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SUMMER 2020 BOOK SUGGESTIONS

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Welcome to MyJewishBooks.com Summer 2020 Suggestions



NOTE: THIS PAGE IS BEST VIEWED IN FIREFOX AND NOT CHROME, Temporarily


SOME SUMMER 2020 BOOK READINGS


Nearly all in person book readings are postponed.
But if we hear of ZOOM one and other online readings, we will let you know
If any authors want to create one with us, please let us know






[book] Night of the Assassins:
The Untold Story of Hitler's Plot
to Kill FDR, Churchill, and Stalin
by Howard Blum
Harper
June 2, 2020


The actor Leslie Howard was killed when his plane was shot down flying from Lisbon to London. Nazis thought Churchill was on board and tried to kill him.
Hitler, Schellenberg, Skorenzy, and Canarsis wanted to kill FDR to secure a better peace.
Did you know that torpedos targeted FDR as he crossed the Atlantic
How did the Secret Service, Mike Reilly, and Russians try to fight the assassins in Tehran who were plotting to kill FDR?
Who was the female Nazi spy who betrayed her lover and told the U.S. Secret service about the plot?
Did Stalin's guards attack 38 Nazi commandos who parachuted into Tehran to kill the Allied leaders?

The New York Times bestselling author returns with a tale as riveting and suspenseful as any thriller: the true story of the Nazi plot to kill the leaders of the United States, Great Britain, and the U.S.S.R. during World War II.

The mission: to kill the three most important and heavily guarded men in the world.
The assassins: a specially trained team headed by the killer known as The Most Dangerous Man in Europe.
The stakes: nothing less than the future of the Western world.

The year is 1943 and the three Allied leaders—Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin—are meeting for the first time at a top-secret conference in Tehran. But the Nazis have learned about the meeting and Hitler sees it as his last chance to turn the tide. Although the war is undoubtedly lost, the Germans believe that perhaps a new set of Allied leaders might be willing to make a more reasonable peace in its aftermath. And so a plan is devised—code name Operation Long Jump—to assassinate FDR, Churchill, and Stalin.

Immediately, a highly trained, hand-picked team of Nazi commandos is assembled, trained, armed with special weapons, and parachuted into Iran. They have six days to complete the daring assignment before the statesmen will return home. With no margin for error and little time to spare, Mike Reilly, the head of FDR’s Secret Service detail—a man from a Montana silver mining town who describes himself as “an Irish cop with more muscle than brains”—must overcome his suspicions and instincts to work with a Soviet agent from the NKVD (the precursor to the KGB) to save the three most powerful men in the world.

Filled with eight pages of black-and-white photographs, Night of the Assassins is a suspenseful true-life tale about an impossible mission, a ticking clock, and one man who stepped up to the challenge and prevented a world catastrophe.




























[book] BIG SUMMER
A Novel
by JENNIFER WEINER
MAY 5, 2020
ATRIA BOOKS

#1 New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Weiner is back with a powerful tale of friendship and forgiveness set on Cape Cod during the disastrous wedding of an old friend.

After giving her readers the family saga across generations that was MRS EVERYTHING, Weiner is back with a warm, funny, insightful book on female friendships and how we return to those we have known since childhood

The prologue opens in 1989. Christina asks her widowed father for the Cape Code house near Truro Beach. He is angry when she informs him that she is staying there since she is pregnant (with the child of a married man with no intention of ever leaving his wife), but he relents, and she makes a life for herself and her son Aidan, scraping by in a creaky cottage. The novel then opens three decades later... where we meet Daphne BERG, a young woman making a career for herself in Manhattan, while trying to afford to live in NYC.

Daphne has grown from an insecure, younger woman.... and now, feels good, on most days, about where she is in life and where she is headed. Behind her are her attempts to be thin. She is strong and accepts her fatter form and empowers others to do the same. She is “adorbs.” Her posts have thousands of followers. She (and her dog Bingo) are climbing the ranks as online influencers; she posts her outfit of the day (OOTD), linking the outfits to where they can be purchased. But then an old friend who has said mean things about her weight in the past (since 6th grade) – Drue Lathrop Cavanaugh - contacts her with a HUGE FAVOR to ask, and this old frenemy is acting all friendly-and-nice now. (But she has been in WASP therapy, so maybe she has actually changed for the better). Will Daphne agree to the huge favor and travel to Cape Cod in June?

This is a story of a woman's BIG SUMMER on CAPE COD and about old friendships and powerful friendships... for better or worse, til beach reads do us part.

Note to file.... I picked up the book on a Sunday... and... could not put it down until 12 hours later, and discovered why Jennifer Weiner is an amazing novelist.


















[book] Becoming Brianna
(Emmie & Friends)
by Terri Libenson
MAY 5, 2020
paperback
Balzer and Bray
Ages 8 - 12

New York Times bestseller! Terri Libenson returns with another endearing, relatable story of friendship and finding confidence. Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier and Jennifer L. Holm.
Middle school is full of challenges.
Everyone knows how much brainy Bri likes the spotlight (not). So why did she ever agree to something that forces her to learn a new language, give a speech, help organize a party, and juggle drama at school and home?! As the big event inches closer, Bri wonders if it’s all worth it. . . .
Told in alternating past and present chapters, Bri’s heartwarming story unfolds over the eight months leading up to her bat mitzvah—as well as over the course of the big day itself.
Plus don't miss Terri Libenson's Invisible Emmie, Positively Izzy, and Just Jaime!


















[book] WHITE KIDS
Growing up With Privilege
in a Racially Divided America
(Critical Perspectives on Youth)
by Margaret A. Hagerman
2020 – paperback reissue
NYU PRESS

Winner, 2019 William J. Goode Book Award, American Sociological Association
Finalist, 2019 C. Wright Mills Award, Soc for the Study of Social Problems
Stories of how affluent, white children learn about race

American kids are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial injustice, and for some, an increased awareness surrounding diversity and inclusion. In this heated context, sociologist Margaret A. Hagerman zeroes in on affluent, white kids to observe how they make sense of privilege, unequal educational opportunities, and police violence. In fascinating detail, Hagerman considers the role that they and their families play in the reproduction of racism and racial inequality in America.

White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?”

Featuring the actual voices of young, affluent white kids and what they think about race, racism, inequality, and privilege, White Kids illuminates how white racial socialization is much more dynamic, complex, and varied than previously recognized. It is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves. By interviewing kids who are growing up in different racial contexts-from racially segregated to meaningfully integrated and from politically progressive to conservative-this important book documents key differences in the outcomes of white racial socialization across families. And by observing families in their everyday lives, this book explores the extent to which white families, even those with anti-racist intentions, reproduce and reinforce the forms of inequality they say they reject.


















SINCE THE AUTO WAS INVENTED (after peddlers gave up walking or using horses), JEWS NEEDED TO KNOW which towns to steer clear of and not be caught in after sundown.
You saw Gentlemen's Agreement, the film where a reporter tries to reserve a room in a Pocono's hotel as a Jew. It was a real thing. Hotels, hospitals, clubs, restaurants were restricted. No Jews allowed.
There was a guide for the Borscht Belt, towns that accepted Jews and those that did not. And there were SUNDOWN TOWNS, towns where African American/Black people could not be in after dark. Some town sounded a siren at 6PM so that Black workers knew to head home and not be caught outside after dark.
Jacob the Jew rented land in the Catskills in 1773 near Woodstock, NY, and 110 years later Austro-Hungarian area born Charles Fleischmann bought 60 acres (and no mule). The Borscht Belt was born, but for the 1880s to 1960s, there were hotels and towns where "no Israelites should be permitted to stop at this hotel."

There was a book for Jews to tell them where to avoid. Based on this book for Jews, a Harlem NYC postal worker created a list for Black drivers called the GREEN BOOK. Its used was the basis for a film a few years ago. BELOW IS A FASCINATING BOOK on the topic.
[book] OVERGROUND RAILROAD
THE GREEN BOOK AND THE
Roots of Black Travel in America
by Candacy Taylor
2020
ABRAMS

See the USA in your CHEVROLET.... as long as you are White

The first book to explore the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists from Maine and NY to Route 66 and the West Coast.

Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the "black travel guide to America." At that time, it was very dangerous and difficult for African-Americans to travel because black travelers couldn’t eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and Overground Railroad celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.







Get a facsimile of the GREEN BOOK HERE















[book] One by One by One:
Making a Small Difference
Amid a Billion Problems
by Aaron Berkowitz, MD
HarperOne
June 2, 2020

In the spirit of Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains, and joining the ranks of works by Bryan Stevenson, Matthew Desmond, Abraham Verghese and Oliver Sacks, the inspiring story of a young American neurologist's struggle to make a difference in Haiti by treating one patient at a time--a story of social justice, clashing cultures, and what it means to treat strangers as members of our family.

Dr. Aaron Berkowitz had just finished his neurology training when he was sent to Haiti on his first assignment with Partners In Health. There, he meets Janel, a 23-year-old man with the largest brain tumor Berkowitz or any of his neurosurgeon colleagues at Harvard Medical School have ever seen. Determined to live up to Partners In Health's mission statement "to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need," Berkowitz tries to save Janel's life by bringing him back to Boston for a 12-hour surgery. In One by One by One, Berkowitz traces what he learns and grapples with as a young doctor trying to bridge the gap between one of the world's richest countries and one of the world's poorest to make the first big save of his medical career.

As Janel and Berkowitz travel back and forth between the high-tech neurosurgical operating rooms of Harvard's hospitals and Janel's dirt-floored hut in rural Haiti, they face countless heart-wrenching twists and turns. Janel remains comatose for months after his surgery. It's not clear he will recover enough to return to Haiti and be able to survive there. So he goes for a second brain surgery, a third, a fourth. Berkowitz brings the reader to the front lines of global humanitarian work as he struggles to overcome the challenges that arise when well-meaning intentions give rise to unintended consequences, when cultures and belief systems clash, and when it's not clear what the right thing to do is, let alone the right way to do it.

One by One by One is a gripping account of the triumphs, tragedies, and confusing spaces in between as an idealistic young doctor learns the hard but necessary lessons of living by the Haitian proverb tout moun se moun--every person is a person.



























[book] In the Name of God:
The Role of Religion in
the Modern World:
A History of Judeo-Christian
and Islamic Tolerance
by Selina O'Grady
Pegasus
June 2, 2020

A groundbreaking book on the history of religious tolerance and intolerance that offers an essential narrative to understanding Islam and the West today.

Never has this book been more timely. Religious intolerance, the resurgence of fundamentalism, hate crimes, repressive laws, and mass shootings are pervasive in today’s world. Selina O’Grady asks how and why our societies came to be as tolerant or intolerant as they are; whether tolerance can be expected to heal today’s festering wound between Islam and the post-Christian West; or whether something deeper than tolerance is needed.

From Umar, the seventh century Islamic caliph who led what became the greatest empire the world has ever known, to King John (of Magna Carta fame) who almost converted to Islam; from Ibn Abd al-Wahhab, who created the religious-military alliance with the House of Saud that still survives today, to the bloody Thirty Years’ War that cured Europe of murderous intra-Christian violence (but probably killed God in the process), Selina O’Grady takes the reader through the intertwined histories of the Muslim, Christian, and Jewish faiths.

In the Name of God is an original and thought-provoking history of monotheistic religions and their ever-shifting relationship with each other.






















[book] The Last Kings of Shanghai:
The Rival Jewish Dynasties
That Helped Create Modern China
by Jonathan Kaufman
(Northeastern University)
June 2, 2020
VIKING

An epic, multigenerational story of two rival dynasties who flourished in Shanghai and Hong Kong as twentieth-century China surged into the modern era, from the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Shanghai, 1936. The Cathay Hotel, located on the city's famous waterfront, is one of the most glamorous in the world. Built by Victor Sassoon--billionaire playboy and scion of the Sassoon dynasty--the hotel hosts a who's who of global celebrities: Noel Coward has written a draft of Private Lives in his suite, Charlie Chaplin entertained his wife-to-be. The American socialite Wallis Simpson reportedly posed for dirty photographs. The city is notorious for easy money and loose morals. And a few miles away, Mao and the nascent communist party have been plotting revolution.

By the 1930's, the Sassoons had been doing business in China for a century, rivaled in wealth and influence by only one other dynasty--the Kadoories. These two Jewish families, both originally from Baghdad, stood astride Chinese business and politics for more than one hundred seventy-five years, profiting from the Opium Wars; surviving Japanese occupation; courting Chiang Kai-shek; and losing nearly everything as the Communists swept into power. In The Last Kings of Shanghai, Jonathan Kaufman tells the remarkable history of how these families participated in an economic boom that opened China to the world, but remained blind to the country's deep inequality and to the political turmoil at their doorsteps. In a story stretching from Baghdad to Hong Kong to Shanghai to London, Kaufman enters the lives and minds of these ambitious men and women to forge a tale of opium smuggling, family rivalry, political intrigue, and survival.

The book lays bare the moral compromises of the Kadoories and the Sassoons--and their exceptional foresight, success and generosity. At the height of World War II, they joined together to rescue and protect eighteen thousand Jewish refugees fleeing Nazism. Though their stay in China started out as a business opportunity, the country became a home that they were reluctant to leave, even on the eve of revolution. The lavish buildings they built and booming businesses they nurtured continue to define Shanghai and Hong Kong to this day. As the United States confronts China's rise, and China grapples with the pressures of breakneck modernization and global power, the long-hidden odysseys of the Sassoons and the Kadoories hold a key to understanding the present moment.

























[book] My Wife Said You May
Want to Marry Me:
A Memoir
by Jason B. Rosenthal
2020

An inspiring memoir of life, love, loss, and new beginnings by the widower of bestselling children’s author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal, whose last of act of love before her death was setting the stage for her husband’s life without her in a column in the New York Times.

On March 3, 2017, Amy Krouse Rosenthal penned an op-ed piece for the New York Times’ “Modern Love” column —”You May Want to Marry My Husband.” It appeared ten days before her death from ovarian cancer. A heartbreaking, wry, brutally honest, and creative play on a personal ad—in which a dying wife encouraged her husband to go on and find happiness after her demise—the column quickly went viral, reaching more than five million people worldwide.

In My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me, Jason describes what came next: his commitment to respecting Amy’s wish, even as he struggled with her loss. Surveying his life before, with, and after Amy, Jason ruminates on love, the pain of watching a loved one suffer, and what it means to heal—how he and their three children, despite their profound sorrow, went on. Jason’s emotional journey offers insights on dying and death and the excruciating pain of losing a soulmate, and illuminates the lessons he learned.

As he reflects on Amy’s gift to him—a fresh start to fill his empty space with a new story—Jason describes how he continues to honor Amy’s life and her last wish, and how he seeks to appreciate every day and live in the moment while trying to help others coping with loss. My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me is the poignant, unreserved, and inspiring story of a great love, the aftermath of a marriage ended too soon, and how a surviving partner eventually found a new perspective on life’s joys in the wake of tremendous loss.


























[book] [book] PREPARE MY PRAYER
(Recipes to Awaken the Soul)
by Rabbi Dov Singer
2020
MAGGID

NOTE: Rabbi Dov Singer contracted Coronavirus in Feb/March 2020 during his book tour in the USA. He is recovering in Israel

Prepare My Prayer is a unique attempt to develop a dedicated language for the worship of the heart, the language of prayer. In a unique style, inspired by recipe books, this volume offers a variety of concise and practical recipes for prayer by one of Israel's most popular religious educators.

Rabbi Dov Singer is a recognized trailblazer in Israeli education and Jewish spirituality. He has attracted thousands of Jews of all backgrounds to workshops and prayer events to explore and enhance spirituality while going beyond ritual choreography. He has taught generations of students, young and old, how to talk and listen to one another, and as a result, how to do the same with God. His new book, Prepare My Prayer: Recipes to Awaken the Soul, invites readers to taste his unique insight.

Rabbi Singer sees humans as “Homo-mitpalelos”- praying beings, rather than “Homo-sapiens” – thinking beings. He claims that all of humanity, and in a sense, all of creation prays instinctively. He guides his readers on how to let go of all the questions – “to whom am I praying? Why I am praying? Does it even work?” and to learn how to harness their spiritual instinct for prayer.

In his debut book in English, translated from the successful, bestselling, Hebrew edition, Tikon Tefillati, Rabbi Singer seeks to engage readers and encourage them to take practical steps and actions to actively influence their prayer experience. In the style of a cookbook, Rabbi Singer includes short recipes as a means to develop and enhance one’s skillset – the mechanisms we use when we pray. Modeled on techniques Rabbi Singer has implemented in his popular workshops that attract people of varied backgrounds, Prepare My Prayer emphasizes one’s concentration, one’s emotional and spiritual connection with God, and one’s personal engagement with the Divine.

Comprising eleven chapters broken down into concise, accessible sections, each “recipe” begins with short, powerful quotes ranging from traditional Jewish texts from the Bible to the Talmud to Hassidic masters like Rebbe Nac?man. Rabbi Singer’s poetic narrative then focuses on and guides readers in a particular practical aspect of prayer encouraging readers to take what’s being shared and practice it.

This book is for anyone who prays, who wants to pray, or who wants to want to pray.

Rabbi Dov Singer, head of Yeshivat Makor Chaim and the Study Center for Renewal, is an educational innovator and a leader of the modern Israeli revival of Hassidut. He is well known in Israel and the US for his inspiring teacher training and prayer workshops.























[book] A New Look at Rabbi Jesus:
Jews and Christians Finally Reconnected
by Rabbi Albert Slomovitz, PhD, (USN, Ret)

A book that the late Rep. John Lewis (D-Georgia) enjoyed.

The primary goal of this book is to solve a two-thousand-year-old puzzle: if Jesus lived a totally Jewish life and became the founder of Christianity, why aren't Jews and Christians in a respectful, appreciative, and embracing relationship? This work begins to reduce two thousand years of misunderstanding, stereotyping, and prejudices that have existed between these two faiths. In its place are historical facts about the childhood, religious education, and communities that nourished and influenced Jesus. This work also encourages new approaches to biblical interpretations and thought.

The ultimate aim of the author is to have Jews and Christians realize that they are strongly connected by mutual faith, beliefs, and traditions. Dr. Slomovitz has summarized this linkage with the phrase, "Loving Jesus means loving Jews."































[book] Trumpocalypse:
Restoring American Democracy
by David Frum
May 26, 2020
Harper

A huge swath of Americans see the rest of the country building a future that doesn’t have a place for them. It’s no wonder they’d rather burn it all down. But the fire can be stopped by Americans who act now to protect their country and its democracy.

President Trump has undermined America’s democratic traditions. At every step, he was aided by Republicans who have given up on winning power the democratic way. Polls have repeatedly shown that about a third of the electorate refuses to abandon Donald Trump, no matter what he does. Those voters aren’t looking for policy wins. They’re seeking cultural revenge.

In Trumpocalypse, David Frum looks at the causes of our tragic national fragmentation and lays out a plan to restore a democracy at home—and renew American leadership abroad. It is not enough to defeat Donald Trump on election day 2020. Even if Trump peacefully departs office, the trauma he inflicted will distort American and world politics for years to come.

Americans can do better. David Frum shows how—and inspires all readers of all points of view to believe again in the possibilities of American life. Trumpocalypse is both a warning of danger and a guide to reform that will be read and discussed for years to come.




























THERE'S ALWAYS A MOISHE
[book] Hidden Heretics:
Jewish Doubt in the Digital Age
(Princeton Studies in Culture...)
by Ayala Fader (Fordham)
May 26, 2020
Princeton University Press

A revealing look at Jewish men and women who secretly explore the outside world, in person and online, while remaining in their ultra-Orthodox religious communities

What would you do if you questioned your religious faith, but revealing that would cause you to lose your family and the only way of life you had ever known? Hidden Heretics tells the fascinating, often heart-wrenching stories of married ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and women in twenty-first-century New York who lead “double lives” in order to protect those they love. While they no longer believe that God gave the Torah to Jews at Mount Sinai, these hidden heretics continue to live in their families and religious communities, even as they surreptitiously break Jewish commandments and explore forbidden secular worlds in person and online. Drawing on five years of fieldwork with those living double lives and the rabbis, life coaches, and religious therapists who minister to, advise, and sometimes excommunicate them, Ayala Fader investigates religious doubt and social change in the digital age.

The internet, which some ultra-Orthodox rabbis call more threatening than the Holocaust, offers new possibilities for the age-old problem of religious uncertainty. Fader shows how digital media has become a lightning rod for contemporary struggles over authority and truth. She reveals the stresses and strains that hidden heretics experience, including the difficulties their choices pose for their wives, husbands, children, and, sometimes, lovers. In following those living double lives, who range from the religiously observant but open-minded on one end to atheists on the other, Fader delves into universal quandaries of faith and skepticism, the ways digital media can change us, and family frictions that arise when a person radically transforms who they are and what they believe.

In stories of conflicts between faith and self-fulfillment, Hidden Heretics explores the moral compromises and divided loyalties of individuals facing life-altering crossroads.




























[book] The Book of V.:
A Novel
by Anna Solomon
2020
Henry Holt and Co.

For fans of The Hours and Fates and Furies, a bold, kaleidoscopic novel intertwining the lives of three women across three centuries as their stories of sex, power, and desire finally converge in the present day.

Lily is a mother and a daughter. And a second wife. And a writer, maybe? Or she was going to be, before she had children. Now, in her rented Brooklyn apartment she’s grappling with her sexual and intellectual desires, while also trying to manage her roles as a mother and a wife in 2016.

Vivian Barr seems to be the perfect political wife, dedicated to helping her charismatic and ambitious husband find success in Watergate-era Washington D.C. But one night he demands a humiliating favor, and her refusal to obey changes the course of her life-along with the lives of others.

Esther is a fiercely independent young woman in ancient Persia, where she and her uncle’s tribe live a tenuous existence outside the palace walls. When an innocent mistake results in devastating consequences for her people, she is offered up as a sacrifice to please the King, in the hopes that she will save them all.

In Anna Solomon's The Book of V., these three characters' riveting stories overlap and ultimately collide, illuminating how women’s lives have and have not changed over thousands of years.





















[book] [book] No Finish Line:
Lessons on Life and Career
by Meyer Feldberg
2020
Columbia Business School Press

Dean Emeritus Meyer Feldberg is a quintessential storyteller. The source of his stories is his rich and unique life, which took him from South Africa under apartheid to a C-Suite in present-day New York, from the hallowed halls of academia to the frenzy of global investment banking. As with all storytellers, there is a purpose embedded in each of his stories that is specific in its details but universal in its message.

No Finish Line is Meyer Feldberg as his friends and colleagues know him. It is the professor dispensing sage advice. It is the mentor telling a tale about himself that is really about you. In his telling, Feldberg’s story-his successes and his failures-is a lesson plan for how to lead a worthy personal and professional life.

This concise volume reminds the reader of the importance of courage and decency in our relationships. Feldberg shows how values such as self-awareness, personal responsibility, and generosity play out in ways that in retrospect become pivotal. He relates his regrets as well as his triumphs, candidly sharing how our failures to live up to our own expectations can continue to haunt us. Written by a leading fixture of New York’s educational, cultural, and business elite, No Finish Line is an engaging portrait of what matters most in living a good and successful life.
























[book] THE BOY WHO FOLLOWED HIS FATHER
IN AUSCHWITZ: A TRUE STORY
OF FAMILY AND SURVIVAL
By Jeremy Dronfield
May 26, 2020
Harper

The #1 Sunday Times bestseller—a remarkable story of the heroic and unbreakable bond between a father and son that is as inspirational as The Tattooist of Auschwitz and as mesmerizing as The Choice.

Where there is family, there is hope

In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholster from Vienna, and his sixteen-year-old son Fritz are arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Germany. Imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp, they miraculously survive the Nazis’ murderous brutality.

Then Gustav learns he is being sent to Auschwitz—and certain death.

For Fritz, letting his father go is unthinkable. Desperate to remain together, Fritz makes an incredible choice: he insists he must go too. To the Nazis, one death camp is the same as another, and so the boy is allowed to follow.

Throughout the six years of horror they witness and immeasurable suffering they endure as victims of the camps, one constant keeps them alive: their love and hope for the future.

Based on the secret diary that Gustav kept as well as meticulous archival research and interviews with members of the Kleinmann family, including Fritz’s younger brother Kurt, sent to the United States at age eleven to escape the war, The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz is Gustav and Fritz’s story—an extraordinary account of courage, loyalty, survival, and love that is unforgettable.





















[book] The Room Where It Happened:
A White House Memoir
by John Bolton
postponed to May 12, 2020
postponed to June 23, 2020
embargoed til June 2020
Simon and Schuster

John Bolton served as National Security Advisor to President Donald J. Trump for 519 days, until resigning or being dismissed.

