how to talk to them; the flamingos especially. He loves routine, and music too: and every week he goes to market with his mother. It’s there he meets Kezia, a Roma girl, who helps her parents run their carousel–and who shows him how to ride the wooden horse as the music plays.

But then the German soldiers come, with their guns. Everything is threatened, everything is falling apart: the carousel, Kezia and her family, even Lorenzo’s beloved flamingos. Yet there are kind people even among soldiers, and there is always hope. . .


























[book] HITLER'S SECRET ARMY
A Hidden History of Spies, Saboteurs,
and Traitors in the World War II
By Tim Tate
July 2019
Pegasus Books

This dramatic exposé of Allied subterfuge and betrayal uncovers the treachery of undercover fascists and American Nazi spy rings during the height of World War II.

Between 1939 and 1945, more than seventy Allied men and women were convicted-mostly in secret trials-of working to help Nazi Germany win the war. In the same period, hundreds of British Fascists were also interned without trial on specific and detailed evidence that they were spying for, or working on behalf of, Germany. Collectively, these men and women were part of a little-known Fifth Column: traitors who committed crimes including espionage, sabotage, communicating with enemy intelligence agents and attempting to cause disaffection amongst Allied troops. Four of these traitors were sentenced to death; two were executed, whilst most of the others received lengthy prison sentences or were interned throughout the war.

Hundreds of official files, released piecemeal and in remarkably haphazard fashion in the years between 2002 and 2017, reveal the truth about the Allied men and women who formed these spy rings. Most were ardent fascists: all willingly betrayed their own country in the hope and anticipation of a German victory. Several were part of international espionage rings based in the United States.

If these men and women were, for the most part, lone wolves or members of small networks, others were much more dangerous. In 1940, during some of the darkest days of the war, two well-connected British Nazi sympathizers planned overlapping conspiracies to bring about a “fascist revolution.” These plots were foiled by Allied spymasters through radical-and often contentious-methods of investigation. Its agents set up elaborate agent provocateur and sting operations which uncovered scores of the Nazi sympathizers seeking to pass military and defense secrets to the enemy.



























[book] The Floating Feldmans
a novel
by Elyssa Friedland
July 23, 2019
Berkley

Sink or swim. Or at least that's what Annette Feldman tells herself when she books a cruise for her entire family. It's been over a decade since the Feldman clan has spent more than twenty-four hours under the same roof, but Annette is determined to celebrate her seventieth birthday the right way. Just this once, they are going to behave like an actual family.
Too bad her kids didn't get the memo.
Between the troublesome family secrets, old sibling rivalries, and her two teenage grandkids, Annette's birthday vacation is looking more and more like the perfect storm. Adrift together on the open seas, the Feldmans will each face the truths they've been ignoring--and learn that the people they once thought most likely to sink them are actually the ones who help them stay afloat.



























[book] Don't Wait Up:
Confessions of a
Stay-at-Work Mom
by Liz Astrof
July 30, 2019
Gallery Books

For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens (a reboot of Alice; a rom com about an engaged single mother whose ex hubby who is an ex con shows up; The Connors; Trial & Error; Kath and Kim, Last Man Standing; and more), who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them.

Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth. They somehow manage to make pregnancy look effortless, bring out the beauty in a screaming child, and keep the back seat of their cars as spotless as their kitchens.

And then there’s women like Liz Astrof. Who originally had children because “everyone else was.”

In this blunt and side-splittingly funny book of essays, Liz Astrof embraces the realities of motherhood (and womanhood) that no one ever talks about: like needing to hide from your kids in your closet, your car, or a yoga class on the other side of town, letting them eat candy for dinner because you just can't deal, to the sheer terror of failing them or at the very least losing them in a mall. And sometimes, many times, wondering if the whole parenting thing wasn’t for you.

In vivid and relatable prose, she discusses her love for her career, how she’s managed to overcome some of her own dysfunctional childhood, and the ups and downs of raising the little demons she calls her own…from the office.

Soul-baring, entertaining, and insightful, Don't Wait Up is an abashedly honest look at parenting and relationships for moms who realize that motherhood doesn’t have to be your entire life—just an amazing part of it—that you would definitely most likely do all over again.

























[book] Beyond Charlottesville:
Taking a Stand Against White Nationalism
by Terry McAuliffe, former Governor, Virginia
July 30, 2019
Thomas Dunne

One term governor of Virginia and one term head of the DNC writes about Charlottesville. You have to read it to glean information but know there is a hidden or not so hidden agenda. The former governor of Virginia tells the behind-the-scenes story of the violent “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville-and shows how we can prevent other Charlottesvilles from happening.

When Governor Terry McAuliffe hung up the phone on the afternoon of the violent “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, he was sure Donald Trump would do the right thing as president: condemn the white supremacists who’d descended on the college town and who’d caused McAuliffe to declare a state of emergency that morning. He didn’t. Instead Trump declared there was “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” Trump was condemned from many sides himself, even by many Republicans, but the damage was done. He’d excused and thus egged on the terrorists at the moment when he could have stopped them in their tracks.

In Beyond Charlottesville, McAuliffe looks at the forces and events that led to the tragedy in Charlottesville, including the vicious murder of Heather Heyer and the death of two state troopers in a helicopter accident. He doesn’t whitewash Virginia history and discusses a KKK protest over the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. He takes a hard real-time behind-the-scenes look at the actions of everyone on that fateful August 12, including himself, to see what could have been done. He lays out what was done afterwards to prevent future Charlottesvilles-and what still needs to be done as America in general and Virginia in particular continue to grapple with their history of racism.

Beyond Charlottesville will be the definitive account of an infamous chapter in our history, seared indelibly into memory, sure to be cited for years as a crucial reference point in the long struggle to fight racism, extremism and hate.ttesville
























[book] When Islam Is Not a Religion:
Inside America's Fight
for Religious Freedom
by Asma T. Uddin
July 9, 2019
Pegasus Books

A galvanizing look at the threat to religious freedom in the United States through the prism of attacks on the constitutional rights of American Muslims.

American Muslim religious liberty lawyer Asma Uddin has long considered her work defending people of all faiths to be a calling more than a job. Yet even as she seeks equal protection for Evangelicals, Sikhs, Muslims, Native Americans, Jews, and Catholics alike, she has seen an ominous increase in attempts to criminalize Islam and exclude Muslim Americans from those protections.

Somehow, the view that Muslims aren’t human enough for human rights or constitutional protections is moving from the fringe to the mainstream-along with the claim “Islam is not a religion.” This conceit is not just a threat to the First Amendment rights of American Muslims. It is a threat to the freedom of all Americans.

When Islam Is Not a Religion reveals a significant but overlooked danger to our religious liberty. Woven throughout this national saga is Uddin’s own story and the stories of American Muslims and other people of faith who have faced tremendous indignities as they attempt to live and worship freely.

Combining her experience of Islam as a religious truth and her legal and philosophical appreciation that all individuals have a right to religious liberty, Uddin examines the shifting tides of American culture and outlines a way forward for individuals and communities navigating today’s culture wars.



























[book] FROM SCHLEMIel to SABRA
Zionist Masculinity and Palestinian
Hebrew Literature
By Philip Hollander
(University of Wisconsin - Madison)
July 1, 2019
Indiana University Press

In From Schlemiel to Sabra Philip Hollander examines how masculine ideals and images of the New Hebrew man shaped the Israeli state. In this innovative book, Hollander uncovers the complex relationship that Jews had with masculinity, interrogating narratives depicting masculinity in the new state as a transition from weak, feminized schlemiels to robust, muscular, and rugged Israelis. Turning to key literary texts by S. Y. Agnon, Y. H. Brenner, L. A. Arieli, and Aharon Reuveni, Hollander reveals how gender and sexuality were intertwined to promote a specific Zionist political agenda. A Zionist masculinity grounded in military prowess could not only protect the new state but also ensure its procreative needs and future. Self-awareness, physical power, fierce loyalty to the state and devotion to the land, humility, and nurture of the young were essential qualities that needed to be cultivated in migrants to the state. By turning to the early literature of Zionist Palestine, Hollander shows how Jews strove to construct a better Jewish future.




























[book] Newcomers in an Ancient Land:
Adventures, Love, and Seeking
Myself in 1960s Israel
by Paula Wagner
July 30, 2019
She Writes Press

At eighteen, Paula is already a seasoned traveler, having begun life in England, crisscrossed the US as a young child, and survived a year in a London boarding school, immersed in her mother’s heritage. But when, at eighteen, she leaves home for Israel to explore her father’s Jewish roots and learn Hebrew on a kibbutz ulpan (a work/study program on a collective farm), her quest will change her life forever. Seduced by her love of language, she continues the journey to France for several years before returning at last to settle to Israel. As she navigates her odyssey from vision to reality, she will learn much more than two new languages-and realize that if she is ever to forge her own identity, she must also separate from her twin sister and follow her own path.























[book] Jacob's Ladder:
A Novel
by Ludmila Ulitskaya
Polly Gannon (Translator)
July 9, 2019
FS&G

One of Russia’s most renowned literary figures and a Man Booker International Prize nominee, Ludmila Ulitskaya presents what may be her final novel. Jacob’s Ladder is a family saga spanning a century of recent Russian history-and represents the summation of the author’s career, devoted to sharing the absurd and tragic tales of twentieth-century life in her nation.

Jumping between the diaries and letters of Jacob Ossetsky in Kiev in the early 1900s and the experiences of his granddaughter Nora in the theatrical world of Moscow in the 1970s and beyond, Jacob’s Ladder guides the reader through some of the most turbulent times in the history of Russia and Ukraine, and draws suggestive parallels between historical events of the early twentieth century and those of more recent memory.

Spanning the seeming promise of the prerevolutionary years, to the dark Stalinist era, to the corruption and confusion of the present day, Jacob’s Ladder is a pageant of romance, betrayal, and memory. With a scale worthy of Tolstoy, it asks how much control any of us have over our lives-and how much is in fact determined by history, by chance, or indeed by the genes passed down by the generations that have preceded us into the world.


























[book] No Past Tense:
Love and Survival in the Shadow of the Shoah
Paperback
by D.Z. Stone
July 18, 2019
Vall.

No Past Tense is the biography of Katarina (Kati) Kellner and William (Willi) Salcer, two Czech Jews who as teenagers were swept up by the Holocaust in Hungary and survived Auschwitz and Mauthausen, respectively. Covering their entire lives, weaving in first person ‘real time’ voices as if watching a documentary about themselves, the unique structure of No Past Tense provides a distinctive ‘whole life’ view of the Holocaust. The book begins with their childhoods, education in Budapest, and 16-year-old Kati meeting 19-year-old Willi in the Jewish ghetto in Plesivec, a Slovak village annexed by Hungary in 1938. After liberation from the camps they returned to discover most Jews were gone, and the villagers did not want them back. In defiance, Kati took up residence in a shed on her family’s property, and in reclaiming what was hers, won Willi’s heart. They lived as smugglers in post-war Europe until immigrating illegally to Palestine in 1946. Describing Palestine, they talk frankly about rarely addressed issues such as prejudice against ‘newcomers’ from other Jews. Willi built tanks for the Haganah, the underground Jewish army, and supported the War of Independence but refused to move into homes abandoned by Palestinian Arabs. After discharge from the Israeli Air Force, Willi founded the country’s first rubber factory and headed the association of Israeli manufacturers at only 28. In 1958, saying he did not want the children to know war, Willi convinced Kati to move to America. He did not tell her that punitive tax fines, imposed when the government needed money due to the crisis in the Sinai, shook his faith in Israel. Once in America, after a few bad investments, Willi lost all their money and for the first time Kati suffered panic attacks. But Willi rebuilt his fortune, while Kati rediscovered her courage, and started living again.


























[book] Don't Wait Up:
Confessions of a
Stay-at-Work Mom
by Liz Astrof
July 30, 2019
Gallery

For fans of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and I Heart My Little A-Holes comes a candid and hilarious collection of essays on motherhood from the award-winning television comedy writer and producer of 2 Broke Girls and The King of Queens, who swears she loves her kids—when she’s not hiding from them.

Some women feel that motherhood is a calling and their purpose on earth. They somehow manage to make pregnancy look effortless, bring out the beauty in a screaming child, and keep the back seat of their cars as spotless as their kitchens.

And then there’s women like Liz Astrof. Who originally had children because “everyone else was.”

In this blunt and side-splittingly funny book of essays, Liz Astrof embraces the realities of motherhood (and womanhood) that no one ever talks about: like needing to hide from your kids in your closet, your car, or a yoga class on the other side of town, letting them eat candy for dinner because you just can't deal, to the sheer terror of failing them or at the very least losing them in a mall. And sometimes, many times, wondering if the whole parenting thing wasn’t for you.

In vivid and relatable prose, she discusses her love for her career, how she’s managed to overcome some of her own dysfunctional childhood, and the ups and downs of raising the little demons she calls her own…from the office.

Soul-baring, entertaining, and insightful, Don't Wait Up is an abashedly honest look at parenting and relationships for moms who realize that motherhood doesn’t have to be your entire life—just an amazing part of it—that you would definitely most likely do all over again.


























[book] Call Sign Chaos:
Learning to Lead
by Jim Mattis and Bing West
July 16, 2019
Random House

Before General Mattis took a job with the Trump Administration, he began work on this book. He set it aside. After her resigned a few months ago, he finished his manuscript

A clear-eyed account of learning how to lead in a chaotic world, by General Jim Mattis—the former Secretary of Defense and one of the most formidable strategic thinkers of our time—and Bing West, a former assistant secretary of defense and combat Marine.

Call Sign Chaos is the account of Jim Mattis’s storied career, from wide-ranging leadership roles in three wars to ultimately commanding a quarter of a million troops across the Middle East. Along the way, Mattis recounts his foundational experiences as a leader, extracting the lessons he has learned about the nature of warfighting and peacemaking, the importance of allies, and the strategic dilemmas—and short-sighted thinking—now facing our nation. He makes it clear why America must return to a strategic footing so as not to continue winning battles but fighting inconclusive wars.

Mattis divides his book into three parts: Direct Leadership, Executive Leadership, and Strategic Leadership. In the first part, Mattis recalls his early experiences leading Marines into battle, when he knew his troops as well as his own brothers. In the second part, he explores what it means to command thousands of troops and how to adapt your leadership style to ensure your intent is understood by your most junior troops so that they can own their mission. In the third part, Mattis describes the challenges and techniques of leadership at the strategic level, where military leaders reconcile war’s grim realities with political leaders’ human aspirations, where complexity reigns and the consequences of imprudence are severe, even catastrophic.

Call Sign Chaos is a memoir of a life of warfighting and lifelong learning, following along as Mattis rises from Marine recruit to four-star general. It is a journey about learning to lead and a story about how he, through constant study and action, developed a unique leadership philosophy, one relevant to us all.























[book] The Jewish Calendar 2019-2020
16-Month Engagement:
Jewish Year 5780 Calendar
– Engagement Calendar
by The Jewish Museum New York
July 30, 2019

The Jewish Calendar 2019-2020 16-Month Engagement features 53 full-color Judaic ceremonial masterpieces from the internationally renowned collection of The Jewish Museum, New York.

Spans a full 16 months from September 2019 through December 2020. Includes U.S. and Jewish holidays, Sabbath candle-lighting times, and a list of Jewish holidays through the year 2030, making this calendar essential for every Jewish household.



























[book] Social Vision:
The Lubavitcher Rebbe's
Transformative Paradigm for
the World
by Philip Wexler
July 6, 2019

Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902-1994), known as the Lubavitcher Rebbe, was one of the most influential personalities of the 20th century and the only rabbi ever awarded the Congressional Gold Medal. Despite wide recognition of Schneerson's impact, this is the first volume to seriously explore his social ideas and activism.

Schneerson not only engineered a global Jewish renaissance but also became an advocate for public education, criminal justice reform, women's empowerment, and alternative energy. From the personal to the global his teachings chart a practical path for the replacement of materialism, alienation, anxiety and divisiveness with a dignified and joyous reciprocity. Social Vision delves into the deep structures of social reality and the ways it is shaped and reshaped by powerful ideologies. Juxtaposed with sociologist Max Weber’s diagnosis of “inner worldly asceticism” as “the spirit of capitalism,” Schneerson's socio-mystical worldview is compellingly framed as a transformative paradigm for the universal repair of society.

The library of Schneerson’s talks and writings is voluminous, but critics have described this distillation as artful, engaging, ambitious, bracing, relevant, and imperative.



























[book] The Weil Conjectures:
On Math and the
Pursuit of the Unknown
by Karen Olsson
July 16, 2019
FS&G

“The Weil Conjectures is a charming meditation on geometry, sacrifice, and adolescent self-discovery, delivered in passionate, impressionistic bursts.” -Jordan Ellenberg, New York Times-bestselling author of How Not to Be Wrong

An eloquent blend of memoir and biography exploring the Weil siblings, math, and creative inspiration

André Weil was born in Paris to agnostic Alsatian Jewish parents who fled the annexation of Alsace-Lorraine by the German Empire after the Franco-Prussian War in 1870–71. Simone Weil – the philosopher – was his sister.

Karen Olsson’s stirring and unusual third book, The Weil Conjectures, tells the story of the brilliant Weil siblings - while also recalling the years Olsson spent studying math, herself. As she delves into the lives of these two singular French thinkers, she grapples with their intellectual obsessions and rekindles one of her own. For Olsson, as a math major in college and a writer now, it’s the odd detours that lead to discovery, to moments of insight. Thus The Weil Conjectures-an elegant blend of biography and memoir and a meditation on the creative life.

Personal, revealing, and approachable, The Weil Conjectures eloquently explores math as it relates to intellectual history, and shows how sometimes the most inexplicable pursuits turn out to be the most rewarding.


















[book] For the Good of the Game:
The Inside Story of the Surprising
and Dramatic Transformation
of Major League Baseball
by Bud Selig
July 9, 2019
William Morrow

Bud Selig, a History and FDR buff, is the former longtime Commissioner of Major League Baseball; and he provides an unprecedented look inside professional baseball today, focusing on how he helped bring the game into the modern age and revealing his interactions with players, managers, fellow owners, and fans nationwide.

More than a century old, the game of baseball is resistant to change—owners, managers, players, and fans all hate it. Yet, now more than ever, baseball needs to evolve—to compete with other professional sports, stay relevant, and remain America’s Pastime it must adapt. Perhaps no one knows this better than Bud Selig who, as the head of MLB for more than twenty years, ushered in some of the most important, and controversial, changes in the game’s history—modernizing a sport that had remained unchanged since the 1960s.

In this enlightening and surprising book, Selig goes inside the most difficult decisions and moments of his career, looking at how he worked to balance baseball’s storied history with the pressures of the twenty-first century to ensure its future. Part baseball story, part business saga, and part memoir, For the Good of the Game chronicles Selig’s career, takes fans inside locker rooms and board rooms, and offers an intimate, fascinating account of the frequently messy process involved in transforming an American institution. Featuring an all-star lineup of the biggest names from the last forty years of baseball, Selig recalls the vital games, private moments, and tense conversations he’s shared with Hall of Fame players and managers and the contentious calls he’s made. He also speaks candidly about hot-button issues the steroid scandal that threatened to destroy the game, telling his side of the story in full and for the first time.
As he looks back and forward, Selig outlines the stakes for baseball’s continued transformation—and why the changes he helped usher in must only be the beginning.
























[book] COPPERHEAD
A Novel
by Alexi Zentner
July 9, 2019
Viking

By Alexi Zentner, son of the late Monna Zentner, professor at Waterloo and famous Canadian civil right activist who fougt anti-Semitism and had her home fire bombed.

Jessup's stepfather gave him almost everything good in his life--a sober mother, a sister, a sense of home, and the game of football. But during the years that David John spent in prison for his part in a brutal hate crime, Jessup came to realize that his stepfather is also a source of lethal poison for his family. Now it's Jessup's senior year, and all he wants to do is lay low until he can accept one of the football scholarships that will be his ticket out of town.

So when his stepfather is released from prison, Jessup is faced with an impossible choice: condemn the man who saved his family or accept his part in his family's legacy of bigotry. Before he can choose a side, Jessup will cause a terrible accident and cover it up--a mistake with the power to ruin them all.

Told with relentless honesty and a ferocious gaze directed at contemporary America's darkest corners, Copperhead vibrates with the energy released by football tackles and car crashes and asks uncomfortable questions about the price we pay--and the mistakes we'll repeat--when we live under the weight of a history we've yet to reckon with. Alexi Zentner unspools the story of boys who think they're men and of the entrenched thinking behind a split-second decision, and asks whether hatred, prejudice, and violence can ever be unlearned.



































[book] Beijing Payback:
A Novel
by Daniel Nieh
July 23, 2019
ECCO

A fresh, smart, and fast-paced revenge thriller about a college basketball player who discovers shocking truths about his family in the wake of his father’s death… or murder. If you liked In the Mood for Love and 2046, or Wong Kar-wai and Johnnie To films, you will imagine how to script this film for the screen as you read it.

Victor Li is devastated by his father’s death, which he figures out was a murder. His father was his rock. Victor is a senior in college. His immigrant father was a mystery to him… even more so when the truth comes out. (Just like in real life, the author learned after college that his secretive but loving father was the son of a wealthy general in Shanghai and then HK, only to arrive at SMU as a nobody student as an undergrad refugee). Back to the book: Victor’s father ran a chain of four Chinese restaurants in California, and maybe the new manager is the one who murdered him. Victor is surprised by a confessional letter he finds among his father’s things. In it, his father admits that he was never just a restaurateur—in fact he was part of a vast international crime syndicate that formed during China’s leanest communist years. He tells Victor that if he is reading this, he must have been murdered. And he asks his son to avenge his death… to go to Beijing… find the organized crime syndicate… find their ICE drug that he opposed for the U.S. market… expose it to a journalist… and force the Chinese leadership to crush the syndicate to avoid embarrassment.

Victor travels to Beijing, where he navigates his father’s secret criminal life, confronting decades-old grudges, violent spats, and a shocking new (ICE) enterprise that the organization wants to undertake. Standing up against it is likely what got his father killed, but Victor remains undeterred. He enlists his growing network of allies and friends to finish what his father started, no matter the costs.

And even if you are jaded enough to figure out the twists and turns and flips… and it still an exciting read. This is the author’s first novel. Daniel (a bi-racial, Jewish/Chinese model, translator and author) was attracted to write this thriller due to the idea of finding a letter to the future with instructions in it and how past is prologue: how the past exerts a force to influence the actions of the characters.
Note to file: Penn grad, failed Shanghai Jewish refugee resettlement plan on China-Burma border.





















[book] We Love Anderson Cooper:
Short Stories
by R.L. Maizes
July 23, 2019
Celadon

In this quirky, humorous, and deeply human short story collection, Pushcart Prize-nominated author R.L. Maizes reminds us that even in our most isolated moments, we are never truly alone.

In We Love Anderson Cooper, characters are treated as outsiders because of their sexual orientation, racial or religious identity, or simply because they look different. A young man courts the publicity that comes from outing himself at his bar mitzvah. When a painter is shunned because of his appearance, he learns to ink tattoos that come to life. A paranoid Jewish actuary suspects his cat of cheating on him-with his Protestant girlfriend.

In this debut collection, humor complements pathos. Readers will recognize themselves in these stories and in these protagonists, whose backgrounds are vastly different from their own-we’ve all been outsiders at some point.



















AUGUST 2019 BOOKS




[book] Chutzpah:
Why Israel Is a Hub of
Innovation and Entrepreneurship
by Inbal Arieli
August 2019
HarperBusiness

Discover the secret behind how Israel, a tiny country with the highest concentration of start-ups per capita worldwide, is raising generations of entrepreneurs who are disrupting markets around the globe and bringing change to the world.

Dubbed “Silicon Wadi,” Israel ranks third in the World Economic Forum Innovation Rating. Despite its small size, it attracts more venture capital per capita than any other country on the planet. What factors have led to these remarkable achievements, and what secrets do Israeli tech entrepreneurs know that others can learn?

Tech insider Inbal Arieli goes against the common belief that Israel’s outstanding economic accomplishments are the byproduct of its technologically advanced military or the result of long-standing Jewish traditions of study and questioning. Rather, Arieli gives credit to the unique way Israelis are raised in a culture that supports creative thinking and risk taking. Growing up within a tribal-like community, Israelis experience childhoods purposely shaped by challenges and risks—in a culture that encourages and rewards chutzpah. This has helped Israelis develop the courage to pursue unorthodox, and often revolutionary, approaches to change and innovation and is the secret behind the country’s economic success.

While chutzpah has given generations of Israelis the courage to break away from conventional thinking, the Israeli concept balagan—messiness in Hebrew—is at the root of how Israelis are taught to interact with the world. Instead of following strict rules, balagan fosters ambiguity, encouraging the development of the skills necessary for dealing with the unpredictability of life and business. Living with balagan provides Israelis with the opportunity to constantly practice the soft skills defined by the World Economic Forum as the Skills for the Future, as balagan promotes creativity, problem-solving, and independence—key characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.

By revealing the unique ways in which Israelis parent, educate and acculturate, Chutzpah offers invaluable insights and proven strategies for success to aspiring entrepreneurs, parents, executives, innovators, and policymakers.


















[book] The Brave Cyclist:
The True Story of a Holocaust Hero
by Amalia Hoffman
Chiara Fedele (Illustrator)
August 2019
Ages 9 - 12

Once a skinny and weak child, Gino Bartali rose to become a Tour de France champion and one of cycling's greatest stars. But all that seemed unimportant when his country came under the grip of a brutal dictator and entered World War II on the side of Nazi Germany. Bartali might have appeared a mere bystander to the harassment and hatred directed toward Italy’s Jewish people, but secretly he accepted a role in a dangerous plan to help them. Putting his own life at risk, Bartali used his speed and endurance on a bike to deliver documents Jewish people needed to escape harm. His inspiring story reveals how one person could make a difference against violence and prejudice during the time of the Holocaust.


















[book] The Elephant in the Sukkah
by Sherri Mandell
Ivana Kuman of Zagreb (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 3 - 6
Kar-Ben

Henry, once a happy circus elephant, feels lonely and sad at the farm for old elephants, where nobody wants to hear him sing. One evening, he follows the sound of music and singing to the Brenner family's sukkah.

At last, a place where he might sing. He listens and learns the tunes. The next night he returns and meets ORI. Ori didn;t know elephants could sing. No worries, cuz Henry didnt know Jewish people have a holiday where they build a sukkah. But Henry cannot fit inside the sukkah! Only his trunk can pop in. Ori knows it's a mitzvah to invite guests, and he gets a big idea about how to include Henry in the Sukkot fun. Doesnt halacha say you just need three free standing walls?....




















[book] Shanah Tovah, Grover!
Board book
by Joni Kibort Sussman
Tom Leigh ( Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 3 - 6
Kar-Ben

Shanah Tovah, everybodeeee! Help Grover get ready to welcome the Jewish New Year.

























[book] Daniel and Ismail (Yonder Series)
by Juan Pablo Iglesias
Alex Peris (Illustrator)
Ilan Stavans (Translator)
Eliezer Nowodworski (Translator)
Frieda Press-Danieli, Randa Sayegh (Translators)
August 20, 2019
Restless Books

IT READS RIGHT TO LEFT

A one-of-a-kind, uplifting picture book about a Jewish boy and a Palestinian boy who bond on the soccer field—translated into English, Hebrew, and Arabic.

Daniel and Ismail, one Jewish and the other Palestinian, don’t know each other yet, but they have more in common than they know. They live in the same city and have the same birthday, and this year they get the same presents: a traditional scarf—for Daniel a tallit and for Ismail a keffiyeh—and a soccer ball. Taking their gifts out for a spin, they meet by chance on a soccer field, and they soon begin to play together and show off the tricks they can do.

They get so absorbed in the fun that they lose track of time and mix up their gifts running home after taking down the goal: Daniel picks up Ismail's keffiyeh and Ismail takes Daniel's tallit. When they get home and discover their mistake, their parents are shocked and angry, asking the boys if they realize who wears those things.

That night, Daniel and Ismail have nightmares about what they have seen on the news and heard from adults about the other group. But the next day, they find each other in the park and get back to what really matters: having fun and playing the game they both love.

Daniel and Ismail is a remarkable multilingual picture book that confronts the very adult conflicts that kids around the world face, and shows us that different cultures, religions, societies, and languages can all share the same page.

BACKGROUND ON THIS BOOK... Prolific professor and writer and podcaster Ilan Stavans was in Santiago Chile at a book fair when he saw this book about futbol (soccer) titled Iguales a 1, or same as one, or tied 1 to 1. It was unusual, since there are few children's book in South America featuring a Jewish character. You see, Chile has over half a million residents of Palestinian heritage. The authors spoke. Why not publish it in North America and half it in English, Hebrew, and Arabic? Fortunately, Stavans is the publisher at Restless Books, so it made the process a little easier. They created a crowdfunding campaign and raised $12,500. And they hired translators for English and Hebrew... and also a translator and copy-editor who would write the Arabic and be willing to appear on a page with Hebrew, and also reflect the Arabic spoken in Santiago, Cairo, Ramallah and points in between.























[book] Grover's Hanukkah Party
Board book
by Joni Kibort Sussman
Tom Leigh ( Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 3 - 6
Kar-Ben

At Hanukkah, 8 is especially great! Use this fun board book to count party guests, candles, latkes, and more!





