A seasoned public servant, Yale Law grad, hawk, and copious note taker, who had previously worked for Presidents Reagan, Bush #41, and Bush #43, Bolton brought to the administration thirty years of experience in international issues and a reputation for tough, blunt talk. To some he was an Iran Hawk who was accused of pushing for confrontations and delighting in war.

In his memoir, he offers a substantive and factual account of his time “in the room where it happened.” (a lyric from the popular Broadway musical, HAMILTON).

He has an axe to grind against Trump for not fulfilling Conservative priorities. According to the book, Trump did not give a crap about human rights abuses and told Chinese President Xi that building concentration camps for Muslims was no problem, as long as Xi could help his reelection. According to the book, Pompeo said to Bolton that Trump was “full of shit” during the meetings with North Korea. On the thirtieth anniversary of the Tienanmen Square massacres, Bolton was angry that the White House did not issue a statement about it. Trump said it was 15 (instead of the actual 30) years ago, and it would not help him in making a deal with China. Bolton writes that Trump reached out to President Xi to help him win reelection in November 2020, and requested China buy more soybeans from American farmers to help Trump. Bolton is angry that Trump believed Putin on Venezuela and “blinked” and was not as tough on Venezuela as Bolton wanted. Bolton writes that world leaders learned quickly how to kiss Trump's ass with flattery to get their way (let's build a settlement in Israel and name it for Trump). Bolton relates the story of how Netanyahu tried desperately to stop Trump from meeting with Iran's President while in Europe, and how Kushner blocked Netanyahu's calls to the White House so he could not influence Trump. Netanyahu, according to the book was not impressed by Kushner's intelligence or skills. On the night that the United States planned to bomb Iran, Bolton went home to change his clothes so he would look fresh for the joyous next morning after the attack. While he was home, Trump called off the attack, not wanting the optics of 150 or more body bags.

The book does not tell us much we did not already know, it just adds to the details. If Bolton thought Trump was a danger, he could have testified to Congress, but the $2 Million book deal was probably of greater interest... so let's not pretend Bolton is a patriot. He appears to be an idealogue who is sad that his leader cared nothing for ideology. It is fitting that the books title is from s song from the musical HAMILTON, sung by Aaron Burr, who wished to be in the room where it happens, but makes it to a position of power and squanders it due to his own ego and ambition instead of the good of the country.




















[book] Champions Day:
The End of Old Shanghai
by James Carter
June 16, 2020
Norton

A triptych of a single day revealing the history and foreshadowing the future of a complex and cosmopolitan city in a world at war.

November 12, 1941: war and revolution are in the air. At the Shanghai Race Club, the city’s elite prepare to face off their best horses and most nimble jockeys in the annual Champions Day races. Across town and amid tight security, others celebrated the birth of Sun Yat-Sen in a new city center meant to challenge European imperialism. Thousands more Shanghai residents from all walks of life attended the funeral of China’s wealthiest woman, the Chinese- French widow of a Baghdadi Jewish businessman. But the biggest crowd of all gathered at the track; no one knew it, but Champions Day heralded the end of a European Shanghai.

Through this colorful snapshotof the day’s events, the rich and complex history that led to them, and a cast of characters as diverse as the city itself, James Carter provides a kaleidoscopic portrait of a time and a place that still speaks to relations between China and the West today.




























[book] Katalin Street
by Magda Szabo
Len Rix (Translator)

WINNER OF THE 2018 PEN TRANSLATION PRIZE
From the author of The Door, selected as one of the New York Times "10 Best Books of 2015," this is a heartwrenching tale about a group of friends and lovers torn apart by the German occupation of Budapest during World War II.

In prewar Budapest three families live side by side on gracious Katalin Street, their lives closely intertwined. A game is played by the four children in which Bálint, the promising son of the Major, invariably chooses Irén Elekes, the headmaster’s dutiful elder daughter, over her younger sister, the scatterbrained Blanka, and little Henriette Held, the daughter of the Jewish dentist.

Their lives are torn apart in 1944 by the German occupation, which only the Elekes family survives intact. The postwar regime relocates them to a cramped Soviet-style apartment and they struggle to come to terms with social and political change, personal loss, and unstated feelings of guilt over the deportation of the Held parents and the death of little Henriette, who had been left in their protection. But the girl survives in a miasmal afterlife, and reappears at key moments as a mute witness to the inescapable power of past events.

As in The Door and Iza’s Ballad, Magda Szabó conducts a clear-eyed investigation into the ways in which we inflict suffering on those we love. Katalin Street, which won the 2007 Prix Cévennes for Best European novel, is a poignant, somber, at times harrowing book, but beautifully conceived and truly unforgettable.




























[book] Exercise of Power:
American Failures, Successes,
and a New Path Forward in
the Post-Cold War World
by Robert M. Gates
June 16, 2020
Knopf

From the former secretary of defense and author of the acclaimed #1 best-selling memoir, Duty, a candid, sweeping examination of power in all its manifestations, and how it has been exercised, for good and bad, by American presidents in the post-Cold War world.

Since the end of the Cold War, the global perception of the United States has progressively morphed from dominant international leader to disorganized entity, seemingly unwilling to accept the mantle of leadership or unable to govern itself effectively. Robert Gates argues that this transformation is the result of the failure of political leaders to understand the complexity of American power, its expansiveness, and its limitations. He makes clear that the successful exercise of power is not limited to the use of military might or the ability to coerce or demand submission, but must encompass as well diplomacy, economics, strategic communications, development assistance, intelligence, technology, ideology, and cyber. By analyzing specific challenges faced by the American government in the post-Cold War period--Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, North Korea, Syria, Libya, Russia, China, and others--Gates deconstructs the ways in which leaders have used the instruments of power available to them. With forthright judgments of the performance of past presidents and their senior-most advisers, firsthand knowledge, and insider stories, Gates argues that U.S. national security in the future will require learning, and abiding by, the lessons of the past, and re-creating those capabilities that the misuse of power has cost the nation.




























[book] I Belong to Vienna:
A Jewish Family's
Story of Exile and Return
by Anna Goldenberg
Alta L. Price (Translator)
June 9, 2020
New Vessel Press

"A must-read for a new understanding of the Holocaust in Vienna."
-Esther Safran Foer, author of I Want You to Know We're Still Here

A defiant memoir from contemporary Europe: In autumn 1942, Anna Goldenberg’s great-grandparents and one of their sons are deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp. Hans, their elder son, survives by hiding in an apartment in the middle of Nazi-controlled Vienna. But this is no Anne Frank-like existence; teenage Hans passes time in the municipal library and buys standing room tickets to the Vienna State Opera. He never sees his family again. Goldenberg reconstructs this unique story in magnificent reportage.

She also portrays Vienna’s undying allure-although they tried living in the United States after World War Two, both grandparents eventually returned to the Austrian capital. The author, too, has returned to her native Vienna after living in New York herself, and her fierce attachment to her birthplace enlivens her engrossing biographical history. A probing tale of heroism, resilience, identity and belonging, marked by a surprising freshness as a new generation comes to terms with history’s darkest era.




























[book] Startup Myths and Models:
What You Won't Learn in Business School
by Rizwan Virk
(MIT)
June 2, 2020
Columbia Business School Press

Budding entrepreneurs face a challenging road. The path isn’t made any easier by all the clichés they hear about how to make a startup succeed-from platitudes and conventional wisdom to downright contradictions.

This witty and wise guide to the dilemmas of entrepreneurship debunks widespread misconceptions about how the world of startups works and offers hard-earned advice for every step of the journey. Instead of startup myths-legends spun from a fantasy version of Silicon Valley-Rizwan Virk provides startup models-frameworks that help make thoughtful decisions about starting, growing, managing, and selling a business. Rather than dispensing simplistic rules, he mentors readers in the development of a mental toolkit for approaching challenges based on how startup markets evolve in real life.

In snappy prose with savvy pop culture and real-world examples, Virk recasts entrepreneurship as a grand adventure. He points out the pitfalls that appear along the way and offers insights into how to avoid them, sharing the secrets of founding a startup, raising money, hiring and firing, when to enter a market and when to exit, and how to value a company.

Virk combines lessons learned the hard way during his twenty-five years of founding, investing in, and advising startups with reflections from well-known venture capitalists and experts. His candid advice makes Startup Myths and Models an ideal companion for readers from those just embarking on the startup life to those looking for their next adventure.





















[book] Hold Your Breath, China
(An Inspector Chen mystery)
by Qiu Xiaolong
June 2, 2020
Severn

Inspector Chen is on the case of a serial murderer when he is called away to report on environmentalists trying to tackle the pollution issues in China.

Chief Inspector Chen and Detective Yu Guangming are brought into a serial murder case when the Homicide squad proves incapable of solving it. But before Chen can make a start, he is called away by a high-ranking Party member for a special assignment: to infiltrate a group of environmental activists meeting to discuss the pollution levels in the country and how to prompt the government into action.

Chen knows it will be a far from simple task, especially when he discovers the leader of the group is a woman from his past. Meanwhile, Yu is left to investigate a serial murder case on his own.

Both Chen and Yu face pressure from those above to resolve the cases in a satisfactory way . . . even if that means innocents face the punishment.





















[book] How to Die in Space:
A Journey Through Dangerous
Astrophysical Phenomena
by Paul M. Sutter PhD
June 2, 2020
Pegasus

A brilliant and breathtakingly vivid tour of the universe, describing the physics of the dangerous, the deadly, and the scary in the cosmos.

So you’ve fallen in love with space and now you want to see it for yourself, huh? You want to witness the birth of a star, or visit the black hole at the center of our galaxy? You want to know if there are aliens out there, or how to travel through a wormhole? You want the wonders of the universe revealed before your very eyes?

Well stop, because all that will probably kill you.

From mundane comets in our solar backyard to exotic remnants of the Big Bang, from dying stars to young galaxies, the universe may be beautiful, but it’s treacherous. Through metaphors and straightforward language, it breathes life into astrophysics, unveiling how particles and forces and fields interplay to create the drama in the heavens above us.























[book] You Exist Too Much:
A Novel
by Zaina Arafat
June 9, 2020
Catapult

A “provocative and seductive debut” of desire and doubleness that follows the life of a young Palestinian American woman caught between cultural, religious, and sexual identities as she tries to lead an authentic life (O, The Oprah Magazine)

On a hot day in Bethlehem, a 12-year-old Palestinian-American girl is yelled at by a group of men outside the Church of the Nativity. She has exposed her legs in a biblical city, an act they deem forbidden, and their judgement will echo on through her adolescence. When our narrator finally admits to her mother that she is queer, her mother’s response only intensifies a sense of shame: “You exist too much,” she tells her daughter.

Told in vignettes that flash between the U.S. and the Middle East-from New York to Jordan, Lebanon, and the Palestinian Territories - Zaina Arafat’s debut novel traces her protagonist’s progress from blushing teen to sought-after DJ and aspiring writer. In Brooklyn, she moves into an apartment with her first serious girlfriend and tries to content herself with their comfortable relationship. But soon her longings, so closely hidden during her teenage years, explode out into reckless romantic encounters and obsessions with other people. Her desire to thwart her own destructive impulses will eventually lead her to The Ledge, an unconventional treatment center that identifies her affliction as “love addiction.” In this strange, enclosed society she will start to consider the unnerving similarities between her own internal traumas and divisions and those of the places that have formed her.

Opening up the fantasies and desires of one young woman caught between cultural, religious, and sexual identities, You Exist Too Much is a captivating story charting two of our most intense longings-for love, and a place to call home.






























[book] Our Time Is Now:
Power, Purpose, and
the Fight for a Fair America
by Stacey Abrams
June 9, 2020
Henry, Holt and Company

"This is a narrative that describes the urgency that compels me and millions more to push for a different American story than the one being told today. It's a story that is one part danger, one part action, and all true. It's a story about how and why we fight for our democracy and win."

Celebrated national leader and bestselling author Stacey Abrams offers a blueprint to end voter suppression, empower our citizens, and take back our country. A recognized expert on fair voting and civic engagement, Abrams chronicles a chilling account of how the right to vote and the principle of democracy have been and continue to be under attack. Abrams would have been the first African American woman governor, but experienced these effects firsthand, despite running the most innovative race in modern politics as the Democratic nominee in Georgia. Abrams didn’t win, but she has not conceded. The book compellingly argues for the importance of robust voter protections, an elevation of identity politics, engagement in the census, and a return to moral international leadership.

Our Time Is Now draws on extensive research from national organizations and renowned scholars, as well as anecdotes from her life and others’ who have fought throughout our country’s history for the power to be heard. The stakes could not be higher. Here are concrete solutions and inspiration to stand up for who we are-now.





















[book] The S.S. Officer's Armchair:
Uncovering the Hidden Life of a Nazi
by Daniel Lee
June 16, 2020
Hachette

Based on documents discovered concealed within a simple chair for seventy years, this gripping investigation into the life of an S.S. officer encapsulates the tragic experience of a generation of Europeans in WWII.

One night at a dinner party in Florence, historian Daniel Lee was told about a remarkable discovery. An upholsterer in Amsterdam had found a bundle of swastika-covered documents inside the cushion of an armchair he was repairing. They belonged to Dr. Robert Griesinger, a lawyer from Stuttgart, who joined the S.S. and worked at the Reich's Ministry of Economics and Labour in Occupied Prague during the war. An expert in the history of the Holocaust, Lee was fascinated to know what circumstances and choices had led to the man's dreadful fate -- and how his most precious documents ended up hidden inside a chair, hundreds of miles from Prague and Stuttgart.

In The S.S. Officer's Armchair, Lee weaves detection with biography to tell an astonishing narrative of ambition and intimacy in the Third Reich. He uncovers Griesinger's American backstory -- his father was born in New Orleans and the family had ties to the plantations and music halls of nineteenth century Louisiana. As Lee follows the footsteps of a rank and file Nazi official seventy years later, and chronicles what became of him and his family at the war's end, Griesinger's role in Nazi crimes comes into focus. When Lee stumbles on an unforeseen connection between Griesinger and the murder of his own relatives in the Holocaust, he must grapple with potent questions about blame, manipulation, and responsibility.

The S.S. Officer's Armchair is an enthralling detective story and a reconsideration of daily life in the Third Reich. It provides a window into the life of Hitler's millions of nameless followers and into the mechanisms through which ordinary people enacted history's most extraordinary atrocity.

























[book] Mother Daughter Widow Wife:
A Novel
by Robin Wasserman
June 23, 2020
Scribner

“Wasserman has a unique gift for describing the turbulent intersection of love and need, hinting that the freedom we seek may only be the freedom to change.” —Liz Phair, author of Horror Stories
From the author of Girls on Fire comes a psychologically riveting novel centered around a woman with no memory, the scientists invested in studying her, and the daughter who longs to understand.

Who is Wendy Doe? The woman, found on a Peter Pan Bus to Philadelphia, has no money, no ID, and no memory of who she is, where she was going, or what she might have done. She’s assigned a name and diagnosis by the state: Dissociative fugue, a temporary amnesia that could lift at any moment—or never at all. When Dr. Benjamin Strauss invites her to submit herself for experimental observation at his Meadowlark Institute for Memory Research, she feels like she has no other choice.

To Dr. Strauss, Wendy is a female body, subject to his investigation and control. To Strauss’s ambitious student, Lizzie Epstein, she’s an object of fascination, a mirror of Lizzie’s own desires, and an invitation to wonder: once a woman is untethered from all past and present obligations of womanhood, who is she allowed to become?

To Alice, the daughter she left behind, Wendy Doe is an absence so present it threatens to tear Alice’s world apart. Through their attempts to untangle the mystery of Wendy’s identity—as well as Wendy’s own struggle to construct a new self—Wasserman has crafted a jaw-dropping, multi-voiced journey of discovery, reckoning, and reclamation.

Searing, propulsive, and compassionate, Mother Daughter Widow Wife is an ambitious exploration of selfhood from an expert and enthralling storyteller. c























[book] The Politics Industry:
How Political Innovation Can
Break Partisan Gridlock and
Save Our Democracy
by Katherine M. Gehl (Gehl Foods, Venn Innovations)
Michael E. Porter (Harvard B School)
Mike Gallagher (R-WI) (Foreword)
Chrissy Houlahan (D-PA) (Foreword)
June 23, 2020
Harvard Business Review Press

Is our political system in America broken? These authors say no and reject that idea. It works as it was designed to work. But maybe it just wasn't designed for what voters expect or desire

The current political system in the US is a duopoly of two competitors (GOP, DNC). There is unhealthy competition between the two players, who then fail to deliver the solutions, policies, programs, taxes, spending, laws. The authors write that solving problems and getting reelected are not related.., so it is as if your product revenue is not related to whether your product delivers benefits to the buyers.

In The Politics Industry, business leader and path-breaking political innovator Katherine Gehl and world-renowned business strategist Michael Porter take a radical new approach.

They ingeniously apply the tools of business analysis—and Porter's distinctive Five Forces framework—to show how the political system functions just as every other competitive industry does, and how the duopoly has led to the devastating outcomes we see today.

Using this competition lens, Gehl and Porter identify the most powerful lever for change — a strategy comprised of a clear set of choices in two key areas:
how our elections work and
how we make our laws.

Their bracing assessment and practical recommendations cut through the endless debate about various proposed fixes, such as term limits and campaign finance reform. The result: true political innovation. The Politics Industry is an original and completely nonpartisan guide that will open your eyes to the true dynamics and profound challenges of the American political system and provide real solutions for reshaping the system for the benefit of all.

THE INSTITUTE FOR POLITICAL INNOVATION: The authors will donate all royalties from the sale of this book to the Institute for Political Innovation. To take action and learn more, go to GehlPorter.com.























[book] Stitching a Life:
An Immigration Story
by Mary Helen Fein
June 9, 2020
She Writes Press
Ages 12 - 18

It’s 1900, and sixteen-year-old Helen comes alone in steerage across the Atlantic from a small village in Lithuania, fleeing terrible anti-Semitism and persecution. She arrives at Ellis Island, and finds a place to live in the colorful Lower East Side of New York. She quickly finds a job in the thriving garment industry and, like millions of others who are coming to America during this time, devotes herself to bringing the rest of her family to join her in the New World, refusing to rest until her family is safe in New York.

A few at a time, Helen’s family members arrive.

Each goes to work with the same fervor she has and contributes everything to bringing over their remaining beloved family members in a chain of migration. Helen meanwhile, makes friends and-once the whole family is safe in New York-falls in love with a man who introduces her to a different New York-a New York of wonder, beauty, and possibility.



























[book] My Sister Is Sleeping>BR> by Devora Busheri
Michel Kichka (illustrator)
2020
Kar Ben
Ages 3 - 8

"A young girl anticipates all the fun she will have when baby sister wakes up from her nap. There will be giggles and cuddles, a chance to feed the baby, and a walk with her in the stroller. This baby is endlessly fascinating, with feathery eyelashes, fists that open like fans, and strawberry lips. The protagonist is patient and reminds herself again and again, 'Soon she will wake up.' As narrator she describes all these attributes and plans in simple, brief sentences as if she is speaking directly to her readers. Originally written in Hebrew and translated into English, the tale is made all the richer by the inclusion of Hebrew words incorporated in the narration, always within context and never intrusively. 'She smells clean like milk, halav.' Kichka's softly hued illustrations add a great deal of clever and amusing details, depicting big sister in different rooms of a comfortable home, drawing bright pictures with colored pencils and paint to while away the time. She draws at and under the kitchen table, on the floor close by baby's crib with stuffed animals seemingly watching her progress, on a porch, and in the backyard. But this big girl can wait no longer and falls asleep, carried off by Ima for her own nap. All members of the family present white. A lovely, sweet treat for big siblings everywhere." - Kirkus Reviews, Journal



























[book][book] The Art of HER Deal:
The Untold Story of Melania Trump
by Mary Jordan
(Washington Post)
June 16, 2020
Simon and Schuster

This revelatory biography of Melania Trump from Pulitzer Prize–winning Washington Post reporter Mary Jordan depicts a first lady who is far more influential in the White House than most people realize.

Based on interviews with more than one hundred people in five countries, The Art of Her Deal: The Untold Story of Melania Trump draws an unprecedented portrait of the first lady. While her public image is of an aloof woman floating above the political gamesmanship of Washington, behind the scenes Melania Trump is not only part of President Trump’s inner circle, but for some key decisions she has been his single most influential adviser.

Throughout her public life, Melania Trump has purposefully worked to remain mysterious. With the help of key people speaking publicly for the first time and never-before-seen documents and tapes, The Art of Her Deal looks beyond the surface image to find a determined immigrant and the life she had before she met Donald Trump. Mary Jordan traces Melania’s journey from Slovenia, where her family stood out for their nonconformity, to her days as a fledgling model known for steering clear of the industry’s hard-partying scene, to a tiny living space in Manhattan she shared platonically with a male photographer, to the long, complicated dating dance that finally resulted in her marriage to Trump. Jordan documents Melania’s key role in Trump’s political life before and at the White House, and shows why he trusts her instincts above all.

The picture of Melania Trump that emerges in The Art of Her Deal is one of a woman who is savvy, steely, ambitious, deliberate, and who plays the long game. And while it is her husband who became famous for the phrase "the art of the deal," it is she who has consistently used her leverage to get exactly what she wants. This is the story of the art of her deal.


























[book] COUNTDOWN 1945
A History
By Chris Wallace
June 9, 2020
Simon and Schuster

From Chris Wallace, the veteran journalist and anchor of Fox News Sunday, comes an electrifying behind-the-scenes account of the 116 days leading up to the American attack on Hiroshima.

April 12, 1945: After years of bloody conflict in Europe and the Pacific, America is stunned by news of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s death. In an instant, Vice President Harry Truman, who has been kept out of war planning and knows nothing of the top-secret Manhattan Project to develop the world’s first atomic bomb, must assume command of a nation at war on multiple continents—and confront one of the most consequential decisions in history. Countdown 1945 tells the gripping true story of the turbulent days, weeks, and months to follow, leading up to August 6, 1945, when Truman gives the order to drop the bomb on Hiroshima.

In Countdown 1945, Chris Wallace, the veteran journalist and anchor of Fox News Sunday, takes readers inside the minds of the iconic and elusive figures who join the quest for the bomb, each for different reasons: the legendary Albert Einstein, who eventually calls his vocal support for the atomic bomb “the one great mistake in my life”; lead researcher J. Robert “Oppie” Oppenheimer and the Soviet spies who secretly infiltrate his team; the fiercely competitive pilots of the plane selected to drop the bomb; and many more.

Perhaps most of all, Countdown 1945 is the story of an untested new president confronting a decision that he knows will change the world forever. Truman’s journey during these 116 days is a story of high drama: from the shock of learning of the bomb’s existence, to the conflicting advice he receives from generals like Dwight D. Eisenhower and George Marshall, to wrestling with the devastating carnage that will result if he gives the order to use America’s first weapon of mass destruction.

But Countdown 1945 is more than a book about the atomic bomb. It’s also an unforgettable account of the lives of ordinary American and Japanese civilians in wartime—from “Calutron Girls” like Ruth Sisson in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to ten-year-old Hiroshima resident Hideko Tamura, who survives the blast at ground zero but loses her mother and later immigrates to the United States, where she lives to this day—as well as American soldiers fighting in the Pacific, waiting in fear for the order to launch a possible invasion of Japan.

Told with vigor, intelligence, and humanity, Countdown 1945 is the definitive account of one of the most significant moments in history.


























[book] An Ocean Without a Shore,
A Novel
(Part 2 ?)
by Scott Spencer
June 16, 2020
Ecco

A wildly entertaining and occasionally heartbreaking story of frustrated longing, and the lengths we will go for those we love—even if they don’t love us in return

An Ocean Without a Shore, from the bestselling, critically acclaimed author of Endless Love and Man in the Woods, is a beautifully rendered exploration of that most timeless of human dilemmas: the one in which your love is left unreturned.

Since their college days, Kip Woods has been infatuated with Thaddeus Kaufman (the son of a Jewish Trotskyite bookseller), who, years later, is a married father of two children and desperately trying to revive a failing career. Kip’s devotion to Thaddeus has been life-defining and destiny-altering, but it has been one that Thaddeus has either failed to notice or refused to acknowledge. But over the course of this heated and mesmerizing novel, set against a background of privilege and affluence in Manhattan and the Hudson Valley, Kip will be forced to reckon with the prison of his own making and decide how much he is willing to sacrifice for a love that may never be shared.

Picking up where his most recent novel, River Under the Road, left off, but writing squarely in the vein of Endless Love, his classic novel of passion and obsession, Scott Spencer gives us an intimate, immersive, and unsettling portrait of the devastation we will wreak in the name of love, and the bitterness of a friendship ravaged by fathomless yearning.




























[book] I Was Told It Would Get Easier
by Abbi Waxman
June 16, 2020
Berkley

Squashed among a bus full of strangers, mother-daughter duo Jessica and Emily Burnstein watch their carefully mapped-out college tour devolve into a series of off-roading misadventures, from the USA Today bestselling author of The Bookish Life of Nina Hill.