[book] Barnyard Bubbe's Hanukkah
Board book
by Joni Klein-Higger
Barbara Sharf
Monica Gutierrez (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 3 - 6
Kar-Ben

Neigh! Oink! Bah! Whimsical farm animals leave presents for Bubbe during Hanukkah. What will Bubbe do with these thoughtful gifts?
























[book] Kol Hakavod:
Way to Go!
by Jamie Kiffel-Alcheh
Sarah-Jayne Mercer (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 2 - 6
Kar-Ben

A series of kindhearted acts and good deeds by a community's residents illustrates how the world can be a better place.The opening narrative offers a more nuanced and expansive translation of the basic Hebrew idiom than is noted in the subtitle.
'It's everything. It's all. It's whole. /
Entire. The Most. In Hebrew, it's kol.… /
And what's kavod? It's gee! It's wow. /
It's honor, respect. It's whoa, holy cow!'

The two Hebrew words put together literally translate to "all respect," making it a powerful message to acknowledge when something good and important is achieved. Various scenarios follow this introduction, depicting a harmonious community of children performing simple altruistic acts that summon a 'Kol Hakavod!' Such acts as giving up a seat on the subway for an elderly person, feeding the dog, recycling, giving money to charity, visiting an ailing friend, inviting a new classmate to sit with you, and so on may seem minor but will produce major goodwill. The text rhymes-a little unevenly-and is illustrated with cartoon figures colored digitally (sometimes with bits of fabric swatches that add interest). The cast is made up of an assortment of races and ages, and one child uses a wheelchair. The message is clear: How one conducts oneself throughout life is important-at school, in the community, and beyond.This expression of a core Jewish value should resonate with readers of all ethnic groups and faiths -Kirkus Reviews




















[book] The Boy at the Back
of the Class
by Onjali Q. Raúf
August 6, 2019
Ages 8 - 12
Delacorte

In the vein of timely titles such as Katherine Applegate's Wishtree and Alan Gratz's Refugee comes a touching, accessible middle-grade debut about the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis, as well as the life-changing power of friendship and standing as an ally.

There used to be an empty chair at the back of Mrs. Khan's classroom, but on the third Tuesday of the school year a new kid fills it: nine-year-old Ahmet, a Syrian refugee.

The whole class is curious about this new boy--he doesn't seem to smile, and he doesn't talk much. But after learning that Ahmet fled a Very Real War and was separated from his family along the way, a determined group of his classmates bands together to concoct the Greatest Idea in the World--a magnificent plan to reunite Ahmet with his loved ones.

Balancing humor and heart, this relatable story about the refugee crisis from the perspective of kids highlights the community-changing potential of standing as an ally and reminds readers that everyone deserves a place to call home.

"This moving and timely debut novel tells an enlightening, empowering, and ultimately hopeful story about how compassion and a willingness to speak out can change the world." --School Library Journal, Starred Review




















[book] Kugel for Hanukkah?
by Gretchen M. Everin
Rebecca Ashdown (Illustrator)
August 31, 2019
Ages 2 - 6
Kar-Ben

As each of Hanukkah's first seven nights brings an unusual new present to a little girl, the mystery deepens. While the gifts grandma receives add up to a delicious Hanukkah treat, her granddaughter's gifts don't seem to make much sense. Until the eighth night they finally do!

























[book] A Dreidel in Time:
A New Spin on an Old Tale
by Marcia Berneger
Beatriz Castro (Illustrator)
August 31, 2019
Kar-Ben

Ages 8-13

Devorah and Benjamin are excited to open their Hanukkah present from Bubbe and Zayde, which turns out to be an ugly old dreidel. It's a big disappointment-until the dreidel transports them out of modern Los Angeles to join the ancient Maccabees! Once they convince a suspicious Judah Maccabee and their new friends that they've arrived to help, they use what they know about the Hanukkah story from Hebrew school to aid the Maccabees in their battle against Antiochus. The kids know that the miracle of Hanukkah relies on finding the special oil for the Temple menorah, but where can it be?

"Devorah and her younger brother, Benjamin, anxiously await their Hanukkah presents.They are disappointed when their grandparents give them only a very old, misshapen dreidel to share, but Mom knows that this dreidel has magical properties that once helped her reach a true understanding of Hanukkah. The children's first spin lands on Shin, meaning they have lost something. They have also somehow landed (with the dreidel) in ancient Modi'in, where Jews are in conflict with the Syrian king. The children find that they are speaking and understanding Hebrew and quickly become caught up in the fight between the Maccabees and the Syrian army. After the next spin, Nun, meaning neither gain nor loss, two years have passed and the battles continue. Hey, or halfway, leads to 'a great miracle happened here': one night's oil burning for eight nights. Finally they spin Gimmel, or everything, and at last return home with a better understanding of their holiday traditions. These modern children are not only witnesses; they use historical information to guide the Maccabees' leaders and to participate bravely in the events-to the extent that the author seems to imply that these ancients might not have been able to succeed without them. Castro's black-and-white cartoon illustrations provide readers with visual context, depicting both historical and modern characters with pale skin. This exciting retelling of the Hanukkah story should appeal to both Jewish and non-Jewish children. (Historical fiction/fantasy. 8-10)"-Kirkus Reviews























[book] In the Jerusalem Forest
by Devora Busheri
Noa Kelner (Illustrator)
October 1, 2019
Ages 2 - 6
Kar-Ben

A child and her mother take a walk in the forest near Jerusalem, gazing at their reflections in a rippling pond and appreciating their time together.
Inspired by the poem “The Pond” by Hayim Nahman Bialik.
"Readers will be happily confused by this picture book.Almost every page of the story-based on a piece by Israeli national poet Hayim Nahman Bialik-is gently disorienting. The narrator is a young girl walking through the woods with her mother, and as they look at the reflections in the water, she says, 'The forest is upside-down,' and 'There in the water: the sky!' Kelner takes this as a challenge. In her paintings, the sky is often the same color as the water or the ground, and the characters' clothing matches the nature around them. The most challenging section is when the girl says, 'Ima and I see our reflections in the pond. We look the same, like two drops of rain.' ('Ima' is the Hebrew word for 'Mom.') This isn't quite true. The mother is tall, freckled, and redheaded. The daughter is more compact, and her skin is the pale brown of coffee ice cream. But the paintings include small details that mirror each other so that the characters really do start to look alike. Busheri adds off rhymes to the text at unexpected moments ('same' and 'rain,' 'come' and 'sun'), which is both lovely and a bit startling. The imagery, both in the words and the pictures, is so beautiful that readers may be heartbroken when a ripple in the water takes the reflections away. People will be stunned by this book even if they're too astonished to explain why."-Kirkus




















[book] The Key from Spain:
Flory Jagoda and Her Music
by Debbie Levy
Sonja Wimmer (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 5-9
Kar-Ben

When Flory's ancestors are forced to leave Spain during the time of the Spanish Inquisition, they take with them their two most precious possessions-the key to their old house and the Ladino language. When Flory flees Europe during World War II to begin a new life in the United States, she carries Ladino with her, along with her other precious possessions-her harmoniku and her music. But what of the key?
Discover the story of Ladino singer Flory Jagoda.


Check out her music on youtube

"When the Altaras family leaves Spain following the Inquisition, they carry a key to their old house and Ladino, the spoken language of Sephardic Jews. In 1923, a girl named Flory is born into the Altaras family in Bosnia. She loves Ladino, music, and the harmoniku (accordion) given to her by her nona (grandmother). In 1941, Flory must flee the Nazis, and playing music keeps her from being unmasked as a Jew. Later, she immigrates to America as a war bride, sharing music and Ladino with all. Levy's succinct text conveys the highlights of Jagoda's life as well as her love of the folk music that is central to Ladino culture. Wimmer's artwork utilizes maps, dates, and other imagery to convey a sense of the many time periods and places depicted. She also works Ladino words and phrases into her art, using strategic placement to ensure readers will grasp the meanings. With further information about Jagoda and links to her performances, this is a worthy (though fictionalized) homage to a language and its fervent promoter."- Kay Weisman,















[book] Francesco Tirelli's Ice Cream Shop
by Tamar Meir
(daughter in law of PETER, who was saved by Francesco) Yael Albert (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 2 - 6
Kar-Ben

Francesco Tirelli loved to eat gelato from his uncle's cart. So when he moves from Italy to Hungary, Francesco decides to open his own ice cream store. There young Peter learns to love ice cream as much as Francesco did. But when the war comes and Francesco closes his shop for the winter, he uses the shop for a special purpose-to hide his Jewish friends and neighbors from danger. This heroic tale is based on true events.

"A gelato shop in Hungary becomes a hideout for Jews during World War II. Francesco, a young Italian boy, falls in love with ice cream in every flavor. When he moves to Hungary, to the city of Budapest, there is none to be found as tasty as what he loved as a child, so he opens Francesco’s Gelato. No Hungarian culinary specialties are on this menu. One day he encounters a young boy named Peter who shares his passion. After some years pass, the German war against Jews comes to Hungary, and Peter and his family are in danger. Francesco, who has closed his shop, now uses it to hide them and some other Jews. And in the midst of the darkness, Peter finds a special way to celebrate HANUKKAH, the festival of lights. The author’s note informs readers that, years later, Peter (known as Yitzchak in Israel) petitioned Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust museum, to honor Francesco as one of the Righteous Among the Nations. It is Peter’s daughter-in-law who has written this simple but moving tale of quiet heroism. The delicately rendered illustrations vary from the sunny vistas of Italy to the darkness of the hideout. Faces are expressive, and the scene with hidden families around the hanukkiah (originally molds for chocolate) is especially moving. An accessible and memorable account for young readers of one man’s humanity during the Holocaust."-Kirkus Reviews (Journal)

















[book] Mr. Tempkin Climbs a Tree
by Cary Fagan
Carles Arbat (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 2 - 8
Kar-Ben

School's out, and Marky looks forward to summer, including helping his friend and neighbor, Mr. Tempkin, with his garden. But when Mr. Tempkin's plan to thwart the squirrels that have been raiding his birdfeeder goes awry, Marky learns how special a friendship can be.

A young boy and his elderly neighbor bond during the summer months. When school is out, Marky enjoys helping Mr. Tempkin with his garden. While watering the flowers and pulling weeds Marky listens to Mr. Tempkin impart his philosophy on aging well: Walk every day to synagogue, enjoy the flowers and birds in the garden, and, most of all, value friendship. When the elder falls and gets hurt because he decides to climb a tree to hang a bird feeder, Marky is there to get help. Once Mr. Tempkin is back from the hospital, in a wheelchair with a sprained ankle, Marky is even more willing to be there for his friend; it's a mitzvah, after all, to wheel Mr. Tempkin to synagogue and do the work in the garden. By summer's end Mr. Tempkin's ankle is healed and the affinity between the two neighbors has blossomed into a very special relationship. Detailed, realistic paintings in bright, sunny, summer colors portray a largely white suburban community (although a final school-bus scene reflects a diverse group of kids). The fluid narrative arc extends main themes of friendship and the Jewish value of mitzvah: doing good through genuine caring. A gentle story with minimal intrigue and plenty of compassion highlights the beauty of intergenerational relationships."-Kirkus Reviews






















[book] Chelm for the Holidays
by Valerie Estelle Frankel
Sonja Wimmer (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 2 - 8
Kar-Ben

Celebrating Jewish holidays has never been sillier than in Chelm, the Village of Fools! While the Chelmites try to solve problems-like outsmarting bees to get Rosh Hashanah honey, and keeping menorah candles lit without enough oil-their foolishness causes even more chaos. Enjoy these tall tales, old and new, one for each of ten holidays throughout the Jewish year.

Chelm is a real Polish town in Poland, but more importantly, it is a mythical place where some very silly things happen. This collection includes stories about 10 Jewish festivals, including the weekly Shabbat. Some are adaptations of Jewish folktales, and some are original, but all highlight both the town's citizenry and its elders, a small group of men even more foolish than the people they lead. The stories follow the Jewish year, starting with Rosh Hashanah. Some themes are quite recognizable. 'It Will Get Better,' a story set on Lag Ba'Omer, is a variant of the popular 'It Could Always Be Worse,' memorably adapted by Margot Zemach. In it, the holiday picnic, bonfire, and archery tournament are forced into a barn because of rain. The animals smell and eat all the food. The barn almost burns down, but the villagers have pulled some boards out of the roof to let the sun shine in on their picnic-but remember, it's raining. The stories are short and accessible, and they will work well as read-alouds. Children can also enjoy the whole book at once, laughing to themselves about the names alone: There's Fishel the Foolish and Uri the Unwise, among others. The book assumes an audience already familiar with Jewish customs and traditions-or one willing just to laugh without understanding everything-as there is no additional contextual material.Humorous stories for Jewish holidays lighten up the year. (Short stories. 6-9)"-Kirkus Reviews






















[book] Matzah Belowstairs
by Susan Lynn Meyer
Mette Engell (Illustrator)
2019
Ages 2 - 6
Kar-Ben

Miriam Mouse's family always celebrates Passover Belowstairs, while the human Winklers celebrate Abovestairs. But this year Miriam is finding it hard to get a piece of matzah to use for the Mouse family afikomen as the human family has decided to store their matzah in a tin. All seems lost for the Mouse family seder, until young Eli Winkler shares the afikomen with her.

"Two loving Jewish families live at the Winkler house: “Abovestairs” are the Winklers themselves; 'Belowstairs'-under the floorboards-is the Mouse family. All the inhabitants are anticipating Passover, but the Mouse family’s preparations are in crisis: the Winklers have put their matzah in a new, impenetrable tin ('Nobody could chew through that,' says Grandpa Mouse), and how can the Mouses have their Seder if they can’t forage for matzah? Leave it to the youngest, smallest members of each family-Eli Winkler and Miriam Mouse-to solve the problem: they turn the ancient ritual of finding the afikoman into an opportunity to restock the Mouses’ matzah supply. Meyer’s breezy, brief text lifts the story, and Engell’s wide-eyed, anxious mice should resonate with readers experiencing their own family’s holiday-related shpilkes." --Publishers Weekly

















[book] Bubbe's Sweet Surprise
by Sherry Dah
2019
Ages 2 - 6
Independent

When Mindy, Daisy, and Charley misinterpret their Bubbe's Yiddish words, they set off on a comic quest to find her the perfect birthday present. Their search for naches (nachos!), babka (bubblegum!), and more leads to a fantastic day full of fun surprises. They ultimately find that for Bubbe, spending time with her grandchildren is the greatest gift of all! Includes a Yiddish Glossary and a delicious recipe!
































[book] Yiddish Saves the Day
by Debbie Levy
Hector Borlasca (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 4 to 7
Apples and Honey Press

At first I cringed. Is this going to put the fart in fartootst?
But it comes from a reputable publisher and editor, so I recommend it

Oy vey! Such bad mazel you are having. You tripped, banged your shnoz and fell on your tuchus. Then, oy vey is mir, you lost your vocab notebook the day before the big test! But don t worry, don t kvetch, you whole mishpacha is here to help you, and they have plenty of unique, Yiddish words that ll help you ace that test like a MAVEN! So quietly sit like the MENTSH that you are, You re a YIDDISHKEIT MAVEN Collect your gold star!
























[book] Crocodile, You're Beautiful!
Embracing Our Strengths and Ourselves
by Dr. Ruth Westheimer
and Pierre Lehu
and Dena Neusner
CB Decker (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 4 to 7
Apples and Honey Press

I have a body. You have a body. But your body is different from mine. Why? Because it is all yours. You are in charge of your body.

So says the wise Dr. Ruth as she helps out animals who each need her sage advice.
Ruth helps an octopus learn to assert itself,
a crocodile feel more comfortable with its bumpy body,
and a rabbit, turtle, and ant discover and appreciate their strengths.
Full of humor and warmth, Ruth s lessons about body image, confidence and standing-up for yourself shine through in this age appropriate tale to which children of all ages can relate.
Fun activities are included after each story, and will delight young readers as they stretch, draw and dance their way through these important ideas. They ll feel empowered to connect to their own strengths, too.
























[book] Once upon an Apple Cake:
A Rosh Hashanah Story
by Elana Rubinstein
Jennifer Naalchigar (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages seven to ten (7 – 10)
Apples and Honey Press

A PJ LIBRARY SELECTION

A clever story about two rival families and a Rosh Hashanah cake recipe.

(Nobody Doesnt Like) Saralee Siegel has a super NOSE.
She can smell things like no one's business.
Her Zadie (cisgender Grandfather) says that with a nose like that, she'll rule the world.
This fast-paced, magical story about a girl who loves to cook, a rival restaurant, and a secret Rosh Hashanah cake recipe, is told in an illustrated chapter book format.
























MYSTIC PIZZA??
NO.
MITZVAH PIZZA
[book] MITZVAH PIZZA
by Sarah Lynn Scheerger, CSW
Deborah Melmon (Illustrator)
2019
Ages five to ten (5 – 10)
KAR-BEN

Missy loves Saturdays with her dad. Every week they do something special together. Usually, Dad brings the funds and Missy brings the fun, but this week, it's Missy's turn to treat with her own allowance-until she and her dad stop for pizza, and Missy discovers a special way to do a mitzvah.

"This book may bring a surge of business to the Philadelphia pizzeria that inspired it. The walls of the Pizza Corner are covered with sticky notes, and at first Missy can't figure out why. 'Each sticky note,' her father explains, 'represents a piece of pizza that somebody has already paid for, like a gift or a treat.' Missy's new friend Jane, a girl she met while waiting in line, needs help paying for her slice, for instance. Melmon's illustration of the line is one of the pleasures of the book. Every customer seems to have a full life story, and the picture uses almost every skin tone on the artist's palette. Ever since Hanukkah, Missy has been saving up her chore money for her day with Daddy, and if there's absolutely no suspense about how she's going to spend it, that's because many readers will be moved to go to the real-life pizza shop in Philadelphia and make a donation to the pizza fund. It's difficult not to be touched by the story, even when Scheerger's phrasing is slightly awkward. When Missy is thinking about what to do with her money, she says, 'my mouth is full, and so is my head.' Given the paucity of books about Jews of color, it's notable that Missy has East Asian features while her father presents white; Jane and her father both present white, and their need is treated with respect. Warm and affecting." --Kirkus
























[book] Jackie and Jesse and Joni and Jae
by Chris Barash
Christine Battuz(Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 4 to 7
Apples and Honey Press

Jackie and Jesse and Joni and Jae walked down to the river one fine autumn day. Neighbors and friends and the rabbi went too. There was something called tashlich they needed to do. On Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, four friends reflect on mistakes they ve made in the past year, they apologize for hurting each other s feelings, and they think about how they will do better in the new year. The title characters in this gentle story model character traits including friendship, honesty, compassion, and empathy, while exploring a lesser-known Jewish holiday tradition.
























[book] Hillel Takes a Bath
by Vicki L. Weber
John Joven (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 4 to 7
Apples and Honey Press

Today I will use this cloth to do a mitzvah!
Hillel the Sage announced to his class.
He whisked the cloth off his shoulder and snapped it in the air. The rabbi's students were puzzled and delighted. What could be done with a cloth? What mysterious mitzvah could it be?
Through this charming story about the famous Hillel of the Talmud, readers will enjoy discovering that the mysterious mitzvah is taking a bath!

The note for families at the back of the book will help readers dig deeper and let them think more about the Jewish value of guarding one s health, shmor et nafshecha, and how having healthy habits (like taking baths) is an important Jewish value.
























[book] Learning from the Germans:
Race and the Memory of Evil
by Susan Neiman
August 2019
FS&G

As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past

In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. Neiman is a white woman who came of age in the civil rights–era South and a Jewish woman who has spent much of her adult life in Berlin. Working from this unique perspective, she combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories.

Through discussions with Germans, including Jan Philipp Reemtsma, who created the breakthrough Crimes of the Wehrmacht exhibit, and Friedrich Schorlemmer, the East German dissident preacher, Neiman tells the story of the long and difficult path Germans faced in their effort to atone for the crimes of the Holocaust. In the United States, she interviews James Meredith about his battle for equality in Mississippi and Bryan Stevenson about his monument to the victims of lynching, as well as lesser-known social justice activists in the South, to provide a compelling picture of the work contemporary Americans are doing to confront our violent history. In clear and gripping prose, Neiman urges us to consider the nuanced forms that evil can assume, so that we can recognize and avoid them in the future.















[book] Color Me In
by Natasha Díaz
August 20, 2019
Delacorte
Ages 13-18

Debut YA author Natasha Díaz pulls from her personal experience to inform this powerful coming-of-age novel about the meaning of friendship, the joyful beginnings of romance, and the racism and religious intolerance that can both strain a family to the breaking point and strengthen its bonds.

Who is Nevaeh Levitz?

Growing up in an affluent suburb of New York City, sixteen-year-old Nevaeh Levitz never thought much about her biracial roots. When her Black mom and Jewish dad split up, she relocates to her mom's family home in Harlem and is forced to confront her identity for the first time.

Nevaeh wants to get to know her extended family, but one of her cousins can't stand that Nevaeh, who inadvertently passes as white, is too privileged, pampered, and selfish to relate to the injustices they face on a daily basis as African Americans. In the midst of attempting to blend their families, Nevaeh's dad decides that she should have a belated bat mitzvah instead of a sweet sixteen, which guarantees social humiliation at her posh private school. Even with the push and pull of her two cultures, Nevaeh does what she's always done when life gets complicated: she stays silent.

It's only when Nevaeh stumbles upon a secret from her mom's past, finds herself falling in love, and sees firsthand the prejudice her family faces that she begins to realize she has a voice. And she has choices. Will she continue to let circumstances dictate her path? Or will she find power in herself and decide once and for all who and where she is meant to be?














[book] The Song of Songs:
A Biography
by Ilana Pardes (Hebrew Univ)
August 13, 2019
Princeton University Press

An essential history of the greatest love poem ever written

The Song of Songs has been embraced for centuries as the ultimate song of love. But the kind of love readers have found in this ancient poem is strikingly varied. Ilana Pardes invites us to explore the dramatic shift from readings of the Song as a poem on divine love to celebrations of its exuberant account of human love. With a refreshingly nuanced approach, she reveals how allegorical and literal interpretations are inextricably intertwined in the Song's tumultuous life. The body in all its aspects?pleasure and pain, even erotic fervor?is key to many allegorical commentaries. And although the literal, sensual Song thrives in modernity, allegory has not disappeared. New modes of allegory have emerged in modern settings, from the literary and the scholarly to the communal.

Offering rare insights into the story of this remarkable poem, Pardes traces a diverse line of passionate readers. She looks at Jewish and Christian interpreters of late antiquity who were engaged in disputes over the Song's allegorical meaning, at medieval Hebrew poets who introduced it into the opulent world of courtly banquets, and at kabbalists who used it as a springboard to the celestial spheres. She shows how feminist critics have marveled at the Song's egalitarian representation of courtship, and how it became a song of America for Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, and Toni Morrison. Throughout these explorations of the Song's reception, Pardes highlights the unparalleled beauty of its audacious language of love.
























[book] Cardozo on the Parashah:
Bereshit Essays on the Weekly Torah Portion
by Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo
August 1, 2019
Kasva Press

Literary Nonfiction. Jewish Studies. This collection of essays by a rabbi known internationally as "one of the most thoughtful voices in contemporary Judaism" looks at the weekly Torah portion through the eyes of philosophy, contemporary controversies, and personal struggles. Written in Rabbi Cardozo's characteristic style, this collection offers something for many different types of readers: laymen and clergy, full-time students and intellectually curious practitioners, Jews and non-Jews alike.
























[book] A State at Any Cost:
The Life of David Ben-Gurion
(First PM of Israel)
by Tom Segev
Haim Watzman (Translator)
August 27, 2019
FS&G

As the founder of Israel, David Ben-Gurion long ago secured his reputation as a leading figure of the twentieth century. Determined from an early age to create a Jewish state, he thereupon took control of the Zionist movement, declared Israel’s independence, and navigated his country through wars, controversies and remarkable achievements. And yet Ben-Gurion remains an enigma-he could be driven and imperious, or quizzical and confounding.

In this definitive biography, Israel’s leading journalist-historian Tom Segev uses large amounts of previously unreleased archival material to give an original, nuanced account, transcending the myths and legends that have accreted around the man. Segev’s probing biography ranges from the villages of Poland to Manhattan libraries, London hotels, and the hills of Palestine, and shows us Ben-Gurion’s relentless activity across six decades. Along the way, Segev reveals for the first time Ben-Gurion’s secret negotiations with the British on the eve of Israel’s independence, his willingness to countenance the forced transfer of Arab neighbors, his relative indifference to Jerusalem, and his occasional “nutty moments”-from UFO sightings to plans for Israel to acquire territory in South America. Segev also reveals that Ben-Gurion first heard about the Holocaust from a Palestinian Arab acquaintance, and explores his tempestuous private life, including the testimony of four former lovers.

The result is a full and startling portrait of a man who sought a state “at any cost”-at times through risk-taking, violence, and unpredictability, and at other times through compromise, moderation, and reason. Segev’s Ben-Gurion is neither a saint nor a villain but rather a historical actor who belongs in the company of Lenin or Churchill-a twentieth-century leader whose iron will and complex temperament left a complex and contentious legacy that we still reckon with today.

























[book] And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?:
A Biographical Memoir
of Oliver Sacks
by Lawrence Weschler
August 13, 2019
FS&G

The untold story of Dr. Oliver Sacks, his own most singular patient

The author Lawrence Weschler began spending time with Oliver Sacks in the early 1980s, when he set out to profile the neurologist for his own new employer, The New Yorker.

Almost a decade earlier, Dr. Sacks had published his masterpiece Awakenings-the account of his long-dormant patients’ miraculous but troubling return to life in a Bronx hospital ward. But the book had hardly been an immediate success, and the rumpled clinician was still largely unknown. Over the ensuing four years, the two men worked closely together until, for wracking personal reasons, Sacks asked Weschler to abandon the profile, a request to which Weschler acceded. The two remained close friends, however, across the next thirty years and then, just as Sacks was dying, he urged Weschler to take up the project once again. This book is the result of that entreaty.

Weschler sets Sacks’s brilliant table talk and extravagant personality in vivid relief, casting himself as a beanpole Sancho to Sacks’s capacious Quixote. We see Sacks rowing and ranting and caring deeply; composing the essays that would form The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; recalling his turbulent drug-fueled younger days; helping his patients and exhausting his friends; and waging intellectual war against a medical and scientific establishment that failed to address his greatest concern: the spontaneous specificity of the individual human soul.

And all the while he is pouring out a stream of glorious, ribald, hilarious, and often profound conversation that establishes him as one of the great talkers of the age. Here is the definitive portrait of Sacks as our preeminent romantic scientist, a self-described “clinical ontologist” whose entire practice revolved around the single fundamental question he effectively asked each of his patients:
How are you?
Which is to say,
How do you be?

A question which Weschler, with this book, turns back on the good doctor himself.
























[book] The Winemaker's Wife
by Kristin Harmel
August 13, 2019
Gallery Books

The author of the “engrossing” (People) international bestseller The Room on Rue Amélie returns with a moving story set amid the champagne vineyards of northern France during the darkest days of World War II, perfect for fans of Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale.

Champagne, 1940: Inès has just married Michel, the owner of storied champagne house Maison Chauveau, when the Germans invade. As the danger mounts, Michel turns his back on his marriage to begin hiding munitions for the Résistance. Inès fears they’ll be exposed, but for Céline, half-Jewish wife of Chauveau’s chef de cave, the risk is even greater—rumors abound of Jews being shipped east to an unspeakable fate.

When Céline recklessly follows her heart in one desperate bid for happiness, and Inès makes a dangerous mistake with a Nazi collaborator, they risk the lives of those they love—and the champagne house that ties them together.

New York, 2019: Liv Kent has just lost everything when her eccentric French grandmother shows up unannounced, insisting on a trip to France. But the older woman has an ulterior motive—and a tragic, decades-old story to share. When past and present finally collide, Liv finds herself on a road to salvation that leads right to the caves of the Maison Chauveau.
























[book] KARL MARX
Philosophy and Revolution
By Shlomo Avineri
August 6, 2019
Jewish Lives series
Yale University Press

A new exploration of Karl Marx's life through his intellectual contributions to modern thought

Karl Marx (1818–1883)—philosopher, historian, sociologist, economist, current affairs journalist, and editor—was one of the most influential and revolutionary thinkers of modern history, but he is rarely thought of as a Jewish thinker, and his Jewish background is either overlooked or misrepresented. Here, distinguished scholar Shlomo Avineri argues that Marx’s Jewish origins did leave a significant impression on his work. Marx was born in Trier, then part of Prussia, and his family had enjoyed equal rights and emancipation under earlier French control of the area. But then its annexation to Prussia deprived the Jewish population of its equal rights. These developments led to the reluctant conversion of Marx’s father, and similar tribulations radicalized many young intellectuals of that time who came from a Jewish background.

Avineri puts Marx’s Jewish background in its proper and balanced perspective, and traces Marx’s intellectual development in light of the historical, intellectual, and political contexts in which he lived.




























[book] Have You Eaten Grandma?
Or, the Life-Saving Importance
of Correct Punctuation, Grammar,
and Good English
by Gyles Brandreth
August 13, 2019
Atria Books

For anyone who wants to make fewer (not less) grammar mistakes, a lively, effective, and witty guide to all the ins and outs of the English language, reminiscent of the New York Times bestseller Eats, Shoots & Leaves.

Our language is changing, literary levels are declining, and our grasp of grammar is at a crisis point. From commas to colons, apostrophes to adverbs, there are countless ways we can make mistakes when writing or speaking. But do not despair! Great Britain’s most popular grammar guru has created the ultimate modern manual for English speakers on both sides of the Atlantic.

In this brilliantly funny and accessible guide to proper punctuation and so much more, Gyles Brandreth explores the linguistic horrors of our times, tells us what we’ve been doing wrong and shows us how, in the future, we can get it right every time. Covering everything from dangling participles to transitive verbs, from age-old conundrums like “lay” vs. “lie,” to the confounding influences of social media on our everyday language, Have You Eaten Grandma? is an endlessly useful and entertaining resource for all.























[book] NOBODY'S VICTIM
Fighting Psychos,
Stalkers, Pervs,
and Trolls
By Attorney Carrie Goldberg
August 2019
PLUME

Nobody's Victim is an unflinching look at a hidden world most people don’t know exists—one of stalking, blackmail, and sexual violence, online and off—and the incredible story of how one lawyer, determined to fight back, turned her own hell into a revolution.

“We are all a moment away from having our life overtaken by somebody hell-bent on our destruction.” That grim reality—gleaned from personal experience and twenty years of trauma work —is a fundamental principle of Carrie Goldberg’s cutting-edge victims’ rights law firm.

Riveting and an essential timely conversation-starter, Nobody's Victim invites readers to join Carrie on the front lines of the war against sexual violence and privacy violations as she fights for revenge porn and sextortion laws, uncovers major Title IX violations, and sues the hell out of tech companies, schools, and powerful sexual predators. Her battleground is the courtroom; her crusade is to transform clients from victims into warriors.

In gripping detail, Carrie shares the diabolical ways her clients are attacked and how she, through her unique combination of advocacy, badass relentlessness, risk-taking, and client-empowerment, pursues justice for them all. There are stories about a woman whose ex-boyfriend made fake bomb threats in her name and caused a national panic; a fifteen-year-old girl who was sexually assaulted on school grounds and then suspended when she reported the attack; and a man whose ex-boyfriend used a dating app to send more than 1,200 men to ex's home and work for sex. With breathtaking honesty, Carrie also shares her own shattering story about why she began her work and the uphill battle of building a business.

While her clients are a diverse group—from every gender, sexual orientation, age, class, race, religion, occupation, and background—the offenders are not. They are highly predictable. In this book, Carrie offers a taxonomy of the four types of offenders she encounters most often at her firm: assholes, psychos, pervs, and trolls. “If we recognize the patterns of these perpetrators,” she explains, “we know how to fight back.”

Deeply personal yet achingly universal, Nobody's Victim is a bold and much-needed analysis of victim protection in the era of the Internet. This book is an urgent warning of a coming crisis, a predictor of imminent danger, and a weapon to take back control and protect ourselves—both online and off.






























[book] Medieval Jewish Philosophy
and Its Literary Forms
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
Edited by
Aaron W. Hughes, James T. Robinson
August 2019
Indiana University Press

Too often the study of philosophical texts is carried out in ways that do not pay significant attention to how the ideas contained within them are presented, articulated, and developed. This was not always the case. The contributors to this collected work consider Jewish philosophy in the medieval period, when new genres and forms of written expression were flourishing in the wake of renewed interest in ancient philosophy. Many medieval Jewish philosophers were highly accomplished poets, for example, and made conscious efforts to write in a poetic style. This volume turns attention to the connections that medieval Jewish thinkers made between the literary, the exegetical, the philosophical, and the mystical to shed light on the creativity and diversity of medieval thought. As they broaden the scope of what counts as medieval Jewish philosophy, the essays collected here consider questions about how an argument is formed, how text is put into the service of philosophy, and the social and intellectual environment in which philosophical texts were produced.
























[book] Heidegger and Kabbalah:
Hidden Gnosis and the
Path of Poi'sis
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by Elliot R. Wolfson
August 2019
Indiana University Press

While many scholars have noted Martin Heidegger’s indebtedness to Christian mystical sources, as well as his affinity with Taoism and Buddhism, Elliot R. Wolfson expands connections between Heidegger’s thought and kabbalistic material. By arguing that the Jewish esoteric tradition impacted Heidegger, Wolfson presents an alternative way of understanding the history of Western philosophy. Wolfson’s comparison between Heidegger and kabbalah sheds light on key concepts such as hermeneutics, temporality, language, and being and nothingness, while yielding surprising reflections on their common philosophical ground. Given Heidegger’s involvement with National Socialism and his use of antisemitic language, these innovative readings are all the more remarkable for their juxtaposition of incongruent fields of discourse. Wolfson’s entanglement with Heidegger and kabbalah not only enhances understandings of both but, more profoundly, serves as an ethical corrective to their respective ethnocentrism and essentialism. Wolfson masterfully illustrates the redemptive capacity of thought to illuminate common ground in seemingly disparate philosophical traditions.































CELEBRATING: Bard Music Festival 2019
Korngold and His World
Bard College
August 9–11 and 16–18, 2019


[book] Korngold and His World
(The Bard Music Festival)
Edited by Daniel Goldmark, Kevin C. Karnes
August 23, 2019
Princeton University Press

A brand-new look at the life and music of renowned composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957) was the last compositional prodigy to emerge from the Austro-German tradition of Mozart and Mendelssohn. He was lauded in his youth by everyone from Mahler to Puccini and his auspicious career in the early 1900s spanned chamber music, opera, and musical theater. Today, he is best known for his Hollywood film scores, composed between 1935 and 1947. From his prewar operas in Vienna to his pathbreaking contributions to American film, Korngold and His World provides a substantial reassessment of Korngold’s life and accomplishments.

Korngold struggled to reconcile the musical language of his Viennese upbringing with American popular song and cinema, and was forced to adapt to a new life after wartime emigration to Hollywood. This collection examines Korngold’s operas and film scores, the critical reception of his music, and his place in the milieus of both the Old and New Worlds. The volume also features numerous historical documents-many previously unpublished and in first-ever English translations-including essays by the composer as well as memoirs by his wife, Luzi Korngold, and his father, the renowned music critic Julius Korngold.

The contributors are Leon Botstein, David Brodbeck, Bryan Gilliam, Daniel Goldmark, Lily Hirsch, Kevin Karnes, Sherry Lee, Neil Lerner, Sadie Menicanin, Ben Winters, Amy Wlodarski, and Charles Youmans.
































[book] BEATEN DOWN, WORKED UP
The Past, Present, and
Future of American Labor
by Steven Greenhouse
August 2019
Knopf

From the longtime New York Times labor correspondent, an in-depth look at working men and women in America, the challenges they face, and how they can be re-empowered. It is a history of major labor events and also a repeating manifesto on why unions and organized labor is the solution to many problems. If you get irritated by lovingly pro-union paragraphs, this is not a book for you.

In an era when corporate profits have soared while wages have flatlined, millions of Americans are searching for ways to improve their lives, and they're often turning to labor unions and worker action, whether #RedforEd teachers' strikes or the Fight for $15. Wage stagnation, low-wage work, and blighted blue-collar communities have become an all-too-common part of modern-day America, and behind these trends is a little-discussed problem: the decades-long decline in worker power.

Steven Greenhouse sees this decline reflected in some of the most pressing problems facing our nation today, including income inequality, declining social mobility, the gender pay gap, and the concentration of political power in the hands of the wealthy. He rebuts the often-stated view that labor unions are outmoded--or even harmful--by recounting some of labor's victories, and the efforts of several of today's most innovative and successful worker groups. He shows us the modern labor landscape through the stories of dozens of American workers, from G.M. workers to Uber drivers, and we see how unions historically have empowered--and lifted--the most marginalized, including young women garment workers in New York in 1909, black sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968, and hotel housekeepers today. Greenhouse proposes concrete, feasible ways in which workers' collective power can be--and is being--rekindled and reimagined in the twenty-first century.



























[book] Thirty-Life Crisis:
Navigating My Thirties,
One Drunk Baby Shower at a Time
by Lisa Schwartz
August 27, 2019
Grand Central Publishing
A hilarious essay collection perfect for anyone dealing with the challenges, indignities, and celebrations that come with being a thirty-something by actor and YouTube star Lisa Schwartz (Lisbug).

THIRTYLIFE CRISIS Lisa Schwartz's stories and musings are all about watching her friends adult like pros, while she tries to understand why she doesn't want or can't seem to find all the things they have for herself. Like a big sister who's already seen it all, Lisa will take readers through her own life experiences to say that one thing we all need to hear: you are so not alone. Unabashed and unfiltered, Schwartz's voice and candor will appeal to anyone in their thirties who just can't deal with the never-ending Facebook feed of friends' engagement photos and baby pictures, the trials of figuring out where their passion meets their career, and everything in between.

So, if you've ever had to figure out...
Parenting Your Parents (Yikes)
Gender Reveal Parties (It's an actual thing.)
Discovering That Your Boyfriend Likes Boys (Surprise!)
Online Shopping Away Your Anxiety (Don't)
or Gender Reveal Parties (Seriously. It's an actual thing.)

The foreword is by fellow YouTube personality Shane Dawson with whom she had a romantic relationship for several years until their breakup in 2015. He has since become engaged to Ryland Adams, after deciding to pursue a more same sex or same gender romantic future


























[book] Right Side Up:
Adventures in Chelm
by Eric A Kimmel
Steven Brown (Illustrator)
August 1, 2019
Ages 8 – 12
Apples and Honey Press

































[book] The Kindertransport:
Contesting Memory
(Studies in Antisemitism)
by Jennifer Craig-norton
August 2019
Indiana University Press

Jennifer Craig-Norton sets out to challenge celebratory narratives of the Kindertransport that have dominated popular memory as well as literature on the subject. According to these accounts, the Kindertransport was a straightforward act of rescue and salvation, with little room for a deeper, more complex analysis. This volume reveals that in fact many children experienced difficulties with settlement: they were treated inconsistently by refugee agencies, their parents had complicated reasons for giving them up, and their caregivers had a variety of motives for taking them in. Against the grain of many other narratives, Craig-Norton emphasizes the use of archival sources, many of them newly discovered testimonial accounts and letters from Kinder to their families. This documentary evidence together with testimonial evidence allows compelling insights into the nature of interactions between children and their parents and caregivers and shows readers a more nuanced and complete picture of the Kindertransport.





















[book] What Are Biblical Values?:
What the Bible Says
on Key Ethical Issues
by John Collins (Yale)
August 6, 2019
Yale University Press

An illuminating exploration of the Bible and many of our most contentious contemporary issues

Many people today claim that their positions on various issues are grounded in biblical values, and they use scriptural passages to support their claims. But the Bible was written over the course of several hundred years and contains contradictory positions on many issues. The Bible seldom provides simple answers; it more often shows the complexity of moral problems. Can we really speak of “biblical values”?

In this eye-opening book, one of the world’s leading biblical scholars argues that when we read the Bible with care, we are often surprised by what we find. Examining what the Bible actually says on a number of key themes, John Collins covers a vast array of topics, including the right to life, gender, the role of women, the environment, slavery and liberation, violence and zeal, and social justice. With clarity and authority, he invites us to dramatically reimagine the basis for biblical ethics in the world today.





















[book] Caging Skies:
A Novel
by Christine Leunens
August 9, 2019
Abrams Books

An avid member of the Hitler Youth in 1940s Vienna, Johannes Betzler discovers his parents are hiding a Jewish girl named Elsa behind a false wall in their home. His initial horror turns to interest—then love and obsession. After his parents disappear, Johannes is the only one aware of Elsa’s existence in the house and the only one responsible for her survival.

By turns disturbing and blackly comic, haunting and cleverly satirical, Christine Leunens’s captivating and masterful novel—sold in 16 countries and the basis for a major forthcoming film by Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnorak,What We Do in the Shadows)—examines this world of truth and lies, laying bare the darkest corners of the human soul.




























[book] JOB
A NEW TRANSLATION
EDwARD L. GRRENSTEIN
(BAR ILAN, Israel)
August 9, 2019
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS

This revelatory new translation of Job by one of the world’s leading biblical scholars will reshape the way we read this canonical text

The book of Job has often been called the greatest poem ever written. The book, in Edward Greenstein’s characterization, is “a Wunderkind, a genius emerging out of the confluence of two literary streams” which “dazzles like Shakespeare with unrivaled vocabulary and a penchant for linguistic innovation.” Despite the text’s literary prestige and cultural prominence, no English translation has come close to conveying the proper sense of the original. The book has consequently been misunderstood in innumerable details and in its main themes.

Edward Greenstein’s new translation of Job is the culmination of decades of intensive research and painstaking philological and literary analysis, offering a major reinterpretation of this canonical text. Through his beautifully rendered translation and insightful introduction and commentary, Greenstein presents a new perspective: Job, he shows, was defiant of God until the end. The book is more about speaking truth to power than the problem of unjust suffering.




























[book] A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves:
One Family and Migration in
the 21st Century
by Jason DeParle
August 20, 2019
VIKING

The definitive chronicle of our new age of global migration, told through the multi-generational saga of a Filipino family, by a veteran New York Times reporter and two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist.

When Jason DeParle moved into the Manila slums with Tita Comodas and her family three decades ago, he never imagined his reporting on them would span three generations and turn into the defining chronicle of a new age--the age of global migration. In a monumental book that gives new meaning to "immersion journalism," DeParle paints an intimate portrait of an unforgettable family as they endure years of sacrifice and separation, willing themselves out of shantytown poverty into a new global middle class. At the heart of the story is Tita's daughter, Rosalie. Beating the odds, she struggles through nursing school and works her way across the Middle East until a Texas hospital fulfills her dreams with a job offer in the States.

Migration is changing the world--reordering politics, economics, and cultures across the globe. With nearly 45 million immigrants in the United States, few issues are as polarizing. But if the politics of immigration is broken, immigration itself--tens of millions of people gathered from every corner of the globe--remains an underappreciated American success. Expertly combining the personal and panoramic, DeParle presents a family saga and a global phenomenon. Restarting her life in Galveston, Rosalie brings her reluctant husband and three young children with whom she has rarely lived. They must learn to become a family, even as they learn a new country. Ordinary and extraordinary at once, their journey is a twenty-first-century classic, rendered in gripping detail.

























SEPTEMBER 2019 BOOKS




[book] How to Fight Anti-Semitism
by Bari Weiss
NYT editor/writer, Pittsburgh native
September 3, 2019
Crown

See her at sixth and I in washington, dc in october

Could it happen here? The prescient New York Times writer delivers an urgent wake-up call to all Americans exposing the alarming rise of anti-semitism in this country--and explains what we can do to defeat it.

On October 27, 2018, the synagogue where Bari Weiss became a bat mitzvah was the site of the deadliest attack on Jews in this country's history. For most Americans, the massacre at Tree of Life came as a total shock. But to those who have been paying attention, it was only a more violent, extreme expression of the broader trend that has been sweeping Europe for the past two decades.

No longer the exclusive province of the far right and far left, anti-semitism finds a home in identity politics and the reaction against identity politics, in the renewal of "America first" isolationism and the rise of one-world socialism. An ancient hatred increasingly allowed into modern political discussion, anti-semitism has been migrating toward the mainstream in dangerous ways, amplified by social media and a culture of conspiracy that threatens us all.

This timely book is Weiss's cri de couer: an unnerving reminder that Jews must never lose their hard-won instinct for danger, and a powerful case for renewing Jewish and liberal values to guide us through this uncertain moment. Not just for the sake of America's Jews, but for the sake of America.




















[book] Here All Along:
Finding Meaning, Spirituality, and
a Deeper Connection to Life--
in Judaism (After Finally
Choosing to Look There)
also known as
DONE WANDERING
A Reintroduction to Judaism
by Sarah Hurwitz
September 2019
Spiegel & Grau

Attorney Hurwitz, a long term speechwriter in the Obama White House, specifically for FLOTUS Michelle Obama, (also wrote Clinton concession speech in 2008, and speeches for Kerry, General Clark, Gore and Clinton) and a graduate of Harvard and Harvard Law writes a deeply felt compelling book on why the Jewish religion – Judaism – is urgent and relevant in the present times. She was named to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council by POTUS Barack Obama.

As she told the JFN Jewish Funders Network a year ago... she did not enjoy “Hebrew School” as a child. Neither she nor any of her classmates had any kind of meaningful Jewish practice going on at home. High Holy Day services were excruciating. After her bat mitzvah, she left the religion behind her. Then, about four years ago, she broke up with a guy she had been dating, and she took an eight week intro to Judaism class at the JCC jCC in response to an email. To fill up her Wednesday nights. The texts on Jewish ethics and values articulated HER ethics and values, but in a way that was far deeper, and more insightful. Seen through adult eyes, practices like Shabbat struck her as utterly brilliant. She found that Judaism has so much to offer today, but few people made it beyond the juvenile ideas from Hebrew School. Her book will try to rectify the epic communications problem American Judaism has. (Also, shout out to Rabbi Aaron Potek and “Gather” which focuses on engaging 20 and 30 somethings in Jewish life.)



















[book] 24/6: The Power of
Unplugging One Day a Week
by Tiffany Shlain
September 24, 2019
Gallery Books

In 24/6, Tiffany Shlain (founder of the Webby Awards) explores how turning off screens one day a week – on Shabbat - can work wonders on your brain, body, and soul—and why this regular practice of looking up gives you a better chance of seeing the big picture.

Internet pioneer and renowned filmmaker Tiffany Shlain takes us on a provocative and entertaining journey through past, present, and future of ideas about time and technology and introduces a strategy for living in our 24/7 world: turning off all screens for 24 hours each week. She and her family call it “Technology Shabbat.” This weekly practice, which they’ve done for nearly a decade with their kids (16 & 10), has completely changed their lives, giving them more time, productivity, connection, and presence.

Drawn from the ancient ritual of Shabbat, living 24/6 can work for anyone from any background. With insight, humor, and wisdom, Shlain shares her story, offers lessons she has learned, and provides a blueprint to do it yourself. Along the way, she examines the neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, and history of a weekly day of rest across cultures, making a convincing argument for why we need to bring this ritual back.

A compelling personal story and a far-reaching examination of the complex world we’ve created, 24/6 is an incisive and urgent call to rebalance ourselves and society through a transformative weekly practice. The book offers a universal, scientifically-grounded, easily doable strategy for living in our 24/7 world that offers exponential benefits.

Go google her UC Berkeley commencement speech
























[book] Diamonds and Scoundrels:
My Life in the Jewelry Business
by Adrienne Rubin
September 17, 2019
She Writes Press

When Adrienne Rubin enters into the jewelry business in 1970s Los Angeles, she is a maverick in a world dominated by men. She soon meets a young hotshot salesman who doesn’t seem to struggle at all, and when he asks her to be his partner, she is excited to join him. She doesn’t know him well, but she does know his father, and she believes he is as trustworthy as the day is long . . .

Diamonds and Scoundrels shows us how a woman in a man’s world, with tenacity and sheer determination, can earn respect and obtain a true sense of accomplishment. Following Rubin’s experiences in the jewelry industry through the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s-with the ups and downs, good guys and bad-this is a tale of personal growth, of how to overcome challenges with courage and resilience. It’s a story for the woman today who, in addition to a rich family life, seeks a self-realized, fulfilling path toward a life well lived.
























[book] In Jerusalem:
Three Generations of an Israeli
Family and a Palestinian Family
by Lis Harris
September 17, 2019
Beacon Press

A fresh lens on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that examines the life-shaping reverberations of wars and ongoing tensions upon the everyday lives of families in Jerusalem.

An American, secular, diasporic Jew, Lis Harris grew up with the knowledge of the historical wrongs done to Jews. In adulthood, she developed a growing awareness of the wrongs they in turn had done to the Palestinian people. This gave her an intense desire to understand how the Israelis' history led them to where they are now. However, she found that top-down political accounts and insider assessments made the people most affected seem like chess pieces. What she wanted was to register the effects of the country's seemingly never-ending conflict on the lives of successive generations.

Shuttling back and forth over ten years between East and West Jerusalem, Harris learned about the lives of two families: the Israeli Pinczowers/Ezrahis and the Palestinian Abuleils. She came to know members of each family--young and old, religious and secular, male and female. As they shared their histories with her, she looked at how each family survived the losses and dislocations that defined their lives; how, in a region where war and its threat were part of the very air they breathed, they gave children hope for their future; and how the adults' understanding of the conflict evolved over time. Combining a decade of historical research with political analysis, Harris creates a moving portrait of one of the most complicated and controversial conflicts of our time.























LOVE, LATKES, AND WHAT I WORE...
[book] It's a Whole Spiel:
Love, Latkes, and Other Jewish Stories
Edited by Katherine Locke
Laura Silverman
and Mayim Bialik (Foreword)
September 2019
Knopf for Young Readers
Ages 12 and up

Includes a special introduction by Mayim Bialik, star of The Big Bang Theory and author of the #1 bestseller Girling Up!

Get ready to fall in love, experience heartbreak, and discover the true meaning of identity in this poignant collection of short stories about Jewish teens, including entries by David Levithan, Nova Ren Suma, and more!

A Jewish boy falls in love with a fellow counselor at summer camp. A group of Jewish friends take the trip of a lifetime. A girl meets her new boyfriend's family over Shabbat dinner. Two best friends put their friendship to the test over the course of a Friday night. A Jewish girl feels pressure to date the only Jewish boy in her grade. Hilarious pranks and disaster ensue at a crush's Hanukkah party.

From stories of confronting their relationships with Judaism to rom-coms with a side of bagels and lox, It's a Whole Spiel features one story after another that says yes, we are Jewish, but we are also queer, and disabled, and creative, and political, and adventurous, and anything we want to be. You will fall in love with this insightful, funny, and romantic Jewish anthology from a collection of diverse Jewish authors.



















[book] The Last Train to London:
A Novel
by Meg Waite Clayton
SEPTEMBER 10, 2019
Harper

The New York Times bestselling author of Beautiful Exiles conjures her best novel yet, a pre-World War II-era story with the emotional resonance of Orphan Train and The Nightingale, centering on the Kindertransports that carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe—and one brave woman who helped them escape to safety.

In 1936, the Nazi are little more than loud, brutish bores to fifteen-year old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright whose playground extends from Vienna’s streets to its intricate underground tunnels. Stephan’s best friend and companion is the brilliant Žofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents’ carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis’ take control.

There is hope in the darkness, though. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss—Hitler’s annexation of Austria—as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape.

Tante Truus, as she is known, is determined to save as many children as she can. After Britain passes a measure to take in at-risk child refugees from the German Reich, she dares to approach Adolf Eichmann, the man who would later help devise the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question,” in a race against time to bring children like Stephan, his young brother Walter, and Žofie-Helene on a perilous journey to an uncertain future abroad.



























[book] We Stand Divided:
The Rift Between American Jews and Israel
by Daniel Gordis, PhD
September 24, 2019
ECCO

From National Jewish Book Award Winner and author of Israel, a bold reevaluation of the tensions between American and Israeli Jews that reimagines the past, present, and future of Jewish life

Relations between the American Jewish community and Israel are at an all-time nadir. Since Israel’s founding seventy years ago, particularly as memory of the Holocaust and of Israel’s early vulnerability has receded, the divide has grown only wider. Most explanations pin the blame on Israel’s handling of its conflict with the Palestinians, Israel’s attitude toward non-Orthodox Judaism, and Israel’s dismissive attitude toward American Jews in general. In short, the cause for the rupture is not what Israel is; it’s what Israel does.

These explanations tell only half the story. We Stand Divided examines the history of the troubled relationship, showing that from the outset, the founders of what are now the world’s two largest Jewish communities were responding to different threats and opportunities, and had very different ideas of how to guarantee a Jewish future.

With an even hand, Daniel Gordis takes us beyond the headlines and explains how Israel and America have fundamentally different ideas about issues ranging from democracy and history to religion and identity. He argues that as a first step to healing the breach, the two communities must acknowledge and discuss their profound differences and moral commitments. Only then can they forge a path forward, together.

Dr. Daniel Gordis is Senior Vice President and the Koret Distinguished Fellow at Shalem College in Jerusalem, and is a columnist for the Jerusalem Post and Bloomberg View. The author of numerous books on Jewish thought and political currents in Israel, and a winner of the National Jewish Book Award, Dr. Gordis was the founding dean of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies at the University of Judaism. He joined Shalem in 2007 to help found Israel’s first liberal arts college, after spending nine years as vice president of the Mandel Foundation in Israel and director of its Leadership Institute. He lives in Jerusalem.

















[book] The World That We Knew:
A Novel
by Alice Hoffman
September 24, 2019
Simon and Schuster

In Berlin in 1941 during humanity’s darkest hour, three unforgettable young women must act with courage and love to survive, from the New York Times bestselling author of The Dovekeepers and The Marriage of Opposites Alice Hoffman.

In Berlin, at the time when the world changed, Hanni Kohn knows she must send her twelve-year-old daughter away to save her from the Nazi regime. She finds her way to a renowned rabbi, but it’s his daughter, Ettie, who offers hope of salvation when she creates a mystical Jewish creature, a rare and unusual golem, who is sworn to protect Lea. Once Ava is brought to life, she and Lea and Ettie become eternally entwined, their paths fated to cross, their fortunes linked.

Lea and Ava travel from Paris, where Lea meets her soulmate, to a convent in western France known for its silver roses; from a school in a mountaintop village where three thousand Jews were saved. Meanwhile, Ettie is in hiding, waiting to become the fighter she's destined to be.

What does it mean to lose your mother? How much can one person sacrifice for love? In a world where evil can be found at every turn, we meet remarkable characters that take us on a stunning journey of loss and resistance, the fantastical and the mortal, in a place where all roads lead past the Angel of Death and love is never ending.



















[book] Sababa: Fresh,
Sunny Flavors From My Israeli Kitchen
by Adeena Sussman
with a Foreword by Zahav's Michael Solomonov
September 3, 2019
Avery

"The pages of this book ooze with [Adeena's] passion for the romance and beauty of Israeli cuisine. The recipes are soulful, elemental and stunningly delicious." --from the foreword by Michael Solomonov

In an Israeli cookbook as personal as it is global, Adeena Sussman celebrates the tableau of flavors the region has to offer, in all its staggering and delicious variety. Adeena is the secret powerhouse recipe developer behind the scenes on many cookbooks, including her collaboration on Cravings and Cravings: Hungry for More with Chrissy Teigen and The Sprinkles Baking Book with Candace Nelson. She has also written about Jewish and Israeli cooking and food culture for Food & Wine, The Wall Street Journal, Epicurious, and the now defunct Gourmet.

In Hebrew (derived from the original Arabic), sababa means "everything is awesome," and it's this sunny spirit with which the American food writer and expat Adeena Sussman cooks and dreams up meals in her Tel Aviv kitchen. Every morning, Sussman makes her way through the bustling stalls of Shuk Hacarmel, her local market, which sells irresistibly fresh ingredients and tempting snacks--juicy ripe figs and cherries, locally made halvah, addictive street food, and delectable cheeses and olives. In Sababa, Sussman presents 125 recipes for dishes inspired by this culinary wonderland and by the wide-varying influences surrounding her in Israel.

Americans have begun to instinctively crave the spicy, bright flavors of Israeli cuisine, and in this timely cookbook, Sussman shows readers how to use border-crossing kitchen staples-- tahini, sumac, silan (date syrup), harissa, za'atar---to delicious effect, while also introducing more exotic spices and ingredients. From Freekeh and Roasted Grape Salad and Crudo with Cherries and Squeezed Tomatoes, to Schug Marinated Lamb Chops and Tahini Caramel Tart, Sussman's recipes make a riot of fresh tastes accessible and effortless for the home cook. Filled with transporting storytelling, Sababa is the ultimate, everyday guide to the Israeli kitchen.



















[book] SHUK
FROM MARKET TO TABLE
the Heart of Israeli Home Cooking
by Einat Admony and Janna Gur
September 17, 2019
ARTISAN

With Shuk, home cooks everywhere can now inhale the fragrances and taste the flavors of the vivacious culinary mash-up that is today’s Israel. The book takes you deeper into this trending cuisine, through the combined expertise of the authors, chef Einat Admony of Balaboosta and food writer Janna Gur. Admony’s long-simmered stews, herb-dominant rice pilafs, toasted-nut-studded grain salads, and of course loads of vegetable dishes—from snappy, fresh, and raw to roasted every way you can think of—will open your eyes and your palate to the complex nuances of Jewish food and culture. The book also includes authoritative primers on the well-loved pillars of the cuisine, including chopped salad, hummus, tabboulehs, rich and inventive shakshukas, and even hand-rolled couscous with festive partners such as tangy quick pickles, rich pepper compotes, and deeply flavored condiments. Through gorgeous photo essays of nine celebrated shuks, you’ll feel the vibrancy and centrality of the local markets, which are so much more than simply shopping venues—they’re the beating heart of the country.

With more than 140 recipes, Shuk presents Jewish dishes with roots in Persia, Yemen, Libya, the Balkans, the Levant, and all the regions that contribute to the evolving food scene in Israel. The ingredients are familiar, but the combinations and techniques are surprising. With Shuk in your kitchen, you’ll soon be cooking with the warmth and passion of an Israeli, creating the treasures of this multicultural table in your own home.

