Jessica and Emily Burnstein have very different ideas of how this college tour should go.

For Emily, it's a preview of freedom, exploring the possibility of her new and more exciting future. Not that she's sure she even wants to go to college, but let's ignore that for now. And maybe the other kids on the tour will like her more than the ones at school. . . . They have to, right?

For Jessica, it's a chance to bond with the daughter she seems to have lost. They used to be so close, but then Goldfish crackers and Play-Doh were no longer enough of a draw. She isn't even sure if Emily likes her anymore. To be honest, Jessica isn't sure she likes herself.

Together with a dozen strangers--and two familiar enemies--Jessica and Emily travel the East Coast, meeting up with family and old friends along the way. Surprises and secrets threaten their relationship and, in the end, change it forever.































[book] Ghost Citizens:
Jewish Return to a Postwar City
by Professor Lukasz Krzyzanowski
June 16, 2020
Harvard

The poignant story of Holocaust survivors who returned to their hometown in Poland and tried to pick up the pieces of a shattered world. In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the lives of Polish Jews were marked by violence and emigration. But some of those who had survived the Nazi genocide returned to their hometowns and tried to start their lives anew. Lukasz Krzyzanowski recounts the story of this largely forgotten group of Holocaust survivors. Focusing on Radom, an industrial city about sixty miles south of Warsaw, he tells the story of what happened throughout provincial Poland as returnees faced new struggles along with massive political, social, and legal change.

Non-Jewish locals mostly viewed the survivors with contempt and hostility. Many Jews left immediately, escaping antisemitic violence inflicted by new communist authorities and ordinary Poles. Those who stayed created a small, isolated community. Amid the devastation of Poland, recurring violence, and bureaucratic hurdles, they tried to start over. They attempted to rebuild local Jewish life, recover their homes and workplaces, and reclaim property appropriated by non-Jewish Poles or the state. At times they turned on their own. Krzyzanowski recounts stories of Jewish gangs bent on depriving returnees of their prewar possessions and of survivors shunned for their wartime conduct.

The experiences of returning Jews provide important insights into the dynamics of post-genocide recovery. Drawing on a rare collection of documents-including the postwar Radom Jewish Committee records, which were discovered by the secret police in 1974-Ghost Citizens is the moving story of Holocaust survivors and their struggle to restore their lives in a place that was no longer home.




























[book] What Are Jews For?:
History, Peoplehood, and Purpose
by Adam Sutcliffe, PhD
King's College, London
June 16, 2020
Princeton University Press

A wide-ranging look at the history of Western thinking since the seventeenth century on the purpose of the Jewish people in the past, present, and future

What is the purpose of Jews in the world? The Bible singles out the Jews as God’s “chosen people,” but the significance of this special status has been understood in many different ways over the centuries. What Are Jews For? traces the history of the idea of Jewish purpose from its ancient and medieval foundations to the modern era, showing how it has been central to Western thinking on the meanings of peoplehood for everybody. Adam Sutcliffe delves into the links between Jewish and Christian messianism and the association of Jews with universalist and transformative ideals in modern philosophy, politics, literature, and social thought.

The Jews have been accorded a crucial role in both Jewish and Christian conceptions of the end of history, when they will usher the world into a new epoch of unity and harmony. Since the seventeenth century this messianic underlay to the idea of Jewish purpose has been repeatedly reconfigured in new forms. From the political theology of the early modern era to almost all domains of modern thought-religious, social, economic, nationalist, radical, assimilationist, satirical, and psychoanalytical-Jews have retained a close association with positive transformation for all. Sutcliffe reveals the persistent importance of the “Jewish Purpose Question” in the attempts of Jews and non-Jews alike to connect the collective purpose of particular communities to the broader betterment of humanity.

Shedding light on questions of exceptionalism, pluralism, and universalism, What Are Jews For? explores an intricate question that remains widely resonant in contemporary culture and political debate.




























[book] The Third Walpurgis Night:
The Complete Text
(The Margellos World Republic of Letters)
by Karl Kraus
Fred Bridgham and Edward Timms(Translator)
Marjorie Perloff (Foreword)
June 23, 2020
YALE

The first complete English translation of a far-seeing polemic, written in 1933 by the preeminent German-language satirist, unmasking the Nazi seizure of power

Now available in English for the first time, Austrian satirist and polemicist Karl Kraus’s Third Walpurgis Night was written in immediate response to the Nazi seizure of power in 1933 but withheld from publication for fear of reprisals against Jews trapped in Germany. Acclaimed when finally published by Kösel Verlag in 1952, it is a devastatingly prescient exposure, giving special attention to the regime’s corruption of language as masterminded by Joseph Goebbels. Bertolt Brecht wrote to Kraus that, in his indictment of Nazism, “You have disclosed the atrocities of intonation and created an ethics of language.” This masterful translation, by the prizewinning translators of Kraus’s The Last Days of Mankind, aims for clarity where Kraus had good reason to be cautious and obscure.
































[book] The Light of Days:
The Untold Story of Women
Resistance Fighters in Hitler's Ghettos
by Judy Batalion
June 23, 2020
William Morrow

One of the most important stories of World War II, already optioned by Steven Spielberg for a major motion picture: a spectacular, searing history that brings to light the extraordinary accomplishments of brave Jewish women who became resistance fighters-a group of unknown heroes whose exploits have never been chronicled in full, until now.

Witnesses to the brutal murder of their families and neighbors and the violent destruction of their communities, a cadre of Jewish women in Poland-some still in their teens-helped transform the Jewish youth groups into resistance cells to fight the Nazis. With courage, guile, and nerves of steel, these “ghetto girls” paid off Gestapo guards, hid revolvers in loaves of bread and jars of marmalade, and helped build systems of underground bunkers. They flirted with German soldiers, bribed them with wine, whiskey, and home cooking, used their Aryan looks to seduce them, and shot and killed them. They bombed German train lines and blew up a town’s water supply. They also nursed the sick and taught children.

Yet the exploits of these courageous resistance fighters have remained virtually unknown.

As propulsive and thrilling as Hidden Figures, In the Garden of Beasts, Band of Brothers, and A Train in Winter, The Light of Days at last tells the true story of these incredible women whose courageous yet little-known feats have been eclipsed by time. Judy Batalion-the granddaughter of Polish Holocaust survivors-takes us back to 1939 and introduces us to Renia Kukielka, a weapons smuggler and messenger who risked death traveling across occupied Poland on foot and by train. Joining Renia are other women who served as couriers, armed fighters, intelligence agents, and saboteurs, all who put their lives in mortal danger to carry out their missions. Batalion follows these women through the savage destruction of the ghettos, arrest and internment in Gestapo prisons and concentration camps, and for a lucky few-like Renia, who orchestrated her own audacious escape from a brutal Nazi jail-into the late 20th century and beyond.

Powerful and inspiring, featuring twenty black-and-white photographs, The Light of Days is an unforgettable true tale of war, the fight for freedom, exceptional bravery, female friendship, and survival in the face of staggering odds.



























[book] The Lives of Isaac Stern
by David Schoenbaum
June 23, 2020
WW Norton and Company

A centennial celebration of the career and legacy of the first made-in-America violin virtuoso and one of the twentieth century’s greatest musicians.

No single American could personify what Henry Luce called the American Century. But over his eighty-one years, Isaac Stern came closer than most. Russian-Jewish parents brought him to San Francisco at ten months; practice and talent got him to Carnegie Hall, critical acclaim, and the attention of the legendary impresario Sol Hurok at twenty-five.

As America came of age, so too did Stern. He would go on to make music on five continents, records in formats from 78 rpm to digital, and friends as different as Frank Sinatra and Sir Isaiah Berlin. An unofficial cultural ambassador for Cold War America, he toured the world from Tokyo to Tehran and Tbilisi. He also shaped public policy from New York and Washington to Jerusalem and Shanghai. His passion for developing young talents-including Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Yo-Yo Ma, and Midori-led him to loan instruments to needy players, broker gigs for Soviet émigrés, and reply in person to inquiring fifth-graders.

As the first historian to mine his papers at the Library of Congress, David Schoenbaum traces Stern’s sixty-year career from his formative years in San Francisco to concurrent careers as an activist, public citizen, chairman, and cultural leader in the Jewish community. Wide-ranging yet intimate, The Lives of Isaac Stern is a portrait of an artist and statesman who began as an American dreamer and left a lasting inheritance to his art, profession, and the world.






























[book] Head Over Heels:
A Novel
by Hannah Orenstein
June 23, 2020
Atria Books

From the author of the Love at First Like and Playing with Matches, an electrifying rom-com set in the high stakes world of competitive gymnastics, full of Hannah Orenstein’s signature “charm, whimsy, and giddy romantic tension” (BuzzFeed).

The past seven years have been hard on Avery Abrams: After training her entire life to make the Olympic gymnastics team, a disastrous performance ended her athletic career for good. Her best friend and teammate, Jasmine, went on to become an Olympic champion, then committed the ultimate betrayal by marrying their emotionally abusive coach, Dimitri.

Now, reeling from a breakup with her football star boyfriend, Avery returns to her Massachusetts hometown, where new coach Ryan asks her to help him train a promising young gymnast with Olympic aspirations. Despite her misgivings and worries about the memories it will evoke, Avery agrees. Back in the gym, she’s surprised to find sparks flying with Ryan. But when a shocking scandal in the gymnastics world breaks, it has shattering effects not only for the sport but also for Avery and her old friend Jasmine.
































[book] Self Care:
A Novel
by Leigh Stein
June 30, 2020
Penguin Press

The female co-founders of a wellness start-up struggle to find balance between being good people and doing good business, while trying to stay BFFs.

Maren Gelb is on a company-imposed digital detox. She tweeted something terrible about the President's daughter, and as the COO of Richual, “the most inclusive online community platform for women to cultivate the practice of self-care and change the world by changing ourselves,” it's a PR nightmare. Not only is CEO Devin Avery counting on Maren to be fully present for their next round of funding, but indispensable employee Khadijah Walker has been keeping a secret that will reveal just how feminist Richual’s values actually are, and former Bachelorette contestant and Richual board member Evan Wiley is about to be embroiled in a sexual misconduct scandal that could destroy the company forever.

Have you ever scrolled through Instagram and seen countless influencers who seem like experts at caring for themselves—from their yoga crop tops to their well-lit clean meals to their serumed skin and erudite-but-color-coded reading stack? Self Care delves into the lives and psyches of people working in the wellness industry and exposes the world behind the filter.


























[book] Hello Darkness,
My Old Friend:
How Daring Dreams and Unyielding
Friendship Turned One Man's Blindness
into an Extraordinary Vision for Life
by Sanford D. Greenberg, PhD
Art Garfunkel (Introduction)
Margaret Atwood (Afterword)
SCOTUS Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
June 30, 2020
Post Hill Press

The remarkable and inspiring story of a 19 year old Columbia University undergrad from a poor Jewish family who, after losing his eyesight to disease during his junior year, finds the power to break through the darkness and fulfill his vision for a life of great professional success and distinguished public service.

It’s a bitterly cold February in 1961, and Sandy Greenberg lies in a hospital bed in Detroit, newly blind. A junior at Columbia University from a Jewish family that struggled to stay above the poverty line, Sandy had just started to see the world open up to him. Now, instead of his plans for a bright future—Harvard Law and politics—Sandy faces a new reality, one defined by a cane or companion dog, menial work, and a cautious path through life.

But that’s not how this story ends.

In the depth of his new darkness, Sandy faces a choice—play it “safe” by staying in his native Buffalo or return to Columbia to pursue his dreams. With the loving devotion of his girlfriend (and now wife) Sue and the selflessness of best friends Art Garfunkel and Jerry Speyer, Sandy endures unimaginable adversity while forging a life of exceptional achievement.

From his time in the White House working for President Lyndon B. Johnson to his graduate studies at Harvard and Oxford under luminaries such as Archibald Cox, Sir Arthur Goodhart, and Samuel Huntington, and through the guidance of his invaluable mentor David Rockefeller, Sandy fills his life and the lives of those around him with a radiant light of philanthropy, entrepreneurship, art, and innovation.


























[book] Use the Power You Have:
A Brown Woman’s Guide
to Politics and Political Change
by Pramila Jayapal
June 30, 2020
The New Press

"Pramila Jayapal came to Congress in 2016 as a progressive outsider, but she's quickly adapted to become the activist insider—negotiating with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the goal of turning progressive ideas into real policy." —Vox Magazine, February 20, 2019

In November 2016, Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first Indian American woman to serve in that role. Two years later, the “fast-rising Democratic star and determined critic of President Donald Trump,” according to Politico’s Playbook 2017 “Power List,” won reelection with more votes than any other member of the House. Jayapal, co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, proved her progressive bonafides when she introduced the most comprehensive Medicare-for-all bill to Congress in February.

Behind the story of Jayapal’s rise to political prominence lie over two decades of devoted advocacy on behalf of immigrants and progressive causes—and years of learning how to turn activism into public policy that serves all Americans. Use the Power You Have is Jayapal’s account of the path from sixteen-year-old Indian immigrant to grassroots activist, state senator, and now progressive powerhouse in Washington, DC.

Written with passion and insight, Use the Power You Have offers a wealth of ideas and inspiration for a new generation of engaged citizens interested in fighting back and making change, whether in Washington or in their own communities.


























[book] Jewish Christianity:
The Making of the Christianity-Judaism Divide
(The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library)
by Matt Jackson-McCabe
June 23, 2020


A fresh exploration of the category Jewish Christianity, from its invention in the Enlightenment to contemporary debates

In this provocative work, Matt Jackson-McCabe argues that the concept of Jewish Christianity represents an enduring legacy of Christian apologetics. Freethinkers of the English Enlightenment created the category of Jewish Christianity as a means of isolating a true and distinctly Christian religion from the Jewish culture of Jesus and the apostles. Jackson-McCabe skillfully shows how a category that began as a way to reimagine the apologetic notion of an authoritative “original Christianity” continues to cause problems in the contemporary study of Jewish and Christian antiquity.




























[book] The House of Fragile Things:
A History of Jewish
Art Collectors in France, 1870 - 1945
by James McAuley, PhD (Oxford)
June 23, 2020
YALE

In the dramatic years between 1870 and the end of World War II, a number of prominent French Jews—pillars of an embattled community—invested their fortunes in France’s cultural artifacts, sacrificed their sons to the country’s army, and were ultimately rewarded by seeing their collections plundered and their families deported to Nazi concentration camps.

In this rich, evocative account, James McAuley explores the central role that art and material culture played in the assimilation and identity of French Jews in the fin-de-siècle. Weaving together narratives of various figures, some familiar from the works of Marcel Proust and the diaries of Jules and Edmond Goncourt—the Camondos, the Rothschilds, the Ephrussis, the Cahens d'Anvers—McAuley shows how Jewish art collectors contended with a powerful strain of anti-Semitism: they were often accused of “invading” France’s cultural patrimony. The collections these families left behind—many ultimately donated to the French state—were their response, tragic attempts to celebrate a nation that later betrayed them.
























[book] Lot Six:
A Memoir
by David Adjmi
June 23, 2020
Harper

In a world where everyone is inventing a self, curating a feed and performing a fantasy of life, what does it mean to be a person? With his grandly entertaining debut memoir, playwright David Adjmi explores how human beings create themselves, and how artists make their lives into art.

Brooklyn, 1970s. Born into the ruins of a Syrian Jewish family that once had it all, David is painfully displaced. Trapped in an insular religious community that excludes him and a family coming apart at the seams, he is plunged into suicidal depression by the age of eight. Through adolescence, David tries to suppress his homosexual feelings and fit in, but when pushed to the breaking point, he makes the bold decision to cut off his family, erase his past, and leave everything he knows behind. There's only one problem: who should he be? Bouncing between identities he steals from the pages of fashion magazines, tomes of philosophy, sitcoms and foreign films, and practically everyone he meets--from Rastafarians to French preppies--David begins to piece together an entirely new adult self. But is this the foundation for a life, or just a kind of quicksand?

Moving from the glamour and dysfunction of 1970s Brooklyn, to the sybaritic materialism of Reagan's 1980s to post-9/11 New York, Lot Six offers a quintessentially American tale of an outsider striving to reshape himself in the funhouse mirror of American culture. Adjmi's memoir is a genre bending Künstlerroman in the spirit of Charles Dickens and Alison Bechdel, a portrait of the artist in the throes of a life and death crisis of identity. Raw and lyrical, and written in gleaming prose that veers effortlessly between hilarity and heartbreak, Lot Six charts Adjmi's search for belonging, identity, and what it takes to be an artist in America.
























[book] A Most Beautiful Thing:
The True Story of America's
First All-Black High School Rowing Team
by Arshay Cooper
June 30, 2020
Flatiron Books

The didn't become Olympic rowers, but the became community leaders and employers.
Now a documentary narrated by Common, produced by Grant Hill, Dwyane Wade, and 9th Wonder, from filmmaker Mary Mazzio

The moving true story of a group of young men growing up on Chicago's West side who form the first all-black high school rowing team in the nation, and in doing so not only transform a sport, but their lives.

Growing up on Chicago’s Westside in the 90’s, Arshay Cooper knows the harder side of life. The street corners are full of gangs, the hallways of his apartment complex are haunted by drug addicts he calls “zombies” with strung out arms, clutching at him as he passes by. His mother is a recovering addict, and his three siblings all sleep in a one room apartment, a small infantry against the war zone on the street below.

Arshay keeps to himself, preferring to write poetry about the girl he has a crush on, and spends his school days in the home-ec kitchen dreaming of becoming a chef. And then one day as he’s walking out of school he notices a boat in the school lunchroom, and a poster that reads “Join the Crew Team”.

Having no idea what the sport of crew is, Arshay decides to take a chance. This decision to join is one that will forever change his life, and those of his fellow teammates. As Arshay and his teammates begin to come together to learn how to row--many never having been in water before--the sport takes them from the mean streets of Chicago, to the hallowed halls of the Ivy League. But Arshay and his teammates face adversity at every turn, from racism, gang violence, and a sport that has never seen anyone like them before.

A Most Beautiful Thing is the inspiring true story about the most unlikely band of brothers that form a family, and forever change a sport and their lives for the better.























[book] Chutzpah, Wisdom and Wine:
The Journey of an Unstoppable Woman
A Memoir
by Jodi Samuels
June 30, 2020
Emek Valley Press

From Johannesburg to Jerusalem, with a stopover in Manhattan, Jodi Samuel’s mission is to change the world, one small, unique step at a time. As an entrepreneur, international speaker, special needs advocate and super mom, on any given day you may find Jodi starting a new business, organizing a community event or conducting an interview with the Wall Street Journal while riding a camel in Morocco.

But if you’re one of the thousands who’ve attended her events, you may be surprised to learn that Jodi was once petrified to take the stage. Jodi’s ability to lead grew with experience, determination, faith and courage. Jodi recounts the seminal moments that shaped her life from being held up at gunpoint in South Africa to living under rocket attacks in Israel and the shocking diagnosis of Down syndrome for her youngest child that turned her into a passionate advocate for children with special needs.

Jodi shows us that with passion, resilience and humor, we can face life’s challenges and come out on top. Her inspiring journey, peppered with a dose of irreverence, is about learning to overcome fear, adapting to unexpected situations and applying time-honored Jewish values to everyday challenges. In short, it’s a story of playing — and winning — the hand you are dealt.























[book] The Lehman Trilogy:
A Novel
by Stefano Massini
Richard Dixon (Translator)
HarperVia
June 1, 2020

Magnificent in scope, internationally lauded, and transcendent, the novel in verse that inspired the sensational West End and Off-Broadway play of the same name. The Lehman Trilogy follows the epic rise and fall of three generations of that infamous family and through them tells the story of American ambition and hubris.

After leaving his native Bavaria, Henry Lehman arrives in America determined to make a better life. Sensing opportunity in the Deep South, he opens a textile shop in Alabama, laying the foundation for a dynasty that will come to dominate and define modern capitalism. Emanuel and his brother Mayer begin investing in anything and everything that will turn a profit, from cotton to coal to railroads to oil to airplanes—even at the expense of the very nation that forged them.

Spanning three generations and 150 years, The Lehman Trilogy is a moving epic that dares to tell the story of modern capitalism through the saga of the Lehman brothers and their descendants. Surprising and exciting, brilliant and inventive, Stefano Massini’s masterpiece—like Hamilton—is a story of immigration, ambition, and success; it is the story of America itself from a daring and original perspective.



























[book] Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg:
A New History of the International
Military Tribunal after World War II
by Francine Hirsch
Wisconsin
June 1, 2020
Oxford University Press

The Nuremberg Trials (IMT), most notable for their aim to bring perpetrators of Nazi war crimes to justice in the wake of World War II, paved the way for global conversations about genocide, justice, and human rights that continue to this day. As Francine Hirsch reveals in this new history of the trials, a central part of the story has been ignored or forgotten: the critical role the Soviet Union played in making them happen in the first place. While there were practical reasons for this omission--until recently, critical Soviet documents about Nuremberg were buried in the former Soviet archives, and even Russian researchers had limited access--Hirsch shows that there were political reasons as well. The Soviet Union was regarded by its wartime Allies not just as a fellow victor but a rival, and it was not in the interests of the Western powers to highlight the Soviet contribution to postwar justice. Stalin's Show Trials of the 1930s had both provided a model for Nuremberg and made a mockery of it, undermining any pretense of fairness and justice. Further complicating matters was the fact that the Soviets had allied with the Nazis before being invaded by them. The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939 hung over the courtroom, as did the fact that the everyone knew that the Soviet prosecution had presented the court with falsified evidence about the Katyn massacre of Polish officers, attempting to pin one of their own major war crimes on the Nazis. For lead American prosecutor Robert Jackson and his colleagues, focusing too much on the Soviet role in the trials threatened the overall credibility of the IMT and possibly even the collective memory of the war.

Soviet Justice at Nuremberg illuminates the ironies of Stalin's henchmen presiding in moral judgment over the Nazis. In effect, the Nazis had learned mass-suppression and mass-murder techniques from the Soviets, their former allies, and now the latter were judging them for crimes they had themselves committed. Yet the Soviets had borne the brunt of the fighting--and the losses--in World War II, and this gave them undeniable authority. Moreover, Soviet jurists were the first to conceive of a legal framework for viewing war as a crime, and without that framework the IMT would have had no basis. In short, there would be no denying their place at the tribunal, nor their determination to make the most of it. Illuminating the shifting relationships between the four countries involved (the U.S., Great Britain, France, and the U.S.S.R.) Hirsch's book shows how each was not just facing off against the Nazi defendants, but against each other and offers a new history of Nuremberg.





















[book] Hitler's True Believers:
How Ordinary People Became Nazis
by Robert Gellately
Florida State University
June 1, 2020
Oxford University Press

Understanding Adolf Hitler's ideology provides insights into the mental world of an extremist politics that, over the course of the Third Reich, developed explosive energies culminating in the Second World War and the Holocaust. Too often the theories underlying National Socialism or Nazism are dismissed as an irrational hodge-podge of ideas. Yet that ideology drove Hitler's quest for power in 1933, colored everything in the Third Reich, and transformed him, however briefly, into the most powerful leader in the world.

How did he discover that ideology? How was it that cohorts of leaders, followers, and ordinary citizens adopted aspects of National Socialism without experiencing the "leader" first-hand or reading his works? They shared a collective desire to create a harmonious, racially select, "community of the people" to build on Germany's socialist-oriented political culture and to seek national renewal. If we wish to understand the rise of the Nazi Party and the new dictatorship's remarkable staying power, we have to take the nationalist and socialist aspects of this ideology seriously.

Hitler became a kind of representative figure for ideas, emotions, and aims that he shared with thousands, and eventually millions, of true believers who were of like mind . They projected onto him the properties of the "necessary leader," a commanding figure at the head of a uniformed corps that would rally the masses and storm the barricades. It remains remarkable that millions of people in a well-educated and cultured nation eventually came to accept or accommodate themselves to the tenants of an extremist ideology laced with hatred and laden with such obvious murderous implications.





















[book] Fodor's Essential Israel
(Full-color Travel Guide)
by Fodor's Travel Guides
June 23, 2020
postponed to DECEMBER 2020
Fodor's Books

Whether you want to visit Jerusalem’s Old City, float in the Dead Sea, or party in Tel Aviv, the local Fodor’s travel experts in Israel are here to help! Fodor’s Essential Israel is part of the award-winning Fodor’s Essential series recognized by Booklist as the “Best Travel Guide in 2019.” guidebook is packed with maps, carefully curated recommendations, and everything else you need to simplify your trip-planning process and make the most of your time.

This new edition has been fully-redesigned with an easy-to-read layout, fresh information, and beautiful color photos.