[book] Modern Sourdough:
Sweet and Savoury Recipes
from Margot Bakery (London)
by Michelle Eshkeri
Patricia Niven (Photographer)
September 10, 2019
White Lion Press

In Modern Sourdough, Michelle Eshkeri reveals how mastering the art of sourdough baking can open up a world of sweet and savoury treats at home.

Michelle opened Margot Bakery in a shop in East Finchley, London in 2016. An instant hit, it became an experiment in pushing the boundaries of what a local bakery could be, by specialising in sourdough leavened pastries and sweet doughs alongside more traditional breads.

Bringing together over 100 mouth-watering recipes inspired by Michelle’s heritage, Modern Sourdough expands our understanding of this ancient baking technique. Featuring a step-by-step guide to making a sourdough starter, as well as methods for folding, shaping, scoring and baking, it demonstrates how you too can make Margot signature loaves, as well as naturally-leavened pizzas, challah, focaccia, French pastries, brioche and babka.

Covering bread, cakes, buns, savoury bakes and store cupboard wonders, plus a selection of non-sourdough favourites from the bakery, these are recipes you’ll want to make again and again.

























[book] Jerusalem Food:
Bold Flavors from the
Middle East and Beyond
SHAKSHUKA
by Nidal Kersh
September 30, 2019
Sterling

Taste Jerusalem’s multicultural flavors in dishes that showcase the region’s incomparable bounty, from hummus and chopped vegetable salads to fresh breads, shawarma, and baklava.

For centuries, Jerusalem has been a melting pot for a dizzying number of cultures, and its cuisine reflects that diversity. The city’s cooking has no boundaries . . . and neither does this cookbook. Here you’ll find a range of classic dishes, including fattoush, schnitzel, kebabs, hummus, falafel, mana'ish, shawarma, and baba ganouj. And of course there are simple but timeless pairings, like olives and Greek yogurt, with lots of za'atar and olive oil, plus a variety of delicious breads and savory vegetables, meats, and fish. In a warm conversational style, Nidal Kersh provides intriguing personal family background and an historical perspective that creates a rich context for understanding Jerusalem’s thriving food culture.

























[book] Kosher Style:
Over 100 Jewish Recipes
for the Modern Cook
by Amy Rosen
September 3, 2019
Random House

For the bubbes and the balabustas, the keepers of Jewish kitchens and the enthusiastic neophytes, comes a cookbook that celebrates how many Jews eat today.

In the Jewish culture, as in many others, bubbes, saftas and nanas are the matriarchs of the kitchen and thus the rulers of the roost. They are culinary giants in quilted polyester muumuus and silk slippers who know how to make the Semitic linchpins cherished from childhood--the kugel, the gefilte fish, the matzah ball soup and the crispy-skinned roasted chicken. They all have their specialties but, of course, they won't be around to feed us forever, and that will be a loss indeed. But it will be an even bigger loss if the recipes we grew up on pass away with them, along with those special connections to our past. That's what prompted Amy Rosen, journalist and cookbook author, to spirit the classic recipes from her grandmothers and other role models into the 21st century. All of the dishes in Kosher Style are inspired by the tables and tales and chutzpah of the North American Jewish experience. They also happen to be kosher.

In this book are all the recipes you need for successful shellfish- and pork-free home entertaining, be it for a Jewish holiday or a workaday dinner. From crave-worthy snacks to family-size salads, soulful mains to show-stopping desserts, all of the recipes are doable in the home kitchen and are clearly marked as either a meat dish, dairy dish, or pareve (neutral). Think: Lacy Latkes & Applesauce, Sour Cream & Onion Potato Knishes, General Tso's Chicken, and Toblerone-Chunk Hamantaschen your family will plotz over. In addition to the classics, Amy has included some of her favorite modern recipes, like a Quinoa-Tofu Bowl with Greens & Green Goddess Dressing, Honey-Harissa Roasted Carrots and a Crisp Cucumber & Radish Salad.

Kosher Style is for anyone who likes to cook and loves to eat, and it's especially for those yearning to create new shared memories around a table brimming with history, loved ones and maple-soy brisket.

























[book] Waste Not, Want Not Kosher Cookbook:
Creative Ways to Serve Yesterday's Meal
by Yaffa Fruchter
2019
Urim

WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Kosher Cookbook promotes a unique and exciting approach to making leftovers new again. Boasting a collection of over 120 innovative recipes, this cookbook offers a comprehensive guide of the best, safest, and most delicious ways to use what's on hand and eat well. To curb her own food-waster's guilt, Yaffa Fruchter developed creative ways of using available ingredients to produce excellent new dishes that will change the way you look at last night's meals -- 30 recipes that use cooked chicken, 15 that use bread and challah, and much more.

A consummate ''balabusta'' (homemaker), Yaffa Fruchter has been cooking from a young age. With experience running an upscale restaurant to cooking for her growing family in New York, Yaffa has been honing her skills for decades.

























[book] The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook
by Annie Gray
Gareth Neame (Royalist, Foreword)
September 17, 2019
Weldon Owen

I thought they might have an American Jewish recipe in there, since Lady Cora was born Jewish, and Lady Rose MacClare went Jewish. But no.

The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook presents over 100 recipes that showcase the cookery and customs of the Crawley household—from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies—and bring an authentic slice of Downton Abbey to modern kitchens and Downton fans.

Whether adapted from original recipes of the period, replicated as seen or alluded to on screen, or typical of the time, all the recipes reflect the influences found on the Downton Abbey tables. Food historian Annie Gray gives a rich and fascinating insight into the background of the dishes that were popular between 1912 and 1926, when Downton Abbey is set —a period of tremendous change and conflict, as well as culinary development.

With a foreword by Gareth Neame, executive producer and co-creator of Downton Abbey, and featuring over 100 stunning color photographs, The Downton Abbey Cookbook also includes a special section on hosting Downton-themed dinner parties and presents stills from across the TV series as well as the latest film. Notes on the etiquette and customs of the times, quotes from the characters, and descriptions of the scenes in which the foods appear provide vivid context for the dishes.

The recipes are grouped by occasion, which include breakfast; luncheons and suppers; afternoon tea and garden parties; picnics, shoots and race meets; festivities; upstairs dinner; downstairs dinner; downstairs supper and tea; and the still room. From the upstairs menu: Cornish Pasties Sausage Rolls Chicken Vol-au-Vents Cucumber Soup Soul a la Florentine Salmon Mousse Quail and Watercress Charlotte Russe... From the downstairs menu: Toad-in-the-Hole Beef Stew with Dumplings Steak and Kidney Pie Cauliflower Cheese Rice Pudding Jam and Custard Tarts Gingerbread Cake Summer Pudding

With these and more historic recipes—compelling to a contemporary palate and easy to replicate in today’s kitchens—savor the rich traditions and flavors of Downton Abbey without end.

























[book] Heal Us O Lord:
A Chaplain's Interface with Pain
by Sidney Goldstein

Urim

Heal Us O Lord: A Chaplain's Interface With Pain is the memoir of Rabbi Sidney Goldstein, a chaplain who encounters the traumas of life as he visits with those who are in the throes of experiencing them. The book expresses the challenges faced by chaplains in providing support during some of the most crucial and painful times of life without being enveloped by them personally. Rabbi Goldstein offers a source of encouragement and council for those whose lives might crave spirituality but do not know where to turn.

























[book] An Unorthodox Match:
A Novel
by Naomi Ragen
September 24, 2019
ST. Martin's Press

California girl Lola has her life all set up: business degree, handsome fiancé, fast track career, when suddenly, without warning, everything tragically implodes. After years fruitlessly searching for love, marriage, and children, she decides to take the radical step of seeking spirituality and meaning far outside the parameters of modern life in the insular, ultraorthodox enclave of Boro Park, Brooklyn. There, fate brings her to the dysfunctional home of newly-widowed Jacob, a devout Torah scholar, whose life is also in turmoil, and whose small children are aching for the kindness of a womanly touch.

While her mother direly predicts she is ruining her life, enslaving herself to a community that is a misogynistic religious cult, Lola’s heart tells her something far more complicated. But it is the shocking and unexpected messages of her new community itself which will finally force her into a deeper understanding of the real choices she now faces and which will ultimately decide her fate.

An Unorthodox March is a powerful and moving novel of faith, love, and acceptance, from Naomi Ragen, the international bestselling author of The Devil in Jerusalem.

























[book] The (First) Jewish Catalog
Paperback reprint
by Richard Siegel
and Michael and Sharon Strassfeld
1973
JPS

The First Jewish Catalog, compiled and edited by Sharon & Michael Strassfeld, and Richard Siegel, Jewish Publication Society, First Edition, 1973. Hundreds of b/w photos and illustrations populate this innovative reference catalog that presents Jewish history, religion, rituals, communities, culture, festivals, writings, and behavior in an easily readable format. Oversize trade paperback with glossy, pictorial, stiff covers.



























[book] ON DIVISION:
A Novel
by Goldie Goldbloom
September 17, 2019
FS&G

Through one woman's life at a moment of surprising change, the award-winning author Goldie Goldbloom tells a deeply affecting, morally insightful story and offers a rare look inside Brooklyn's Chasidic community

In Williamsburg, Brooklyn, just a block or two up from the East River on Division Avenue, Surie Eckstein is soon to be a great-grandmother. Her ten children range in age from thirteen to thirty-nine. Her in-laws, postwar immigrants from Romania, live on the first floor of their house. Her daughter Tzila Ruchel lives on the second. She and Yidel, a scribe in such demand that he makes only a few Torah scrolls a year, live on the third. Wed when Surie was sixteen, they have a happy marriage and a full life, and, at the ages of fifty-seven and sixty-two, they are looking forward to some quiet time together.

Into this life of counted blessings comes a surprise. Surie is pregnant... with twins. Pregnant at fifty-seven. It is a shock. And at her age, at this stage, it is an aberration, a shift in the proper order of things, and a public display of private life... that she has sexual relations with her husband even after childbearing age. Surie feels exposed, ashamed. She is unable to share the news, even with her husband. And what if the news brings shame to the family and its income... even worse than when their son LIPA became estranged from the community. And so for the first time in her life, she has a secret - a secret that slowly separates her from the community... a Division... and what about this curiosity she has for the outside world and people outside of her community... her own agency.

Goldie Goldbloom's On Division is an excavation of one woman's life, a story of awakening at middle age, and a thoughtful examination of the dynamics of self and collective identity, of kindness, of insularity, of intolerance. It is a steady-eyed look inside insular communities that also celebrates their comforts. It is a rare portrait of a long, happy marriage. And it is an unforgettable new novel from a writer whose imagination is matched only by the depth of her humanity.


























[book] Defending Israel:
The Story of My Relationship
with My Most Challenging Client
by Alan M. Dershowitz
September 3, 2019
All Points Books

World-renowned lawyer Alan Dershowitz recounts stories from his many years of defending the state of Israel.

Alan Dershowitz has spent years advocating for his "most challenging client"-the state of Israel-both publicly and in private meetings with high level international figures, including every US president and Israeli leader of the past 40 years. Replete with personal insights and unreported details, Defending Israel offers a comprehensive history of modern Israel from the perspective of one of the country's most important supporters. Readers are given a rare front row seat to the high profile controversies and debates that Dershowitz was involved in over the years, even as the political tides shifted and the liberal community became increasingly critical of Israeli policies.

Beyond documenting America's changing attitude toward the country, Defending Israel serves as an updated defense of the Jewish homeland on numerous points-though it also includes Dershowitz's criticisms of Israeli decisions and policies that he believes to be unwise. At a time when Jewish Americans as a whole are increasingly uncertain as to who supports Israel and who doesn't, there is no better book to turn to for answers-and a pragmatic look toward the future.





















[book] A Field Guide to the Jewish People:
Who They Are,
Where They Come From,
What to Feed Them,
What They Have Against Foreskins,
How Come They Carry Each ...
of Water, and Much More.
Maybe Too Much More
by Dave Barry,
Adam Mansbach,
and Alan Zweibel
September 24, 2019
FLATIRON Books

From the three male stars of the annual Miami Book Fair

The last book on Judaism you will ever have to buy, this hilarious tome from three comedy legends contains the sweetness of an apricot rugelach and all the wisdom of a matzoh ball.

Why do random Jewish holidays keep springing up unexpectedly? Why are yarmulkes round? Who was the first Jewish comedian?

These baffling questions and many more are answered by the comedic powerhouse trio of Dave Barry, Adam Mansbach, and Alan Zweibel. In A Field Guide to the Jewish People the authors dissect every holiday, rite of passage, and tradition, unravel a long and complicated history, and tackle the tough questions that have been plaguing the long-suffering Jewish people everywhere for centuries.

So gather round your chosen ones, pop open a bottle of Manischewitz, and get ready to laugh as you finally begin to understand the inner-workings of Judaism.





















[book] The Jewish Cookbook
by Leah Koenig
with Julia Turshen (Introduction) and Jenni Ferrari-Adler
September 3, 2019
PHAIDON

A rich trove of contemporary global Jewish cuisine, featuring hundreds of stories and 400 recipes for home cooks everywhere, with icons for every recipe denoting deitary restrictions, number of ingredients, and cooking times.

Includes 25 extra recipes from Einat Admony, James and David Ardinast, Evan Bloom, Assaf granit, Florence Kahn, Laurel Kratochvila, Yotam Ottolenghi, Alex Raij, Anthony Rose, Niki Russ Federman, Eyal Shani, Alon Shaya, and Michael Solomonov.

The Jewish Cookbook is an inspiring celebration of the diversity and breadth of this venerable culinary tradition. A true fusion cuisine, Jewish food evolves constantly to reflect the changing geographies and ingredients of its cooks. Featuring more than 400 home-cooking recipes for everyday and holiday foods from the Middle East to the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa - as well as contemporary interpretations by renowned chefs including Yotam Ottolenghi, Michael Solomonov, and Alex Raij - this definitive compendium of Jewish cuisine introduces readers to recipes and culinary traditions from Jewish communities the world over, and is perfect for anyone looking to add international tastes to their table.





















[book] Summertime:
George Gershwin's Life in Music
by Richard Crawford
September 3, 2019
WW Norton

The life of a beloved American composer reflected through his music, writings, and letters.

New York City native and gifted pianist George Gershwin blossomed as an accompanist before his talent as a songwriter opened the way to Broadway, where he fashioned his own brand of American music. He composed a long run of musical comedies, many with his brother Ira as lyricist, but his aspirations reached beyond commercial success.

A lifetime learner, Gershwin was able to appeal to listeners on both sides of the purported popular-classical divide. In 1924-when he was just twenty-five-he bridged that gap with his first instrumental composition, Rhapsody in Blue, an instant classic premiered by Paul Whiteman’s jazz orchestra, as the anchor of a concert entitled “An Experiment in Modern Music.”

From that time forward his work as a composer, pianist, and citizen of the Jazz Age made him in some circles a leader on America’s musical scene. The late1920s found him extending the range of the shows he scored to include the United Kingdom, and he published several articles to reveal his thinking about a range of musical matters. Moreover, having polished his skills as an orchestrator, he pushed boundaries again in 1935 with the groundbreaking folk opera, Porgy and Bess-his magnum opus.

Gershwin’s talent and warmth made him a presence in New York’s musical and social circles (and linked him romantically with pianist-composer Kay Swift). In 1936 he and Ira moved west to write songs for Hollywood. Their work was cut short, however, when George developed a brain tumor and died at thirty-eight, a beloved American artist.

Drawing extensively from letters and contemporaneous accounts, acclaimed music historian Richard Crawford traces the arc of Gershwin’s remarkable life, seamlessly blending colorful anecdotes with a discussion of Gershwin’s unforgettable oeuvre. His days on earth were limited to the summertime of life. But the spirit and inventive vitality of the music he left behind lives on.





















[book] The Stakes:
2020 and the Survival
of American Democracy
by Robert Kuttner
September 3, 2019
WW Norton

Brandeis University Professor writes that to save both democracy and a decent economy Americans should elect a progressive president. Either the USA continues the twin slides into corrupt autocracy and corporate plutocracy - the course set in the past half century by Republican and Democratic presidents alike - or we elect a progressive Democrat in the mold of FDR.

At stake is nothing less than the continued success of the American experiment in liberal democracy, which depends on a fairer distribution of life chances and a reduction of the financial industry’s influence in the political sphere. Kuttner goes on to show convincingly that a progressive Democrat also has a better chance than a centrist of winning the presidency in the current political environment.

A passionate book from one of our best political analysts, The Stakes will be the book to read ahead of the 2020 primaries.































[book] BELIEVERS:
Faith in Human Nature
by Melvin Konner M.D.
September 10, 2019
NORTON

An anthropologist examines the nature of religiosity, and how it shapes and benefits humankind.

Believers is a scientist’s answer to attacks on faith by some well-meaning scientists and philosophers. It is a firm rebuke of the “Four Horsemen”-Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens-known for writing about religion as something irrational and ultimately harmful.

Anthropologist Melvin Konner, who was raised as an Orthodox Jew but has lived his adult life without such faith, explores the psychology, development, brain science, evolution, and even genetics of the varied religious impulses we experience as a species.

Conceding that faith is not for everyone, he views religious people with a sympathetic eye; his own upbringing, his apprenticeship in the trance-dance religion of the African Bushmen, and his friends and explorations in Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, Muslim, and other faiths have all shaped his perspective. Faith has always manifested itself in different ways-some revelatory and comforting; some kind and good; some ecumenical and cosmopolitan; some bigoted, coercive, and violent. But the future, Konner argues, will both produce more nonbelievers, and incline the religious among us-holding their own by having larger families-to increasingly reject prejudice and aggression.

A colorful weave of personal stories of religious-and irreligious-encounters, as well as new scientific research, Believers shows us that religion does much good as well as undoubted harm, and that for at least a large minority of humanity, the belief in things unseen neither can nor should go away.












[book] Talking to Strangers:
What We Should Know
about the People We Don't Know
by Malcolm Gladwell
September 10, 2019
Little, Brown and Co

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and #1 bestselling author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, David and Goliath, and What the Dog Saw, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers---and why they often go wrong.

How did Bernie Madoff convince Jewish investors and Hadassah to invest millions with him? How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true?

Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland---throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world. In his first book since his #1 bestseller, David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell has written a gripping guidebook for troubled times.




















[book] The Jews Should Keep Quiet:
Franklin D. Roosevelt,
Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and
the Holocaust
by Rafael Medoff
September 1, 2019
THE JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Based on recently discovered documents, The Jews Should Keep Quiet reassesses the how’s and why’s behind the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration’s fateful policies during the Holocaust.

Rafael Medoff delves into difficult truths: With FDR’s consent, the administration deliberately suppressed European immigration far below the limits set by U.S. law. His administration also refused to admit Jewish refugees to the U.S. Virgin Islands, dismissed proposals to use empty Liberty ships returning from Europe to carry refugees, and rejected pleas to drop bombs on the railways leading to Auschwitz, even while American planes were bombing targets only a few miles away—actions that would not have conflicted with the larger goal of winning the war.

What motivated FDR?

Medoff explores the sensitive question of the president’s private sentiments toward Jews. Unmasking strong parallels between Roosevelt’s statements regarding Jews and Asians, he connects the administration’s policies of excluding Jewish refugees and interning Japanese Americans.

The Jews Should Keep Quiet further reveals how FDR’s personal relationship with Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, American Jewry’s foremost leader in the 1930s and 1940s, swayed the U.S. response to the Holocaust. Documenting how Roosevelt and others pressured Rabbi Wise to STIFLE American Jewish criticism of FDR’s policies, Medoff chronicles how and why the American Jewish community largely fell in line with Wise. Ultimately Medoff weighs the administration’s realistic options for rescue action, which, if taken, would have saved many lives.




































[book] The Hundred Years' War on Palestine:
A History of Settler Colonial
Conquest and Resistance, 1917 -- 2017
by Rashid Khalidi
September 24, 2019
Metropolitan Books

A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history

In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous people who would not easily accept their own displacement. He warned of the perils ahead, ending his note, “in the name of God, let Palestine be left alone.” Thus Rashid Khalidi, al-Khalidi’s great-great-nephew, begins this sweeping history, the first general account of the conflict told from an explicitly Palestinian perspective.

Drawing on a wealth of untapped archival materials and the reports of generations of family members-mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats, and journalists-The Hundred Years' War on Palestine upends accepted interpretations of the conflict, which tend, at best, to describe a tragic clash between two peoples with claims to the same territory. Instead, Khalidi traces a hundred years of colonial war on the Palestinians, waged first by the Zionist movement and then Israel, but backed by Britain and the United States, the great powers of the age. He highlights the key episodes in this colonial campaign, from the 1917 Balfour Declaration to the destruction of Palestine in 1948, from Israel’s 1982 invation of Lebanon to the endless and futile peace process.

Original, authoritative, and important, The Hundred Years' War on Palestine is not a chronicle of victimization, nor does it whitewash the mistakes of Palestinian leaders or deny the emergence of national movements on both sides. In reevaluting the forces arrayed against the Palestinians, it offers an illuminating new view of a conflict that continues to this day.


























[book] BILL CUNNINGHAM
ON THE STREET
FIVE DECADES IF ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHY
The New York Times
Clarkson Potter
September 3, 2019

This official book of photographs houses the 50-year collection of the most iconic and beloved photographs taken by prolific fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, the king of street style.

The iconic Bill Cunningham was known for wearing a blue work jacket and for riding a bicycle around New York City as he captured cutting-edge street style (before street style was even a thing). He took pictures for the New York Times from 1978 until his death in 2016 and wrote the beloved columns On the Street and Evening Hours, which began in 1989. This book will be an oversize collection of Bill's hallowed photography--a mixture of published and unpublished--organized by decade with essays by and about Bill's muses and subjects, such Anna Wintour, Cathy Horyn, Vanessa Friedman, and Ruth La Ferla. Every fashion lover and fashionista--from NYC and beyond--will have to add this book to their collection.


























[book] TECH TITANS OF CHINA
HOW CHINA's TECH SECTOR IS
CHALLENGING THE WORLD BY
INNOVATING FASTER, WORKING
HARDER, AND GOING GLOBAL
By Rebecca Fannin
September 24, 2019
Nicholas Brearley

Start up Nation (Israel)'s Tech Sector – and Silicon Valley - will face greater competition from Chinese start ups. In this book, an expert on Chinese tech firms shares strategies.






















[book] JEWISH EMANCIPATION
A HiSTORY ACROSS FIVE CENTURIES
BY DAVID SORKIN
September 10, 2019
Princeton University Press

The first comprehensive history of how Jews became citizens in the modern world

For all their unquestionable importance, the Holocaust and the founding of the State of Israel now loom so large in modern Jewish history that we have mostly lost sight of the fact that they are only part of-and indeed reactions to-the central event of that history: emancipation. In this book, David Sorkin seeks to reorient Jewish history by offering the first comprehensive account in any language of the process by which Jews became citizens with civil and political rights in the modern world. Ranging from the mid-sixteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first, Jewish Emancipation tells the ongoing story of how Jews have gained, kept, lost, and recovered rights in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, the United States, and Israel.

Emancipation, Sorkin shows, was not a one-time or linear event that began with the Enlightenment or French Revolution and culminated with Jews' acquisition of rights in Central Europe in 1867–71 or Russia in 1917. Rather, emancipation was and is a complex, multidirectional, and ambiguous process characterized by deflections and reversals, defeats and successes, triumphs and tragedies. For example, American Jews mobilized twice for emancipation: in the nineteenth century for political rights, and in the twentieth for lost civil rights. Similarly, Israel itself has struggled from the start to institute equality among its heterogeneous citizens.

By telling the story of this foundational but neglected event, Jewish Emancipation reveals the lost contours of Jewish history over the past half millennium.






















[book] Fly Already:
Stories
by Etgar Keret
September 3, 2019
Riverhead

From a "genius" (New York Times) storyteller: a new, subversive, hilarious, heart-breaking collection.

"There is sweetheartedness and wisdom and eloquence and transcendence in his stories because these virtues exist in abundance in Etgar himself... I am very happy that Etgar and his work are in the world, making things better." --George Saunders

There's no one like Etgar Keret. His stories take place at the crossroads of the fantastical, searing, and hilarious. His characters grapple with parenthood and family, war and games, marijuana and cake, memory and love. These stories never go to the expected place, but always surprise, entertain, and move...

In "Arctic Lizard," a young boy narrates a post-apocalyptic version of the world where a youth army wages an unending war, rewarded by collecting prizes. A father tries to shield his son from the inevitable in "Fly Already." In "One Gram Short," a guy just wants to get a joint to impress a girl and ends up down a rabbit hole of chaos and heartache. And in the masterpiece "Pineapple Crush," two unlikely people connect through an evening smoke down by the beach, only to have one of them imagine a much deeper relationship.

The thread that weaves these pieces together is our inability to communicate, to see so little of the world around us and to understand each other even less. Yet somehow, in these pages, through Etgar's deep love for humanity and our hapless existence, a bright light shines through and our universal connection to each other sparks alive.





















[book] Gertrude Stein Has Arrived:
The Homecoming of a Literary Legend
by Roy Morris Jr
September 10, 2019
Johns Hopkins University Press

In 1933, experimental writer and longtime expatriate Gertrude Stein skyrocketed to overnight fame with the publication of an unlikely best seller, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Pantomiming the voice of her partner Alice, The Autobiography was actually Gertrude's work. But whoever the real author was, the uncharacteristically lucid and readable book won over the hearts of thousands of Americans, whose clamor to meet Gertrude and Alice in person convinced them to return to America for the first time in thirty years from their self-imposed exile in France.

For more than six months, Gertrude and Alice crisscrossed America, from New England to California, from Minnesota to Texas, stopping at thirty-seven different cities along the way. They had tea with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, attended a star-studded dinner party at Charlie Chaplin's home in Beverly Hills, enjoyed fifty-yard-line seats at the annual Yale-Dartmouth football game, and rode along with a homicide detective through the streets of Chicago. They met with the Raven Society in Edgar Allan Poe's old room at the University of Virginia, toured notable Civil War battlefields, and ate Oysters Rockefeller for the first time at Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans. Everywhere they went, they were treated like everyone's favorite maiden aunts-colorful, eccentric, and eminently quotable.

In Gertrude Stein Has Arrived, noted literary biographer Roy Morris Jr. recounts with characteristic energy and wit the couple's rollicking tour, revealing how-much to their surprise-they rediscovered their American roots after three decades of living abroad. Entertaining and sympathetic, this clear-eyed account captures Gertrude Stein for the larger-than-life legend she was and shows the unique relationship she had with her indefatigable companion, Alice B. Toklas-the true power behind the throne.





















[book] Broken Strings
by Eric Walters
September 10, 2019
Penguin Random House – Puffin Canada
AGES 10-14
Shir Li (my Song)
A violin and a middle-school musical unleash a dark family secret in this moving story by an award-winning author duo. For fans of The Devil's Arithmetic and Hana's Suitcase.

It's 2002. In the aftermath of the twin towers -- and the death of her beloved grandmother -- Shirli Berman is intent on moving forward. The best singer in her junior high, she auditions for the lead role in Fiddler on the Roof, but is crushed to learn that she's been given the part of the old Jewish mother in the musical rather than the coveted part of the eldest sister. But there is an upside: her "husband" is none other than Ben Morgan, the cutest and most popular boy in the school.

Deciding to throw herself into the role, she rummages in her grandfather's attic for some props. There, she discovers an old violin in the corner -- strange, since her Zayde has never seemed to like music, never even going to any of her recitals.

Showing it to her grandfather unleashes an anger in him she has never seen before, and while she is frightened of what it might mean, Shirli keeps trying to connect with her Zayde and discover the awful reason behind his anger. A long-kept family secret spills out, and Shirli learns the true power of music, both terrible and wonderful.





















[book] Bill Cunningham:
On the Street:
Five Decades of Iconic Photography
by The New York Times
September 3, 2019

Hello young man...
This official book of photographs houses the 50-year collection of the most iconic and beloved photographs taken by prolific fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, the king of street style.

The iconic Bill Cunningham was known for wearing a blue work jacket and for riding a bicycle around New York City as he captured cutting-edge street style (before street style was even a thing). He took pictures for the New York Times from 1978 until his death in 2016 and wrote the beloved columns On the Street and Evening Hours, which began in 1989. This book will be an oversize collection of Bill's hallowed photography--a mixture of published and unpublished--organized by decade with essays by and about Bill's muses and subjects, such Anna Wintour, Cathy Horyn, Vanessa Friedman, and Ruth La Ferla. Every fashion lover and fashionista--from NYC and beyond--will have to add this book to their collection.





















[book] Ghetto:
The History of a Word
by Daniel B. Schwartz
September 24, 2019
Harvard University Press

Just as European Jews were being emancipated and ghettos in their original form-compulsory, enclosed spaces designed to segregate-were being dismantled, use of the word ghetto surged in Europe and spread around the globe. Tracing the curious path of this loaded word from its first use in sixteenth-century Venice to the present turns out to be more than an adventure in linguistics.

Few words are as ideologically charged as ghetto. Its early uses centered on two cities: Venice, where it referred to the segregation of the Jews in 1516, and Rome, where the ghetto survived until the fall of the Papal States in 1870, long after it had ceased to exist elsewhere.