Fodor’s Essential Israel includes: AN ILLUSTRATED ULTIMATE EXPERIENCES GUIDE to the top things to see and do MULTIPLE ITINERARIES to effectively organize your days and maximize your time MORE THAN 40 DETAILED MAPS to help you navigate confidently COLOR PHOTOS throughout to spark your wanderlust!
UP-TO-DATE and HONEST RECOMMENDATIONS for the best sights, restaurants, hotels, nightlife, shopping, performing arts, activities, side-trips, and more PHOTO-FILLED “BEST OF” FEATURES on “Most Sacred Sites,” “Best Museums,” and “Israel’s Natural Wonders”
TRIP-PLANNING TOOLS AND PRACTICAL TIPS including when to go, getting around, beating the crowds, and saving time and money
SPECIAL FEATURES on “Israel Through the Ages,” “Jerusalem: Keeping the Faith,” “The Dead Sea, A Natural Wonder,” “Masada: Desert Fortress,” “The Wines of Israel,” and “Jesus in the Galilee”
HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL INSIGHTS providing rich context on the local people, politics, art, architecture, cuisine, geography and more
LOCAL WRITERS to help you find the under-the-radar gems
HEBREW AND PALESTINIAN ARABIC LANGUAGE PRIMERS with useful words and essential phrases
COVERS: Jerusalem, Jaffa, Bethlehem, Tel Aviv, the Dead Sea, Masada, Haifa, Nazareth, Tiberias, the Sea of Galilee, the Golan Heights, Eilat, the Negev, Beersheva, Petra, and more


*Important note for digital editions: The digital edition of this guide does not contain all the images or text included in the physical edition.










[book] Nine Quarters of Jerusalem:
New Paths Through the Old City
by Matthew Teller
June 23, 2020
POSTPONED TO SEPTEMBER 29, 2020
New Internationalist

FROM A BBC REPORTER. THEIR SYNOPSIS:
In Jerusalem, what you see and what is true are two different things. Beyond the crush and frenzy of a few tourist sites, the Old City within its medieval walls remains largely unknown to visitors, its people ignored and its stories untold. Nine Quarters of Jerusalem lets the Palestinian and other communities of the Old City speak for themselves. Ranging from past to present, highlighting stories and personalities across faiths and outlooks, it evokes the depth and cultural diversity of Palestinian Jerusalem.

Around the time the British arrived in the Holy Land, the idea began to spread that the ancient Old City could be divided by straight lines into four neat quarters, each defined by a faith community. The idea was false. Jerusalem’s people had always clustered together according to religious belief or ethnicity or geographic origin, but the city was undivided.

Nonetheless, those divisions suited successive rulers, so today – more than a century on – they have become entrenched. Maps show ‘Christian Quarter’ or ‘Muslim Quarter’ as if they were real, defined places within borders. They are not. The reality of Jerusalem is a diversity and inclusion that belies imposed narratives of opposition, separation and exclusivity.

This book evokes a sense of place through Jerusalem’s other, ignored quarters – its African and Indian voices, its Greek and Armenian and Syriac communities, its downtrodden Gypsy families, its Sufi mystics and its lost Moroccan Quarter. It discusses the sources of the city’s holiness and the ideas – often startlingly secular – that have shaped lives within its walls. It links discussions of the city’s finest mosques, libraries, churches and monuments through personal stories that, in many cases, have never been told before in English, and certainly not in an accessible, marketable form.



















MANY PEOPLE IN THE USA ARE READING WHITE FRAGILITY
SOME SYNAGOGUES EVEN HAVE VIRTUAL READING GROUPS TO STUDY IT
SOME LOVE IT. SOME THINK IT IS PSEUDI ACADEMIC HORSESHIT (MATT TAIBBI)


[book] White Fragility:
Why It's So Hard for White People
to Talk About Racism
by Robin DiAngelo
Michael Eric Dyson (Foreword)
2018 Paperback
Beacon Press reprint

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist-educator Robin DiAngelo illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’” (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

On the other hand... you can read this criticism of the book:
https://taibbi.substack.com/p/on-white-fragility

OTHER BOOKS FOR SUMMER READING:

You Don't Look Like a Lawyer: Black Women and Systemic Gendered Racism (Perspectives on a Multiracial America) by Tsedale M. Melaku
How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi
How to Argue With a Racist: What Our Genes Do (and Don't) Say About Human Difference by Adam Rutherford
The Leader's Guide to Unconscious Bias: How to Reframe Bias, Cultivate Connection, and Create High-Performing Teams by Pamela Fuller, with Mark Murphy and Anne Chow


















JULY 2020
BOOKS


[book] Impact:
Reshaping Capitalism to Drive Real Change
by Sir Ronald Cohen
July 2, 2020

Sir Ronald, (a Knight Bachelor) the Egyptian born British philanthropist is the father of social investing. A grad of Oxford and Havard B School, a former McKinsey consultant, he resides in London and T.A.

Throughout the world, capitalism and democracy are being challenged with great force. The world must change, but we cannot change it by throwing money at old ideas that no longer work. We need a new path to a new world where inequality is shrinking, where natural resources are regenerated, and people can benefit from shared prosperity. This is the world being created by the Impact Revolution. Preeminent international investor, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and social finance innovator, Sir Ronald Cohen, has dedicated two decades to leading the Impact Revolution to achieve real social and environmental change. As one of the founders of venture capital, which ushered in the Tech Revolution, he builds on his years of personal experience to deliver a compelling account of how impact investing is reshaping capitalism. Whether you're an aspiring young entrepreneur, an established business person, an investor, a philanthropist, or somebody in government - or are interested, as a consumer or employee, in companies doing good and doing well at the same time - this book is a sure fire way to find out how you can play a role in changing the world.



























[book] Fifty Miles Wide
Cycling Through Israel and Palestine
by Mr. Julian Sayarer
July 16, 2020
Arcadia

Ten years after breaking a world record for cycling around the world, award-winning travel writer Julian Sayarer returns to two wheels on the roads of Israel and the areas controlled by the Palestinian Authority.

His route weaves from the ancient hills of Galilee, along the blockaded walls of the Gaza Strip and down to the Bedouin villages of the Negev/Naqab Desert. He speaks with Palestinian hip-hop artists who wonder if music can change their world, Israelis hoping that kibbutz life can, and Palestinian cycling club members who make a point of criticizing Israeli soldiers and civilians.

As the miles pass, the journey becomes a meditation on making change – how people in dark times keep their spirit, and go on believing that a different world is possible. As you can tell from the synopsis... it is not a book too favorable to Israel




























[book] Florence Adler Swims Forever:
A Novel
by Rachel Beanland
July 7, 2020
Simon & Schuster

Over the course of one summer that begins with a shocking tragedy, three generations of the Adler family grapple with heartbreak, romance, and the weight of family secrets in this stunning debut novel that’s perfect for fans of Manhattan Beach and The Dollhouse.

“Rachel Beanland is a writer of uncommon wit and wisdom, with a sharp and empathetic eye for character. She’ll win you over in the most old fashioned of ways: She simply tells a hell of a story.” —Rebecca Makkai, Pulitzer Finalist for The Great Believers

Atlantic City, 1934. Every summer, Esther and Joseph Adler rent their house out to vacationers escaping to “America’s Playground” and move into the small apartment above their bakery. Despite the cramped quarters, this is the apartment where they raised their two daughters, Fannie and Florence, and it always feels like home.

Now Florence has returned from college, determined to spend the summer training to swim the English Channel, and Fannie, pregnant again after recently losing a baby, is on bedrest for the duration of her pregnancy. After Joseph insists they take in a mysterious young woman whom he recently helped emigrate from Nazi Germany, the apartment is bursting at the seams.

Esther only wants to keep her daughters close and safe but some matters are beyond her control: there’s Fannie’s risky pregnancy—not to mention her always-scheming husband, Isaac—and the fact that the handsome heir of a hotel notorious for its anti-Semitic policies, seems to be in love with Florence.

When tragedy strikes, Esther makes the shocking decision to hide the truth—at least until Fannie’s baby is born—and pulls the family into an elaborate web of secret-keeping and lies, bringing long-buried tensions to the surface that reveal how quickly the act of protecting those we love can turn into betrayal.

Based on a true story and told in the vein of J. Courtney Sullivan’s Saints for All Occasions and Anita Diamant’s The Boston Girl, Beanland’s family saga is a breathtaking portrait of just how far we will go to in order to protect our loved ones and an uplifting portrayal of how the human spirit can endure—and even thrive—after tragedy.




























[book] The Influence of Soros:
Politics, Power, and the
Struggle for an Open Society
by Emily Tamkin
July 7, 2020
HARPER

A seasoned journalist probes one of the right-wing’s favorite targets, Hungarian-American investor and philanthropist George Soros, to explore the genesis of his influence and the truth of the conspiracies that surround him.

For years, hedge fund tycoon George Soros has been demonized by GOP politicians, fringe outlets, and right-wing media personalities, who claim Soros often manipulates the global economy and masterminds the radical left. He has been accused of using his billions to foment violence, support “white genocide,” and pay migrants to seek asylum in the United States. Right-wing media personalities have described him as working to hijack our democracy and undermine sovereignty. Left-leaning outlets, meanwhile, have suggested that his philanthropy is a distraction from the economic misery he himself has made.

But who is George Soros? How did he make his money? What causes does he actually support? How did this billionaire become the right’s favorite target—used by elected officials sympathetic to the idea that their country’s opposition can be blamed on one man in the endless messaging war? How much of the hatred is driven by rising antisemitism?

Though his name appears often in the media, most people know little about Soros. Weaving biography, cultural commentary, and investigative reporting, Emily Tamkin brings into focus the man and his myth to examine how much influence he actually has on politics. Is Soros simply a left-wing version of the Koch brothers? Or is he genuinely trying to make the world a better place?

The Influence of Soros offers an understanding of the man and his money, his contributions and donations, and his true sway over our politics, elections, and our societies. Ultimately, Tamkin asks, can a truly open society exist if any one man can have the kind of power Soros wields?




























[book] The Vapors:
A Southern Family, the New York Mob,
and the Rise and Fall of Hot Springs,
America's Forgotten Capital of Vice
by David Hill
July 7, 2020
FS&G

A Juicy Summer beach read
"Complex, turbulent, haunting – NYT”
Until it was closed in 1965, Hot Springs Arkansas was America's city of vice, just not as loud as Las Vegas. It boasted easily influenced politicians and discretion. Dating back to before 1900, the town had two synagogues and even a Jewish hospital.

Back in the days before Vegas was big, when the Mob was at its peak and neon lights were but a glimmer on the horizon, a little Southern town styled itself as a premier destination for the American leisure class. Hot Springs, Arkansas was home to healing waters, Art Deco splendor, and America’s original national park - as well as horse racing, nearly a dozen illegal casinos, countless backrooms and brothels, and some of the country’s most bald-faced criminals. Al Capone took the waters for his syphills there.

Gangsters, gamblers, and gamines: all once flocked to America’s forgotten capital of vice, a place where small-town hustlers and bigtime high-rollers could make their fortunes, and hide from the law. And thousands serviced the hospitality trade. There was a great diversity> The Vapors is the extraordinary story of three individuals - spanning the golden decades of Hot Springs, from the 1930s through the 1960s - and the lavish casino whose spectacular rise and fall would bring them together before blowing them apart.

Hazel Hill (The author's grandmother) was still a young girl when legendary mobster Owney “The Killer” Madden rolled into town in his convertible, fresh off a crime spree in New York. He started robbing people as a kid, went to prison twice, had many wounds from the people he murdered and was sent to Hot Springs by Meyer Lansky to be the mob's gentleman ambassador (Mae West, a former Hells Kitchen girlfriend of his sad he was a sweet man but a killer). Madden quickly established himself as the gentleman Godfather of Hot Springs, cutting barroom deals and buying stakes in the clubs at which Hazel made her living - and drank away her sorrows. She became a shill, gambling with casino money.

Owney Madden's protégé was Dane Harris, the son of a Cherokee bootlegger who rose through the town’s ranks to become Boss Gambler. It was his idea to build The Vapors, a pleasure palace more spectacular than any the town had ever seen, and an establishment to rival anything on the Vegas Strip or Broadway in sophistication and supercharged glamour.

In this riveting work of forgotten history, native Arkansan David Hill plots the trajectory of everything from organized crime to America’s fraught racial past, examining how a town synonymous with white gangsters supported a burgeoning black middle class, with over a dozen Black churches, and black owned hotels and restaurants. He reveals how the louche underbelly of the South was also home to veterans hospitals and baseball’s spring training grounds, giving rise to everyone from Babe Ruth to President Bill Clinton. It was the place WWII wounded went to heal. Infused with the sights and sounds of America’s entertainment heyday-jazz orchestras and auctioneers, slot machines and suited comedians-The Vapors is an arresting glimpse into a bygone era of American vice.

























[book] Memoirs and Misinformation:
A novel
by Jim Carrey
and
Dana Vachon
July 7, 2020
KNOPF

"None of this is real and all of it is true." --Jim Carrey

Meet Jim Carrey. Sure, he's an insanely successful and beloved movie star drowning in wealth and privilege--but he's also lonely, severely depressed. Maybe he is past his prime. Maybe even... getting fat? He's tried diets, gurus, and cuddling with his military-grade Israeli guard dogs, but nothing seems to lift the cloud of emptiness. Even the pleasure of imagining that he strangles his mother or sage advice from his best friend, actor and dinosaur skull collector Nicolas Cage, isn't enough to pull Carrey out of his slump. Romantically dreaming of Renee Zellweger can't even save him (Cage is a dirty fighter in their imagined jujitsu duel)

But then Jim meets Georgie: ruthless ingénue, love of his life. And with the help of auteur screenwriter Charlie Kaufman, he has a role to play in a boundary-pushing new picture that may help him uncover a whole new side to himself--finally, his Oscar vehicle! (Hippos) Things are looking up!

But the universe has other plans. As they say in Yiddish in the West Village, Man plans, God laughs.

Memoirs and Misinformation is a fearless semi-autobiographical novel, a deconstruction of persona. In it, Jim Carrey and Dana Vachon have fashioned a story about acting, Hollywood, agents, celebrity, privilege, friendship, romance, addiction to relevance, fear of personal erasure, our "one big soul," Canada, and a cataclysmic ending of the world--apocalypses within and without. And ues, flying saucers appears and Rodeo Drive burns.


























[book] FALASTIN:
A COOKBOOK
by Sami Tamimi with
Tara Wigley, and a foreword
by Yotam Ottolenghi
Spring 2020
Date changed to June 16, 2020
fTen Speed Press.

A soulful tour of Palestinian cooking today that opens minds and mouths... from the Ottolenghi restaurants’ executive chef and partner — over 110 recipes shaped by his personal story as well as the history of Palestine.
“This is a beautiful book and I want to cook every single recipe in it.”—Nigella Lawson

Yotam Ottolenghi has written several very popular, best selling cookbooks, and his restaurants in London are prime destinations for tourists and locals. But the co author and chef behind a lot has been Sami Tamimi, who, like Yotam, was born in Jerusalem and is queer. He left his Jerusalem home and 11 siblings and half-siblings at the age of 17 and cooked in Tel Aviv for a dozen years, five of them at Lilith. In London, he worked at Baker & Spice where he met Yotam. By the time he returned to his family after a 17 year gap, he had 30 nephews and nieces. Now he has penned his own cookbook where he gets the top billing and shares his stories, recipes, and stories of family.

The story of Palestine’s food is really the story of its people. When the events of 1948 forced residents from all regions of Palestine together into one compressed land, recipes that were once closely guarded family secrets were shared and passed between different groups in an effort to ensure that they were not lost forever.

In Falastin (pronounced “fa-la-steen”), Sami Tamimi retraces the lineage and evolution of his country’s cuisine, born of its agriculturally optimal geography, its distinct culinary traditions, and Palestinian cooks’ ingenuity and resourcefulness. Tamimi covers the territory between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River—East Jerusalem and the West Bank, up north to the Galilee and the coastal cities of Haifa and Akko, inland to Nazareth, and then south to Hebron and the coastal Gaza Strip—recounting his upbringing with eleven siblings and his decision to leave home at seventeen to cook in West Jerusalem, where he met and first worked with Yotam Ottolenghi. It encompasses recipes of the people of the North, Arabs of the Negev, Gazans, refugees, 48ers, Arab Israelis, Israeli Arabs, Palestinians, and other identities.

From refugee-camp cooks to the home kitchens of Gaza and the mill of a master tahini maker, Tamimi teases out the vestiges of an ancient culinary tradition as he records the derivations of a dynamic cuisine and people in more than 130 transporting photographs and 120 recipes, including:

• A fascinating story on Sami and Tar's visit to a chef/restaurant in Haifa's lower port road and in Nazareth, and the politics of food (or not).. (and how even if you studied amazing seafood techniques in Sweden, the customer still just wants a kids menu and basic linguini with seafood.
• Hassan’s Easy Eggs with Za’atar and Lemon, an homage to his late father, Hassan. Use a high quality oilve oil if you can, and Aleppo chili flakes and avocado cubes.
• Fresh herb omelette, which uses baking powder and flour and fried in olive oil
• Red Shakshuka and Green Shakshuka
• Hummus (two types)
• A story of the village of Battir and its eggplant
• Labneh and the women of Bethlehem
• Beet and Sweet Potato dip
• Muhammarah
• Butternut squash m' tabbal … with an explantion on how m'tabbal and baba ganoush differ.
• Roasted figs and onions with radicchio and goat cheese
• Mashed Turnip with greens, carmelized onions, and feta
• Chilled cucumber and Tahini soup; Besara soup with fava beans, charred eggplant and lemon soup
• Meatballs and Peas in Tomato sauce
• Fish Kofta with Yogurt, Sumac, and Chile
• Pulled-Lamb Schwarma Sandwich
• Labneh Cheesecake with Roasted Apricots, Honey, and Cardamom


Named after the Palestinian newspaper that brought together a diverse people, Falastin is a vision of a cuisine, a culture, and a way of life as experienced by one influential chef.


SEE ALSO: [book] [book]



































[book] Chow!:
Secrets of Chinese Cooking Cookbook
by Dolly Chow
2020
Acc Art Books

A cookery book infused with Chinese heritage - 75 easy to follow recipes
• New edition of the classic, bestselling traditional Chinese cookbook, a staple in Chinese and US kitchens for 83 years
• First printed in 1936, the book has been reprinted 68 times and has sold over 300,000 copies in China
• The present edition features a new preface and new introductions to chapters by Dolly's great-grand-niece, art collector and philanthropist Carolyn Hsu-Balcer
The provinces of China are united by their love of a good meal. Each has their own specialties and methods of preparation - all of which are, of course, purported to be 'the best'. Rather than attempting to cover the entirety of Chinese cuisine, this charming little book instead focuses on recipes born from melding the author's favorite family menus with tips on traditional preparation and table etiquette as dictated by Confucius 2500 years ago. The result is an informative and delicious peek into the Chinese food culture of the early twentieth century. Requiring only minimal materials and expertise, the recipes are accessible and flavorful, while the insights into traditional Chinese eating customs will be of use for travelers hoping to dine authentically while abroad. Chow! guides the reader through the basics - how to wash rice, serve tea and make noodles from scratch - before introducing them to a variety of dishes based around meat, seafood and vegetables. Whether you seek familiar tastes or adventurous dishes, Chow! has it all: from stuffed mushrooms and fried rice to minced pigeon, crab fat with green vegetables and duck tongue soup.





























[book] Peas, Love and Carrots
Cookbook
by Danielle Renov
July 31, 2020
Mesorah Publications

Delicious recipes and beautiful art and photos worthy of space in your kitchen and on your coffee table from blogger/influencer Danielle Renov. An extension of the @peaslovencarrots community Danielle has built, where tens of thousands of people tune in daily for recipes and cooking tutorials, lifestyle tips, and all things family related. With 254+ approachable recipes and 186+ gorgeous photos that draw inspiration from Danielle's Sephardic / Moroccan and Ashkenazi roots, there is plenty in here for every person and every occasion. Filled with tips + tricks, stories, anecdotes, and insights that leave us laughing, teach us how to be better cooks, and make us proud of our lives in the kitchen and of the food that we serve to beloved friends and family.



























[book] CARPATHIA
Food from the Heart of Romania
(A Cookbook)
by Irina Georgescu
2020
Interlink

A cookbook to celebrate the culturally diverse and delicious cuisine of Romania. A fusion of east and west, where traditional recipes are given a truly modern twist.

Romania is a true cultural melting pot, its character rooted in many traditions from Greek, Turkish, and Slavic in the south and east, to Austrian, Hungarian, and Saxon in the north and west.

Carpathia, the first book from food writer Irina Georgescu, aims to introduce readers to Romania's unique, bold and delicious cuisine. Bringing the country to life with stunning photography and recipes, it will take the reader on a culinary journey to the very heart of the Balkans, exploring Romania's history, traditions, and food, one mouth-watering recipe at a time. Irina is Romanian expatriot now living in the UK, Carpathia offers an enchanting and informative survey of the food of this Balkan country, much of which lies within the Carpathian mountain range. Georgescu emphasizes the many influences which intersect in Romanian cooking, as the country lies on the edge of multiple cultural spheres: Turkish, Greek, Hungarian, Austrian, Russian, and more. The result is food that seems familiar and yet somehow not: fish broth with rice and sour cream; polenta cakes with cheese and dill; pan-fried chicken with caramelized quince; peppers stuffed with millet and parsley pesto; ricotta doughnuts with sour cherry jam and crème fraîche.

The names of dishes appear in Romanian as well as in English, and nearly every recipe begins with a short head note that address some aspect of its character, such as the origin of its name, its association with a particular part of the country or holiday celebration, or the wisdom that a Romanian cook would bring to shopping for the ingredients. Carpathia is not a systematic tour of Romania, but it is an evocative one. From chargrilled eggplants, polenta fritters, and butter bean hummus, to tangy bors, stuffed breads, and Viennese-style layer cakes, this book is a true celebration of a country that's never afraid to mix things up!























[book] Feasting and Fasting
by Aaron S. Gross
2020
NYU PRESS

How Judaism and food are intertwined. Judaism is a religion that is enthusiastic about food. Jewish holidays are inevitably celebrated through eating particular foods, or around fasting and then eating particular foods. Through fasting, feasting, dining, and noshing, food infuses the rich traditions of Judaism into daily life. What do the complicated laws of kosher food mean to Jews? How does food in Jewish bellies shape the hearts and minds of Jews? What does the Jewish relationship with food teach us about Christianity, Islam, and religion itself? Can food shape the future of Judaism?

Feasting and Fasting explores questions like these to offer an expansive look at how Judaism and food have been intertwined, both historically and today. It also grapples with the charged ethical debates about how food choices reflect competing Jewish values about community, animals, the natural world and the very meaning of being human. Encompassing historical, ethnographic, and theoretical viewpoints, and including contributions dedicated to the religious dimensions of foods including garlic, Crisco, peanut oil, and wine, the volume advances the state of both Jewish studies and religious studies scholarship on food.

“What are the advantages of attempting to understand a religion through the apparent detour of food?” So asks Aaron S. Gross in the introduction to this fascinating collection of essays exploring millennia of historical relationships, along with ethnographic, philosophic, and ethical viewpoints. Following a section in which different chapters look at Jewish ideas about food in the biblical, rabbinical, medieval, and modern eras, contributors address subjects as varied as Jews and garlic, the perspective of Jews, Christians, and Muslims on food and Jewishness, ecological ethics in the Jewish community farming movement, and the contemporary quest for a Jewish ethic of food consumption. The contributors hail from a breadth of academic backgrounds and include professors of history, religion, and Jewish studies as well as many cross-disciplinary endeavors. Marion Nestle says of the book, “A fascinating account of the history of Jewish food, within and outside of dietary laws…This book is a great read.”

A foreword is by the Jewish historian Hasia Diner. An epilogue is by the novelist and food activist Jonathan Safran Foer.



























[book] Rabbinic Drinking:
What Beverages Teach
Us About Rabbinic Literature
by Jordan D. Rosenblum
University of Wisconsin – Madison
2020
UNIV OF CALIFORNIA PRESS

Though ancient rabbinic texts are fundamental to analyzing the history of Judaism, they are also daunting for the novice to read. Rabbinic literature presumes tremendous prior knowledge, and its fascinating twists and turns in logic can be disorienting. Rabbinic Drinking helps learners at every level navigate this brilliant but mystifying terrain by focusing on rabbinic conversations about beverages, such as beer and wine, water, and even breast milk. By studying the contents of a drinking vessel—including the contexts and practices in which they are imbibed—Rabbinic Drinking surveys key themes in rabbinic literature to introduce readers to the main contours of this extensive body of historical documents.

Contains a broad array of rabbinic passages, accompanied by didactic and rich explanations and contextual discussions, both literary and historical Thematic chapters are organized into sections that include significant and original translations of rabbinic texts Each chapter includes in-text references and concludes with a list of both referenced works and suggested additional readings

























[book] I Can Cook Vegan
by Isa Chandra Moskowitz
Cookbook
Abrams

For the pandemic Home Cook

From Isa Chandra Moskowitz—the bestselling author of Veganomicon—comes a book dedicated to her true love: the home cook. Isa Moskowitz learned to cook from cookbooks, recipe by recipe. And after a few decades of writing her own cookbooks, she knows what the people want: easy-to-follow instructions and accessible ingredients.

I Can Cook Vegan is for cooks of all stripes:
The Just-Born, Brand New Cook
The Tried-and-True Seasoned Cook Who Is Tofu-Curious
The Busy Weeknight Pantry Cook (this is everyone)
The Farmers’ Market Junkie Who Looks at All the Pretty Colors
The Reluctant Parent to the Vegan Child
For Anyone Doing Vegan for the Animals
For Anyone Doing Vegan for the Health

Each chapter is a building block to becoming a better, more competent cook. The book teaches readers to cook the way someone might learn a new instrument: master a couple of chords, and then start to put them together to form songs.

Each chapter starts with a fresh mission, and readers will cook their way through pastas, salads, sandwiches, bowls, sautés, sheet-pan suppers, and sweets—more than 125 recipes!—until they are ultimately the Best Cook Imaginable.




























[book] One Last Lunch:
A Final Meal with Those Who Meant So Much to US
by Erica Heller
2020
HARRY N ABRAMS

In this heartwarming collection edited by Joseph Heller's daughter, dozens of contributors imagine one last lunch with someone they cherished

A few years ago, Erica Heller realized how universal the longing is for one more moment with a lost loved one. It could be a parent, a sibling, a mentor, or a friend, but who wouldn’t love the opportunity to sit down, break bread, and just talk? Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to ask those unasked questions, or share those unvoiced feelings?

In One Last Lunch, Heller, an acclaimed memoirist herself, has asked friends and family of authors, artists, musicians, comedians, actors, and others, to recount one such fantastic repast. Muffie Meyer and her documentary subject Little Edie Beale go to a deli in Montreal. Kirk Douglas asks his father what he thought of him becoming an actor. Sara Moulton dines with her friend Julia Child. The Anglican priest George Pitcher has lunch with Jesus. These richly IMAGINED stories are endlessly revealing, about the subject, the writer, the passage of time, regret, gratitude, and the power of enduring love. Also: Malachy McCourt, Rick Moody, and guests: James Baldwin, Tallulah Bankhead, David Bowie, Nora Ephron, Allen Ginsberg, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Groucho Marx, Oliver Sacks, Richard Pryor, and more. Also Stephanie Pierson imagines a meal with Marcella Hazan, with whom she studied both in New York and Bologna.

























[book] Feasting Wild:
In Search of the Last Untamed Food
by Gina Rae La Cerva
2020
Greystone Books

In the 17th Century, Native Americans and some colonists depended on Ramps. But then colonists felt the food smelled of poverty. It was no longer part of menus. Now they are fetishized and prized. Two centuries ago, nearly half the North American diet was foraged, hunted, or caught in the wild. Today, so-called “wild foods” are expensive luxuries, served to the wealthy in top restaurants. Meanwhile, people who depend on wild foods for survival and sustenance find their lives forever changed as new markets and roads invade the world’s last untamed landscapes. When a white person kills an animal in the forest, they are a game hunter. When a non white eats it, they are a poacher of bush meat.

In FEASTING WILD, geographer and environmental anthropologist Gina Rae La Cerva embarks on a global culinary adventure to trace our relationship to wild foods. Throughout her travels, La Cerva reflects on how colonialism and the extinction crisis have impacted wild spaces, and reveals what we sacrifice when we domesticate our foods -including biodiversity, Indigenous and women’s knowledge, a vital connection to nature, and delicious flavors. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, La Cerva investigates the violent “bush meat” trade, tracking illicit delicacies from the rainforests of the Congo Basin to the dinner tables of Europe. In a Danish cemetery, she forages for wild onions with the esteemed staff of Noma. In Sweden––after saying goodbye to a man known only as The Hunter––La Cerva smuggles freshly-caught game meat home to New York in her suitcase, for a feast of “heartbreak moose.” Thoughtful, ambitious, and wide-ranging, Feasting Wild challenges us to take a closer look at the way we eat today, and introduces an exciting new voice in food journalism.

NOTE TO FILE: The author's great grandmother, Esther, fled Poland before WWII, and arrived in NYC. She changed her name. She was known to forage for hours in the forests on family weekend trips in the Catskills. To those around her, foraging was archaic and too closely associated with poverty. Perhaps seen as a shameful behavior. Foraging needs to be elevated and reclaimed.























[book] Hubby is Hungry:
Kosher Everyday Recipes from my
Kitchen to Yours
by Ashira Mirsky
July 5, 2020


Ashira Mirsky brings you over 50 recipes in this full-color gorgeous paperback cookbook, Hubby is Hungry - Kosher Everyday Recipes from My Kitchen to Yours. The graphics, delicious photos and easy to follow recipes are beautiful and enticing. This stand-out kosher cookbook includes everything a home cook ever dreamed of. Can't think of any new supper ideas? Trying to feed a family in little to no time? Just got married and want help with your cooking? Tired of following so many steps? The Hubby is Hungry cookbook is your answer. •Original recipes include: • BBQ Pulled Chicken•Cilantro Pesto Tacos •Skirt Steak Salad•The Best Brisket •Coconut Carrot Soup with Parsnip Curls• Succulent Chicken with Squash •Heirloom Tomato Cheddar Tart•No-Bake Chocolate Mousse Pie...and much more! All the photos were taken on Ashira's very own countertops.

Each recipe is tested, tried and true. No complicated ingredients, MSG, or exotic products. Just SIMPLE KOSHER food that’s DELICIOUS! Ashira guarantees that you will love every single recipe. About the Author: Ashira Mirsky is a 3rd grade teacher, recipe developer and foodie. She has written a column for The Jewish Press called Hubby is Hungry since 2015. She's been published in the Masbia holiday cookbook, The Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation and on Arutz Sheva. She won the Bgan's like it and win recipe contest and her recipes have been featured for companies like De La Rosa, Meal Mart and Gourmet Glatt. More of her exciting recipes can be found on Kosher.com.

























[book] Stepchildren of the Shtetl:
The Destitute, Disabled,
and Mad of Jewish Eastern Europe, 1800-1939
by Natan M. Meir
(Stanford University)
July 14, 2020
Stanford University Press

Memoirs of Jewish life in the east European shtetl often recall the hekdesh (town poorhouse) and its residents: beggars, madmen and madwomen, disabled people, and poor orphans. Stepchildren of the Shtetl tells the story of these marginalized figures from the dawn of modernity to the eve of the Holocaust.

Combining archival research with analysis of literary, cultural, and religious texts, Natan M. Meir recovers the lived experience of Jewish society's outcasts and reveals the central role that they came to play in the drama of modernization. Those on the margins were often made to bear the burden of the nation as a whole, whether as scapegoats in moments of crisis or as symbols of degeneration, ripe for transformation by reformers, philanthropists, and nationalists. Shining a light into the darkest corners of Jewish society in eastern Europe-from the often squalid poorhouse of the shtetl to the slums and insane asylums of Warsaw and Odessa, from the conscription of poor orphans during the reign of Nicholas I to the cholera wedding, a magical ritual in which an epidemic was halted by marrying outcasts to each other in the town cemetery-Stepchildren of the Shtetl reconsiders the place of the lowliest members of an already stigmatized minority.




























[book] The Nesting Dolls:
A Novel
by Alina Adams
July 14, 2020
Harper

Spanning nearly a century, from 1930s Siberia to contemporary Brighton Beach, a page turning, epic family saga centering on three generations of women in one Russian Jewish family-each striving to break free of fate and history, each yearning for love and personal fulfillment-and how the consequences of their choices ripple through time.

Odessa, 1931. Marrying the handsome, wealthy Edward Gordon, Daria-born Dvora Kaganovitch-has fulfilled her mother’s dreams. But a woman’s plans are no match for the crushing power of Stalin’s repressive Soviet state. To survive, Daria is forced to rely on the kindness of a man who takes pride in his own coarseness.

Odessa, 1970. Brilliant young Natasha Crystal is determined to study mathematics. But the Soviets do not allow Jewish students-even those as brilliant as Natasha-to attend an institute as prestigious as Odessa University. With her hopes for the future dashed, Natasha must find a new purpose-one that leads her into the path of a dangerous young man.

Brighton Beach, 2019. Zoe Venakovsky, known to her family as Zoya, has worked hard to leave the suffocating streets and small minds of Brighton Beach behind her-only to find that what she’s tried to outrun might just hold her true happiness.

Moving from a Siberian gulag to the underground world of Soviet refuseniks to oceanside Brooklyn, The Nesting Dolls is a heartbreaking yet ultimately redemptive story of circumstance, choice, and consequence-and three dynamic unforgettable women, all who will face hardships that force them to compromise their dreams as they fight to fulfill their destinies.



























[book] The Beauty and the Terror:
The Italian Renaissance and the
Rise of the West
by Catherine Fletcher
July 7, 2020
Oxford University Press

A new account of the birth of the West through its birthplace--Renaissance Italy

The period between 1492--resonant for a number of reasons--and 1571, when the Ottoman navy was defeated in the Battle of Lepanto, embraces what we know as the Renaissance, one of the most dynamic and creatively explosive epochs in world history. Here is the period that gave rise to so many great artists and figures, and which by its connection to its classical heritage enabled a redefinition, even reinvention, of human potential. It was a moment both of violent struggle and great achievement, of Michelangelo and da Vinci as well as the Borgias and Machiavelli. At the hub of this cultural and intellectual ferment was Italy.

The Beauty and the Terror offers a vibrant history of Renaissance Italy and its crucial role in the emergence of the Western world. Drawing on a rich range of sources--letters, interrogation records, maps, artworks, and inventories--Catherine Fletcher explores both the explosion of artistic expression and years of bloody conflict between Spain and France, between Catholic and Protestant, between Christian and Muslim; in doing so, she presents a new way of witnessing the birth of the West.

Smithsonian writes: As alluded to by its title, Catherine Fletcher’s latest book juxtaposes seemingly discordant aspects of the Italian Renaissance: its aesthetic brilliance and, in the words of fellow historian Simon Sebag Montefiore, the “filth and thuggery, slavery, sex, slaughter and skullduggery behind [this] exquisite art.” Framed as an alternative history of the much-explored period of creative rebirth, The Beauty and the Terror contextualizes the Italian Renaissance within the framework of European colonialism, widespread warfare and religious reform. Rather than focusing solely on such artistic geniuses as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Botticelli, Fletcher lends a voice to the women writers, Jewish merchants, mercenaries, prostitutes, farmers and array of average citizens who also called the Italian peninsula’s competing city-states home. The “lived reality” of 15th- and 16th-century Italy involved far more violence, uncertainty and devastation than widely believed, argues Fletcher. Forces beyond its residents’ control—a series of wars, the rise of the Ottoman Empire, the advent of the Protestant Reformation—shaped their lives yet have been largely overshadowed by what their greatest minds left behind. “We revere Leonardo da Vinci for his art but few now appreciate his ingenious designs for weaponry,” notes the book’s description. “We know the Mona Lisa for her smile but not that she was married to a slave-trader. We visit Florence to see Michelangelo's David but hear nothing of the massacre that forced the republic’s surrender.”























[book] Disposable City:
Miami's Future on the
Shores of Climate Catastrophe
by Mario Alejandro Ariza
July 14, 2020
Bold Type Books

There are many Jewish Americans and Israeli Americans who reside in Miami Dade Counties in South Florida. This may be of interest to them.

Miami, Florida, is likely to be entirely underwater by the end of this century. Residents are already starting to see the effects of sea level rise today. From sunny day flooding caused by higher tides to a sewer system on the brink of total collapse, the city undeniably lives in a climate changed world.

In Disposable City, Miami resident Mario Alejandro Ariza shows us not only what climate change looks like on the ground today, but also what Miami will look like 100 years from now, and how that future has been shaped by the city's racist past and present. As politicians continue to kick the can down the road and Miami becomes increasingly unlivable, real estate vultures and wealthy residents will be able to get out or move to higher ground, but the most vulnerable communities, disproportionately composed of people of color, will face flood damage, rising housing costs, dangerously higher temperatures, and stronger hurricanes that they can't afford to escape.

Miami may be on the front lines of climate change, but the battle it's fighting today is coming for the rest of the U.S.--and the rest of the world--far sooner than we could have imagined even a decade ago. Disposable City is a thoughtful portrait of both a vibrant city with a unique culture and the social, economic, and psychic costs of climate change that call us to act before it's too late.



























[book] Poland 1939:
The Outbreak of World War II
by Roger Moorhouse
May 5, 2020
Postponed to July 14, 2020
Basic Books

A gripping history of the September Campaign and the onset of World War II

For Americans, World War II began in December of 1941, with the bombing of Pearl Harbor; but for Poland, the war began on September 1, 1939, when Hitler's soldiers invaded, followed later that month by Stalin's Red Army. The conflict that followed saw the debut of many of the features that would come to define the later war-blitzkrieg, the targeting of civilians, ethnic cleansing, and indiscriminate aerial bombing-yet it is routinely overlooked by historians.

In Poland 1939, Roger Moorhouse reexamines the least understood campaign of World War II, using original archival sources to provide a harrowing and very human account of the events that set the bloody tone for the conflict to come.





















[book] THE ORDER
A NOVEL
Book 20
By Daniel Silva
July 14, 2020
HARPER

From Daniel Silva, author of the #1 New York Times bestsellers The New Girl and The Other Woman, comes a stunning new action-packed thriller of high stakes international intrigue featuring the enigmatic art restorer and master spy Gabriel Allon.

Master of the spy thriller Silva has entertained readers with twenty-two thoughtful and gripping suspense novels featuring a diverse cast of compelling characters and ingenious plots that have taken them around the globe and back-from the United States to Europe, Russia to the Middle East.

He returns with another blockbuster-a powerhouse novel that showcases his outstanding skill and brilliant imagination, destined to be a must read for both his multitudes of fans and growing legions of converts.






























[book] GERMAN AS A JEWISH PROBLEM
THE LANGUAGE POLITICS OF JEWISH NATIONALISM
BY MARC VOLOVICI
(University of London)
July 14, 2020
Stanford University Press

The German language holds an ambivalent and controversial place in the modern history of European Jews, representing different-often conflicting-historical currents. It was the language of the German classics, of German Jewish writers and scientists, of Central European Jewish culture, and of Herzl and the Zionist movement. But it was also the language of Hitler, Goebbels, and the German guards in Nazi concentration camps. The crucial role of German in the formation of Jewish national culture and politics in the late nineteenth century has been largely overshadowed by the catastrophic events that befell Jews under Nazi rule.

German as a Jewish Problem tells the Jewish history of the German language, focusing on Jewish national movements in Central and Eastern Europe and Palestine/Israel. Marc Volovici considers key writers and activists whose work reflected the multilingual nature of the Jewish national sphere and the centrality of the German language within it, and argues that it is impossible to understand the histories of modern Hebrew and Yiddish without situating them in relation to German. This book offers a new understanding of the language problem in modern Jewish history, turning to German to illuminate the questions and dilemmas that largely defined the experience of European Jews in the age of nationalism.


























[book] The Bohemians:
The Lovers Who Led Germany’s
Resistance Against the Nazis
by Norman Ohler
July 14, 2020
HMH

From the New York Times best-selling author of Blitzed, the incredible true story of two idealistic young lovers who led the anti-Nazi resistance in the darkening heart of Berlin

Summertime, 1935. On a lake near Berlin, a young man is out sailing when he glimpses a woman reclining in the prow of a passing boat. Their eyes meet—and one of history’s greatest conspiracies is born.

Harro Schulze-Boysen already had shed blood in the fight against Nazism by the time he and Libertas Haas-Heye began their whirlwind romance. She joined the cause, and soon the two lovers were leading a network of antifascist fighters that stretched across Berlin’s bohemian underworld. Harro himself infiltrated German intelligence and began funneling Nazi battle plans to the Allies, including the details of Hitler’s surprise attack on the Soviet Union. But nothing could prepare Harro and Libertas for the betrayals they would suffer in this war of secrets—a struggle in which friend could be indistinguishable from foe. Drawing on unpublished diaries, letters, and Gestapo files, Norman Ohler spins an unforgettable tale of love, heroism, and sacrifice in The Bohemians.






























[book] The Perfect Fascist:
A Story of Love, Power,
and Morality in Mussolini’s Italy
by Victoria De Grazia
July 14, 2020
Harvard University Press

Through the story of one exemplary fascist-a war hero turned commander of Mussolini’s Black Shirts-the award-winning author of How Fascism Ruled Women reveals how the personal became political in the fascist quest for manhood and power.

When Attilio Teruzzi, Mussolini’s handsome political enforcer, married a striking young American opera star, his good fortune seemed settled. The wedding was a carefully stage-managed affair, capped with a blessing by Mussolini himself. Yet only three years later, after being promoted to commander of the Black Shirts, Teruzzi renounced his wife. In fascist Italy, a Catholic country with no divorce law, he could only dissolve the marriage by filing for an annulment through the medieval procedures of the Church Court.

The proceedings took an ominous turn when Mussolini joined Hitler: Lilliana Teruzzi was Jewish, and fascist Italy would soon introduce its first race laws.

The Perfect Fascist pivots from the intimate story of an inconvenient marriage-brilliantly reconstructed through family letters and court records-to a riveting account of Mussolini’s rise and fall. It invites us to see in the vain, loyal, lecherous, and impetuous Attilio Teruzzi, a decorated military officer with few scruples and a penchant for parades, an exemplar of fascism’s New Man. Why did he abruptly discard the woman he had so eagerly courted? And why, when the time came to find another partner, did he choose another Jewish woman as his would-be wife? In Victoria de Grazia’s engrossing account, we see him vacillating between the will of his Duce and the dictates of his heart.

De Grazia’s landmark history captures the seductive appeal of fascism and shows us how, in his moral pieties and intimate betrayals, his violence and opportunism, Teruzzi is a forefather of the illiberal politicians of today.





























[book] A Very Punchable Face:
A Memoir
by Colin Jost
July 14, 2020
Crown Books

Although raised Catholic, Jost was a proud graduate of the JCC preschool in Staten Island. It is here that he learned his comic timing and appreciation for snacks. (he is quite skinny now, however)

In these hilarious essays, the Saturday Night Live head writer and Weekend Update co-anchor learns how to take a beating.
“I always wanted to punch his face before I read this book. Now I just want to kick him in the balls.”—Larry David
If there’s one trait that makes someone well suited to comedy, it’s being able to take a punch—metaphorically and, occasionally, physically. From growing up in a family of firefighters on Staten Island to commuting three hours a day to high school and “seeing the sights” (like watching a Russian woman throw a stroller off the back of a ferry), to attending Harvard while Facebook was created, Jost shares how he has navigated the world like a slightly smarter Forrest Gump.
You’ll also discover things about Jost that will surprise and confuse you, like how Jimmy Buffett saved his life, how Czech teenagers attacked him with potato salad, how an insect laid eggs inside his legs, and how he competed in a twenty-five-man match at WrestleMania (and almost won). You’ll go behind the scenes at SNL (where he’s written some of the most memorable sketches and characters of the past fifteen years) and Weekend Update (where he’s forced by Michael Che to tell racist jokes). And you’ll experience the life of a touring stand-up comedian—from performing in rural college cafeterias at noon to opening for Dave Chappelle at Radio City Music Hall.

For every accomplishment (hosting the Emmys), there is a setback (hosting the Emmys). And for every absurd moment (watching paramedics give CPR to a raccoon), there is an honest, emotional one (recounting his mother’s experience on the scene of the Twin Towers’ collapse on 9/11). Told with a healthy dose of self-deprecation, A Very Punchable Face reveals the brilliant mind behind some of the dumbest sketches on television, and lays bare the heart and humor of a hardworking guy—with a face you can’t help but want to punch.

If you are expecting dish on dating and being engaged to Jewish-American actress Scarlett (Sloan/Schlamberg) Johannson, u will be disappointed.

Join a virtual book launch / reading on July 14, 2020, at the Sixth & I syngaogue in Washington DC (online) at this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/colin-jost-tickets-109208040188

























[book] The Answer Is . . .:
Reflections on My Life
by Alex Trebek
Host of Jeopardy
July 21, 2020
Simon and Schuster

Longtime Jeopardy! host and television icon Alex Trebek reflects on his life and career.

Since debuting as the host of Jeopardy! in 1984, Alex Trebek has been something like a family member to millions of television viewers, bringing entertainment and education into their homes five nights a week. Last year, he made the stunning announcement that he had been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. What followed was an incredible outpouring of love and kindness. Social media was flooded with messages of support, and the Jeopardy! studio received boxes of cards and letters offering guidance, encouragement, and prayers.

For over three decades, Trebek had resisted countless appeals to write a book about his life. Yet he was moved so much by all the goodwill, he felt compelled to finally share his story. “I want people to know a little more about the person they have been cheering on for the past year,” he writes in The Answer Is…: Reflections on My Life.

The book combines illuminating personal anecdotes with Trebek’s thoughts on a range of topics, including marriage, parenthood, education, success, spirituality, and philanthropy. Trebek also addresses the questions he gets asked most often by Jeopardy! fans, such as what prompted him to shave his signature mustache, his insights on legendary players like Ken Jennings and James Holzhauer, and his opinion of Will Ferrell’s Saturday Night Live impersonation. The book uses a novel structure inspired by Jeopardy!, with each chapter title in the form of a question, and features dozens of never-before-seen photos that candidly capture Trebek over the years.

This wise, charming, and inspiring book is further evidence why Trebek has long been considered one of the most beloved and respected figures in entertainment.






















[book] The Loneliness of the
Long-Distance Cartoonist
by Adrian Tomine
(The New Yorker)
July 21, 2020
Drawn and Quarterly

What happens when a childhood hobby grows into a lifelong career? The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist, Adrian Tomine's funniest and most revealing foray into autobiography, offers an array of unexpected answers. When a sudden medical incident lands Tomine in the emergency room, he begins to question if it was really all worthwhile: despite the accolades and opportunities of a seemingly charmed career, it's the gaffes, humiliations, slights, and insults he's experienced (or caused) within the industry that loom largest in his memory.

Tomine illustrates the amusing absurdities of how we choose to spend our time, all the while mining his conflicted relationship with comics and comics culture. But in between chaotic book tours, disastrous interviews, and cringe-inducing interactions with other artists, life happens: he fumbles his way into marriage, parenthood, and an indisputably fulfilling existence. A richer emotional story emerges as his memories are delineated in excruciatingly hilarious detail.

In a bold stylistic departure from his award-winning Killing and Dying, he distills his art to the loose, lively essentials of cartooning, each pen stroke economically imbued with human depth. Designed as a sketchbook complete with placeholder ribbon and an elastic band, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist shows an acclaimed artist at the peak of his career.






















[book] UNION
A Democrat, a Republican,
and a Search for Common Ground
by Jordan Blashek and Christopher Haugh
July 21, 2020
Little, Brown

GO TO THE SCENE, if you want to learn the truth.
Just like o the Real World... when you are trapped in a car.. you can get real and unfiltered.
Two white, strong, highly educated and accomplished friends, both Yale Law School grads, one a Democrat and another a Republican, decide to travel across America in search of the country they love, in good times and bad. De Tocqueville Lite?

In 2015, the year before Donald J. Trump was elected president of the United States, Jordan Blashek, a Republican who served as an officer in the USMC/Marines for half a deacde, and Chris Haugh, a Democrat and son of a single mother from Berkeley, CA, who worked in the Obama White House, formed an unlikely friendship. Jordan was fresh off his service in the Marines and feeling a bit out of place at Yale Law School. Chris was yearning for a sense of mission after leaving Washington D.C.

Over the months, Jordan and Chris's friendship blossomed, influenced by their political differences. So they decided to hit the road in search of reasons to strengthen their bond in an era of strife and partisanship. What follows is a three-year adventure story, across forty-four states and along 20,000 miles of road to find out exactly where the American experiment stands at the close of the second decade of the twenty-first century.

In their search, Jordan and Chris go from the tear gas-soaked streets of a Trump rally in Phoenix, Arizona to the Mexican highways running between Tijuana and Juarez. They witness the full scope of American life, from lobster trawlers and jazz clubs of Portland and New Orleans to the streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma and the prisons of Detroit, where former addicts and inmates painstakingly put their lives back together. They ride with a trucker in a MAGA t shirt (Pete Mylen) as he drives from Las Vegas to Slidell, Louisiana, and find him deeper than just his Trump slogan. They meet Gabriel in Parnall Prison at a Shakespeare in Prison ensemble doing King Lear and discuss redemption, addiction and recidivism.