Ghetto: The History of a Word offers a fascinating account of the changing nuances of this slippery term, from its coinage to the present day. It details how the ghetto emerged as an ambivalent metaphor for “premodern” Judaism in the nineteenth century and how it was later revived to refer to everything from densely populated Jewish immigrant enclaves in modern cities to the hypersegregated holding pens of Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe. We see how this ever-evolving word traveled across the Atlantic Ocean, settled into New York’s Lower East Side and Chicago’s Near West Side, then came to be more closely associated with African Americans than with Jews.

Chronicling this sinuous transatlantic odyssey, Daniel B. Schwartz reveals how the history of ghettos is tied up with the struggle and argument over the meaning of a word. Paradoxically, the term ghetto came to loom larger in discourse about Jews when Jews were no longer required to live in legal ghettos. At a time when the Jewish associations have been largely eclipsed, Ghetto retrieves the history of a disturbingly resilient word.




















[book] Passionate Spirit:
The Life of Alma Mahler
by Cate Haste
September 10, 2019
Basic Books

A new biography of Alma Mahler (1879-1964), revealing a woman determined to wield power in a world that denied her agency

History has long vilified Alma Mahler. Critics accused her of distracting Gustav Mahler from his work, and her passionate love affairs shocked her peers. Drawing on Alma's vivid, sensual, and overlooked diaries, biographer Cate Haste recounts the untold and far more sympathetic story of this ambitious and talented woman. Though she dreamed of being the first woman to compose a famous opera, Alma was stifled by traditional social values. Eventually, she put her own dreams aside and wielded power and influence the only way she could, by supporting the art of more famous men. She worked alongside them and gained credit as their muse, commanding their love and demanding their respect.

Passionate Spirit restores vibrant humanity to a woman time turned into a caricature, providing an important correction to a history where systemic sexism has long erased women of talent.























[book] Transaction Man:
The Rise of the Deal
and the Decline of the American Dream
by Nicholas Lemann
September 10, 2019
FS&G

Over the last generation, the United States has undergone seismic changes. Stable institutions have given way to frictionless transactions, which are celebrated no matter what collateral damage they generate. The concentration of great wealth has coincided with the fraying of social ties and the rise of inequality. How did all this come about?

In Transaction Man, Nicholas Lemann explains the United States’-and the world’s-great transformation by examining three remarkable individuals who epitomized and helped create their eras. Adolf Berle, Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s chief theorist of the economy, imagined a society dominated by large corporations, which a newly powerful federal government had forced to become benign and stable institutions, contributing to the public good by offering stable employment and generous pensions. By the 1970s, the corporations’ large stockholders grew restive under this regime, and their chief theoretician, Harvard Business School’s Michael Jensen, insisted that firms should maximize shareholder value, whatever the consequences. Today, Silicon Valley titans such as the LinkedIn cofounder and venture capitalist Reid Hoffman hope “networks” can reknit our social fabric.

Lemann interweaves these fresh and vivid profiles with a history of the Morgan Stanley investment bank from the 1930s through the financial crisis of 2008, while also tracking the rise and fall of a working-class Chicago neighborhood and the family-run car dealerships at its heart. Incisive and sweeping, Transaction Man is the definitive account of the reengineering of America and the enormous impact it has had on us all.























[book] Pat Conroy:
Our Lifelong Friendship
by Bernie Schein
September 10, 2019
Arcade Publishing

For Pat Conroy Fans, a Loving, Laughter-Filled Homage to a Loyal, Big-Hearted Friend

Pat Conroy, the bestselling author of The Prince of Tides and The Great Santini among many other books, was beloved by millions of readers. Bernie Schein was his best friend from the time they met in a high-school pickup basketball game in Beaufort, South Carolina, until Conroy’s death in 2016. Both were popular athletes but also outsiders as a Jew and a Catholic military brat in the small-town Bible-Belt South, and they bonded.

Wiseass and smart aleck loudmouths both, they shared an ebullient sense of humor and romanticism, were mesmerized by the highbrow and reveled in the low, and would sacrifice entire evenings and afternoons to endless conversation. As young teachers in the Beaufort area and later in Atlanta, they were activists in the civil rights struggle and against institutional racism and bigotry. Bernie knew intimately the private family story of the Conroys and his friend’s difficult relationship with his Marine Corps colonel father that Pat would draw on repeatedly in his fiction.

A love letter and homage, and a way to share the Pat he knew, this book collects Bernie’s cherished memories about the gregarious, welcoming, larger-than-life man who remained his best friend, even during the years they didn’t speak. It offers a trove of insights and anecdotes that will be treasured by Pat Conroy’s many devoted fans.
























[book] Audience of One:
Donald Trump, Television,
and the Fracturing of America
by James Poniewozik (NYT Critic)
September 10, 2019
Liveright

One of PW’s Top 10 Politics and Current Events Books of Fall 2019
An incisive cultural history that captures a fractious nation through the prism of television and the rattled mind of a celebrity president. Television has entertained America, television has ensorcelled America, and with the election of Donald J. Trump, television has conquered America. In Audience of One, New York Times chief television critic James Poniewozik traces the history of TV and mass media from the Reagan era to today, explaining how a volcanic, camera-hogging antihero merged with America’s most powerful medium to become our forty-fifth president.

In the tradition of Neil Postman’s masterpiece Amusing Ourselves to Death, Audience of One shows how American media have shaped American society and politics, by interweaving two crucial stories. The first story follows the evolution of television from the three-network era of the 20th century, which joined millions of Americans in a shared monoculture, into today’s zillion-channel, Internet-atomized universe, which sliced and diced them into fractious, alienated subcultures. The second story is a cultural critique of Donald Trump, the chameleonic celebrity who courted fame, achieved a mind-meld with the media beast, and rode it to ultimate power.

Braiding together these disparate threads, Poniewozik combines a cultural history of modern America with a revelatory portrait of the most public American who has ever lived. Reaching back to the 1940s, when Trump and commercial television were born, Poniewozik illustrates how Donald became “a character that wrote itself, a brand mascot that jumped off the cereal box and entered the world, a simulacrum that replaced the thing it represented.” Viscerally attuned to the media, Trump shape-shifted into a boastful tabloid playboy in the 1980s; a self-parodic sitcom fixture in the 1990s; a reality-TV “You’re Fired” machine in the 2000s; and finally, the biggest role of his career, a Fox News–obsessed, Twitter-mad, culture-warring demagogue in the White House.

Poniewozik deconstructs the chaotic Age of Trump as the 24-hour TV production that it is, decoding an era when politics has become pop culture, and vice versa. Trenchant and often slyly hilarious, Audience of One is a penetrating and sobering review of the raucous, raging, farcical reality show?performed for the benefit of an insomniac, cable-news-junkie “audience of one”?that we all came to live in, whether we liked it or not.























[book] Renia's Diary:
A Holocaust Journal
by Renia Spiegel
September 24, 2019
St Martin’s Press

The long-hidden diary of a young Polish woman's life during the Holocaust, translated for the first time into English

Renia Spiegel was born in 1924 to an upper-middle class Jewish family living in southeastern Poland, near what was at that time the border with Romania. At the start of 1939 Renia began a diary. “I just want a friend. I want somebody to talk to about my everyday worries and joys. Somebody who would feel what I feel, who would believe me, who would never reveal my secrets. A human being can never be such a friend and that’s why I have decided to look for a confidant in the form of a diary.” And so begins an extraordinary document of an adolescent girl’s hopes and dreams. By the fall of 1939, Renia and her younger sister Elizabeth (née Ariana) were staying with their grandparents in Przemysl, a city in the south, just as the German and Soviet armies invaded Poland. Cut off from their mother, who was in Warsaw, Renia and her family were plunged into war.

Like Anne Frank, Renia’s diary became a record of her daily life as the Nazis spread throughout Europe. Renia writes of her mundane school life, her daily drama with best friends, falling in love with her boyfriend Zygmund, as well as the agony of missing her mother, separated by bombs and invading armies. Renia had aspirations to be a writer, and the diary is filled with her poignant and thoughtful poetry. When she was forced into the city’s ghetto with the other Jews, Zygmund is able to smuggle her out to hide with his parents, taking Renia out of the ghetto, but not, ultimately to safety. The diary ends in July 1942, completed by Zygmund, after Renia is murdered by the Gestapo.

Renia's Diary has been translated from the original Polish, and includes a preface, afterword, and notes by her surviving sister, Elizabeth Bellak. An extraordinary historical document, Renia Spiegel survives through the beauty of her words and the efforts of those who loved her and preserved her legacy.





















OCTOBER 2019



[book] FIND ME
A NOVEL
by André Aciman
October 29, 2019
FS&G

As I looked at the cover and name FIND ME... I thought of the biblical characters saying HINENI, HERE I am, here is my place and status... and morphing into the desire to be found and seen for ones actual being. OPSIZO. An Ancient Greek verb meaning to arrive late for the feast. What do we pass on to the living but our shadow selves? Is love on a different itinerary or schedule than life and lifespans? And what of Kol Nidre, that one evening when many face their Jewish selves with hidden Aramaic words, just as the Greeks of the Roman Empire remembered their identities one evening a year.... There is much to say about this new novel, but anything I think I would say will ruin the surprise that comes from reading each section as it res its layers.

But what can be said safely? IN 2007, author André Aciman published a novel written during a Summer break where he was stuck in NYC instead of Italy. It was about a teenage Jewish boy and his family in rural bucolic Italy one Summer and the Jewish grad student studying Classics who spends a few months with them. The novel, CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, was turned into an critically acclaimed, award-winning film of the same name. THIS IS a PART TWO of that novel.

Those who only saw the film will recall that at its end, Elio stares into a fireplace in Italy in December, as Oliver, a grad student in Classics, calls from America with news of his engagement and coming marriage. Those who read the original novel (700,000 copies sold) may recall the end chapters where a more adult Elio visits the New Hampshire college where Oliver, now married with children, is teaching. Elio sits in on Oliver's class lecture, sees the postcard they shared now framed in Oliver's office, and later shares a drink with Oliver at a hotel bar after class. In FIND ME... we find out what happened in the 10 years before that revelation filled, quiet meeting and the years after.

In FIND ME, Aciman explores of the varieties of love and time. THE COVER, with its Italian ochre yellows and Sienna reds evoke a timeless, romantic Italy. Elio’s father, Samuel (Sami), a semi-retired Classics professor, is on a train from Florence to Rome to visit Elio, who has become a gifted classical pianist. It is a decade after Oliver and Elio kissed and he vomited at the wall on the Via Santa Maria dell'Anima in Rome, where they called each other by their names, and Elio's father told him that he envied him.... a wall that would say FIND ME.

Sami will see Elio in Rome but will also deliver a lecture on a classic ancient city where the elites chose not to leave, just as Jews did not leave Germany, before it was too late, He meets a young woman, named Miranda, and her dog in their shared train compartment – which upends his plans and changes his life... forever. (Elio's parents divorced soon after he left for college in the USA, finding that Elio had been the glue that kept their fragile marriage together; with Elio's absence, Sami left his wife). Just as an Americano is water added to an espresso to make it last, we wonder how long the conversation between Sami and Miranda will last...

Elio, who Sami isn't sure has ANYone or EVERYone as lovers, moves to Paris, where he, too, has a consequential love affair; meanwhile, Oliver, now a New Hampshire college professor with a family and sabbaticals, suddenly finds himself contemplating a return trip across the Atlantic, to that house, that pool, that bedroom where he was the real him.

Aciman is a master of sensibility, of the intimate details and the emotional nuances that are the substance of passion. He spends several sentences just on the stare between two people on a train. He relates a dissertation parable in which a mother of five kept the picture of a dead secret first husband, killed in WWII, behind the picture of her second husband, just as Oliver kept an inscribed framed postcard in his office... or Michel's father kept a secret musical score in his summer house... perhaps? FIND ME brings us back inside the magic circle of one of our greatest contemporary romances to ask if, in fact, true love ever dies.



























[book] The ACCUSATION:
Blood Libel in an American Town
by Edward Berenson
October 2019

A fascinating investigation of America’s only alleged case of blood libel, and what it reveals about anti-Semitism in the United States and Europe.

On Saturday, September 22, 1928, Barbara Griffith, age 4, strayed into the woods surrounding the upstate village of Massena, New York. Hundreds of people looked everywhere for the child but could not find her; several hours into the search, someone suggested that Barbara had been kidnapped and killed by Jews. The mayor and local police believed the rumor, and suddenly the allegation of ritual murder, known to Jews as “blood libel,” took hold. Rational people in government and Jewish leaders had to intervene to restore calm once Barbara was found safe and sound.

That so many embraced the accusation seems bizarre at first glance- blood libel was essentially unknown in the United States- but a great many of Massena’s inhabitants, Christians and Jews alike, had emigrated recently from Central and Eastern Europe, where it was all too common. The Accusation is a shocking and perceptive cross- cultural exploration of American and European responses to anti- Semitism. 29 illustrations





























[book] More Noble Than War:
A Soccer History of Israel-Palestine
by Nicholas Blincoe
October 29, 2019
Bold Type Books/Economist Books

Blincoe, an author and filmmaker (Sansour), and resident of Bethlehem and London, writes about how soccer has influenced politics--and how politics has shaped the game.

Soccer has never been apolitical. This is especially true for Israel and Palestine. Its history in the region is longer than the conflict itself. Almost all of the earliest teams were formed by political leaders, and the sport always came with national aspirations attached. The game played a direct role in shaping the politics of both countries, and the view from the stands or the pitch shine a light on key moments in region's volatile history.

Blincoe creates a dramatic narrative filled with driven people who are inspired as much by nationalism as a love of the game. Brilliant teams are scattered by wars or sidelined through boycotts; players are arrested, expelled, driven to hunger strikes, or beaten or shot.

By turns tragic and hopeful, More Noble Than War offers the soccer field as a potential catalyst for resolution.




























[book] Six Impossible Things:
The Mystery of the Quantum World
by John Gribbin
October 6, 2019
MIT PRESS

A concise and engaging investigation of six interpretations of quantum physics.

Rules of the quantum world seem to say that a cat can be both alive and dead at the same time and a particle can be in two places at once. And that particle is also a wave; everything in the quantum world can described in terms of waves?or entirely in terms of particles. These interpretations were all established by the end of the 1920s, by Erwin Schrödinger, Werner Heisenberg, Paul Dirac, and others. But no one has yet come up with a common sense explanation of what is going in. In this concise and engaging book, astrophysicist John Gribbin offers an overview of six of the leading interpretations of quantum mechanics.

Gribbin calls his account “agnostic,” explaining that none of these interpretations is any better?or any worse?than any of the others. Gribbin presents the Copenhagen Interpretation, promoted by Niels Bohr and named by Heisenberg; the Pilot-Wave Interpretation, developed by Louis de Broglie; the Many Worlds Interpretation (termed “excess baggage” by Gribbin); the Decoherence Interpretation (“incoherent”); the Ensemble “Non-Interpretation”; and the Timeless Transactional Interpretation (which theorized waves going both forward and backward in time). All of these interpretations are crazy, Gribbin warns, and some are more crazy than others?but in the quantum world, being more crazy does not necessarily mean more wrong..




























[book] Cilka's Journey
by Heather Morris
October 1, 2019

From the author of the TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITz

Lale Sokolov, a death camp survivor, shared her life stories with Heather Morris, who based a screenplay on them and later a novel, The Tattooist of Auschwitz. Now she goes back to the well and tells a tale based on or influenced by the life of Cilka Klein.

Cilka is just sixteen years old when she is taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp, in 1942. The Commandant at Birkenau, Schwarzhuber, notices her long beautiful hair, and forces her separation from the other women prisoners. Cilka learns quickly that power, even unwillingly given, equals survival.

After liberation, Cilka Klein is charged as a collaborator for sleeping with the enemy and sent to Siberia. But what choice did she have? And where did the lines of morality lie for Cilka, who was sent to Auschwitz when still a child?

In a Siberian prison camp, Cilka faces challenges both new and horribly familiar, including the unwanted attention of the guards. But when she makes an impression on a woman doctor, Cilka is taken under her wing. Cilka begins to tend to the ill in the camp, struggling to care for them under brutal conditions.

Cilka finds endless resources within herself as she daily confronts death and faces terror. And when she nurses a man called Ivan, Cilka finds that despite everything that has happened to her, there is room in her heart for love.



























[book] All This Could Be Yours
A Novel
by Jami Attenberg
October 22, 2019

From critically acclaimed New York Times best-selling author Jami Attenberg comes a novel of family secrets: think the drama of Big Little Lies set in the heat of a New Orleans summer

“If I know why he is the way he is then maybe I can learn why I am the way I am,” says Alex Tuchman, strong-headed lawyer, loving mother, and daughter of Victor Tuchman—a power-hungry real estate developer and, by all accounts, a bad man. Now that Victor is on his deathbed, Alex feels she can finally unearth the secrets of who he is and what he did over the course of his life and career. She travels to New Orleans to be with her family, but mostly to interrogate her tightlipped mother, Barbra.

As Barbra fends off Alex’s unrelenting questions, she reflects on her tumultuous life with Victor. Meanwhile Gary, Alex’s brother, is incommunicado, trying to get his movie career off the ground in Los Angeles. And Gary’s wife, Twyla, is having a nervous breakdown, buying up all the lipstick in drug stores around New Orleans and bursting into crying fits. Dysfunction is at its peak. As each family member grapples with Victor’s history, they must figure out a way to move forward—with one another, for themselves, and for the sake of their children.

ALL THIS COULD BE YOURS is a timely, piercing exploration of what it means to be caught in the web of a toxic man who abused his power; it shows how those webs can tangle a family for generations and what it takes to—maybe, hopefully—break free. With her signature “sparkling prose” (Marie Claire) and pitch-perfect wit, Jami Attenberg deftly explores one of the most important subjects of our age




























[book] What You Do Is Who You Are:
How to Create Your Business Culture
by Ben Horowitz
Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Foreword)
October 29, 2019
HarperBusiness

Ben Horowitz, a leading venture capitalist, modern management expert, and New York Times bestselling author, combines lessons both from history and from modern organizational practice with practical and often surprising advice to help executives build cultures that can weather both good and bad times.

Ben Horowitz has long been fascinated by history, and particularly by how people behave differently than you’d expect. The time and circumstances in which they were raised often shapes them—yet a few leaders have managed to shape their times. In What You Do Is Who You Are, he turns his attention to a question crucial to every organization: how do you create and sustain the culture you want?

To Horowitz, culture is how a company makes decisions. It is the set of assumptions employees use to resolve everyday problems: should I stay at the Red Roof Inn, or the Four Seasons? Should we discuss the color of this product for five minutes or thirty hours? If culture is not purposeful, it will be an accident or a mistake.

What You Do Is Who You Are explains how to make your culture purposeful by spotlighting four models of leadership and culture-building—the leader of the only successful slave revolt, Haiti’s Toussaint Louverture; the Samurai, who ruled Japan for seven hundred years and shaped modern Japanese culture; Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire; and Shaka Senghor, a man convicted of murder who ran the most formidable prison gang in the yard and ultimately transformed prison culture.

Horowitz connects these leadership examples to modern case-studies, including how Louverture’s cultural techniques were applied (or should have been) by Reed Hastings at Netflix, Travis Kalanick at Uber, and Hillary Clinton, and how Genghis Khan’s vision of cultural inclusiveness has parallels in the work of Don Thompson, the first African-American CEO of McDonalds, and of Maggie Wilderotter, the CEO who led Frontier Communications. Horowitz then offers guidance to help any company understand its own strategy and build a successful culture.

What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted?

Who you are is not the values you list on the wall. It’s not what you say in company-wide meeting. It’s not your marketing campaign. It’s not even what you believe. Who you are is what you do. This book aims to help you do the things you need to become the kind of leader you want to be—and others want to follow.


























[book] Bitter Reckoning:
Israel Tries Holocaust
Survivors as Nazi Collaborators
by Dan Porat
October 15, 2019
Belknap Press/Harvard University Press

Beginning in 1950, the state of Israel prosecuted and jailed dozens of Holocaust survivors who had served as camp kapos or ghetto police under the Nazis. At last comes the first full account of the kapo trials, based on records newly declassified after forty years.

One of the largest cases involved a sickly Israeli amputee who was accused of being a kapo and beating Jewish prisoners even when Nazi guards were not around. He was sentenced to death but as time moved on, the sentence was softened

In December 1945, a Polish-born commuter on a Tel Aviv bus recognized a fellow rider as the former head of a town council the Nazis had established to manage the Jews. When he denounced the man as a collaborator, the rider leapt off the bus, pursued by passengers intent on beating him to death. Five years later, to address ongoing tensions within Holocaust survivor communities, the State of Israel instituted the criminal prosecution of Jews who had served as ghetto administrators or kapos in concentration camps.

Dan Porat brings to light more than three dozen little-known trials, held over the following two decades, of survivors charged with Nazi collaboration. Scouring police investigation files and trial records, he found accounts of Jewish policemen and camp functionaries who harassed, beat, robbed, and even murdered their brethren. But as the trials exposed the tragic experiences of the kapos, over time the courts and the public shifted from seeing them as evil collaborators to victims themselves, and the fervor to prosecute them abated.

Porat shows how these trials changed Israel’s understanding of the Holocaust and explores how the suppression of the trial records?long classified by the state?affected history and memory. Sensitive to the devastating options confronting those who chose to collaborate, yet rigorous in its analysis, Bitter Reckoning invites us to rethink our ideas of complicity and justice and to consider what it means to be a victim in extraordinary circumstances.





















[book] TEHRAN CHILDREN
A HOLOCAUST REFUGEE CHILDREN
BY MIKHAL DEKEL
(City College of NY)
October 1, 2019

The extraordinary true story of Polish-Jewish child refugees who escaped the Nazis and found refuge in Iran.

More than a million Jews escaped east from Nazi occupied Poland to Soviet occupied Poland. There they suffered extreme deprivation in Siberian gulags and “Special Settlements” and then, once “liberated,” journeyed to the Soviet Central Asian Republics. The majority of Polish Jews who survived the Nazis outlived the war in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan; some of them continued on to Iran. The story of their suffering, both those who died and those who survived, has rarely been told.

Following the footsteps of her father, one of a thousand refugee children who traveled to Iran and later to Palestine, Dekel fuses memoir with historical investigation in this account of the all-but-unknown Jewish refuge in Muslim lands. Along the way, Dekel reveals the complex global politics behind this journey, discusses refugee aid and hospitality, and traces the making of collective identities that have shaped the postwar world-the histories nations tell and those they forget.



























[book] The Scrum Fieldbook:
A Master Class on Accelerating
Performance, Getting Results,
and Defining the Future
by J.J. Sutherland
October 1, 2019
Currency

Based on years of work in the field with scores of companies including Bosch, 3M, Schlumberger, and Saab, The Scrum Fieldbook delivers a hands-on, practical approach for successfully implementing the Scrum framework in any domain.

Scrum is the secret weapon behind some of today’s most successful companies. Giants like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple use Scrum to reshape our world through incredibly fast innovation, a laser focus on customers, and continuous improvement.

In recent years, Scrum has helped companies large and small thrive in the age of disruption. Its use has exploded across the corporate world far beyond its software and technology roots. J.J. Sutherland and the team at Scrum Inc. have dramatically improved performance at global banks, utilities, medical device manufacturers, mining conglomerates, and labs on the cutting edge of genetic science.

In The Scrum Fieldbook, JJ draws on his firm’s extensive experience to take leaders, managers, and employees deeper into the specific challenges and new opportunities of an Agile world. He shows how the Scrum framework can be successfully applied to any situation, in any industry, from automobile manufacturers in the US and Europe to nonprofits in Africa, from home renovation contractors in Minnesota to gas exploration companies in South America, from building fighter planes in Sweden to accelerating US Navy special forces teams in regions of the world we can’t mention.



























[book] They Will Have to Die Now:
Mosul and the Fall of the Caliphate
by James Verini
October 1, 2019

James Verini arrived in Iraq in the summer of 2016 to write about life in the Islamic State. He stayed to cover the jihadis’ last great stand, the Battle of Mosul, not knowing it would go on for nearly a year, nor that it would become, in the words of the Pentagon, "the most significant urban combat since WWII."

They Will Have to Die Now takes the reader into the heart of the conflict against the most lethal insurgency of our time. We see unspeakable violence, improbable humanity, and occasional humor. We meet an Iraqi major fighting his way through the city with a bad leg; a general who taunts snipers; an American sergeant who removes his glass eye to unnerve his troops; a pair of Moslawi brothers who welcomed the Islamic State, believing, as so many Moslawis did, that it might improve their shattered lives. Verini also relates the rich history of Iraq, and of Mosul, one of the most beguiling cities in the Middle East.




























[book] The Fire Is upon Us:
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr.,
and the Debate over Race in America
by Nicholas Buccola
October 1, 2019

How the clash between the civil rights firebrand and the father of modern conservatism continues to illuminate America’s racial divide

On February 18, 1965, an overflowing crowd packed the Cambridge Union in Cambridge, England, to witness a historic televised debate between James Baldwin, the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, and William F. Buckley Jr., a fierce critic of the movement and America's most influential conservative intellectual. The topic was "the American dream is at the expense of the American Negro," and no one who has seen the debate can soon forget it. Nicholas Buccola's The Fire Is upon Us is the first book to tell the full story of the event, the radically different paths that led Baldwin and Buckley to it, the controversies that followed, and how the debate and the decades-long clash between the men continues to illuminate America's racial divide today.

Born in New York City only fifteen months apart, the Harlem-raised Baldwin and the privileged Buckley could not have been more different, but they both rose to the height of American intellectual life during the civil rights movement. By the time they met in Cambridge, Buckley was determined to sound the alarm about a man he considered an "eloquent menace." For his part, Baldwin viewed Buckley as a deluded reactionary whose popularity revealed the sickness of the American soul. The stage was set for an epic confrontation that pitted Baldwin’s call for a moral revolution in race relations against Buckley’s unabashed elitism and implicit commitment to white supremacy.

A remarkable story of race and the American dream, The Fire Is upon Us reveals the deep roots and lasting legacy of a conflict that continues to haunt our politics.



























[book] The Man Who Saw Everything
a novel
by Deborah Levy
October 8, 2019

An electrifying and audacious novel about beauty, envy, and carelessness by Deborah Levy, two-time Man Booker Prize finalist.

It is 1988 and Saul Adler, a narcissistic young historian, has been invited to Communist East Berlin to do research; in exchange, he must publish a favorable essay about the German Democratic Republic. As a gift for his translator's sister, a Beatles fanatic who will be his host, Saul's girlfriend will shoot a photograph of him standing in the crosswalk on Abbey Road, an homage to the famous album cover. As he waits for her to arrive, he is grazed by an oncoming car, which changes the trajectory of his life--and this story of good intentions and reckless actions.

The Man Who Saw Everything is about the difficulty of seeing ourselves and others clearly. It greets the specters that come back to haunt old and new love, previous and current incarnations of Europe, conscious and unconscious transgressions, and real and imagined betrayals, while investigating the cyclic nature of history and its reinvention by people in power. Here, Levy traverses the vast reaches of the human imagination while artfully blurring sexual and political binaries--feminine and masculine, East and West, past and present--to reveal the full spectrum of our world.



























[book] JGV
A MEMOIR
A LIFE IN 12 RECIPES
BY JEAN-GEORGES VONGERICHTEN
with Michael Ruhlman
October 8, 2019
Norton

One of the most influential chef-restaurateurs of all time reflects on a career defined by surprising, delicious food.

Jean- Georges Vongerichten was born into a coal- business family in rural Alsace. He didn’t enroll at a top culinary program. He was kicked out of high school at age fifteen. How, then, did he find himself apprenticing with the most renowned chefs, opening restaurants across the world, and cementing his legacy in the New York City food scene?

JGV is Vongerichten’s passionate answer, his life and the recipes that moved him. With humor and heart, he opens up as never before, telling the story of his mother’s goose stew, enlivened with a coffee slurry, and of his first taste of tom yum kung soup, served hot at a stand off a Bangkok highway. Every story is full of wisdom, conveyed with the magnanimity and precision that has made this chef’s name.

With old handwritten menus and black- and- white photographs throughout, this is a book for young chefs, as well as anyone who has stood at a stove and wondered what might be.

























[book] My Drunk Kitchen Holidays!:
How to Savor and Celebrate
the Year: A Cookbook
by Hannah Hart
October 22, 2019
Plume

New York Times bestselling author and Food Network star Hannah Hart is back with her biggest book ever: a humorous cookbook celebrating year-round holidays with food, drink, and friends. You probably remember the video she did with Mayim Bialik on how to cook a CHOLENT

In a world where everyone is looking for some good news and something to celebrate, Hannah Hart is there with almost fifty ideas, arranged into twelve months of themes and recipes for how to celebrate with family and friends.

A collection of recipes, activities, and suggestions about hilarious and joyous ways to celebrate with family, friends, pets, and your entire community, My Drunk Kitchen Holidays! will commemorate holidays from Valentine's Day to Graduation, Pride Month and International Left-Handers’ Day (really!). The book will cumulate with the fall holidays that get much deserved attention: recipes for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and a celebration of Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/Christmas that is festive, inclusive, and incredibly hilarious.

























[book] Unfollow
a journey from hatred to hope
by Megan Phelps-Roper
October 8, 2019
river run

NICK HORNBY: 'A beautiful, gripping book about a singular soul, and an unexpected redemption'

JON RONSON: 'Her journey - from Westboro to becoming one of the most empathetic, thoughtful, humanistic writers around - is exceptional and inspiring'

It was an upbringing in many ways normal. A loving home, shared with squabbling siblings, overseen by devoted parents. Her grandfather at one point was an amazing civil rights attorney. Yet in other ways it was the precise opposite: a revolving door of TV camera crews and documentary makers, a world of extreme discipline, of siblings vanishing in the night.

Megan Phelps-Roper was raised in the Westboro Baptist Church - the fire-and-brimstone religious sect at once aggressively homophobic and anti-Semitic, rejoiceful for AIDS and natural disasters, and notorious for its picketing the funerals of American soldiers. From her first public protest, aged five, to her instrumental role in spreading the church's invective via social media, her formative years brought their difficulties. But being reviled was not one of them. She was preaching God's truth. She was, in her words, 'all in'.

In November 2012, at the age of twenty-six, she left the church, her family, and her life behind. She ESCAPED. She escaped with the help of a Jewish man I Jerusalem who chatted with her, debated with her, while managing his JEWLICIOUS.com website.

Unfollow is a story about the rarest thing of all: a person changing their mind. It is a fascinating insight into a closed world of extreme belief, a biography of a complex family, and a hope-inspiring memoir of a young woman finding the courage to find compassion for others, as well as herself.


























[book] A CASTLE IN WARTIME
ONE FAMILY
THER MISSING SONS
AND THE FIGHT TO DEFEAT NAZIS
By Catherine Bailey
October 29, 2019
Viking - Penguin Random House

An enthralling story of one family's extraordinary courage and resistance amidst the horrors of war from the New York Times bestselling author of The Secret Rooms.

As war swept across Europe in 1940, the idyllic life of Fey von Hassell seemed a world away from the conflict. The daughter of Ulrich von Hassell, Hitler's Ambassador to Italy, her marriage to Italian aristocrat Detalmo Pirzio-Biroli brought with it a castle and an estate in the north of Italy. Beautiful and privileged, Fey and her two young sons lead a tranquil life undisturbed by the trauma and privations of war. But with Fascism approaching its zenith, Fey's peaceful existence is threatened when Ulrich and Detalmo take the brave and difficult decision to resist the Nazis.

When German soldiers pour over the Italian border, Fey is suddenly marooned in the Nazi-occupied north and unable to communicate with her husband, who has joined the underground anti-Fascist movement in Rome. Before long, SS soldiers have taken up occupancy in the castle. As Fey struggles to maintain an air of warm welcome to her unwanted guests, the clandestine activities of both her father and husband become increasingly brazen and openly rebellious. Darkness descends when Ulrich's foiled plot to kill the Fuhrer brings the Gestapo to Fey's doorstep. It would be months before Detalmo learns that his wife had been arrested and his two young boys seized by the SS.

Suffused with Catherine Bailey's signature atmospheric prose, A Castle in Wartime tells the unforgettable story of the extraordinary bravery and fortitude of one family who collectively and individually sacrificed everything to resist the Nazis from within. Bailey's unprecedented access to stunning first-hand family accounts, along with records from concentration camps and surviving SS files, make this a dazzling and compulsively readable book, opening a view on the cost and consequences of resistance.

























[book] Jerusalem Food:
Bold Flavors from the Middle East and Beyond
by Nidal Kersh
October 1, 2019

Taste Jerusalem’s multicultural flavors in dishes that showcase the region’s incomparable bounty, from hummus and chopped vegetable salads to fresh breads, shawarma, and halvah.

For centuries, Jerusalem has been a melting pot for a dizzying number of cultures and its cuisine reflects that diversity. The city’s cooking has no boundaries . . . and neither does this cookbook. Here you’ll find a range of classic recipes, including fattoush, schnitzel, kebabs, hummus, falafel, mana'ish, shawarma, and baba ganouj. And of course there are simple but timeless pairings, like olives and Greek yogurt, with lots of za'atar and olive oil, plus a variety of delicious breads and savory vegetables, meats, and fish. In a warm conversational style, Nidal Kersh provides intriguing personal family background and an historical perspective that creates a rich context for understanding the meaning behind Jerusalem’s thriving food culture.

Nidal Kersh was born in Sweden, and grew up in both Jerusalem and Stockholm. He is now the owner of Falafelbaren, Stockholm’s first falafel restaurant. Jerusalem Food is his first book, and was published in Sweden before being translated and published by Sterling.
























[book] IN THE JERUSALEM FOREST
BY DEVORA BUSHERI
Illustrated by NOA KELNER
October 1, 2019
Kar-Ben
Ages 3-7

“Readers will be happily confused by this picture book.Almost every page of the story-based on a piece by Israeli national poet Hayim Nahman Bialik-is gently disorienting. The narrator is a young girl walking through the woods with her mother, and as they look at the reflections in the water, she says, 'The forest is upside-down,' and 'There in the water: the sky!' Kelner takes this as a challenge. In her paintings, the sky is often the same color as the water or the ground, and the characters' clothing matches the nature around them. The most challenging section is when the girl says, 'Ima and I see our reflections in the pond. We look the same, like two drops of rain.' ('Ima' is the Hebrew word for 'Mom.') This isn't quite true. The mother is tall, freckled, and redheaded. The daughter is more compact, and her skin is the pale brown of coffee ice cream. But the paintings include small details that mirror each other so that the characters really do start to look alike. Busheri adds off rhymes to the text at unexpected moments ('same' and 'rain,' 'come' and 'sun'), which is both lovely and a bit startling. The imagery, both in the words and the pictures, is so beautiful that readers may be heartbroken when a ripple in the water takes the reflections away. People will be stunned by this book even if they're too astonished to explain why."-Kirkus Reviews

























[book] Return to the Reich:
A Holocaust Refugee’s Secret
Mission to Defeat the Nazis
by Eric Lichtblau
October 15, 2019
HMH Press

The remarkable story of Fred Mayer, a German-born Jew who escaped Nazi Germany only to return as an American commando on a secret mission behind enemy lines.

Growing up in Germany, Freddy Mayer witnessed the Nazis' rise to power. When he was sixteen, his family made the decision to flee to the United States—they were among the last German Jews to escape, in 1938.

In America, Freddy tried enlisting the day after Pearl Harbor, only to be rejected as an “enemy alien” because he was German. He was soon recruited to the OSS, the country’s first spy outfit before the CIA. Freddy, joined by Dutch Jewish refugee Hans Wynberg and Nazi defector Franz Weber, parachuted into Austria as the leader of Operation Greenup, meant to deter Hitler’s last stand. He posed as a Nazi officer and a French POW for months, dispatching reports to the OSS via Hans, holed up with a radio in a nearby attic. The reports contained a goldmine of information, provided key intelligence about the Battle of the Bulge, and allowed the Allies to bomb twenty Nazi trains. On the verge of the Allied victory, Freddy was captured by the Gestapo and tortured and waterboarded for days. Remarkably, he persuaded the Nazi commander for the region to surrender, completing one of the most successful OSS missions of the war.

Based on years of research and interviews with Mayer himself, whom the author was able to meet only months before his death at the age of ninety-four, Return to the Reich is an eye-opening, unforgettable narrative of World War II heroism.

























[book] The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia:
From Abraham to Zabar’s
and Everything in Between
by Stephanie Butnick
Liel Leibovitz
and Mark Oppenheimer
October 2019
Artisan

Deeply knowing, highly entertaining, and just a little bit irreverent, this unputdownable encyclopedia of all things Jewish and Jew-ish covers culture, religion, history, habits, language, and more. Readers will refresh their knowledge of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs, the artistry of Barbra Streisand, the significance of the Oslo Accords, the meaning of words like balaboosta,balagan, bashert, and bageling. Understand all the major and minor holidays. Learn how the Jews invented Hollywood. Remind themselves why they need to read Hannah Arendt, watch Seinfeld, listen to Leonard Cohen. Even discover the secret of happiness (see “Latkes”). Includes hundreds of photos, charts, infographics, and illustrations. It’s a lot.
























[book] Wooden on Leadership:
How to Create a Winning Organization
by John Wooden
with Steve Jamison
2005
McGraw Hill

Recommended by top business leaders and military leaders in the United States.
Coach John Wooden’s goal (GOOD VALUES ATTRACT GOOD PEOPLE) in 41 years of coaching never changed; namely, to get maximum effort and peak performance from each of his players in the manner that best served the team. Wooden on Leadership explains step-by-step how he pursued and accomplished this goal. Focusing on Wooden’s 12 Lessons in Leadership and his acclaimed Pyramid of Success, it outlines the mental, emotional, and physical qualities essential to building a winning organization, and shows you how to develop the skill, confidence, and competitive fire to “be at your best when your best is needed”--and teach your organization to do the same.

“What an all-encompassing Pyramid of Success for leadership! Coach Wooden’s moral authority and brilliant definition of success encompass all of life. How I admire his life’s work and concept of what it really means to win!” --Stephen R. Covey, author, The 7 Habits of Highly Successful People and The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness “Wooden On Leadership offers valuable lessons no matter what your endeavor. 'Competitive Greatness' is our goal and that of any successful organization. Coach Wooden’s Pyramid of Success is where it all starts.” --Jim Sinegal, president & CEO, Costco

























[book] SCIPIO AFRICANUS
GREATER THAN NAPOLEON
B. H. LIDDELL HART
De Capo Press

From one of the most brilliant military historians of our time, this is the classic biography of Rome's greatest general and the victor over Rome's greatest enemy, Hannibal

Scipio Africanus (236-183 B.C.) was one of the most exciting and dynamic leaders in history. As commander, he never lost a battle. Yet it is his adversary, Hannibal, who has lived on in public memory.As B.H. Liddell Hart writes,"Scipio's battles are richer in stratagems and ruses--many still feasible today--than those of any other commander in history." Any military enthusiast or historian will find this to be an absorbing, gripping portrait.


























[book] JOSEPHUS’s
THE JEWISH WAR
A Biography
By Martin Goodman (Oxford, Wolfson)
October 2019
Princeton University Press

Roman camp and wrote his history of these cataclysmic events from a comfortable exile in Rome. His history enjoyed enormous popularity among Christians, who saw it as a testimony to the world that gave rise to their faith and a record of the suffering of the Jews due to their rejection of Christ. Jews were hardly aware of the book until the Renaissance. In the nineteenth century, Josephus's history became an important source for recovering Jewish history, yet Jewish enthusiasm for his stories of heroism?such as the doomed defense of Masada?has been tempered by suspicion of a writer who betrayed his own people.

Goodman provides a concise biography of one of the greatest war narratives ever written, explaining why Josephus's book continues to hold such fascination today.


























[book] In Defense of Elitism:
Why I'm Better Than You
and You're Better Than
Someone Who Didn't Buy This Book
by Joel Stein (Princeton)
October 22, 2019
Grand Central Pub

The night Donald Trump won the presidency, our author Joel Stein, Thurber Prize finalist and former staff writer for Time Magazine, instantly knew why. The main reason wasn't economic anxiety or racism. It was that he was anti-elitist. Hillary Clinton represented Wall Street, academics, policy papers, Davos, international treaties and the people who think they're better than you. People like Joel Stein. Trump represented something far more appealing, which was beating up people like Joel Stein.

In a full-throated defense of academia, the mainstream press, medium-rare steak, and civility, Joel Stein fights against populism. He fears a new tribal elite is coming to replace him, one that will fend off expertise of all kinds and send the country hurtling backward to a time of wars, economic stagnation and the well-done steaks doused with ketchup that Trump eats.

To find out how this shift happened and what can be done, Stein spends a week in Roberts County, Texas, which had the highest percentage of Trump voters in the country. He goes to the home of Trump-loving Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams; meets people who create fake news; and finds the new elitist organizations merging both right and left to fight the populists. All the while using the biggest words he knows.


























[book] Protest!
A History of Social and
Political Protest Graphics
by Liz McQuiston
October 8, 2019
Princeton University Press

An authoritative, richly illustrated history of six centuries of global protest art

Throughout history, artists and citizens have turned to protest art as a means of demonstrating social and political discontent. From the earliest broadsheets in the 1500s to engravings, photolithographs, prints, posters, murals, graffiti, and political cartoons, these endlessly inventive graphic forms have symbolized and spurred on power struggles, rebellions, spirited causes, and calls to arms. Spanning continents and centuries, Protest! presents a major new chronological look at protest graphics.

Beginning in the Reformation, when printed visual matter was first produced in multiples, Liz McQuiston follows the iconic images that have accompanied movements and events around the world. She examines fine art and propaganda, including William Hogarth’s Gin Lane, Thomas Nast’s political caricatures, French and British comics, postcards from the women’s suffrage movement, clothing of the 1960s counterculture, the anti-apartheid illustrated book How to Commit Suicide in South Africa, the “Silence=Death” emblem from the AIDS crisis, murals created during the Arab Spring, electronic graphics from Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution, and the front cover of the magazine Charlie Hebdo. Providing a visual exploration both joyful and brutal, McQuiston discusses how graphics have been used to protest wars, call for the end to racial discrimination, demand freedom from tyranny, and satirize authority figures and regimes.

From the French, Mexican, and Sandinista revolutions to the American civil rights movement, nuclear disarmament, and the Women’s March of 2017, Protest! documents the integral role of the visual arts in passionate efforts for change.
























[book] GHOSTS OF BERLIN
STORIES
BY RUDOLPH HERZOG
October 8, 2019
Melville House

Berlin's hip present comes up against the city's dark past in these seven supernatural tales by the son of the great filmmaker who "shares his father's curious and mordant wit" (The Financial Times).

In these hair-raising stories from the celebrated filmmaker and author Rudolph Herzog, millennial Berliners discover that the city is still the home of many unsettled—and deeply unsettling—ghosts. And those ghosts are not very happy about the newcomers. Thus the coddled daughter of a rich tech executive finds herself slowly tormented by the poltergeist of a Weimer-era laborer, and a German intelligence officer confronts a troll wrecking havoc upon the city's unbuilt airport. An undead Nazi sympathizer romances a Greek emigre, while Turkish migrants curse the gentrifiers that have evicted them.
Herzog's keen observational eye and acid wit turn modern city stories into deliciously dark satires that ride the knife-edge of suspenseful and terrifying.
























[book] NARRATIVE ECONOMICS
HOW STORIES GO VIRAL
AND DRIVE MAJOR ECONOMIC EVENTS
BY ROBERT J. SHILLER (Yale)
October 1, 2019
Princeton University Press

From our favorite Methodist Nobel winning Economist

From Nobel Prize–winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller, a new way to think about how popular stories help drive economic events

In a world in which internet troll farms attempt to influence foreign elections, can we afford to ignore the power of viral stories to affect economies? In this groundbreaking book, Nobel Prize–winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller offers a new way to think about the economy and economic change. Using a rich array of historical examples and data, Shiller argues that studying popular stories that affect individual and collective economic behavior-what he calls "narrative economics"-has the potential to vastly improve our ability to predict, prepare for, and lessen the damage of financial crises, recessions, depressions, and other major economic events.

Spread through the public in the form of popular stories, ideas can go viral and move markets-whether it's the belief that tech stocks can only go up, that housing prices never fall, or that some firms are too big to fail. Whether true or false, stories like these-transmitted by word of mouth, by the news media, and increasingly by social media-drive the economy by driving our decisions about how and where to invest, how much to spend and save, and more. But despite the obvious importance of such stories, most economists have paid little attention to them. Narrative Economics sets out to change that by laying the foundation for a way of understanding how stories help propel economic events that have had led to war, mass unemployment, and increased inequality.

The stories people tell-about economic confidence or panic, housing booms, the American dream, or Bitcoin-affect economic outcomes. Narrative Economics explains how we can begin to take these stories seriously. It may be Robert Shiller's most important book to date.
























[book] Outward Bound Lessons
to Live a Life of Leadership:
To Serve, to Strive, and Not to Yield
by Mark Michaux Brown
October 15, 2019
Berrett Koehler

This is the first book to describe in detail the principles of Outward Bound, told through the stories of former instructors and graduates who show how to apply them to create healthier, more effective teams, organizations, and communities.

For nearly six decades Outward Bound USA's education programs have shaped the lives of tens of thousands of participants. Strangers are put in an unfamiliar and unpredictable setting, where to succeed they must develop a sense of teamwork, resilience, self-confidence, and a focus on the greater good. But, Mark Brown asks, isn't the modern world just as unpredictable and challenging as any mountain or desert? He shows how the same principles that bind people together in the natural world work just as well in cities, companies, and communities. This book explores the concept of Expeditionary Leadership through the stories of people such as third-generation business steward Laura Kohler, the Home Depot cofounder Arthur Blank, and former United States Senator Mark Udall, whose lives were touched by Outward Bound and who then went on to make a positive difference in the world. They show how each of us can, in our own way, use the Outward Bound philosophy to bravely face the wild unknowns in our daily lives.

From training the first Peace Corps volunteers to partnering with thousands of educational institutions and corporations, Outward Bound has helped build the self-confidence and character of participants who have gone on to live richer, more fulfilling, and successful lives. Outward Bound internationally operates in thirty-three countries and impacts nearly a quarter of a million people annually.
























[book] PLEASE DONT EAT ME
BY LIZ CLIMO
October 15, 2019
Little Brown

Beloved author-illustrator Liz Climo is back with a hilarious take on (reluctant) friendship that will appeal to fans of We Don't Eat Our Classmates and I Want My Hat Back!

When a carefree bunny is approached by a voracious bear in the woods, Bunny has just one request: "Please don't eat me."

But the bear has a never-ending list of requests, he wants a pizza, he wants a dessert, he wants to impress his friends, he wants a lucky rabbit's foot, and Bunny realizes maybe Bear isn't as hungry as he'd let on...maybe he just wants his new friend's company for a while.

This witty and poignant exploration of predator and prey will have children and parents alike roaring with laughter--and looking for their next meal.























[book] Survivors of the Holocaust:
True Stories of Six Extraordinary Children
Edited by Kath Shackleton
Zane Whittingham (Illustrator), Ryan Jones (Designer)
October 1, 2019
Sourcebooks
Ages 10 -14

Between 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party were responsible for the persecution of millions of Jews across Europe as well as the murder of millions

This unique graphic novel tells the true stories of six Jewish children and young people who survived the Holocaust. From suffering the horrors of Auschwitz, to hiding from Nazi soldiers in war-torn Paris, to sheltering from the Blitz in England, each true story is a powerful testament to the survivors' courage. These remarkable testimonials serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again.























[book] I Love My Glam-Ma!
by Samantha Berger
Sujean Rim (Illustrator)
October 1, 2019
Orchard Books
Ages 3-5

A celebration of EVERY grandma's glamorous ways -- and the special love that glam-mas share with everything they do!

"Glam-mas don't just come over... they make a grand entrance!
Glam-mas don't just celebrate holidays... they celebrate everything!
Glam-mas don't just carry a purse... they carry a treasure chest!"

A joyful celebration of grandmothers who are young at heart, adventurous, and find a bit of glamour in everything they do. Whether these glam-mas are building sandcastles, riding with dolphins, or turning blankets into reading forts and super capes, they live each day with a playful spirit -- just like their grandchildren.

From the writer of Crankenstein and the illustrator of Birdie's Big-Girl Shoes comes a playful and heartwarming ode to grandmas and grandchildren everywhere... because there's nothing more glamorous than being a grandma.























[book] The Berlin Mission:
The American Who Resisted Nazi
Germany from Within
by Richard Breitman
October 29, 2019
PublicAffairs

An unknown story of an unlikely hero--the US consul who best analyzed the threat posed by Nazi Germany and predicted the horrors to come.

In 1929, Raymond Geist went to Berlin as a consul, and he handled visas for emigrants to the US. Geist expedited the exit of Albert Einstein just before Hitler came to power. Once the Nazis began to oppress Jews and others, Geist's role became vitally important. It was Geist who extricated Sigmund Freud from Vienna and Geist who understood the scale and urgency of the humanitarian crisis.

Even while hiding his homosexual relationship with a German, Geist fearlessly challenged the Nazi police state whenever it abused Americans in Germany or threatened US interests. He made greater use of a restrictive US immigration quota and secured visas for hundreds of unaccompanied children. All the while, he maintained a working relationship with high Nazi officials such as Himmler, Heydrich, and Göring.

While US ambassadors and consuls general cycled in and out, the indispensable Geist remained in Berlin for a decade. An invaluable analyst and problem solver, he was the first American official to warn that what lay ahead for Germany's Jews was what later would become known as the Holocaust.























[book] Operation Swallow:
American Soldiers' Remarkable Escape
from Berga Concentration Camp
by Mark Felton
October 15, 2019
Center Street

The true and heroic story of American POWs' daring escape from a Nazi concentration camp.

In this little-known story from World War II, a group of American POW camp leaders risk everything to save hundreds of fellow servicemen from a diabolical Nazi concentration camp. Their story begins in the dark forests of the Ardennes during Christmas 1944 and ends at the Buchenwald Concentration Camp in the spring of 1945.

This appalling chapter of US military history and uplifting Holocaust story deserves to be widely known and understood.

Operation Swallow provides a historical, first person perspective of how American GIs stood up against their evil SS captors who were forcing them to work as slave laborers. A young GI is thrust into a leadership position and leads his fellow servicemen on a daring escape. It is a story filled with courage, sacrifice, torture, despair, and salvation. A compelling narrative-driven nonfiction book has not been written that takes the reader deep into the dark story of Operation 'Swallow' and Berga Concentration Camp--until now.

Written from personal testimonies and official documents, Operation Swallow is a tale replete with high adventure, compelling characters, human drama, tragedy, and eventual salvation, from the pen of a master of the modern military narrative.























[book] The Man Who Saw Everything
a novel
by Deborah Levy
October 15, 2019
Bloomsbury

An electrifying novel about beauty, envy, and carelessness from Deborah Levy, author of the Booker Prize finalists Hot Milk and Swimming Home. Might remind one of Stephen Spender's The Temple.

It is 1988 and Saul Adler, a narcissistic young historian, has been invited to Communist East Berlin to do research; in exchange, he must publish a favorable essay about the German Democratic Republic. As a gift for his translator's sister, a Beatles fanatic who will be his host, Saul's girlfriend will shoot a photograph of him standing in the crosswalk on Abbey Road, an homage to the famous album cover. As he waits for her to arrive, he is grazed by an oncoming car, which changes the trajectory of his life.

The Man Who Saw Everything is about the difficulty of seeing ourselves and others clearly. It greets the specters that come back to haunt old and new love, previous and current incarnations of Europe, conscious and unconscious transgressions, and real and imagined betrayals, while investigating the cyclic nature of history and its reinvention by people in power. Here, Levy traverses the vast reaches of the human imagination while artfully blurring sexual and political binaries-feminine and masculine,























[book] The Life and Afterlife
of Harry Houdini
by Joe Posnanski
October 22, 2019
Simon and Schuster

Award-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author Joe Posnanski enters the world of Harry Houdini and his legions of devoted fans in an immersive, entertaining, and magical work on the illusionist’s impact on American culture—and why his legacy endures to this day.

Harry Houdini. Say his name and a number of things come to mind. Escapes. Illusions. Magic. Chains. Safes. Live burials. Close to a century after his death, nearly every person in America knows his name from a young age, capturing their imaginations with his death-defying stunts and daring acts. He inspired countless people, from all walks of life, to find something magical within themselves.

This is a book about a man and his extraordinary life, but it is also about the people who he has inspired in death. As Joe Posnanski delves into the deepest corners of Houdini-land, visiting museums (one owned by David Copperfield), attractions, and private archives, he encounters a cast of unforgettable and fascinating characters: a woman who runs away from home to chase her dream of becoming a magician; an Italian who revives Houdini’s most famous illusion every night; a performer at the Magic Castle in Los Angeles who calls himself Houdini’s Ghost; a young boy in Australia who, one day, sees an old poster and feels his life change; and a man in Los Angeles whose sole mission is life has been to keep the legend’s name alive.

Both a personal obsession and an odyssey of discovery, Posnanski draws inspiration from his lifelong passion for and obsession with magic, blending biography, memoir, and first-person reporting to examine Harry Houdini’s life and legacy. This is the ultimate journey to uncover why this magic man endures, and what he still has to teach the world about wonder.























[book] OUT LOUD
A MEMOIR
By MARK MORRIS
Wesley Stace
October 22, 2019
Penguin Press

From the most brilliant and audacious choreographer of our time, the exuberant tale of a young dancer’s rise to the pinnacle of the performing arts world, and the triumphs and perils of creating work on his own terms—and staying true to himself

Before Mark Morris became “the most successful and influential choreographer alive” (The New York Times), he was a six year-old in Seattle cramming his feet into Tupperware glasses so that he could practice walking on pointe. Often the only boy in the dance studio, he was called a sissy, a term he wore like a badge of honor. He was unlike anyone else, deeply gifted and spirited.

Moving to New York at nineteen, he arrived to one of the great booms of dance in America. Audiences in 1976 had the luxury of Merce Cunningham’s finest experiments with time and space, of Twyla Tharp’s virtuosity, and Lucinda Childs's genius. Morris was flat broke but found a group of likeminded artists that danced together, travelled together, slept together. No one wanted to break the spell or miss a thing, because “if you missed anything, you missed everything.” This collective, led by Morris’s fiercely original vision, became the famed Mark Morris Dance Group.

Suddenly, Morris was making a fast ascent. Celebrated by The New Yorker’s critic as one of the great young talents, an androgynous beauty in the vein of Michelangelo’s David, he and his company had arrived. Collaborations with the likes of Mikhail Baryshnikov, Yo-Yo Ma, Lou Harrison, and Howard Hodgkin followed. And so did controversy: from the circus of his tenure at La Monnaie in Belgium to his work on the biggest flop in Broadway history. But through the Reagan-Bush era, the worst of the AIDS epidemic, through rehearsal squabbles and backstage intrigues, Morris emerged as one of the great visionaries of modern dance, a force of nature with a dedication to beauty and a love of the body, an artist as joyful as he is provocative.

Out Loud is the bighearted and outspoken story of a man as formidable on the page as he is on the boards. With unusual candor and disarming wit, Morris’s memoir captures the life of a performer who broke the mold, a brilliant maverick who found his home in the collective and liberating world of music and dance.























[book] Life Undercover:
Coming of Age in the CIA
by Amaryllis Fox
October 15, 2019
KNOPF

Amaryllis Fox's riveting memoir tells the story of her ten years in the most elite clandestine ops unit of the CIA, hunting the world's most dangerous terrorists in sixteen countries while marrying and giving birth to a daughter

Amaryllis Fox was in her last year as an undergraduate at Oxford studying theology and international law when her writing mentor Daniel Pearl was captured and beheaded.

Galvanized by this brutality, Fox applied to a master's program in conflict and terrorism at Georgetown's School of Foreign Service, where she created an algorithm that predicted, with uncanny certainty, the likelihood of a terrorist cell arising in any village around the world. At twenty-one, she was recruited by the CIA. Her first assignment was reading and analyzing hundreds of classified cables a day from foreign governments and synthesizing them into daily briefs for the president. Her next assignment was at the Iraq desk in the Counterterrorism center. At twenty-two, she was fast-tracked into advanced operations training, sent from Langley to "the Farm," where she lived for six months in a simulated world learning how to use a Glock, how to get out of flexicuffs while locked in the trunk of a car, how to withstand torture, and the best ways to commit suicide in case of captivity.

At the end of this training she was deployed as a spy under non-official cover--the most difficult and coveted job in the field as an art dealer specializing in tribal and indigenous art and sent to infiltrate terrorist networks in remote areas of the Middle East and Asia. Life Undercover is exhilarating, intimate, fiercely intelligent--an impossible to put down record of an extraordinary life, and of Amaryllis Fox's astonishing courage and passion.
























[book] The Seventh Heaven:
Travels Through Jewish Latin America
(Pitt Latin American Series)
by Ilan Stavans
October 15, 2019
University of Pittsburgh Press

Essayist and cultural commentator Ilan Stavans spent five years traveling from across a dozen countries in Latin America, in search of what defines the Jewish communities in the region, whose roots date back to Christopher Columbus’s arrival.

In the tradition of V.S. Naipaul’s explorations of India, the Caribbean, and the Arab World, he came back with an extraordinarily vivid travelogue. Stavans talks to families of the desaparecidos in Buenos Aires, to “Indian Jews,” and to people affiliated with neo-Nazi groups in Patagonia. He also visits Spain to understand the long-term effects of the Inquisition, the American Southwest habitat of “secret Jews,” and Israel, where immigrants from Latin America have reshaped the Jewish state.

Along the way, he looks for the proverbial “seventh heaven,” which, according to the Talmud, out of proximity with the divine, the meaning of life in general, and Jewish life in particular, becomes clearer. The Seventh Heaven is a masterful work in Stavans’s ongoing quest to find a convergence between the personal and the historical.
























[book] Beautiful on the Outside:
A Memoir
by Adam Rippon
Award winning skater
October 15, 2019
Grand Central Publishing

Former Olympic figure skater and self-professed America's Sweetheart Adam Rippon showcases his funny and inspiring personality in this entertaining memoir in the vein of Andy Cohen.

Your mom probably told you it's what on the inside that counts. Well, then she was never a competitive figure skater. Olympic medalist Adam Rippon has been making it pretty for the judges even when, just below the surface, everything was an absolute mess.