UNION is a road narrative, a civics lesson, and an unforgettable window into one friendship. We ride along with Jordan and Chris for the whole journey, listening in on front-seat arguments and their conversations with Americans from coast to coast. We also peer outside the car to understand America's hot-button topics, including immigration, mass incarceration, and the military-civilian divide. And by the time Jordan and Chris kill the engine for the last time, they answer one of the most pressing questions of our time: How far apart are we really?

Jordan Blashek is a businessman, military veteran, Yale Law grad and attorney from LA. Actually from Encino, where he grew up in a Jewish family in the Valley (Congregation Ohr HaTorah of MarVista?). In addition to Yale, he went to Stanford GSB, and Princeton. He works in NYC at Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic initiative led by the Schmidt's of Google/Alphabet. During his military career, he reached the rank of captain in the infantry and led units in two combat deployments. From 2011-2012, he led a helicopter-borne raid force (11th Marine Expeditionary Unit) and a crisis response task force positioned in the Horn of Africa. In 2013, he served as a combat advisor in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, training the 215 Corps of the Afghan National Army/ANA. Jordan also serves on the board of Operation Gratitude, which you may recall from a 2001 profile in JewishJournal, was founded by his mother, the nurturing Atty Carolyn Blashek, to send care packages to the troops after 9/11. (She tried to enlist at 46, but the cutoff is 35)
Christopher Haugh is a writer from Kensington, California. A graduate of Berkeley he studied at Oxford, interned at the Obama White House and worked as a speechwriter for the Secretary of State John Kerry. He is a recent grad of Yale Law.






















[book] WITH US MORE THAN EVER
MAKING THE ABSENT REBBE
PRESENT IN MESSIANIC CHABAD
BY YORAM BILU
(HEBREW UNIVERSITY)
July 23, 2020
Stanford University Press

Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson was the charismatic leader of the Chabad Hasidic movement and its designated Messiah. Yet when he died in 1994, the messianic fervor he inspired did not subside. Through traditional means and digital technologies, a group of radical Hasidim, the Meshichistim, still keep the Rebbe palpably close-engaging in ongoing dialogue, participating in specific rituals, and developing an ever-expanding visual culture of portraits and videos. With Us More Than Ever focuses on this group to explore how religious practice can sustain the belief that a messianic figure is both present and accessible.

Yoram Bilu documents a unique religious experience that is distinctly modern. The rallying point of the Meshichistim-that the Rebbe is "with us more than ever"-is sustained through an elaborate system that creates the sense of his constant and pervasive presence in the lives of his followers. The virtual Rebbe that emerges is multiple, visible, accessible, and highly decentralized, the epicenter of a truly messianic movement in the twenty-first century. Combining ethnographic fieldwork and cognitive science with nuanced analysis, Bilu documents the birth and development of a new religious faith, describing the emergence of new spiritual horizons, a process common to various religious movements old and new.






















[book] Tales of the Havurah
by David Kronfeld
July 23, 2020
Bookbaby Press
448 pages

You can read it as a fictional novel. But I prefer reading it and imagining HAVURAT SHALOM in the Boston suburbs in the 1960s/1970s, and the nascent writing of The Jewish Catalog. Did I mention that 70 year old David Kronfeld WAS a member of Havurat Shalom from 1972-77? He wrote this novel four decades ago, after living in the havurah's yello house for a time and finishing his PhD in Comp Lit and living in Paris and Jerusalem.

Tales of the Havurah is a kaleidoscope of interrelated stories about life in the Jewish counterculture in post-1960's Boston. Narrated by a talkative, pot-smoking host named Solomon, who is endowed with "a chaotic, eccentric, ironic, poetic, and touchy religious bent," the stories introduce the reader into an off-beat little universe of educated but not-always-reverent young adults experimenting with creating a new style of close-knit Jewish community while also seeking to forge a meaningful yet contemporary spiritual life.

Serving up a mixture of stories both funny and serious, the character Solomon ushers the reader into a big old rambling house that serves as home to Havurat Chaim Community, the heart of Jewish counterculture gatherings. Solomon then spins out tales about his own and his fellow group members' personal lives – their loves and friendships, their inner struggles and searches, and their often unorthodox relationship to Jewish observance.

Within these varied stories, the reader encounters wondrous and sensually evocative Friday night dinners, garrulous communal meals, an array of unusual visitors and oddball hangers-on, as well as an unusual perspective on the game of baseball, a private pilgrimage to the Western Wall, and an incongruous visit to the local synagogue, among other stops along the way.

Tales of the Havurah captures a particular moment in America, when a rebellious youth culture – influenced by rock music, psychedelic drugs, changing sexual ethics, and eastern philosophies – intersected with traditional Jewish practice, symbols and values, ultimately bringing profound changes to the American Jewish society at large.





















[book] Philanthropy Revolution:
How to Inspire Donors,
Build Relationships and
Make a Difference
by Lisa Greer and Larissa Kostoff
July 23, 2020
HarperCollins

In the first book on philanthropy written from a donor’s perspective, businesswoman and philanthropist Lisa Greer lifts the lid on our charitable sector, with an authentic account that describes exactly how outdated the sector has become and why it’s at risk of collapse.

Weaving in her story of instant wealth and philanthropy, Lisa showcases the latest research, as well as dozens of interviews with donors, nonprofit professionals and leading academics in the field. She also provides much-needed ethical solutions that apply to any business, including:

• Upfront ways to ask for money
• Effective communications strategies
• Ways to be transparent from the outset
• How to curate meaningful events


Philanthropy Revolution is the handbook all fundraisers, nonprofits and donors should be using to create trusting, authentic partnerships that can be sustained long-term. Philanthropy is changing dramatically and it needs nothing short of an intervention to succeed. In this book, Lisa Greer shows us how to 'save giving' by providing a clear path to success. With her help, the nonprofit world will see its donors energized, its charities better supported and its impact increased, all while building a more honest philanthropic culture.

Lisa Greer is an active philanthropist, investor and entrepreneur. She founded CaregiversDirect (in-home care) and Beverly Hills Egg Donation. She led Media Venture Advisors, specializing in digital media and entertainment businesses, and worked at NBC, Universal Studios, and Spencer Gifts. She is on the board of the NIF New Israel Fund, and serves as a Commissioner of the Beverly Hills Cultural Heritage Commission, Trustee of the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles, and Board Member of Girl Scouts of Greater LA. She is also an active member of the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors, an advisor to the Union of Reform Judaism’s Campaign for Youth Engagement, and former President of Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills. Lisa graduated from UCLA and Pepperdine.
Listen to her podcast here: https://1832communications.com/what-donors-think-and-want/
and here: https://dotorgstrategy.com/nonprofit-hero-factory/episode-13-thinking-like-a-donor-to-build-authentic-relationships-with-lisa-greer/


















[book] Yes, I Can Say That:
When They Come for the Comedians,
We Are All in Trouble
by Judy Gold
July 28, 2020
Dey Street Books (Dey Street,,, sounds WASPy)

"No one makes me laugh harder than Judy Gold. If I had to pick one comedian to write a book about free speech, it would be Judy." – Amy Schumer
From award-winning comedian Judy Gold, an equal parts thoughtful and hilarious polemic on the current efforts to censor comedians, arguing that they undermine the art—and purpose—of comedy itself.
“You can say anything that comes to mind as long as it is funny.” — Richard Pryor
The fallout after Michelle Wolf’s roast at the 2018 White House Correspondent’s Dinner, Samantha Bee’s forced apology after calling Ivanka Trump a “feckless c*nt,” Kathy Griffin’s being “blacklisted” from Hollywood after posting a photo with what looked like the president’s severed head, all represent a dangerous and growing trend—to censor comedians.

In Yes I Can Say That, comedy veteran Judy Gold argues that "no one has the right to tell comics what they can or cannot joke about…. Laughter is a unifier. It's the best medicine. It's also the most palatable way to bring up seditious, subversive topics.” For Gold, nothing is more insidious than enforcing silence and repressing jokes—the job of a comedian is to expose society's demons, and confront them head-on, no prisoners allowed. In ten impassioned polemics, she frames comedy as a tool of empowerment, a way to reclaim hateful rhetoric and battle the democracy-crushing plight of censorship.

Uninhibited and bold, Gold is as skilled at making readers laugh as she is at exposing uncomfortable truths about our culture and society. In this era of partisan politics and gaping inequalities, Yes I Can Say That is the refreshingly candid, wickedly funny and deliciously blunt manifesto we need.


























[book] EAT THE BUDDHA
Life and Death in a Tibetan Town
by Barbara Demick
July 28, 2020

A gripping portrait of modern Tibet told through the lives of its people, from the bestselling author of Nothing to Envy.
Just as she did with North Korea, award-winning journalist Barbara Demick explores one of the most hidden corners of the world. She tells the story of a Tibetan town perched eleven thousand feet above sea level that is one of the most difficult places in all of China for foreigners to visit. Ngaba was one of the first places where the Tibetans and the Chinese Communists encountered one another. In the 1930s, Mao Zedong’s Red Army fled into the Tibetan plateau to escape their adversaries in the Chinese Civil War. By the time the soldiers reached Ngaba, they were so hungry that they looted monasteries and ate religious statues made of flour and butter—to Tibetans, it was as if they were eating the Buddha. Their experiences would make Ngaba one of the engines of Tibetan resistance for decades to come, culminating in shocking acts of self-immolation.

Eat the Buddha spans decades of modern Tibetan and Chinese history, as told through the private lives of Demick’s subjects, among them a princess whose family is wiped out during the Cultural Revolution, a young Tibetan nomad who becomes radicalized in the storied monastery of Kirti, an upwardly mobile entrepreneur who falls in love with a Chinese woman, a poet and intellectual who risks everything to voice his resistance, and a Tibetan schoolgirl forced to choose at an early age between her family and the elusive lure of Chinese money. All of them face the same dilemma: Do they resist the Chinese, or do they join them? Do they adhere to Buddhist teachings of compassion and nonviolence, or do they fight?

Illuminating a culture that has long been romanticized by Westerners as deeply spiritual and peaceful, Demick reveals what it is really like to be a Tibetan in the twenty-first century, trying to preserve one’s culture, faith, and language against the depredations of a seemingly unstoppable, technologically all-seeing superpower. Her depiction is nuanced, unvarnished, and at times shocking.



























[book] Enlightenment Now:
The Case for Reason, Science,
Humanism, and Progress
by Steven Pinker
2019

If you think the world is coming to an end, think again: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.

Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: In seventy-five jaw-dropping graphs, Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West, but worldwide. This progress is not the result of some cosmic force. It is a gift of the Enlightenment: the conviction that reason and science can enhance human flourishing.

Far from being a naïve hope, the Enlightenment, we now know, has worked. But more than ever, it needs a vigorous defense. The Enlightenment project swims against currents of human nature--tribalism, authoritarianism, demonization, magical thinking--which demagogues are all too willing to exploit. Many commentators, committed to political, religious, or romantic ideologies, fight a rearguard action against it. The result is a corrosive fatalism and a willingness to wreck the precious institutions of liberal democracy and global cooperation.

With intellectual depth and literary flair, Enlightenment Now makes the case for reason, science, and humanism: the ideals we need to confront our problems and continue our progress.

























[book] The Virus in The Age of Madness
by Bernard-Henri Lévy
July 28, 2020
paperback
Yale University Press

Forget the world that came before. The author of American Vertigo serves up an incisive look at how COVID-19 reveals the dangerous fault lines of contemporary society.

With medical mysteries, rising death tolls, and conspiracy theories beamed minute by minute through the vast web universe, the coronavirus pandemic has irrevocably altered societies around the world. In this sharp essay, world-renowned philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy interrogates the many meanings and metaphors we have assigned to the pandemic—and what they tell us about ourselves.

Drawing on the philosophical tradition from Plato and Aristotle to Lacan and Foucault, Lévy asks uncomfortable questions about reality and mythology: he rejects the idea that the virus is a warning from nature, the inevitable result of global capitalism; he questions the heroic status of doctors, asking us to think critically about the loci of authority and power; he challenges the panicked polarization that dominates online discourse. Lucid, incisive, and always original, Lévy takes a bird’s-eye view of the most consequential historical event of our time and proposes a way to defend human society from threats to our collective future.




























AUGUST 2020 BOOKS



[book] Forging Ties, Forging Passports:
Migration and the Modern
Sephardi Diaspora
(Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture)
by Devi Mays
(University of Michigan, Judaic Studies)
August 25, 2020
Stanford University Press

"Forging Ties, Forging Passports explores the history of Ottoman Sephardic Jews who emigrated to the Americas-and especially, to Mexico-in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the complex relationships they maintained to legal documentation during their migration and as they settled in new homes. Through the stories of individual women, men, and families who navigated these transitions, Devi Mays considers broader questions of belonging, nationality, and citizenship. In the aftermath of World War I and the Mexican Revolution, migrants navigated new layers of bureaucracy and authority, as borders and political regimes changed around them.

In this period of upheaval and possibility, the meanings ascribed to nationality, class, race, and gender were in flux. Mays argues that Ottoman Sephardi migrants in Mexico were caught up in a process of defining citizenship and national belonging: they resisted classification as either Ottoman expatriates or unequivocal Mexicans by maintaining a diasporic consciousness linking them with Sephardim in formerly Ottoman lands, France, Cuba, and the United States. Drawing on these transnational commercial and family networks, Sephardic migrants maintained a geographic and social mobility that challenged the physical borders of the state and the conceptual boundaries of the nation"

























[book] GRIEF
The Biography of a Holocaust Photograph
by David Shneer
University of Colorado – Boulder
August 3, 2020
Oxford University Press

In January 1942, Soviet press photographers came upon a scene like none they had ever documented. That day, they took pictures of the first liberation of a German mass atrocity, where an estimated 7,000 Jews and others were executed at an anti-tank trench near Kerch on the Crimean peninsula. Dmitri Baltermants, a photojournalist working for the Soviet newspaper Izvestiia, took photos that day that would have a long life in shaping the image of Nazi genocide in and against the Soviet Union. Presenting never before seen photographs, Grief: The Biography of a Holocaust Photograph shows how Baltermants used the image of a grieving woman to render this gruesome mass atrocity into a transcendentally human tragedy.

David Shneer tells the story of how that one photograph from the series Baltermants took that day in 1942 near Kerch became much more widely known than the others, eventually being titled "Grief." Baltermants turned this shocking wartime atrocity photograph into a Cold War era artistic meditation on the profundity and horror of war that today can be found in Holocaust photo archives as well as in art museums and at art auctions. Although the journalist documented murdered Jews in other pictures he took at Kerch, in "Grief" there are likely no Jews among the dead or the living, save for the possible NKVD soldier securing the site. Nonetheless, Shneer shows that this photograph must be seen as an iconic Holocaust photograph. Unlike images of emaciated camp survivors or barbed wire fences, Shneer argues, the Holocaust by bullets in the Soviet Union make "Grief" a quintessential Soviet image of Nazi genocide.






















[book] Three
by D.A. Mishani
Jessica Cohen (Translator from Hebrew)
August 18, 2020
Europa

An abandoned woman searching for love, a deeply religious immigrant caretaker, a disillusioned researcher trapped in her marriage. Three women whose lives seem as far apart as possible, united by a common secret.

When Orna meets Gil on an online dating site, their lackluster affair seems like nothing more than a way to stave off the pain of her recent divorce. But soon it becomes clear that Gil may not be exactly who he claims to be. And Orna’s own lies may be weaving an unexpected trap for her.

Set against the turbulent backdrop of the gritty Holon neighborhood in Tel Aviv, this enigmatic and intelligent novel is in fact an intricate puzzle. Mishani’s first standalone book explores Israel’s forgotten margins, unearthing complicated layers, conflicts, and prejudices. At turns shocking, deceptive, and subversive, Three is a slow burning psychological thriller from one of Israel’s most beloved writers.





















[book] Stanley Kubrick:
American Filmmaker
(Jewish Lives)
by David Mikics
August 18, 2020
Yale University Press

Stanley Kubrick revolutionized Hollywood with movies like Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and A Clockwork Orange, and electrified audiences with The Shining and Full Metal Jacket. David Mikics takes readers on a deep dive into Kubrick’s life and work, illustrating his intense commitment to each of his films.





























[book] The Queen of Tuesday:
A Lucille Ball Story
by Darin Strauss
August 18, 2020
Random House

From the award-winning, bestselling author of Chang & Eng and Half a Life, a new novel about Lucille Ball, a thrilling love story starring Hollywood’s first true media mogul.

This indelible romance begins with a daring conceit—that the author’s grandfather may have had an affair with Lucille Ball. Strauss offers a fresh view of a celebrity America loved more than any other.

Lucille Ball—the most powerful woman in the history of Hollywood—was part of America’s first high-profile interracial marriage. She owned more movie sets than did any movie studio. She more or less single-handedly created the modern TV business. And yet Lucille’s off-camera life was in disarray. While acting out a happy marriage for millions, she suffered in private. Her partner couldn’t stay faithful. She struggled to balance her fame with the demands of being a mother, a creative genius, an entrepreneur, and, most of all, a symbol.

The Queen of Tuesday—Strauss’s follow-up to Half a Life, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award—mixes fact and fiction, memoir and novel, to imagine the provocative story of a woman we thought we knew.

BUT WAIT.... central to the story is that of ISIDORE STRAUSS (Jewish grandfather of the author), a real estate developer in Coney Island, Brooklyn, who meets BALL at a party hosted by FRED TRUMP (father of U.S. President Donald J. Trump). STRAUSS embarks on a guilt ridden affair with Ball, while Desi Arnez...


























[book] 27 Essential Principles of Story:
Master the Secrets of Great
Storytelling, from Shakespeare
to South Park
by Daniel Joshua Rubin
August 3, 2020
Workman Publishing

Open your notebook, take out your pen, and welcome a bold new approach to teaching the art of great storytelling. In 27 lessons, drawn from 27 critical moments at the heart of 27 diverse narratives—from plays, novels, movies, television, and even songs and video games—Daniel Joshua Rubin unlocks the secrets of what makes a story work and then teaches us how to understand and use each principle in our own storytelling.

Rubin, an incisive and no BS teacher, writing consultant, and founder of the Story 27 Studio, expands our understanding of narrative by drilling into examples ranging from Hamlet to The Godfather, Parts I and II, from Harry Potter to an episode of South Park, and unearthing exactly what makes each scene tick. The result is a collection of priceless advice: Escalate Risk, with an example from Pulp Fiction. Write Characters to the Top of Their Intelligence, from the Eminem song “Stan.” Explore All Endings, from HBO’s The Night Of. Attack Your Theme, from The Brothers Karamazov. Peel the Onion, from Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies. Clash Expectation with Reality, from Breaking Bad. After each principle comes a lesson in how to do it, plus a Mini Final Exam and Related Principles from other sources.

Rubin’s writing is the writing we all aspire to: insightful, encouraging, filled with attitude; the examples are relatable, contemporary, and fresh. For writers, storytellers, filmmakers, video game designers, podcasters, writing teachers, and anyone interested in how story works, it’s a guide that turns the traditional writing manual on its head, drawing from a world of diverse voices and sources and media. In other words, from where contemporary storytellers find their inspiration.






















[book] The Fixed Stars
a novel
by Molly Wizenberg
May 12, 2020
postponed to August 4, 2020
Abrams Press

From a bestselling memoirist, a thoughtful and provocative story of changing identity, complex sexuality, and enduring family relationships

At age 36, while serving on a jury, author Molly Wizenberg found herself drawn to a female attorney she hardly knew. Married to a man for nearly a decade and mother to a toddler, Wizenberg tried to return to her life as she knew it, but something inside her had changed irredeemably. Instead, she would discover that the trajectory of our lives is rarely as smooth or as logical as we’d like to believe.

Like many of us, Wizenberg had long understood sexual orientation as a stable part of ourselves: we’re “born this way.” Suddenly she realized that her story was more complicated. Who was she, she wondered, if something at her very core could change so radically? The Fixed Stars is a taut, electrifying memoir exploring timely and timeless questions about desire, identity, and the limits and possibilities of family. In honest and searing prose, Wizenberg forges a new path: through the murk of separation and divorce, coming out to family and friends, learning to co-parent a young child, and realizing a new vision of love. The result is a frank and moving story about letting go of rigid definitions and ideals that no longer fit, and learning instead who we really are.























Now in Paperback

[book] Find Me:
A Novel
by André Aciman
August 4, 2020
Picador paperback

Part 2 of Call Me By Your Name. A decade and a half later. What has happened to the characters. In Find Me, Aciman shows us Elio’s father, Samuel, on a trip from Florence to Rome to visit Elio, who has become a gifted classical pianist. Samuel, now a widower, has a chance encounter on the train with a beautiful young woman, which upend's the rest of his life.

Elio, leaves Rome, and moves to Paris, where he, sexually fluid, meets someone at a church concert and embarks on a consequential affair. His lover briefly relates his own father's relationship with a Jewish survivor, but this brief mention evaporates, as the reader moves on to an update on Oliver, now a New England college professor with a wife and kids, suddenly finds himself yearning to retirn to Italy as a sabbatical at Columbia comes to an end. (note... recall from the end of Call Me By Your Name when Elio visits Oliver at his New England campus). Most readers will be disappointed by this sequel if they are expecting some fantasy. This paperback is more grounded on realistic events and issues of again and family, and the nature of love.

Like in Waiting for Godot... you may get frustrated by the “wait.”























[book] Caste
The Origins of Our Discontents
by Isabel Wilkerson
August 4, 2020
Random House

Wilkerson, an award winning former NYT reporter, says that CASTE is the bones and race is the skin. Caste is the underlying infrastructure, race is the metric to determine one's assignment in the CASTE system. CASTE pre-dates RACE.
Speaking of the author and race, Wilkerson was once waiting to interview a harried retailer in Chicago for The New York Times. The retailer disregarded her because he expected a white woman to interview him. The retailer asked to see her business card or an I.d. Card to prove she was a reporter for The NYT (She never told her editors, because it would have been perceived as a barrier)

“As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power—which groups have it and which do not.”

In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings.

Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people’s lives and behavior and the nation’s fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people—including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball’s Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others—she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. The author's study of Germany's racial laws grew out of the attack in Charlottesville against the Jews. Germany studied how America subjugated Blacks to learn how to handle Jews and could not understand why America's treated Jewish as Whites.


Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.



After reading it your can ponder... was there a CASTE in ancient Israel? Namely why about kohanim; leviyim; Israelites, Chalalim (priests born to illegitimate unions), Gerim, Charurim (Former slaves now freed), Mamzerim (children of marriages or sexual unions that are not allowed), Netinim (temple servants/slaves, Gibeonites), Shetugim (those who do not know who their fathers are), and Assufim (orphans, abandoned children, not knowing their parents).





















[book] The Converso's Return:
Conversion and Sephardi History
in Contemporary Literature and Culture
by Dalia Kandiyoti
August 4, 2020
Stanford University Press

Five centuries after the forced conversion of Spanish and Portuguese Jews to Catholicism, stories of these conversos' descendants uncovering long-hidden Jewish roots have come to light and taken hold of the literary and popular imagination. This seemingly remote history has inspired a wave of contemporary writing involving hidden artifacts, familial whispers and secrets, and clandestine Jewish ritual practices pointing to a past that had been presumed dead and buried. The Converso's Return explores the cultural politics and literary impact of this reawakened interest in converso and crypto-Jewish history, ancestry, and identity, and asks what this fascination with lost-and-found heritage can tell us about how we relate to and make use of the past.

Dalia Kandiyoti offers nuanced interpretations of contemporary fictional and autobiographical texts about crypto-Jews in Cuba, Mexico, New Mexico, Spain, France, the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey. These works not only imagine what might be missing from the historical archive but also suggest an alternative historical consciousness that underscores uncommon convergences of and solidarities within Sephardi, Christian, Muslim, converso, and Sabbatean histories. Steeped in diaspora, Sephardi, transamerican, Iberian, and world literature studies, The Converso's Return illuminates how the converso narrative can enrich our understanding of history, genealogy, and collective memory.

























[book] Calling Bullshit:
The Art of Skepticism
in a Data-Driven World
by Carl T. Bergstrom and
Jevin D. West (Univ of Washington)
August 4, 2020
Random House

Correlation, Causation, selection bias, confirmation bias, false equivalencies, bar charts, line graphs...