A son of Scranton and it suburb, Clarks Summit, PA, Rippon was driven to practicies weekly by hist hard working mother and took the Greyhound bus next to ex convicts when available. He recounts being so poor he could only afford to eat the free apples at his gym. But he got through the toughest times with a smile on his face, a glint in his eye, and quip ready for anyone listening. Beautiful on the Outside looks at his journey from a home-schooled kid in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to a self-professed American sweetheart on the world stage and all the disasters and self-delusions it took to get him there. Yeah, it may be what's on the inside that counts, but life is so much better when it's beautiful on the outside. Rippon got extra publicity during the Olympics when he criticized Vice President Michael Pence, and when actress Sally Field tried to set him up with her gay Jewish Son, Sam. Rippon met him but already has a bf, a gay Finnish realtor whom he met on a social dating app while competing/performing in Finland.





















[book] Alpine Cooking:
Recipes and Stories from
Europe's Grand Mountaintops:
A Cookbook
by Meredith Erickson
October 15, 2019
Ten Speed Press

A lushly photographed cookbook and travelogue showcasing the regional cuisines of the Alps (Italy, Switzerland, Austria, France) including 80 recipes for the elegant, rustic dishes served in the chalets and mountain huts situated among the alpine peaks. Each recipe includes a discussion on the hotel (chalet) in which it is found.

From the wintry peaks of Chamonix and the picturesque trails of Gstaad to the remote villages of the Gastein Valley, the alpine regions of Europe are all-season wonderlands that offer outdoor adventure alongside hearty cuisine and intriguing characters. In Alpine Cooking, food writer Meredith Erickson travels through the region--by car, on foot, and via funicular--collecting the recipes and stories of the legendary stubes, chalets, and refugios.

Remember... butter is unsalted, cream is heavy, eggs are large, herbs are fresh, oil is EVOO, and sugar is granulated.

On the menu is an eclectic mix of mountain dishes:
muesli, Sofie's Beef Shoulder Goulash, radicchio dumplings (substitute the speck (ham), Smoked Char (Colt Alt, Dolomite style), Pumpkin Seed Oil Sundae, Puccia Bread, Spinach and Cheese Mezzaluna shlutz krapfen with four cheeses (ricotta, gruyere), Bellunese Beet and Poppy Seed Casunzeie (fresh filled pasta), fondue brioche, the best schnitzel recipe, Bombardinos (egg yolk, brandy, wine), Cogne style Ditalini (pasta shape) with Fava beans and fontina and dark bread, warming soups, wine cave fonduta, a Chartreuse soufflé, and a host of decadent strudels and confections (Salzburger Nockerl, anyone?) served with a bottle of Riesling plucked from the snow bank beside your dining table. Also, Pinzgau style huckleberry dumplings, Tafespitz (try to modify their rump roast with your brisket), Tyrolean Liver Salad, Spiced Quark Cheese, Kaiserschmarrn cheese dessert, apricot and quark cheese dumplings, Herdsman Macaroni (skip the bacon), cabbage tart with smoked whitefish (you need a blowtorch).

Organized by country and including logistical tips, detailed maps, the alpine address book, and narrative interludes discussing alpine art and wine, the Tour de France, high-altitude railways, grand European hotels, and other essential topics, this gorgeous and spectacularly photographed cookbook is a romantic ode to life in the mountains for food lovers, travelers, skiers, hikers, and anyone who feels the pull of the peaks. Includes three pages of addresses of alpine hotels to visit at eat at.















[book] Change Is the Only Constant:
The Wisdom of Calculus
in a Madcap World
by Ben Orlin
(Northhampton Mass)
October 8, 2019
Black Dog & Levanthol

The next book from Ben Orlin, the popular math blogger and author of the underground bestseller Math With Bad Drawings.... and dreidel specialist.

Change Is The Only Constant is an engaging and eloquent exploration of the intersection between calculus and daily life, complete with Orlin's sly humor and wonderfully bad drawings.

Change is the Only Constant is an engaging and eloquent exploration of the intersection between calculus and daily life, complete with Orlin's sly humor and memorably bad drawings. By spinning 28 engaging mathematical tales, Orlin shows us that calculus is simply another language to express the very things we humans grapple with every day -- love, risk, time, and most importantly, change. Divided into two parts, "Moments" and "Eternities," and drawing on everyone from Sherlock Holmes to Mark Twain to David Foster Wallace, Change is the Only Constant unearths connections between calculus, art, literature, and a beloved dog named Elvis. This is not just math for math's sake; it's math for the sake of becoming a wiser and more thoughtful human.




























NOVEMBER 2019 BOOKS



[book] Irving Berlin:
New York Genius
(Jewish Lives)
by James Kaplan
November 5, 2019
Yale University Press

A fast-moving, musically astute portrait of arguably the greatest composer of American popular music

Irving Berlin (1888–1989) has been called—by George Gershwin, among others—the greatest songwriter of the golden age of the American popular song. “Berlin has no place in American music,” legendary composer Jerome Kern wrote; “he is American music.” In a career that spanned an astonishing nine decades, Berlin wrote some fifteen hundred tunes, including “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” “God Bless America,” and “White Christmas.” From ragtime to the rock era, Berlin’s work has endured in the very fiber of American national identity.

Exploring the intertwining of Berlin’s life with the life of New York City, noted biographer James Kaplan offers a visceral narrative of Berlin as self-made man and witty, wily, tough Jewish immigrant. This fast-paced, musically opinionated biography uncovers Berlin’s unique brilliance as a composer of music and lyrics. Masterfully written and psychologically penetrating, Kaplan’s book underscores Berlin’s continued relevance in American popular culture.






















[book] Karl Marx:
Philosophy and Revolution
(Jewish Lives)
by Shlomo Avineri
(Hebrew Univ)
November 5, 2019
Yale University Press

A new exploration of Karl Marx's life through his intellectual contributions to modern thought

Karl Marx (1818–1883)—philosopher, historian, sociologist, economist, current affairs journalist, and editor—was one of the most influential and revolutionary thinkers of modern history, but he is rarely thought of as a Jewish thinker, and his Jewish background is either overlooked or misrepresented. Here, distinguished scholar Shlomo Avineri argues that Marx’s Jewish origins did leave a significant impression on his work. Marx was born in Trier, then part of Prussia, and his family had enjoyed equal rights and emancipation under earlier French control of the area. But then its annexation to Prussia deprived the Jewish population of its equal rights. These developments led to the reluctant conversion of Marx’s father, and similar tribulations radicalized many young intellectuals of that time who came from a Jewish background.

Avineri puts Marx’s Jewish background in its proper and balanced perspective, and traces Marx’s intellectual development in light of the historical, intellectual, and political contexts in which he lived.






















[book] Like Falling Through a Cloud
by Eugenia Zukerman
November 5, 2019
East End Press

What if the dreaded world of Alzheimer’s was also a world of emotional discovery? Eugenia Zukerman’s poetry and simple prose, both heartbreaking and ultimately inspirational, ushers the reader into her world as she unflinchingly examines familial loyalties, moments from her past and present, and the need to face an uncertain future due to the diagnosis of a condition that she truly hopes “will remain unnamed.”

Flutist, writer, artistic director of major music series, television journalist, educator and internet entrepreneur, Zukerman addresses her “lapses and losses” as she confronts and deals with a future under the shadow of her Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Touching, honest and fearlessly heartfelt, Zukerman recounts her discovery, consultations, and diagnosis, all while navigating the death of her 103-year-old mother, a performance at the Kennedy Center, and the consolidation of her life via a full-time move to upstate New York.

As she finds strength in family love, through self-examination via Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and the enduring power of creating music, Zukerman teaches us the importance of living-in-the-now, while accepting what comes next may remain a mystery.





















[book] Citizen 865:
The Hunt for Hitler's Hidden Soldiers in America
by Debbie Cenziper
November 12, 2019
Hachette

The gripping story of a team of Nazi hunters at the U.S. Department of Justice as they raced against time to expose members of a brutal SS killing force who disappeared in America after World War Two.

In 1990, in a drafty basement archive in Prague, two American historians made a startling discovery: a Nazi roster from 1945 that no Western investigator had ever seen. The long-forgotten document, containing more than 700 names, helped unravel the details behind the most lethal killing operation in World War Two.

In the tiny Polish village of Trawniki, the SS set up a school for mass murder and then recruited a roving army of foot soldiers, 5,000 men strong, to help annihilate the Jewish population of occupied Poland. After the war, some of these men vanished, making their way to the U.S. and blending into communities across America. Though they participated in some of the most unspeakable crimes of the Holocaust, "Trawniki Men" spent years hiding in plain sight, their terrible secrets intact.

In a story spanning seven decades, Citizen 865 chronicles the harrowing wartime journeys of two Jewish orphans from occupied Poland who outran the men of Trawniki and settled in the United States, only to learn that some of their one-time captors had followed. A tenacious team of prosecutors and historians pursued these men and, up against the forces of time and political opposition, battled to the present day to remove them from U.S. soil.

Through insider accounts and research in four countries, this urgent and powerful narrative provides a front row seat to the dramatic turn of events that allowed a small group of American Nazi hunters to hold murderous men accountable for their crimes decades after the war's end.





















[book] The Zookeepers' War:
An Incredible True Story
from the Cold War
by J.W. Mohnhaupt
Shelley Frisch (Translator)
November 12, 2019
Simon and Schuster

THE ACCLAIMED INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER
The unbelievable true story of the Cold War’s strangest proxy war, fought between the zoos on either side of the Berlin Wall.

Living in West Berlin in the 1960s often felt like living in a zoo, everyone packed together behind a wall, with the world always watching. On the other side of the Iron Curtain, the East Berlin zoo was spacious and lush, a socialist utopia where everything was perfectly planned...and then rarely successfully finished.

Berlin’s two zoos quickly became symbols of the divided city’s two halves. And so no one was terribly surprised when the head zookeepers on either side started an animal arms race—rather than stockpiling nuclear warheads, competing to have the most pandas and hippos. Soon, state funds were being quietly diverted to give these new animals lavish welcomes worthy of visiting dignitaries. West German presidential candidates were talking about zoo policy on the campaign trail. And eventually politicians on both side of the Wall became convinced that if their zoo were proved to be inferior, then that would mean their country’s whole ideology was too.

A quirky piece of Cold War history unlike anything you’ve heard before, The Zookeepers’ War is an epic tale of desperate rivalries, human follies, and an animal-mad city in which zookeeping became a way of continuing politics by other means.






















[book] The Puritans:
A Transatlantic History
by David D. Hall
November 12, 2019
Princeton University Press

This book is a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding critical new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, David Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth's reign to be unfinished. Hall's vivid and wide-ranging narrative describes the movement's deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a "perfect reformation" in the New World.

A breathtaking work of scholarship by an eminent historian, The Puritans examines the tribulations and doctrinal dilemmas that led to the fragmentation and eventual decline of Puritanism. It presents a compelling portrait of a religious and political movement that was divided virtually from the start. In England, some wanted to dismantle the Church of England entirely and others were more cautious, while Puritans in Scotland were divided between those willing to work with a troublesome king and others insisting on the independence of the state church. This monumental book traces how Puritanism was a catalyst for profound cultural changes in the early modern Atlantic world, opening the door for other dissenter groups such as the Baptists and the Quakers, and leaving its enduring mark on what counted as true religion in America.






















[book] BECOMING EVE:
My Journey from Ultra-Orthodox
Rabbi to Transgender Woman
by Abby Stein
November 12, 2019
Seal Press

The powerful coming-out story of an ultra-Orthodox child who was born to become a rabbinic leader and instead became a woman and an outspoken voice for gender freedom

Abby Stein was raised in a Hasidic Jewish community in Brooklyn, isolated in a culture that lives according to the laws and practices of eighteenth-century Eastern Europe, speaking only Yiddish and Hebrew and shunning modern life. Stein was born as the first son in a dynastic rabbinical family, poised to become a leader of the next generation of Hasidic Jews.

But Abby felt certain at a young age that she was a girl. Without access to TV or the Internet, and never taught to speak English, she suppressed her desire for a new body while looking for answers wherever she could find them, from forbidden religious texts to smuggled secular examinations of faith. Finally, she orchestrated a personal exodus from ultra-Orthodox manhood to mainstream femininity-a radical choice that forced her to leave her home, her family, her way of life.

Powerful in the truths it reveals about biology, culture, faith, and identity, Becoming Eve poses the





















[book] THE OTHER AI
Aesthetic Intelligence:
How to Boost It and
Use It in Business
and Beyond
by Pauline Brown
(LVMH, Wharton, Dartmouth)
November 26, 2019
Harper Business

Longtime leader in the luxury goods sector and former Chairman of LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton North America reinvents the art and science of brand-building under the rubric of Aesthetic Intelligence. With a background of Dartmouth, Wharton, Estee Lauder, Avon, Carlyle Group, LVMH, Aspen Inst. She has seen a lot and knows a lot to share.

In a world in which people have cheap and easy access to most goods and services, yet crave richer and more meaningful experiences, aesthetics has become a key differentiator for most companies and a critical factor of their success and even their survival. In this groundbreaking book, Pauline Brown, a former leader of the world’s top luxury goods company and a pioneer in identifying the role of aesthetics in business, shows executives, entrepreneurs, and other professionals how to harness the power of the senses to create products, services, and experiences that stand out, resonate with their customers, and create long-term value for their businesses. The power is rooted in Aesthetic Intelligence—or “the other AI,” as Brown refers to it.

Aesthetic Intelligence can be learned. Indeed, people are born with far more capacity than they use, but even those that are naturally gifted must continue to refine their skills, lest their aesthetic advantage atrophy. Through a combination of storytelling and practical advice, the author shows how aesthetic intelligence creates business value and how executives, entrepreneurs and others can boost their own AI and successfully apply it to business. Brown offers research, strategies and practical exercises focused on four essential AI skills:
- Attunement—how to develop higher consciousness of your environment and the emotional effects of all its stimuli

- Interpretation—how to translate your emotional reactions (both positive and negative) to sensorial stimuli into thoughts and ideas that form the basis of an aesthetic position, preference, or expression

- Articulation—how to express the aesthetic vision for your products or services in a way that your partners and team members can implement and deliver to customers Curation—how to organize, integrate and edit a wide variety of aesthetic expressions and ideas into a cohesive, credible, and powerful experience for your customers.


Aesthetic Intelligence provides a crucial roadmap to help business leaders build their businesses in their own authentic and distinctive way. Aesthetic Intelligence is about creating delight, lifting the human spirit, and rousing the imagination through sensorial experiences.























[book] Jewish Literary Cultures:
Volume 2,
The Medieval and Early Modern Periods
by David Stern
(Harvard University)
November 6, 2019
Penn State University Press

In this second of three planned volumes of Jewish Literary Cultures, David Stern explores diverse texts and topics in medieval and early modern Jewish literature and book history.

Stern uses contemporary critical approaches to assess larger themes and currents in medieval and early modern Jewish civilization—opening new windows into cultural exchange, the impact of materiality upon reading practice and literary reception, and the nature of the Jewish imagination and literary creativity. The texts and topics examined in this volume include a remarkable story about a Jew who marries a demoness, a blasphemous rabbinic parody, and the material histories of four classic Jewish books: the Hebrew Bible in the manuscript age; the early printed rabbinic Bible, the Talmud, and the invention of its unusual page format; the medieval Jewish prayerbook and its unexpected illustrations; and Passover Haggadah and its cartographic messianism.

Accessibly written and thoughtfully compiled, these essays are perfect for use in the classroom and for reference in personal and professional research. Scholars and specialists in medieval and early modern Judaism in particular will appreciate Stern’s work.


























[book] WASTE SIEGE
The Life of Infrastructure
in Palestine
by Sophia Stamatopouloi-Robbins
November 28, 2019
Stanford University Press

Waste Siege offers an analysis unusual in the study of Palestine: it depicts the environmental, infrastructural, and aesthetic context in which Palestinians are obliged to forge their lives. To speak of waste siege is to describe a series of conditions, from smelling wastes to negotiating military infrastructures, from biopolitical forms of colonial rule to experiences of governmental abandonment, from obvious targets of resistance to confusion over responsibility for the burdensome objects of daily life. Within this rubble, debris, and infrastructural fallout, West Bank Palestinians create a life under settler colonial rule.

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins focuses on waste as an experience of everyday life that is continuous with, but not a result only of, occupation. Tracing Palestinians' own experiences of wastes over the past decade, she considers how multiple authorities governing the West Bank-including municipalities, the Palestinian Authority, international aid organizations, NGOs, and Israel-rule by waste siege, whether intentionally or not. Her work challenges both common formulations of waste as "matter out of place" and as the ontological opposite of the environment, by suggesting instead that waste siege be understood as an ecology of "matter with no place to go." Waste siege thus not only describes a stateless Palestine, but also becomes a metaphor for our besieged planet


























[book] 36 RIGHTEOUS MEN
a Novel
By Steven Pressfield
November 5, 2019
WW NORTON

New York homicide detectives pursue a serial killer in this apocalyptic thriller.

When detectives James Manning and Covina “Dewey” Duwai are called in to investigate a series of bizarre murders, they make a shocking discovery: the legend of the hidden righteous ones, the 36 who preserve the world from destruction, is no legend at all. They are real, and they are being murdered.

As the bodies pile up and the world tilts into chaos, Manning and Dewey must protect the righteous ones from a ruthless killer able to beguile his victims and command them against their will. The detectives find their traditional arsenal of bullets and blades of little use against a foe who seems to anticipate their every move.

Joining forces with a disgraced but brilliant rabbinical scholar and a renowned anthropologist-who’s also the last of the righteous ones-Manning and Dewey set off on a perilous quest from New York to Gehenna to defeat a murderer who won’t stop until he’s killed everyone.


























[book] Medieval Bodies:
Life and Death in the Middle Ages
by Jack Hartnell
November 12, 2019
WW NORTON

With wit, wisdom, and a sharp scalpel, Jack Hartnell dissects the medieval body and offers a remedy to our preconceptions.

Included in Professor Hartnell's analysis are stories of medicine, death, circumcision, blood, and blood libels in Medieval European Jewish communities.

Medieval beliefs about the body were drastically different from ours today: Hair was thought to be a condensation of fumes emitted from the pores, ideas were supposedly committed to memory by being directly imprinted on the brain, and the womb of a goat was believed to function as a contraceptive. But while this medieval medicine now seems archaic, it also made a critical contribution to modern science.

Medieval Bodies guides us on a head-to-heel journey through this era’s revolutionary advancements and disturbing convictions. We learn about the surgeons who dissected a living man’s stomach, then sewed him up again; about the geographers who delineated racial groups by skin color; and about the practice of fasting to gain spiritual renown. Encompassing medicine and mysticism, politics and art-and complete with vivid, full-color illustrations-Medieval Bodies shows us how it felt to live and die a thousand years ago. 95 color illustrations






















[book] The Movement and the
Middle East: How the Arab-Israeli
Conflict Divided the American Left
by Michael R. Fischbach
November 5, 2019
Stanford University Press

The Arab-Israeli conflict constituted a serious problem for the American Left in the 1960s: pro-Palestinian activists hailed the Palestinian struggle against Israel as part of a fundamental restructuring of the global imperialist order, while pro-Israeli leftists held a less revolutionary worldview that understood Israel as a paragon of democratic socialist virtue. This intra-left debate was in part doctrinal, in part generational. But further woven into this split were sometimes agonizing questions of identity. Jews were disproportionately well-represented in the Movement, and their personal and communal lives could deeply affect their stances vis-à-vis the Middle East.

The Movement and the Middle East offers the first assessment of the controversial and ultimately debilitating role of the Arab-Israeli conflict among left-wing activists during a turbulent period of American history. Michael R. Fischbach draws on a deep well of original sources-from personal interviews to declassified FBI and CIA documents-to present a story of the left-wing responses to the question of Palestine and Israel. He shows how, as the 1970s wore on, the cleavages emerging within the American Left widened, weakening the Movement and leaving a lasting impact that still affects progressive American politics today.





















[book] What We Will Become:
A Mother, a Son, and a
Journey of Transformation
by Mimi Lemay
November 12, 2019
Houghton Mifflin HMH

A mother’s memoir of her transgender child’s odyssey, and her journey outside the boundaries of the faith and culture that shaped her.

From the age of two-and-a-half, Jacob, born “Em,” adamantly told his family he was a boy. While his mother Mimi struggled to understand and come to terms with the fact that her child may be transgender, she experienced a sense of déjà vu—the journey to uncover the source of her child’s inner turmoil unearthed ghosts from Mimi’s past and her own struggle to live an authentic life.

Raised in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish family, every aspect of Mimi’s life was dictated by ancient rules and her role in life largely preordained from cradle to grave. As a young woman, Mimi wrestled with the demands of her faith and eventually made the painful decision to leave her faith and community and the strict gender roles it upheld.

Having risen from the ashes of this past life, Mimi was prepared to help her son forge a new one, at a time when there was little consensus on how best to help young transgender children. Brimming with love and courage, and an honest, heartfelt portrait of an unforgettable family, What We Will Become is a testament to how painful events from the past can be redeemed to give us hope for the future.






















[book] THE MOVEMENT AND THE MIDDLE EAST
HOW THE ARAB-ISRAELI
CONFLICT DIVIDED THE AMERICAN LEFT
By Michael R. Fischbach
November 2019
Stanford University Press

From the author of Black Power and Palestine, comes a thesis that the Arab-Israeli conflict constituted a serious problem for the American Left in the 1960s: pro-Palestinian activists hailed the Palestinian struggle against Israel as part of a fundamental restructuring of the global imperialist order, while pro-Israeli leftists held a less revolutionary worldview that understood Israel as a paragon of democratic socialist virtue. This intra-left debate was in part doctrinal, in part generational. But further woven into this split were sometimes agonizing questions of identity. Jews were disproportionately well-represented in the Movement, and their personal and communal lives could deeply affect their stances vis-à-vis the Middle East.

The Movement and the Middle East offers the first assessment of the controversial and ultimately debilitating role of the Arab-Israeli conflict among left-wing activists during a turbulent period of American history. Michael R. Fischbach draws on a deep well of original sources-from personal interviews to declassified FBI and CIA documents-to present a story of the left-wing responses to the question of Palestine and Israel. He shows how, as the 1970s wore on, the cleavages emerging within the American Left widened, weakening the Movement and leaving a lasting impact that still affects progressive American politics today.



























[book] The RBG Way:
Secrets of Success of
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
by Rebecca Gibian
November 15, 2019
Skyhorse

Understanding and applying the wisdom of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg!

Given her incredible tenure as a Supreme Court justice as well as her monumental impact on the modern women’s rights movement, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has become one of the most prominent political leaders of today. To complement her judicial significance, she has also become one of the most culturally popular political figures in US history. Not only has her workout routine gone viral (and been detailed in a book by her trainer), but RBG’s story has been featured in multiple critically acclaimed films.

Organized into five parts and then broken down into more specific chapters within each part, The RBG Way offers wisdom from Justice Ginsburg, based on comments she has made on particular topics of importance. Insight is offered on subjects such as women’s rights, creating lasting partnerships, overcoming hardship, how to be brave, and how to create lasting change. Rebecca Gibian offers her seasoned journalistic perspective to shed light on beliefs that RBG holds strongly, in a manner that is both comprehensive and accessible.



























[book] Leadership Decapitation:
Strategic Targeting of
Terrorist Organizations
by Jenna Jordan
(Georgia Tech)
November 2019
Stanford University Press

One of the central pillars of U.S. counterterrorism policy is that capturing or killing a terrorist group's leader is effective. Yet this pillar rests more on a foundation of faith than facts. In Leadership Decapitation of Terrorist Organizations, Jenna Jordan examines over a thousand instances of leadership targeting-involving groups such as Hamas, al Qaeda, Shining Path, and ISIS-to identify the successes, failures, and unintended consequences of this strategy. As Jordan demonstrates, group infrastructure, ideology, and popular support all play a role in determining how and why leadership decapitation succeeds or fails. Taking heed of these conditions is essential to an effective counterterrorism policy going forward.


























[book] A Taste of South Africa
with the Kosher Butcher’s Wife
by Sharon Lurie
November 19, 2019
Penguin Random House South Africa

After highly successful outings with her first two books, Sharon Lurie, aka the Kosher Butcher’s Wife, decided that it was time to make it official and combine the influences of her culinary inheritance, i.e. cooking kosher as a proud South African. In her latest book, A Taste of South Africa with the Kosher Butcher’s Wife, she takes the home cook on an adventure encompassing many of the country’s diverse and iconic dishes, including traditional South African food with a traditional Jewish twist. This book not only includes meat and nondairy recipes but mouthwatering dairy dishes to dive into. And in her inimitable style, Sharon will keep you laughing along the way.



























[book] Pain: A Novel
by Zeruya Shalev
Sondra Silverston (Translator)
November 5, 2019
Other Press

A powerful, astute novel that exposes how old passions can return, testing our capacity to make choices about what is most essential in life.

Ten years after she was seriously injured in a terrorist attack, the pain comes back to torment Iris. But that is not all: Eitan, the love of her youth, also comes back into her life. Though their relationship ended many years ago, she was more deeply wounded when he left her than by the suicide bomber who blew himself up next to her.

Iris's marriage is stagnant. Her two children have grown up and are almost independent; she herself has become a dedicated, successful school principal. Now, after years without passion and joy, Eitan brings them back into her life. But she must concoct all sorts of lies to conceal her affair from her family, and the lies become more and more complicated.

Is this an impossible predicament, or on the contrary a scintillating revelation of the many ways life's twists and turns can bring us to a place we would never have expected to be?




























[book] WHOSE LIFE IS WORTH MORE
HIERARCHIES OF RISK AND
DEATH IN CONTEMPORARY WARS
By YAGIL LEVY
Open University of Israel
November 2019
Stanford University Press

Modern democracies face tough life-and-death choices in armed conflicts. Chief among them is how to weigh the value of soldiers' lives against those of civilians on both sides. The first of its kind, Whose Life Is Worth More? reveals that how these decisions are made is much more nuanced than conventional wisdom suggests. When these states are entangled in prolonged conflicts, hierarchies emerge and evolve to weigh the value of human life.

Yagil Levy delves into a wealth of contemporary conflicts, including the drone war in Pakistan, the Kosovo war, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the U.S. and U.K. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Cultural narratives about the nature and necessity of war, public rhetoric about external threats facing the nation, antiwar movements, and democratic values all contribute to the perceived validity of civilian and soldier deaths. By looking beyond the military to the cultural and political factors that shape policies, this book provides tools to understand how democracies really decide whose life is worth more.



























[book] NEVER GO WITH YOUR GUT
HOW PIONEERING LEADERS MAKE
THE BEST DECISIONS AND
AVOID BUSINESS DISASTERS
By Dr. Gleb Tsipursky
(Ohio State University)
November 1, 2019
Career Press

Gleb teached/teaches at Ohio State University. An outspoken Humanist and specialist on anxiety disorders, he was born in Moldova, and he came with his family as a pre-teen to America and studied human behavior and decision making at NYU, Harvard and UNC. He asks whether you want to avoid business disasters, whether minor mishaps, such as excessive team conflict, or major calamities like those that threaten bankruptcy or doom a promising career? Fortunately, behavioral economics studies show that such disasters stem from poor decisions due to our faulty mental patterns—what scholars call “cognitive biases”—and are preventable.

Unfortunately, the typical advice for business leaders to “go with their guts” plays into these cognitive biases and leads to disastrous decisions that devastate the bottom line. By combining practical case studies with cutting-edge research, Never Go With Your Gut will help you make the best decisions and prevent these business disasters.

The leading expert on avoiding business disasters, Dr. Gleb Tsipursky, draws on over 20 years of extensive consulting, coaching, and speaking experience to show how pioneering leaders and organizations—many of them his clients—avoid business disasters. Reading this book will enable you to:

Discover how pioneering leaders and organizations address cognitive biases to avoid disastrous decisions. Adapt best practices on avoiding business disasters from these leaders and organizations to your own context. Develop processes that empower everyone in your organization to avoid business disasters.



























[book] The Physics of Krav Maga
by John Eric Goff
November 19, 2019
Johns Hopkins University Press

Krav Maga ("contact combat" in Hebrew) is a hard-hitting and efficient form of self-defense that was popularized by Israeli soldiers. Stressing practical, real-world fighting and a philosophy of self-defense, its popularity has grown worldwide over the past few decades.

In The Physics of Krav Maga, John Eric Goff, a physicist, best-selling author, and martial arts practitioner, explains the science behind dozens of Krav Maga moves, from headlocks to hammer fists. Focusing on Warrior Krav Maga, a fighting style that combines the key elements of Krav Maga with kickboxing, wrestling, karate, and other fighting specialties, this equation-free, conceptual introduction is aimed at martial arts practitioners interested in refining their fighting technique and all fans of the fascinating moment when sports meets science.

With step-by-step descriptions and detailed photos of each critical motion, Goff takes a scientific look at everything from punch speed to power output and reaction time. Armed with this book, readers will understand the physics behind each move. They will also learn how to

• enhance their level of physical fitness
• disrupt an opponent's balance-while keeping theirs
• make use of leverage to defeat a larger, stronger attacker
• become faster and more powerful
• inflict pain up close
• use weapons-and "weapons of opportunity"
• and much more!

Anyone interested in martial arts, in how physics applies to sports and combat, and in how a physicist wins a fight will love The Physics of Krav Maga.
