Bullshit isn’t what it used to be. Now, two science professors give us the tools to dismantle misinformation and think clearly in a world of fake news and bad data.
Misinformation, disinformation, and fake news abound and it’s increasingly difficult to know what’s true. Our media environment has become hyperpartisan. Science is conducted by press release. Startup culture elevates bullshit to high art. We are fairly well equipped to spot the sort of old-school bullshit that is based in fancy rhetoric and weasel words, but most of us don’t feel qualified to challenge the avalanche of new-school bullshit presented in the language of math, science, or statistics. In Calling Bullshit, Professors Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West give us a set of powerful tools to cut through the most intimidating data.
You don’t need a lot of technical expertise to call out problems with data. Are the numbers or results too good or too dramatic to be true? Is the claim comparing like with like? Is it confirming your personal bias? Drawing on a deep well of expertise in statistics and computational biology, Bergstrom and West exuberantly unpack examples of selection bias and muddled data visualization, distinguish between correlation and causation, and examine the susceptibility of science to modern bullshit.
We have always needed people who call bullshit when necessary, whether within a circle of friends, a community of scholars, or the citizenry of a nation. Now that bullshit has evolved, we need to relearn the art of skepticism.























[book] The Boys' Club:
A Novel
by Erica Katz
August 4, 2020
HARPER

Sweetbitter meets The Firm in this buzzy, page-turning debut novel—already optioned to Netflix—about sex and power in the halls of corporate America. One of Buzzfeed's Most Anticipated Books of 2020, Cosmopolitan's Best Summer Reads of 2020, and the New York Post's 30 Best Summer Books

Alex Vogel has always been a high achiever who lived her life by the book—star student and athlete in high school, prelaw whiz in college, Harvard Law School degree. Accepting a dream offer at the prestigious Manhattan law firm of Klasko & Fitch, she promises her sweet and supportive longtime boyfriend that the job won’t change her.

Yet Alex is seduced by the firm’s money and energy . . . and by her cocksure male colleagues, who quickly take notice of the new girl. She’s never felt so confident and powerful—even the innuendo-laced banter with clients feels fun. In the firm’s most profitable and competitive division, Mergers and Acquisitions, Alex works around the clock, racking up billable hours and entertaining clients late into the evening. While the job is punishing, it has its perks, like a weekend trip to Miami, a ride in a client’s private jet, and more expense-account meals than she can count.

But as her clients’ expectations and demands on her increase, and Alex finds herself magnetically drawn to a handsome coworker despite her loving relationship at home, she begins to question everything—including herself. She knows the corporate world isn’t black and white, and that to reach the top means playing by different rules. But who made those rules? And what if the system rigged so that women can’t win, anyway?

When something happens that reveals the dark reality of the firm, Alex comes to understand the ways women like her are told—explicitly and implicitly—how they need to behave to succeed in the workplace. Now, she can no longer stand by silently—even if doing what’s right means putting everything on the line to expose the shocking truth.
























HISTORICAL FICTION
[book] THE DAY LINCOLN LOST
A NOVEL
BY CHARLES ROSENBERG
August 4, 2020
Hanover Square

An inventive historical thriller that reimagines the tumultuous presidential election of 1860, capturing the people desperately trying to hold the nation together—and those trying to crack it apart.

Abby Kelley Foster arrived in Springfield, Illinois, with the fate of the nation on her mind. Her fame as an abolitionist speaker had spread west and she knew that her first speech in the city would make headlines. One of the residents reading those headlines would be none other than the likely next president of the United States.

Abraham Lincoln, lawyer and presidential candidate, knew his chances of winning were good. All he had to do was stay above the fray of the slavery debate and appear the voice of reason until the people cast their votes. The last thing he needed was a fiery abolitionist appearing in town. When her speech sparks violence, leading to her arrest and a high-profile trial, he suspects that his political rivals have conspired against him.

President James Buchanan is one such rival. As his term ends and his political power crumbles, he gathers his advisers at the White House to make one last move that might derail Lincoln’s campaign, steal the election and throw America into chaos.

A fascinating historical novel and fast-paced political thriller of a nation on the cusp of civil war, The Day Lincoln Lost offers an unexpected window into one of the most consequential elections in our country’s history.

























[book] Tomboy:
The Surprising History and Future
of Girls Who Dare to Be Different
by Lisa Selin Davis
May 5, 2020
postponed to August 11, 2020
Hachette

You probably recall the author from her essay on finding out she was “Jewish” in the second grade, and her exploration of her hippie parents views on Jewishness, and her grandparents (and brother's) view of being “Jew-ish” and her exploration of Judaism at Hampshire. Also, her op-ed in The New York Times caught the zeitgeist, when she wrote about her geneder non conforming daughter... Strong Is the New Pretty meets All the Single Ladies in this heartfelt celebration and exploration of the tomboy phenomenon and the future of girlhood, based on the author's viral New York Times op-ed.

Inspired by her thought-provoking op-ed for the New York Times, Lisa Selin Davis's Tomboy explores the history and imagines the future of girls who defy societal expectations based on their gender. Tomboy is a revealing dive into the forces that have shifted and narrowed our ideas of what's normal for boys and girls, and for kids who don't fall neatly into either category. It looks at tomboyism from a Victorian ideal to a twenty-first century fashion statement, chronicling the evolution of the pink/blue divide and what motivates those who cross or straddle it to gender independence -- and who they grow up to be. Davis critically investigates the word "tomboy," but lauds the ideas and ideals it represents.

Davis talks to experts from clothing designers to psychologists, historians to neuroscientists, and tomboys from eight to eighty, to illuminate debates about what is masculine and feminine; what is biological versus socially constructed; what constitutes the categories of boy and girl; and the connection between tomboyism, gender identity, and sexuality.

In Tomboy, Davis tackles an intellectual and emotional makeover of notions of gender, ultimately finding that gender nonconformity can be -- and often is -- a true gift. Ultimately, this book is a celebration not just of tomboys but of gender diversity itself, and of those who resist the pressure of gender norms and summon the courage to live as their true selves.





















[book] Nine Quarters of Jerusalem:
New Paths Through the Old City
by Matthew Teller
June 23, 2020
POSTPONED TO AUGUST 25, 2020
New Internationalist

FROM A BBC REPORTER. THEIR SYNOPSIS:
In Jerusalem, what you see and what is true are two different things. Beyond the crush and frenzy of a few tourist sites, the Old City within its medieval walls remains largely unknown to visitors, its people ignored and its stories untold. Nine Quarters of Jerusalem lets the Palestinian and other communities of the Old City speak for themselves. Ranging from past to present, highlighting stories and personalities across faiths and outlooks, it evokes the depth and cultural diversity of Palestinian Jerusalem.

Around the time the British arrived in the Holy Land, the idea began to spread that the ancient Old City could be divided by straight lines into four neat quarters, each defined by a faith community. The idea was false. Jerusalem’s people had always clustered together according to religious belief or ethnicity or geographic origin, but the city was undivided.

Nonetheless, those divisions suited successive rulers, so today – more than a century on – they have become entrenched. Maps show ‘Christian Quarter’ or ‘Muslim Quarter’ as if they were real, defined places within borders. They are not. The reality of Jerusalem is a diversity and inclusion that belies imposed narratives of opposition, separation and exclusivity.

This book evokes a sense of place through Jerusalem’s other, ignored quarters – its African and Indian voices, its Greek and Armenian and Syriac communities, its downtrodden Gypsy families, its Sufi mystics and its lost Moroccan Quarter. It discusses the sources of the city’s holiness and the ideas – often startlingly secular – that have shaped lives within its walls. It links discussions of the city’s finest mosques, libraries, churches and monuments through personal stories that, in many cases, have never been told before in English, and certainly not in an accessible, marketable form.





















[book] The Origins of You:
How Childhood Shapes Later Life
by Jay Belsky, Avshalom Caspi,
Terrie E. Moffitt, Richie Poulton
August 11, 2020
Harvard University Press

After tracking the lives of thousands of people from birth to midlife, starting in the 1970's, four of the world’s preeminent psychologists reveal what they have learned about how humans develop. They did not have to depend on retrieved, edited memories of bullying and ADHD... they recorded it at the time.

Does temperament in childhood predict adult personality?
What role do parents play in shaping how a child matures?
What about cohorts and teachers?
Is day care bad-or good-for children?
Does adolescent delinquency forecast a life of crime?
Do genes influence success in life?
Is health in adulthood shaped by childhood experiences?
Does an ADHD diagnosis change in adulthood?
Does bullying affect a child for life?

In search of answers to these and similar questions, four leading psychologists have spent their careers studying thousands of people, observing them as they’ve grown up and grown older. The result is unprecedented insight into what makes each of us who we are.

In The Origins of You, Jay Belsky, Avshalom Caspi, Terrie Moffitt, and Richie Poulton share what they have learned about childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, about genes and parenting, and about vulnerability, resilience, and success. The evidence shows that human development is not subject to ironclad laws but instead is a matter of possibilities and probabilities-multiple forces that together determine the direction a life will take. A child’s early years do predict who they will become later in life, but they do so imperfectly. For example, genes and troubled families both play a role in violent male behavior, and, though health and heredity sometimes go hand in hand, childhood adversity and severe bullying in adolescence can affect even physical well-being in midlife.

Painstaking and revelatory, the discoveries in The Origins of You promise to help schools, parents, and all people foster well-being and ameliorate or prevent developmental problems.

















[book] The MADMAN Theory:
Trump Takes On the World
by Jim Sciutto
(CNN)
August 11, 2020
Harper



Did the Pentagon keep military options away from TRUMP in fear that he would order military attacks on Iran and North Korea?
From praising dictators to alienating allies, Trump has made chaos his calling card. Has his strategy caused more problems than it solved?

Richard Nixon tried it first. Hoping to make communist bloc countries uneasy and thus unstable, Nixon let them think he was just crazy enough to nuke them. He called this “the madman theory.” Nearly half a century later, President Trump has employed his own “madman theory,” sometimes intentionally and sometimes not.

Was it a ploy to seem like a MADMAN? Or real?

Trump praises Kim Jong-un and their “love notes,” admires and flatters Vladimir Putin, and gives a greenlight to Recep Tayyip Erdogan to invade Syria. Meanwhile, he attacks US institutions and officials, ignores his own advisors, and turns his back on US allies from Canada and Mexico to NATO to Ukraine to the Kurds at war with ISIS. Trump is willing to make the nation’s most sensitive and consequential decisions while often ignoring the best information and intelligence available to him. He continually catches the world off guard, but is it working?

In The Madman Theory, Jim Sciutto shows how Trump's supporters assume he has a strategy for long-term success – that he is somehow playing three-dimensional chess. Now that we are four years into his presidency, we can see his unpredictable focus on short-term headlines has in fact lead to predictably mediocre results in the short and long run. Trump’s foreign policy has undermined American values and national security interests, while hurting allies who have been on our side for decades, leaving them isolated and vulnerable without American support. Meanwhile, he comforts and emboldens our enemies. The White House’s revolving door of staff demonstrates that Trump has no real plan; all serious policymakers—and those who would be a check on his most destructive impulses—have been exiled or jumped ship.

Sciutto has interviewed a wide swath of current and former administration officials to assemble the first comprehensive portrait of the impact of Trump’s erratic foreign policy. Smart, authoritative, and compelling, The Madman Theory is the definitive take on Trump’s calamitous legacy around the globe, showing how his proclivity for chaos is creating a world which is more unstable, violent, and impoverished than it was before.















[book] Today Tonight Tomorrow
A Young Adult Nove
by Rachel Lynn Solomon
Summer 2020
Ages 12 and up
Simon Pulse
In the words of Kung Fu Panda, yesterday is gone, the future is unknown. Focus on today, it is called the present and is a gift.

A romantic comedy about two rival overachievers whose relationship completely transforms over the course of twenty-four hours. Today, she hates him. It’s the last day of senior year. Rowan Roth (she loves romance novels) and Neil McNair have been bitter rivals for all of high school, clashing on test scores, student council elections, and even gym class pull-up contests. While Rowan, who secretly wants to write romance novels, is anxious about the future, she’d love to beat her infuriating nemesis one last time.

Tonight, she puts up with him. When Neil is named valedictorian, Rowan has only one chance at victory: Howl, a senior class game that takes them all over Seattle, a farewell tour of the city she loves. But after learning a group of seniors is out to get them, she and Neil reluctantly decide to team up until they’re the last players left—and then they’ll destroy each other.

As Rowan spends more time with Neil, she realizes he’s much more than the awkward linguistics nerd she’s sparred with for the past four years. And, perhaps, this boy she claims to despise might actually be the boy of her dreams. Tomorrow…maybe she’s already fallen for him.

By the way... the characters don't know it... but Roth and MacNair are both Members of the Tribe (MOT).



















[book] It's Challah Time!:
20th Anniversary Edition
by Latifa Berry Kropf
Moshe Shai (Photographer)
August 1, 2020
Ages 2 - 6
KAR-BEN

In this 20th anniversary edition of Kar-Ben’s best-seller with all new photos, a diverse preschool class works together to make challah for Shabbat in this photo-driven book. They combine yeast, water, flour and salt into dough that is braided into perfect challah loaves. The children enjoy tasting their creation, and learn that making challah is a special ritual of Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath.
























[book] HILLEL BUILDS A HOUSE!
SUKKOT AND SIMCHAT TORAH
by Shoshana Lepon (Author)
Ángeles Ruiz / Angeles Ruiz (Illustrator)
August 1, 2020
Ages 2 - 6
KAR-BEN

All year, Hillel builds treehouses and forts. His structures-in the backyard, under the stairs and even in the living room-can get in the way when the family is busy with holiday preparations. As the Jewish holidays come and go throughout the year, Hillel can't seem to find the right one for his building projects. That is, until fall comes, and with it the holiday of Sukkot, the Jewish harvest holiday, which is all about building a temporary structure, called a sukkah. Hillel puts all his practice building to work as he helps his father use boards, branches and decorations to create the family sukkah.
























[book] Nicanor's Gate
by Eric A. Kimmel
Alida Massari (Illustrator)
August 1, 2020
Ages 4 - 8
KAR-BEN

Set in biblical times, the story of Nicanor's Gate-one of the entrances to the Temple in Jerusalem-shows how a man's faith is important to living a happy, fulfilled life. Nicanor, a wealthy merchant from Alexandria, is thrilled when King Herod calls on him to assist in rebuilding the ruined Temple in Jerusalem. Nicanor orders massive, beautifully intricate doors to be built, especially for the Eastern Gate of the Temple, but disaster strikes while the gates are being shipped from Alexandria to Jerusalem. To escape sinking, the ship must reduce its load, and one of the doors is pushed into the sea. But a miracle happens: the heavy door surfaces, is recovered from the sea, and installed as an entrance to the Temple area.

Kirkus:"Anyone looking for a definition of “miracle” could look to this picture book. The miracle Nicanor witnesses couldn’t be more straightforward. He’s hired the finest artisans to build a gate for the Temple in Jerusalem, two colossal doors made of metal. But as soon as they’re placed on a transport ship, a storm begins. It sinks one of the doors-and very nearly the ship-to the bottom of the sea. But just as the precious cargo seems to be lost, the law of gravity appears to reverse itself, and the door is suddenly floating on top of the water. It would be difficult to find a clearer example of deus ex machina. But if the plot is unsurprising (at least to people who believe in miracles), the story still manages to convey a sense of wonder. This is due largely to Massari’s illustrations. The text describes the doors: 'cast from Corninthian gold, a rare mixture of copper, gold, and silver that gleamed like the sun.' The colors in her pictures are so rich that the metal really does look like gold. (The characters’ skin tones are equally rich and varied shades of brown.) The marvels also contrast beautifully with the bleakness of the story. When hope seems lost, one character responds with both faith and resignation: 'We do what we can. The rest is in God’s hands.' ...”
























[book] ANOTHER MODERNITY
Elia Benamozegh’s Jewish
Universalism
by Clémence Boulouque
(Columbia University)
August 25, 2020
Stanford University Press

Another Modernity is a rich study of the life and thought of Elia Benamozegh, a nineteenth-century rabbi and philosopher whose work profoundly influenced Christian-Jewish dialogue in twentieth-century Europe. Benamozegh, a Livornese rabbi of Moroccan descent, was a prolific writer and transnational thinker who corresponded widely with religious and intellectual figures in France, the Maghreb, and the Middle East. This idiosyncratic figure, who argued for the universalism of Judaism and for interreligious engagement, came to influence a spectrum of religious thinkers so varied that it includes proponents of the ecumenical Second Vatican Council, American evangelists, and right-wing Zionists in Israel.

What Benamozegh proposed was unprecedented: that the Jewish tradition presented a solution to the religious crisis of modernity. According to Benamozegh, the defining features of Judaism were universalism, a capacity to foster interreligious engagement, and the political power and mythical allure of its theosophical tradition, Kabbalah-all of which made the Jewish tradition uniquely equipped to assuage the post-Enlightenment tensions between religion and reason.

In this book, Clémence Boulouque presents a wide-ranging and nuanced investigation of Benamozegh's published and unpublished work and his continuing legacy, considering his impact on Christian-Jewish dialogue as well as on far-right Christians and right-wing religious Zionists.




















[book] Henry Kissinger and
American Power:
A Political Biography
by Thomas A. Schwartz
August 25, 2020
Hill and Wang

A biography of Henry Kissinger that attempts balance.

Over the past six decades, Henry Kissinger has been America’s most consistently praised-and reviled-public figure. He was hailed as a “miracle worker” for his peacemaking in the Middle East, pursuit of détente with the Soviet Union, negotiation of an end to the Vietnam War, and secret plan to open the United States to China. He was assailed from the left and from the right for his indifference to human rights, complicity in the pointless sacrifice of American and Vietnamese lives, and reliance on deception and intrigue. Was he a brilliant master strategist-“the 20th century’s greatest 19th century statesman”-or a cold-blooded monster who eroded America’s moral standing for the sake of self-promotion?

In this masterfully researched biography, the renowned diplomatic historian Thomas Schwartz offers an authoritative, and fair-minded, answer to this question. While other biographers have engaged in hagiography or demonology, Schwartz takes a measured view of his subject. He recognizes Kissinger’s successes and acknowledges that Kissinger thought seriously and with great insight about the foreign policy issues of his time, while also recognizing his failures, his penchant for backbiting, and his reliance on ingratiating and fawning praise of the president as a source of power. Throughout, Schwartz stresses Kissinger’s artful invention of himself as a celebrity diplomat and his domination of the medium of television news. He also notes Kissinger’s sensitivity to domestic and partisan politics, complicating-and undermining-the image of the far-seeing statesman who stands above the squabbles of popular strife.

Rounded and textured, and rich with new insights into key dilemmas of American power, Henry Kissinger and American Power stands as an essential guide to a man whose legacy is as complex as the last sixty years of US history itself.


























[book] Pluses and Minuses:
How Math Solves
Our Problems
by Stefan Buijsman, PhD
August 25, 2020
Penguin

Are numbers in nature and humans merely discover them. Or are numbers created by humans to explain the world. Stefan is a math prodigy. The Dutch young man received a Master's degree at 18 and finished a PhD at 20 in 18 months (usually takes 4 years). This is a guide to changing how you think about numbers and mathematics.

We all know math is important: we live in the age of big data, our lives are increasingly governed by algorithms, and we're constantly faced with a barrage of statistics about everything from politics to our health. But what might be less obvious is how math factors into your daily life, and what memorizing all of those formulae in school had to do with it.

Math prodigy Stefan Buijsman is beginning to change that through his pioneering research into the way we learn math. Plusses and Minuses is based in the countless ways that math is engrained in our daily lives, and shows readers how math can actually be used to make problems easier to solve. Taking readers on a journey around the world to visit societies that have developed without the use of math, and back into history to learn how and why various disciples of mathematics were invented, Buijsman shows the vital importance of math, and how a better understanding of mathematics will give us a better understanding of the world as a whole.

Stefan Buijsman has become one of the most sought-after experts in math education after he completed his PhD at age 20. In Plusses and Minuses, he puts his research into practice to help anyone gain a better grasp of mathematics than they have ever had.





























[book] PARIS NEVER LEAVES YOU
A NOVEL
BY ELLEN FELDMAN
August 4, 2020
St. Martin's Griffin

Living through World War II working in a Paris bookstore with her young daughter, Vivi, and fighting for her life, Charlotte is no victim, she is a survivor. But can she survive the next chapter of her life?

Alternating between wartime Paris and 1950s New York publishing, Ellen Feldman's Paris Never Leaves You is an extraordinary story of resilience, love, and impossible choices, exploring how survival never comes without a cost.

The war is over, but the past is never past.





























[book] Friendship List #4:
13 and 3/4
by Lisa Greenwald
August 4, 2020
Tegen Book
Ages 8 - 12

BFFs Ari and Kaylan make a new bucket list as they set out for different summer camps in the fourth and final Friendship List novel. The perfect summer read for fans of Lauren Myracle and Rachel Renee Russo’s Dork Diaries!

Ari and Kaylan aren’t sure how they’re going to survive their first summer apart. No pool. No sleepovers. No emergency late night chats on the porch.

So as Ari returns to Camp Silver and Kaylan heads off to comedy camp, they come up with a new list of 13 and 3/4 ways to keep their friendship strong as they tackle everything from bias to batik and moping to matchmaking.

Told in alternating perspectives, the fourth book in the popular Friendship List series is sure to make readers cry, laugh, and start plotting their own friendship lists.









See also:





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[book] CHANCE
ESCAPE FROM THE HOLOCAUST
(through the eyes of Uri as a child)
A MEMOIR
BY URI SHULEVITZ
August 25, 2020
postponed to October 20, 2020 FS&G
Ages 8-14

From a beloved voice in children’s literature comes this landmark memoir of hope amid harrowing times and an engaging and unusual Holocaust story.

With backlist sales of over 2.3 million copies, Uri Shulevitz, one of FSG BYR’s most acclaimed picture-book creators, details the eight-year odyssey of how he and his Jewish family escaped the terrors of the Nazis by fleeing Warsaw for the Soviet Union in CHANCE.

It was during those years, with threats at every turn, that the young Uri experienced his awakening as an artist, an experience that played a key role during this difficult time. By turns dreamlike and nightmarish, this heavily illustrated account of determination, courage, family loyalty, and the luck of coincidence is a true publishing event.

Note: The illustrations are facially expressive, impressionistic and emotional and might be sketchy since they relate memory and emotion more than realism. Of course, he did not remember the features of some people from 1939, so the “wisdom of his fingers” drew his impressions. (He let his fingers do the guiding/walking)

Uri Shulevitz is a Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator and author. He was born in Warsaw, Poland, on February 27, 1935. He began drawing at the age of three and, unlike many children, never stopped. The Warsaw blitz occurred when he was four years old, and the Shulevitz family fled. For eight years they were wanderers, arriving, eventually, in Paris in 1947. There Shulevitz developed an enthusiasm for French comic books, and soon he and a friend started making their own. At thirteen, Shulevitz won first prize in an all-elementary-school drawing competition in Paris's 20th district. In 1949, the family moved to Israel, where Shulevitz worked a variety of jobs: an apprentice at a rubber-stamp shop, a carpenter, and a dog-license clerk at Tel Aviv City Hall. He studied at the Teachers' Institute in Tel Aviv, where he took courses in literature, anatomy, and biology, and also studied at the Art Institute of Tel Aviv. At fifteen, he was the youngest to exhibit in a group drawing show at the Tel Aviv Museum. At 24 he moved to New York City, where he studied painting at Brooklyn Museum Art School and drew illustrations for a publisher of Hebrew books. One day while talking on the telephone, he noticed that his doodles had a fresh and spontaneous look-different from his previous illustrations. This discovery was the beginning of Uri's new approach to his illustrations for The Moon in My Room, his first book, published in 1963. Since then he was written and illustrated many celebrated children’s books. He won the Caldecott Medal for The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship, written by Arthur Ransome. He has also earned three Caldecott Honors, for The Treasure, Snow and How I Learned Geography. His other books include One Monday Morning, Dawn, So Sleepy Story, and many others. He also wrote the instructional guide Writing with Pictures: How to Write and Illustrate Children’s Books. He lives in New York City.

























[book] Talking Until Nightfall:
Remembering Jewish Salonica, 1941–44
by Isaac Matarasso
Translated by Pauline Matarasso
August 25, 2020
Bloomsbury Continuum

When Nazi occupiers arrived in Greece in 1941, it was the beginning of a horror that would reverberate through generations. In the city of Salonica (Thessaloniki), almost 50,000 Jews were sent to Nazi concentration camps during the war, and only 2,000 returned. A Jewish doctor named Isaac Matarasso and his son escaped imprisonment and torture at the hands of the Nazis and joined the resistance. After the city's liberation they returned to rebuild Salonica and, along with the other survivors, to grapple with the near-total destruction of their community.

Isaac was a witness to his Jewish community's devastation, and the tangled aftermath of grief, guilt and grace as survivors returned home. Talking Until Nightfall presents his account of the tragedy and his moving tribute to the living and the dead. His story is woven together with his son Robert's memories of being a frightened teenager spared by a twist of fate, with an afterword by his grandson Francois that looks back on the survivors' stories and his family's place in history. This slim, wrenching account of loss, survival, and the strength of the human spirit will captivate readers and ensure the Jews of Salonica are never forgotten.

