[book] Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds:
100 New Ways to See the World
by Ian Wright
November 1, 2019
The Experiment

An atlas of 100 infographic maps, each one revealing something about the world that you’ve never thought of before (or in some cases cared to think about)

Which nations have North Korean embassies? How many countries have bigger economies than California? (very few)
Who drives on the “wrong” side of the road?
Some are exciting, like 50% of Canadians live near Toronto; countries with 50% of populations that are immigrants (or less than 1%); second largest nationality living in each European country; highest speed limits; decimal point vs decimal comma; age of consent; highest paid public employees by state (governor, surgeon or football coach?); countries not using the metric system. Others not so much.

In Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds, you’ll learn all this and much more. One hundred maps strike a balance between sobering analysis (number of executions by state) and whimsical insight (the countries of the world where there aren’t any McDonald’s).

Thought-provoking and flat-out fun, this one-of-a-kind atlas—compiled by the editor of the popular Brilliant Maps website—makes surprising connections that illuminate the contours of culture, history, and politics. Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds will change the way you see the world—and your place in it.































[book] The Moves That Matter:
A Chess Grandmaster
on the Game of Life
by Jonathan Rowson
November 5, 2019
Bloomsbury... of course

Is your primary responsibility your best next move? Are ther situations where you can only do harm to move forward? What if neither side can move without doing home?

A chess grandmaster reveals the powerful teachings this ancient game offers for staying present, thriving in a complex world, and crafting a fulfilling life.

Refined and perfected through 1,500 years of human history, chess has long been a touchstone for shrewd tacticians and master strategists. But what if we thought of the game not as warfare in miniature, but rather as an ever-shifting puzzle to be solved, a narrative to be written, or a task that demands players create their own motivation from moment to moment? Then, as champion player Jonathan Rowson argues in this utterly unique book, it starts to seem as if all of life might be reflected in those 64 black and white squares.

Taking us inside the psychologically charged world of chess’s global elite, and into the minds of outstanding players sitting at a board, Rowson mines the game for its dazzling insights into sustaining focus, quieting our inner saboteur, making tough decisions, overcoming failure, and more. He peels back the arcane rules and wondrous logic of chess to reveal the timeless wisdom underneath. This exhilarating tour ranges from how to love our mistakes to how people are like trees, from the mysteries of parenting to the beauty of technical details, to the endgame of death. Throughout, chess emerges as a powerful-and surprisingly accessible-metaphor for the thrills and setbacks that invest our daily lives with meaning and beauty.





























[book] Finding Meaning:
The Sixth Stage of Grief
by David Kessler
November 5, 2019
Scribner

In this groundbreaking new work, David Kessler—an expert on grief and the coauthor with Elisabeth Kübler-Ross of the iconic On Grief and Grieving—journeys beyond the classic FIVE STAGES to discover a sixth stage: MEANING.

In 1969, Elisabeth Kübler Ross first identified the stages of dying in her transformative book On Death and Dying. Decades later, she and David Kessler wrote the classic On Grief and Grieving, introducing the stages of grief with the same transformative pragmatism and compassion. Now, based on hard-earned personal experiences, as well as knowledge and wisdom earned through decades of work with the grieving, Kessler introduces a critical sixth stage.

Many people look for “closure” after a loss. Kessler argues that it’s finding meaning beyond the stages of grief most of us are familiar with—denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance—that can transform grief into a more peaceful and hopeful experience.

In this book, Kessler gives readers a roadmap to remembering those who have died with more love than pain; he shows us how to move forward in a way that honors our loved ones. Kessler’s insight is both professional and intensely personal. His journey with grief began when, as a child, he witnessed a mass shooting at the same time his mother was dying. For most of his life, Kessler taught physicians, nurses, counselors, police, and first responders about end of life, trauma, and grief, as well as leading talks and retreats for those experiencing grief. Despite his knowledge, his life was upended by the sudden death of his twenty-one-year-old son.

How does the grief expert handle such a tragic loss? He knew he had to find a way through this unexpected, devastating loss, a way that would honor his son. That, ultimately, was the sixth state of grief—meaning. In Finding Meaning, Kessler shares the insights, collective wisdom, and powerful tools that will help those experiencing loss.

Finding Meaning is a necessary addition to grief literature and a vital guide to healing from tremendous loss. This is an inspiring, deeply intelligent must-read for anyone looking to journey away from suffering, through loss, and towards meaning.























[book] The Godman and the Sea:
The Empty Tomb, the Trauma of
the Jews, and the Gospel of Mark
(Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion) Hardcover – November 1, 2019 by Michael J. Thate (Princeton)
November 1, 2019
University of Pennsylvania Press

If scholars no longer necessarily find the essence and origins of what came to be known as Christianity in the personality of a historical figure known as Jesus of Nazareth, it nevertheless remains the case that the study of early Christianity is dominated by an assumption of the force of Jesus's personality on divergent communities. In The Godman and the Sea, Michael J. Thate shifts the terms of this study by focusing on the Gospel of Mark, which ends when Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome discover a few days after the crucifixion that Jesus's tomb has been opened but the corpse is not there. Unlike the other gospels, Mark does not include the resurrection, portraying instead loss, puzzlement, and despair in the face of the empty tomb.

Reading Mark's Gospel as an exemplary text, Thate examines what he considers to be retellings of other traumatic experiences—the stories of Jesus's exorcising demons out of a man and into a herd of swine, his stilling of the storm, and his walking on the water. Drawing widely on a diverse set of resources that include the canon of western fiction, classical literature, the psychological study of trauma, phenomenological philosophy, the new materialism, psychoanalytic theory, poststructural philosophy, and Hebrew Bible scholarship, as well as the expected catalog of New Testament tools of biblical criticism in general and Markan scholarship in particular, The Godman and the Sea is an experimental reading of the Gospel of Mark and the social force of the sea within its traumatized world. More fundamentally, however, it attempts to position this reading as a story of trauma, ecstasy, and what has become through the ruins of past pain.



























[book] Her Neighbor's Wife:
A History of Lesbian
Desire Within Marriage
by Lauren Jae Gutterman
November 1, 2019
University of Pennsylvania Press

At first glance, Barbara Kalish fit the stereotype of a 1950s wife and mother. Married at eighteen, Barbara lived with her husband and two daughters in a California suburb, where she was president of the Parent-Teacher Association. At a PTA training conference in San Francisco, Barbara met Pearl, another PTA president who also had two children and happened to live only a few blocks away from her. To Barbara, Pearl was "the most gorgeous woman in the world," and the two began an affair that lasted over a decade.

Through interviews, diaries, memoirs, and letters, Her Neighbor's Wife traces the stories of hundreds of women, like Barbara Kalish, who struggled to balance marriage and same-sex desire in the postwar United States. In doing so, Lauren Jae Gutterman draws our attention away from the postwar landscape of urban gay bars and into the homes of married women, who tended to engage in affairs with wives and mothers they met in the context of their daily lives: through work, at church, or in their neighborhoods.

In the late 1960s and 1970s, the lesbian feminist movement and the no-fault divorce revolution transformed the lives of wives who desired women. Women could now choose to divorce their husbands in order to lead openly lesbian or bisexual lives; increasingly, however, these women were confronted by hostile state discrimination, typically in legal battles over child custody. Well into the 1980s, many women remained ambivalent about divorce and resistant to labelling themselves as lesbian, therefore complicating a simple interpretation of their lives and relationship choices. By revealing the extent to which marriage has historically permitted space for wives' relationships with other women, Her Neighbor's Wife calls into question the presumed straightness of traditional American marriage.



























[book] Battling Bella:
The Protest Politics
of Bella Abzug
by Leandra Ruth Zarnow
November 26, 2019
Harvard University Press

Bella Abzug’s promotion of women’s and gay rights, universal childcare, green energy, and more provoked not only fierce opposition from Republicans but a split within her own party. The story of this notorious, galvanizing force in the Democrats’ “New Politics” insurgency is a biography for our times.

Before Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Elizabeth Warren, or Hillary Clinton, there was New York’s Bella Abzug. With a fiery rhetorical style forged in the 1960s antiwar movement, Abzug vigorously promoted gender parity, economic justice, and the need to “bring Congress back to the people.”

The 1970 congressional election season saw Abzug, in her trademark broad-brimmed hats, campaigning on the slogan “This Woman’s Place Is in the House?the House of Representatives.” Having won her seat, she advanced the feminist agenda in ways big and small, from gaining full access for congresswomen to the House swimming pool to cofounding the National Women’s Political Caucus to putting the title “Ms.” into the political lexicon. Beyond women’s rights, “Sister Bella” promoted gay rights, privacy rights, and human rights, and pushed legislation relating to urban, environmental, and foreign affairs.

Her stint in Congress lasted just six years?it ended when she decided to seek the Democrats’ 1976 New York senate nomination, a race she lost to Daniel Patrick Moynihan by less than 1 percent. Their primary contest, while gendered, was also an ideological struggle for the heart of the Democratic Party. Abzug’s protest politics had helped for a time to shift the center of politics to the left, but her progressive positions also fueled a backlash from conservatives who thought change was going too far.

This deeply researched political biography highlights how, as 1960s radicalism moved protest into electoral politics, Abzug drew fire from establishment politicians across the political spectrum?but also inspired a generation of women.























[book] The Lost Art of Scripture:
Rescuing the Sacred Texts
by Karen Armstrong
November 5, 2019
KNOPF

FROM THE PUBLISHER: “Today the Quran is used by some to justify war and acts of terrorism, the Torah to deny Palestinians the right to live in the Land of Israel, and the Bible to condemn homosexuality and contraception. The significance of Scripture may not be immediately obvious in our secular world, but its misunderstanding is perhaps the root cause of many of today's controversies… The sacred texts have been coopted by fundamentalists, who insist that they must be taken literally, and by others who interpret Scripture to bolster their own prejudices. These texts are seen to prescribe ethical norms and codes of behavior that are divinely ordained: they are believed to contain eternal truths. But as Karen Armstrong shows in this chronicle of the development and significance of major religions, such a narrow, peculiar reading of Scripture is a relatively recent, modern phenomenon. For most of their history, the world's religious traditions have regarded these texts as tools that enable the individual to connect with the divine, to experience a different level of consciousness, and to help them engage with the world in more meaningful and compassionate ways… At a time of intolerance and mutual incomprehension, The Lost Art of Scripture shines fresh light on the world's major religions to help us build bridges between faiths and rediscover a creative and spiritual engagement with holy texts.”





















DECEMBER 2019 BOOKS




[book] THE JEWS OF OTTOMAN IZMIR
A MODERN HISTORY
BY ANON
(Binghamton University)
December 2019
Stanford University Press

By the turn of the twentieth century, the eastern Mediterranean port city of Izmir had been home to a vibrant and substantial Sephardi Jewish community for over four hundred years, and had emerged as a major center of Jewish life. The Jews of Ottoman Izmir tells the story of this long overlooked Jewish community, drawing on previously untapped Ladino archival material.

Across Europe, Jews were often confronted with the notion that their religious and cultural distinctiveness was somehow incompatible with the modern age. Yet the view from Ottoman Izmir invites a different approach: what happens when Jewish difference is totally unremarkable? Dina Danon argues that while Jewish religious and cultural distinctiveness might have remained unquestioned in this late Ottoman port city, other elements of Jewish identity emerged as profound sites of tension, most notably those of poverty and social class. Through the voices of both beggars on the street and mercantile elites, shoe-shiners and newspaper editors, rabbis and housewives, this book argues that it was new attitudes to poverty and class, not Judaism, that most significantly framed this Sephardi community's encounter with the modern age.



























[book] AMERICAN JEWBU
AMERICAN JUBU
JEWS, BUDDHISTS, AND RELIGIOUS CHANGE
By EMILY SIGALOW
(UJA – Performance Assessment, Sociologist)
November 12, 2019
Princeton University Press

A revealing look at the Jewish American encounter with Buddhism Today, many Jewish Americans are embracing a dual religious identity, practicing Buddhism while also staying connected to their Jewish roots. This book tells the story of Judaism's encounter with Buddhism in the United States, showing how it has given rise to new contemplative forms within American Judaism?and shaped the way Americans understand and practice Buddhism.

Taking readers from the nineteenth century to today, Emily Sigalow traces the history of these two traditions in America and explains how they came together. She argues that the distinctive social position of American Jews led them to their unique engagement with Buddhism, and describes how people incorporate aspects of both into their everyday lives. Drawing on a wealth of original in-depth interviews conducted across the nation, Sigalow explores how Jewish American Buddhists experience their dual religious identities. She reveals how Jewish Buddhists confound prevailing expectations of minority religions in America. Rather than simply adapting to the majority religion, Jews and Buddhists have borrowed and integrated elements from each other, and in doing so they have left an enduring mark on the American consciousness.

American JewBu highlights the leading role that American Jews have played in the popularization of meditation and mindfulness in the United States, and the profound impact that these two venerable traditions have had on one another.
























[book] A Convert’s Tale:
Art, Crime, and Jewish Apostasy
in Renaissance Italy
by Tamar Herzig (
December 3, 2019
Harvard University Press

An intimate portrait, based on newly discovered archival sources, of one of the most famous Jewish artists of the Italian Renaissance who, charged with a scandalous crime, renounced his faith and converted to Catholicism.

In 1491 the renowned goldsmith Salomone da Sesso converted to Catholicism. Born in the mid-fifteenth century to a Jewish family in Florence, Salomone later settled in Ferrara, where he was regarded as a virtuoso artist whose exquisite jewelry and lavishly engraved swords were prized by Italy’s ruling elite. But rumors circulated about Salomone’s behavior, scandalizing the Jewish community, who turned him over to the civil authorities. Charged with sodomy, Salomone was sentenced to die but agreed to renounce Judaism to save his life. He was baptized, taking the name Ercole “de’ Fedeli” (“One of the Faithful”). With the help of powerful patrons like Duchess Eleonora of Aragon and Duke Ercole d’Este, his namesake, Ercole lived as a practicing Catholic for three more decades. Drawing on newly discovered archival sources, Tamar Herzig traces the dramatic story of his life, half a century before ecclesiastical authorities made Jewish conversion a priority of the Catholic Church.

A Convert’s Tale explores the Jewish world in which Salomone was born and raised; the glittering objects he crafted, and their status as courtly hallmarks; and Ercole’s relations with his wealthy patrons. Herzig also examines homosexuality in Renaissance Italy, the response of Jewish communities and Christian authorities to allegations of sexual crimes, and attitudes toward homosexual acts among Christians and Jews. In Salomone/Ercole’s story we see how precarious life was for converts from Judaism, and how contested was the meaning of conversion for both the apostates’ former coreligionists and those tasked with welcoming them to their new faith.
























[book] Religious Parenting:
Transmitting Faith and Values
in Contemporary America
by Christian Smith
December 3, 2019
Princeton University Press

How parents approach the task of passing on religious faith and practice to their children How do American parents pass their religion on to their children? At a time of overall decline of traditional religion and an increased interest in personal “spirituality,” Religious Parenting investigates the ways that parents transmit religious beliefs, values, and practices to their kids. We know that parents are the most important influence on their children’s religious lives, yet parents have been virtually ignored in previous work on religious socialization. Renowned religion scholar Christian Smith and his collaborators Bridget Ritz and Michael Rotolo explore American parents’ strategies, experiences, beliefs, and anxieties regarding religious transmission through hundreds of in-depth interviews that span religious traditions, social classes, and family types all around the country.

Throughout we hear the voices of evangelical, Catholic, Mormon, mainline and black Protestant, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist parents and discover that, despite massive diversity, American parents share a nearly identical approach to socializing their children religiously. For almost all, religion is important for the foundation it provides for becoming one’s best self on life’s difficult journey. Religion is primarily a resource for navigating the challenges of this life, not preparing for an afterlife. Parents view it as their job, not religious professionals’, to ground their children in life-enhancing religious values that provide resilience, morality, and a sense of purpose. Challenging longstanding sociological and anthropological assumptions about culture, the authors demonstrate that parents of highly dissimilar backgrounds share the same “cultural models” when passing on religion to their children.

Taking an extensive look into questions of religious practice and childrearing, Religious Parenting uncovers parents’ real-life challenges while breaking innovative theoretical ground.

























[book] 999:
The Extraordinary Young Women
of the First Official Jewish
Transport to Auschwitz
by Heather Dune Macadam
Caroline Moorehead (Foreword)
December 31, 2019
Citadel

On March 25, 1942, nearly a thousand young, unmarried Jewish women boarded a train in Poprad, Slovakia. Filled with a sense of adventure and national pride, they left their parents’ homes wearing their best clothes and confidently waving good-bye. Believing they were going to work in a factory for a few months, they were eager to report for government service. Instead, the young women—many of them teenagers—were sent to Auschwitz. Their government paid 500 Reich Marks (about $200) apiece for the Nazis to take them as slave labor. Of those 999 innocent deportees, only a few would survive.

The facts of the first official Jewish transport to Auschwitz are little known, yet profoundly relevant today. These were not resistance fighters or prisoners of war. There were no men among them. Sent to almost certain death, the young women were powerless and insignificant not only because they were Jewish—but also because they were female. Now acclaimed author Heather Dune Macadam reveals their poignant stories, drawing on extensive interviews with survivors, and consulting with historians, witnesses, and relatives of those first deportees to create an important addition to Holocaust literature and women’s history.



























[book] Last Stop Auschwitz
by Eliazar de Wind
January 21, 2020
Grand Central Publishing

Auschwitz survivor Eddy de Wind provides a minute-by-minute true account from his journal of fighting for his life at the largest extermination camp in Nazi Germany, with an award-winning translator.

"We know that there is only one ending to this, only one liberation from this barbed wire hell: death." --Eddy de Wind

In 1943, amidst the start of German occupation, Eddy de Wind worked as a doctor at Westerbork, a Dutch transit camp. His mother had been taken to this camp by Nazis but Eddy was assured by the Jewish Council she would be freed in exchange for his labor. He later found out she'd already been transferred to Auschwitz.

While at Westerbork, he fell in love with a woman named Friedel and they married. The young couple was forced to share a room with cardboard walls with another pair until, one year later, they were transported to Auschwitz. Upon arrival, Friedel and Eddy were separated--Eddy to work as the camp's doctor, and Friedel at the mercy of the Nazis, facing regular experimentation and sexual assault. While they were able to be in contact sporadically, Eddy longed for the day he could be free with Friedel, and by some miracle they both survived among the 1.1 million that didn't make it out alive.

In this poignant, moving account of Eddy's life during the Holocaust translated from Dutch, he provides unparalleled access to the atrocities faced in the camp. He doesn't just write about the horrors of the camp, but analyzes, philosophizes, and observes the kind of behavior--both good and evil--people are capable of. Through raw prose and photographs from his childhood, the camp is described in detail like never documented before.
























[book] NOT BORN YESTERDAY
THE SCIENCE OF WHO WE TRUST
AND WHAT WE BELIEVE
B HUGO MERCIER
January 2020
Princeton University Press

Why people are not as gullible as we think

Not Born Yesterday explains how we decide who we can trust and what we should believe?and argues that we're pretty good at making these decisions. In this lively and provocative book, Hugo Mercier demonstrates how virtually all attempts at mass persuasion?whether by religious leaders, politicians, or advertisers?fail miserably. Drawing on recent findings from political science and other fields ranging from history to anthropology, Mercier shows that the narrative of widespread gullibility, in which a credulous public is easily misled by demagogues and charlatans, is simply wrong.

Why is mass persuasion so difficult? Mercier uses the latest findings from experimental psychology to show how each of us is endowed with sophisticated cognitive mechanisms of open vigilance. Computing a variety of cues, these mechanisms enable us to be on guard against harmful beliefs, while being open enough to change our minds when presented with the right evidence. Even failures?when we accept false confessions, spread wild rumors, or fall for quack medicine?are better explained as bugs in otherwise well-functioning cognitive mechanisms than as symptoms of general gullibility.

Not Born Yesterday shows how we filter the flow of information that surrounds us, argues that we do it well, and explains how we can do it better still.
























[book] The Shenzhen Experiment:
The Story of China’s Instant City
by Juan Du
January 10, 2020
Harvard University Press

For under $700 R/T you can take a direct flight from Tel Aviv to Shenzhen, China. Two decades ago, few people even knew of the city.

An award-winning Hong Kong–based architect with decades of experience designing buildings and planning cities in the People’s Republic of China takes us to the Pearl River delta and into the heart of China’s iconic Special Economic Zone, Shenzhen.

Shenzhen is ground zero for the economic transformation China has seen in recent decades. In 1979, driven by China’s widespread poverty, Deng Xiaoping supported a bold proposal to experiment with economic policies in a rural borderland next to Hong Kong. The site was designated as the City of Shenzhen and soon after became China’s first Special Economic Zone (SEZ). Four decades later, Shenzhen is a megacity of twenty million, an internationally recognized digital technology hub, and the world’s most successful economic zone. Some see it as a modern miracle city that seemingly came from nowhere, attributing its success solely to centralized planning and Shenzhen’s proximity to Hong Kong. The Chinese government has built hundreds of new towns using the Shenzhen model, yet none has come close to replicating the city’s level of economic success.

But is it true that Shenzhen has no meaningful history? That the city was planned on a tabula rasa? That the region’s rural past has had no significant impact on the urban present? Juan Du unravels the myth of Shenzhen and shows us how this world-famous “instant city” has a surprising history?filled with oyster fishermen, villages that remain encased within city blocks, a secret informal housing system?and how it has been catapulted to success as much by the ingenuity of its original farmers as by Beijing’s policy makers. The Shenzhen Experiment is an important story for all rapidly urbanizing and industrializing nations around the world seeking to replicate China’s economic success in the twenty-first century.























[book] Building a Life Worth Living:
A Memoir
by Dr. Marsha M. Linehan
January 2020
Random House

Marsha Linehan tells the story of her journey from suicidal teenager to world-renowned developer of the life-saving behavioral therapy DBT, using her own struggle to develop life skills for others. Growing up in the early 1960s, Marsha Linehan was a popular teenager from a big, Catholic family in the Midwest )Oklahoma, daughter of oil man). Then, at the age of eighteen, she began an abrupt downward spiral to a severely depressed, suicidal, young woman who cut herself multiple times. During several years in a psychiatric institute, Linehan made a vow: if she could get out of hell, she would find a way to help others get out, too. And she did. In this book she tells how she did it, and she says, "If I can do it, you can too."

This is the inspiring life story of the woman who established the first meaningful therapeutic treatment for some of the most desperate people in the world: individuals suffering from suicidal thoughts and borderline personality disorder. After putting herself through night school and university, living at the YWCA and often scraping together spare change to buy food, Linehan went on to get her PhD in psychology, specializing in behavior therapy. In the 1980s, she achieved a breakthrough when she developed Dialectical Behavior Therapy: a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness, acceptance of the self, and ways to change.

Throughout her extraordinary scientific career, Linehan remained a woman of deep spirituality, eventually leaving the Catholic Church for the Eastern practice of Zen, and becoming a Zen master. Her powerful and moving story is one of faith and perseverance. Marsha Linehan is living proof that the principles of DBT really work--and that, using her life skills and techniques, people can build a life worth living.























[book] HUNTER KILLER
A Pike Logan Novel
An Espionage Thriller Novel
By Brad Taylor
January 2020
William Morrow

Can Israeli assassins aid Pike Logan as he fights highly skilled Russians in South America?

Pike Logan tracks highly-trained Russian assassins to Brazil in this blistering, action-packed thriller from New York Times bestselling author and former Special Forces Officer Brad Taylor.

Pike Logan and the Taskforce were once the apex predators, an unrivaled hunting machine that decimated those out to harm the United States, but they may have met their match. While Pike Logan and Jennifer Cahill prepare to join their team on a counter-terrorist mission in the triple frontier—the lawless tri-border region where Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay meet—they are targeted in Charleston, South Carolina. A vicious explosion kills a friend, and the perpetrators have set it up to look like an accident. While the authorities believe this was not foul play, Pike knows the attack was meant for him.

When he loses contact with the team in South America, Pike is convinced he and the Taskforce are under assault. His men are the closest thing to family that Pike has, which means he will do anything, even ignore direct orders to stand down, to find them. Pike and Jennifer head to Brazil to investigate their disappearance and run headlong into a crew of Russian assassins. Within days they are entangled in a byzantine scheme involving Brazilian politics and a cut-throat battle for control of offshore oil fields.

Forged in combat, the Russians are the equal of anything the Taskforce has encountered before, but they make a mistake in attacking Pike’s team, because Pike has a couple of elite Israeli assassins of his own. And Pike will stop at nothing to protect his family.

























[book] EXILE
Portraits of the Jewish Diaspora
by Annika Hernroth-rothstein
Tiffany Gabbay (Editor)
January 14, 2020
Bombardier Books

An innovative and poignant exploration of diverse Jewish communities throughout the diaspora. Small resilient Jewish communities continue to endure and thrive around the world – sometimes in the most unlikely places, and often in the face of extreme persecution. Journalist Annika Hernroth-Rothstein has spent two years of her life uncovering the hidden beauty of these largely forgotten Jewish enclaves. Drawing from her personal experience of growing up as a Jew in a tiny village in Sweden, Annika brings brilliant life to the history, culture, and most importantly, the fascinating people she has met on her journey.

Part sociology, part history lesson, and always a love letter to the Jewish people, Exile is an indispensable guide to rediscovering forgotten pieces of a rich Jewish history. Sweden * Finland * Cuba * Turkey * Colombia * Iran * Tunisia * Morocco * Russia (Siberia) * Uzbekistan





















[book] And in the Vienna Woods the Trees Remain:
The Heartbreaking True Story
of a Family Torn Apart by War
by Elisabeth Åsbrink
Saskia Vogel (Translator)
January 2020
Other Press

Winner of the August Prize, an intricate weave of documents, substantive narrative, and emotional commentary that centers on a young Jewish refugee's friendship with the future founder of IKEA.

Pepi Ullman and his wife lived in Vienna. Pepi was a newspaper editor. But the Nazi race laws caused him to be fired. In February 1939, Pepi and his wife sent their only child Otto to Sweden. Otto Ullman, a Jewish boy, had been sent to safety in Sweden before the outbreak of WWII. There he became best friends with Ingvar Kamprad, who would grow up to become the founder of IKEA, a hero of Swedish innovation and entrpreneurship. Despite the huge Swedish resistance to Jews, the thirteen-year-old Otto was granted permission to enter Sweden – all in accordance with the Swedish archbishop's secret plan to save Jews on condition that they converted to Christianity.

Otto found work as a farmhand at the Kamprad family's farm Elmtaryd in Agunnaryd in the province of Småland. Ingvar and Otto became very close friends. But at the same time, Ingvar Kamprad was actively engaged in Nazi organizations and a great supporter of the Swedish fascist Per Engdahl. The Swedish security service kept tabs on Kamprad for nearly a year. Kamprad was happy about his work for Engdahl and his attempts to recruit more people to the fascistic party.

Otto's parents were trapped in Vienna, and the last letters he received were sent from Theresienstadt. They were deported to Auschwitz where they were murdered.

With thorough research, including personal files initiated by the predecessor to today's Swedish Security Service (SÄPO) and more than 500 letters, Elisabeth Åsbrink illustrates how Swedish society was infused with anti-Semitism and how families were shattered by war and asylum politics. When news of her recearch first came to light, IKEA donated tens of million of dollars to the United Nations in order to help refugees. This huge donation drowned out her story, but here it is, a story of IKEA's founder and a reflection of Swedish society, neither of wish that wish to dwell on the past, now translated into English























[book] The Sun and Her Stars:
Salka Viertel and Hitler's
Exiles in the Golden Age of Hollywood
by Donna Rifkind
January 28, 2020
The Other Press

The little-known story of screenwriter Salka Viertel, whose salons in 1930s and 40s Hollywood created a refuge for a multitude of famous figures who had escaped the horrors of World War ll.

Hollywood was created by its "others"; that is, by women, Jews, and immigrants. Salka Viertel was all three and so much more. She was the screenwriter for five of Greta Garbo's movies and also her most intimate friend. At one point during the Irving Thalberg years, Viertel was the highest-paid writer on the MGM lot. Meanwhile, at her house in Santa Monica she opened her door on Sunday afternoons to scores of European émigrés who had fled from Hitler--such as Thomas Mann, Bertolt Brecht, and Arnold Schoenberg--along with every kind of Hollywood star, from Charlie Chaplin to Shelley Winters. In Viertel's living room (the only one in town with comfortable armchairs, said one Hollywood insider), countless cinematic, theatrical, and musical partnerships were born.

Viertel combined a modern-before-her-time sensibility with the Old-World advantages of a classical European education and fluency in eight languages. She combined great worldliness with great warmth. She was a true bohemian with a complicated erotic life, and at the same time a universal mother figure. A vital presence in the golden age of Hollywood, Salka Viertel is long overdue for her own moment in the spotlight.






















[book] A City in Fragments:
Urban Text in Modern Jerusalem
by Yair Wallach
JANUARY 2020
Stanford University Press

Jerusalem-born Yair Wallach is an independent writer, researcher and analyst based in London. He has recently completed his PhD at the University of London, on the use of Arabic and Hebrew “public texts” (street signs, inscriptions and graffiti) in modern Jerusalem, 1858-1948.



























[book] READING ISRAEL,
READING AMERICA
The Politics of Translation
Between Jews
By Omri Asscher, UCLA
December 2019
Stanford University Press

























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