[book] The Jewish Calendar
16-Month 2020-2021
Engagement Calendar:
Jewish Year 5781 Calendar
by The Jewish Museum New York
August 4, 2020
Universe Publishing

The Jewish Calendar 16-Month 2020-2021 Engagement features 53 full-color Judaic ceremonial masterpieces from the internationally renowned collection of The Jewish Museum, New York.
Features include:
2-page weekly spreads include a full-color art page of museum artifacts and plenty of room to record appointments, notes, or anything!
7x9-inch size (14x9 open) feels like a paperback and fits easily in purses, totes, or backpacks
Spans a full 16 months from September 2020 through December 2021
Includes U.S. and Jewish holidays, Sabbath candle-lighting times, and a list of Jewish holidays through the year 2030, making this calendar essential for every Jewish household
























[book] The Jewish Museum Calendar 2021
Wall Calendar
by The Jewish Museum
August 4, 2020
Pomegranate

The extraordinary works of art reproduced here communicate the aesthetic values and skill of their creators while revealing different aspects of Jewish culture. Paintings, prints, sculptures, and ceremonial objects all speak as evocatively about the Jewish experience in the world as they do about the unique power of art to both inspire and inform. Spanning several centuries, these works represent the enormous range of art in the unparalleled collection of the Jewish Museum in New York City. Features sixteen months (September 2020 through December 2021), with Jewish holidays, weekly Torah readings and candle-lighting times, and the blessings to be recited over the candles. Calendars are printed with soy-based inks on environmentally sourced paper.
























[book] The 2021 Jewish Calendar
16-Month Wall Calendar:
Jewish Year 5781 Calendar – Illustrated
by Jewish Historical Museum Amsterdam
August 4, 2020
Universe

This beautiful 2021 Jewish Calendar 16-Month Wall Calendar features selections from the superb collection of the Jewish Historical Museum, Amsterdam.

Full-color illustrations of Judaic ceremonial and historical masterpieces are beautifully reproduced throughout this calendar. Other features include: Spans a full 16 months from September 2020 through December 2021 Includes U.S. and Jewish holidays, Sabbath candle-lighting times, blessings, and a list of Jewish holidays through the year 2030, making this calendar essential for every Jewish household
























[book] The Takeaway Men:
A Novel
by Meryl Ain
August 4, 2020

With the cloud of the Holocaust still looming over them, twin sisters Bronka and Johanna Lubinski and their parents arrive in the US from a Displaced Persons Camp. In the years after World War II, they experience the difficulties of adjusting to American culture as well as the burgeoning fear of the Cold War. Years later, the discovery of a former Nazi hiding in their community brings the Holocaust out of the shadows. As the girls get older, they start to wonder about their parents’ pasts, and they begin to demand answers. But it soon becomes clear that those memories will be more difficult and painful to uncover than they could have anticipated. Poignant and haunting, The Takeaway Men explores the impact of immigration, identity, prejudice, secrets, and lies on parents and children in mid-twentieth-century America.


























[book] Thinking about God:
Jewish Views
(JPS Essential Judaism)
by Rabbi Kari H. Tuling
August 4, 2020
The Jewish Publication SOciety

Who—or what—is God? Is God like a person? Does God have a gender? Does God have a special relationship with the Jewish people? Does God intervene in our lives? Is God good—and, if yes, why does evil persist in the world? In investigating how Jewish thinkers have approached these and other questions, Rabbi Kari H. Tuling elucidates many compelling—and contrasting—ways of thinking about God in Jewish tradition.

Thinking about God addresses the genuinely intertextual nature of evolving Jewish God concepts. Just as in Jewish thought the Bible and other historical texts are living documents, still present and relevant to the conversation unfolding now, and just as a Jewish theologian examining a core concept responds to the full tapestry of Jewish thought on the subject all at once, this book is organized topically, covers Jewish sources (including liturgy) from the biblical to the postmodern era, and highlights the interplay between texts over time, up through our own era.

A highly accessible resource for introductory students, Thinking about God also makes important yet challenging theological texts understandable. By breaking down each selected text into its core components, Tuling helps the reader absorb it both on its own terms and in the context of essential theological questions of the ages. Readers of all backgrounds will discover new ways to contemplate God. Access a study guide.

























[book] True Crimes and Misdemeanors:
The Investigation of Donald Trump
by Jeffrey Toobin
August 4, 2020
Doubleday

From CNN chief legal analyst and bestselling author Jeffrey Toobin, a real-life legal thriller about the prosecutors and congressional investigators pursuing the truth about Donald Trump's complicity in several crimes--and why they failed.

Donald Trump's campaign chairman went to jail. So did his personal lawyer. His long-time political consigliere was convicted of serious federal crimes, and his national security advisor pled guilty to others. Several Russian spies were indicted in absentia. Career intelligence agents and military officers were alarmed enough by the president's actions that they alerted senior government officials and ignited the impeachment process.

Yet despite all this, a years-long inquiry led by special counsel Robert Mueller, and the third impeachment of a president in American history, Donald Trump survived to run for re-election. Why?

Jeffrey Toobin's highly entertaining definitive account of the Mueller investigation and the impeachment of the president takes readers behind the scenes of the epic legal and political struggle to call Trump to account for his misdeeds. With his superb storytelling and analytic skills Toobin recounts all the mind-boggling twists and turns in the case--Trump's son met with a Russian operative promising Kremlin support! Trump paid a porn star $130,000 to hush up an affair! Rudy Giuliani and a pair of shady Ukrainian-American businessmen got the Justice Department to look at Russian-created conspiracy theories! Toobin shows how Trump's canny lawyers used Mueller's famous integrity against him, and how Trump's bullying and bluster cowed Republican legislators into ignoring the clear evidence of the impeachment hearings.

Based on dozens of interviews with prosecutors in Mueller's office, Trump's legal team, Congressional investigators, White House staffers, and several of the key players, including some who are now in prison, True Crimes and Misdemeanors is a revelatory narrative that makes sense of the seemingly endless chaos of the Trump years. Filled with never-before-reported details of the high-stakes legal battles and political machinations, the book weaves a tale of a rogue president guilty of historic misconduct, and how he got away with it.

























[book] Cry Havoc:
Charlottesville and American
Democracy Under Siege
by Michael Signer
Former Mayor, Charlottesville
Summer Beach Read 2020
PubicAffairs

The former mayor of Charlottesville delivers a vivid, first-person chronicle of the terror and mayhem of the August 2017 "Unite the Right" event, and shows how issues of extremism are affecting not just one city but the nation itself.

The deadly invasion of Charlottesville, Virginia, by white nationalist militias in August 2017 is a microcosm of the challenges facing American democracy today. In his first-person account of one of recent American history's most polarizing events, Michael Signer, then Charlottesville's mayor, both tells the story of what really happened and draws out its larger significance.

Signer's gripping, strikingly candid "you are there" narrative sets the events on the ground-the lead-up to August's "Unite the Right" rally, the days of the weekend itself, the aftermath-in the larger context of a country struggling to find its way in a disruptive new era. He confronts some of the most challenging questions of our moment, namely how can we: Reconcile free speech with the need for public order?
Maintain the values of pragmatism, compromise, even simple civility, in a time of intensification of extremes on the right and the left?
Address systemic racism through our public spaces and memorials?
Provide accountability after a crisis?


While Signer shows how easily our communities can be taken hostage by forces intent on destroying democratic norms and institutions, he concludes with a stirring call for optimism, revealing how the tragic events of Charlottesville are also bolstering American democracy from within.



















NOW IN PAPERBACK:


[book] Out of the Depths:
The Story of a Child of Buchenwald
Who Returned Home at Last
by Rabbi Israel Meir Lau
a former Chief Rabbi of the State of Israel (1993-2003)
the late Elie Wiesel (Foreword)
the late Shimon Peres (Foreword)
August 4, 2020
Sterling

With a foreword by Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel! Israel Meir Lau, one of the youngest survivors of Buchenwald, was just eight years old when the camp was liberated in 1945. Descended from a 1,000-year unbroken chain of rabbis, he grew up to become Chief Rabbi of Israel--and like many of the great rabbis, Lau is a master storyteller. Out of the Depths is his harrowing, miraculous, and inspiring account of life in one of the Nazis' deadliest concentration camps, and how he managed to survive against all possible odds.

Lau, who lost most of his family in the Holocaust, also chronicles his life after the war, including his emigration to Mandate Palestine during a period that coincides with the development of the State of Israel. The story continues up through today, with that once-lost boy of eight now a brilliant, charismatic, and world-revered figure who has visited with Popes John Paul and Benedict; the Dalai Lama, Nelson Mandela, and countless global leaders including Ronald Reagan, Bill and Hillary Clinton, and Tony Blair.

























[book] The Tunnel
A Novel
by A. B. Yehoshua
Stuart Schoffman (Translator)
August 4, 2020
HMH

From the award-winning, internationally acclaimed Israeli author, a suspenseful and poignant story of a family coping with the sudden mental decline of their beloved husband and father—an engineer who they discover is involved in an ominous secret military project

Until recently, Zvi Luria was a healthy man in his seventies, an engineer living in Tel Aviv with his wife, Dina, visiting with their two children whenever possible. Now he is showing signs of early dementia, and his work on the tunnels of the Trans-Israel Highway is no longer possible. To keep his mind sharp, Zvi decides to take a job as the unpaid assistant to Asael Maimoni, a young engineer involved in a secret military project: a road to be built inside the massive Ramon Crater in the northern Negev Desert.

The challenge of the road, however, is compounded by strange circumstances. Living secretly on the proposed route, amid ancient Nabatean ruins, is a Palestinian family under the protection of an enigmatic archaeological preservationist. Zvi rises to the occasion, proposing a tunnel that would not dislodge the family. But when his wife falls sick, circumstances begin to spiral . . .

The Tunnel—wry, wistful, and a tour de force of vital social commentary—is Yehoshua at his finest.

























[book] Synergetic Stew:
Explorations in Dymaxion Dining
Spiral-bound 1982 Facsimile Copy
by Jamie Snyder (Introduction)
August 4, 2020

Back in 1982, when this was published, we had the good fortune of studying with Professor Fuller. For his 125th, here is a facsimile reproduction of Dymaxion cooking, synergistic for Spaceship Earth

A delightful dymaxion cookbook homage to Buckminster Fuller, featuring John Cage’s macrobiotic recipes, Margaret Mead’s cucumber salad and more

Buckminster Fuller is globally known as a design scientist, architect, author, poet, engineer and a true visionary. On his 86th birthday he received the cookbook Synergetic Stew as a surprise present from his friends and admirers, who share recipes along with personal anecdotes and humorous recollections of Fuller (for example, a reminiscence about Bucky’s love for tea in all its variations). Scattered throughout the book are enticing texts and poems from Fuller himself, including even a recipe for tomato ice cream.

Constructed around 100 achievable recipes, this book is a glimpse into Fuller’s life, as told by his peers. A few of the recipes are a joyful ode to Fuller’s oeuvre, such as Shirley Sharkey’s “GEODESICANDY,” the “Macrobiotic Diet” by John Cage or Amy Edmondson’s “Allspace-Filling Whole Wheat Bread.”

In addition to the facsimile, Jamie Snyder reflects upon often-overlooked facets of Bucky’s character, as revealed through anecdotes of his relationship to food.

Contributors include: Bil Baird, Peter Brown, John Cage, Lim Chong Keat, Elizabeth Choy, John Ciardi, John Denver, Amy Edmondson, Ted Ehmann, Werner Erhard, Ronald Feldman, John and Isobel Fistere, Medard Gabel, Eugene Garfield, Neva Goodwin, d'Arcy Hayman, Henry J. Heimlich, Miranda Kaiser, Anne Kordus, Kuyoshi Kuromiya, Mae Lee, Paula Martin, Margaret Mead, Karl Menninger, Yehudi Menuhin, Martin and Margy Meyerson (former Penn President), Ann Mintz, Don Moore, Ed Muskie, Libby Newman, Isamu Noguchi, Gerard K. O'Neill, Steve Parker, Eleanor and George Pavloff, Cedric Price, Kariska Pulchalski, Harrison Salisbury, Shirley and Bill Sharkey, Peter Simoneaux, Hester Stearns, Connie Thelander, Thomas Tse-Kwai Zung, Dennis Tyler, Amei Wallach, Hope Watts and Kathryn Withlow.






















SEPTEMBER 2020
BOOKS




STARRED REVIEW
HIGHLY ANTICIPATED
NO GERMAN PUBLISHER HAS ACQUIRED IT YET
[book] THE APPOINTMENT
A NOVEL
BY Katharina Volckmer
September 1, 2020
Avid

For readers of Ottessa Moshfegh and Han Kang, a whip-smart, darkly funny, and subversive debut novel in which a woman on the verge of major change addresses her doctor in a stream of consciousness narrative.

In a well-appointed examination in London, a young woman unburdens herself to a certain Dr. Seligman. Though she can barely see above his head, she holds forth about her life and desires, her struggles with her sexuality and identity. Born and raised in Germany, she has been living in London for several years, determined to break free from her family origins and her haunted homeland. But the recent death of her grandfather, and an unexpected inheritance, make it clear that you cannot easily outrun your own shame, whether it be physical, familial, historical, national, or all of the above.

Or can you? With Dr. Seligman’s help, our narrator will find out.

In a monologue that is both deliciously dark and subversively funny, she takes us on a wide-ranging journey from Hitler-centered sexual fantasies and overbearing mothers to the medicinal properties of squirrel tails and the notion that anatomical changes can serve as historical reparation. The Appointment is an audacious debut novel by an explosive new international literary voice, challenging all of our notions of what is fluid and what is fixed, and the myriad ways we seek to make peace with others and ourselves in the 21st century.


















[book] THE MEMORY MONSTER
A NOVEL
BY YISHAI SHARID
Translated from Hebrew by Yardenna Greespan
September 8, 2020
Restless

The controversial English-language debut of celebrated Israeli novelist Yishai Sarid is a harrowing, ironic parable of how we reckon with human horror, in which a young, present-day historian becomes consumed by the memory of the Holocaust.

Written as a report to the chairman of Yad Vashem, Israel’s memorial to the victims of the Holocaust, our unnamed narrator recounts his own undoing. Hired as a promising young historian, he soon becomes a leading expert on Nazi methods of extermination at concentration camps in Poland during World War II and guides tours through the sites for students and visiting dignitaries. He hungrily devours every detail of life and death in the camps and takes pride in being able to recreate for his audience the excruciating last moments of the victims’ lives.

The job becomes a mission, and then an obsession. Spending so much time immersed in death, his connections with the living begin to deteriorate. He resents the students lost in their iPhones, singing sentimental songs, not expressing sufficient outrage at the genocide committed by the Nazis. In fact, he even begins to detect, in the students as well as himself, a hint of admiration for the murderers-their efficiency, audacity, and determination. Force is the only way to resist force, he comes to think, and one must be prepared to kill.

With the perspicuity of Kafka’s The Trial and the obsessions of Delillo’s White Noise, The Memory Monster confronts difficult questions that are all too relevant to Israel and the world today: How do we process human brutality? What makes us choose sides in conflict? And how do we honor the memory of horror without becoming consumed by it?


















[book] No Vacancy
by Tziporah Cohen
September 1, 2020
Ages 9 - 12
Groundwood Books

Buying and moving into the run-down Jewel Motor Inn in upstate New York wasn’t eleven-year-old Miriam Brockman’s dream, but at least it’s an adventure. Miriam befriends Kate, whose grandmother owns the diner next door, and finds comfort in the company of Maria, the motel’s housekeeper, and her Uncle Mordy, who comes to help out for the summer.

She spends her free time helping Kate’s grandmother make her famous grape pies and begins to face her fears by taking swimming lessons in the motel’s pool.

But when it becomes clear that only a miracle is going to save the Jewel from bankruptcy, Jewish Miriam and Catholic Kate decide to create their own miracle. Otherwise, the No Vacancy sign will come down for good, and Miriam will lose the life she’s worked so hard to build.
























[book] If I Lived with Noah
by Pamela Moritz
MacKenzie Haley (Illustrator)
September 1, 2020
Ages 3 - 6
Apples and Honey Press / Behrman

A playful peek into Noah s Ark that will spark a compare-and-contrast conversation about the traditional Bible story. --Kirkus Reviews

If I saw the animals boarding the ark
As Noah stood by with his staff
I'd say, 'I can help with the animals, sir.'
He'd welcome me on with a laugh.


What would you do if you could meet the animals on Noah's ark? Would you make friends with the monkeys? Read stories to the cows? Play games with the chickens?

Maybe you'd set up a diving board so you could all swim in the sea together. Come climb aboard the ark, and let's find out! For ages 3 to 6.






















[book] Behind the Bookcase:
Miep Gies, Anne Frank,
and the Hiding Place
by Barbara Lowell
Valentina Toro (Illustrator)
SEPTEMBER 1, 2020
Ages 4 - 8
KAR-BEN

Anne Frank’s diary is a gift to the world because of Miep Gies. One of the protectors of the Frank family, Miep recovered the diary after the family was discovered by Nazis, and then returned it to Otto Frank after World War II. Displaced from her own home as a child during World War I, Miep had great empathy for Anne, and she found ways-like talking about Hollywood gossip and fashion trends-to engage her. The story of their relationship-and the impending danger to the family in hiding-unfolds in this unique perspective of Anne Frank’s widely known story.






















[book] Does Your Dog Speak Hebrew?:
A Book of Animal Sounds
Board book – Illustrated
by Ellen Bari
Holly Clifton-Brown (Illustrator)
SEPTEMBER 1, 2020
Ages 1-4
KAR-BEN

A dog says “bow, wow” in English and “hav, hav” in Hebrew. Whimsical animals in American and Israeli settings compare their varied noises and sounds. Readers can explore which sounds are the same and which are different in droll depictions of animals in Israel and the United States.

Basic Hebrew vocabulary, including animal names and sounds, are introduced. Iconic locations like Capitol Hill and Central Park in the United States, and the Dome of the Rock and the Sea of Galilee in Israel are featured in illustrations.






















[book] There Was a Young Rabbi:
A Hanukkah Tale
by Suzanne Wolfe
Jeffrey Ebbeler (Illustrator)
SEPTEMBER 1, 2020
Ages 4-9
KAR-BEN

Hanukkah is a very busy time! Join the young rabbi as she makes festive preparations-spinning the dreidel, cooking a tasty meal, lighting the menorah, and more-in this cumulative, rhyming story reminding readers of the Hanukkah miracle of long ago! Learn about Hanukkah’s festivities and rituals, and about the Jewish holiday itself.






















[book] Kayla and Kugel's
Happy Hanukkah
by Ann D. Koffsky
September 1, 2020
Ages 3 - 6
Apples and Honey Press / Behrman

From the author of Judah Macabee Goes to the Doctor and other Kayla and Kugel books

I'm Kayla and this is my dog, Kugel. We are getting ready for Hanukkah. KUGEL! We need the Hanukkah candles tonight, not the Shabbat candles. Oh, no Kugel! Just because the soldiers in the Hanukkah story made a mess doesn't mean you have to.

Celebrate the story of Hanukkah with Kayla and her mischievous dog, Kugel. And don't forget to light the menorah and play dreidel!






















[book] The Contradictions
by Sophie Yanow
September 8, 2020
Drawn and Quarterly
Graphic novel

The Eisner Award–winning story about a student figuring out radical politics in a messy world

Sophie is young and queer and into feminist theory. She decides to study abroad, choosing Paris for no firm reason beyond liking French comics. Feeling a bit lonely and out of place, she’s desperate for community and a sense of belonging. She stumbles into what/who she’s looking for when she meets Zena. An anarchist student-activist committed to veganism and shoplifting, Zena offers Sophie a whole new political ideology that feels electric. Enamored-of Zena, of the idea of living more righteously-Sophie finds herself swept up in a whirlwind friendship that blows her even further from her rural California roots as they embark on a disastrous hitchhiking trip to Amsterdam and Berlin, full of couch surfing, drug tripping, and radical book fairs.

Capturing that time in your life where you’re meeting new people and learning about the world-when everything feels vital and urgent-The Contradictions is Sophie Yanow’s fictionalized coming-of-age story. Sophie’s attempts at ideological purity are challenged time and again, putting into question the plausibility of a life of dogma in a world filled with contradictions. Keenly observed, frank, and very funny, The Contradictions speaks to a specific reality while also being incredibly relatable, reminding us that we are all imperfect people in an imperfect world.





















[book] The Hanukkah Magic of Nate Gadol
by Arthur A. Levine
Kevin Hawkes (Illustrator)
September 8, 2020
Ages 5 - 8
Candlewick

A play on words... Nate Gadol and Nes Gadol

From an imaginative team come a new larger-than-life holiday hero who brings Hanukkah wonder and generosity to anyone in need!

Nate Gadol is a great big spirit with eyes as shiny as golden coins and a smile that is lantern bright. He can make anything last as long as it is needed, like a tiny bit of oil that must stretch for eight nights, a flower that needs to stay fresh to cheer up someone ailing, or a small lump of chocolate that grows to allow the Glasers to treat their children over the holiday and, during a harsh winter when medicine is needed more than sweets, spurs them to share what little they have with the O’Malleys. In this charming holiday hybrid story, well-known children’s author and editor Arthur A. Levine pairs with award-winning illustrator Kevin Hawkes to offer a mythical, magical take on the way Jewish families came to give and receive gifts over Hanukkah, just as their Christian neighbors do at Christmas, thanks to a loving spirit named Nate Gadol working behind the scenes—together with a certain jolly old soul.






























[book] Grounded:
A Senator's Lessons on
Winning Back Rural America
by Jon Tester
U.S. Senator (D, MT)
September 15, 2020
Ecco

An inspiring and eye-opening memoir showing how Democrats can reconnect with rural and red-state voters, from Montana’s three-term democratic senator

Senator Jon Tester is a rare voice in Congress. He is the only United States senator who manages a full-time job outside of the Senate—as a farmer. But what has really come to distinguish Tester in the Senate is his commitment to accountability, his ability to stand up to Donald Trump, and his success in, time and again, winning red state voters back to the Democratic Party.

In Grounded, Tester shares his early life, his rise in the Democratic party, his vision for helping rural America, and his strategies for reaching red state voters. Leaning deeply into lessons on the value of authenticity and hard work that he learned growing up on his family’s 1,800-acre farm near the small town of Big Sandy, Montana—the same farm he continues to work today with his wife, Sharla—Tester has made his political career a testament to crossing the divides of class and geography. The media and Democrats too often discount rural people as Trump supporters; Tester knows better. His voice is vital to the public discourse as we seek to understand the issues that are important to rural and working-class America in not just the 2020 election but also for years to come.

A heartfelt and inspiring memoir from a courageous voice, Grounded shows us that the biggest threat to our democracy isn’t a president who has no moral compass. It’s politicians who don’t understand the value of accountability and hard work. Tester demonstrates that if American democracy is to survive, we must put our trust in the values that keep us grounded.




















[book] Finding My Father:
His Century-Long Journey
from World War I Warsaw
and My Quest to Follow
by Deborah Tannen
September 15, 2020
Ballantine

A #1 New York Times bestselling author traces her father’s life from turn-of-the-century Warsaw to New York City in an intimate memoir about family, memory, and the stories we tell.

Long before she was the acclaimed author of a groundbreaking book about women and men, praised by Oliver Sacks for having “a novelist’s ear for the way people speak,” Deborah Tannen was a girl who adored her father. Though he was often absent during her childhood, she was profoundly influenced by his gift for writing and storytelling. As she grew up and he grew older, she spent countless hours recording conversations with her father for the account of his life she had promised him she’d write. But when he hands Tannen journals he kept in his youth, and she discovers letters he saved from a woman he might have married instead of her mother, she is forced to rethink her assumptions about her father’s life and her parents’ marriage.

In this memoir, Tannen embarks on the poignant, yet perilous, quest to piece together the puzzle of her father’s life. Beginning with his astonishingly vivid memories of the Hasidic community in Warsaw, where he was born in 1908, she traces his journey: from arriving in New York City in 1920 to quitting high school at fourteen to support his mother and sister, through a vast array of jobs, including prison guard and gun-toting alcohol tax inspector, to eventually establishing the largest workers’ compensation law practice in New York and running for Congress. As Tannen comes to better understand her father's—and her own—relationship to Judaism, she uncovers aspects of his life she would never have imagined.

Finding My Father is a memoir of Eli Tannen’s life and the ways in which it reflects the near century that he lived. Even more than that, it’s an unflinching account of a daughter’s struggle to see her father clearly, to know him more deeply, and to find a more truthful story about her family and herself.




















[book] Speaking for Myself:
Faith, Freedom, and the
Fight of Our Lives Inside
the Trump White House
by Sarah Huckabee Sanders
September 8, 2020
St. Martin's Press

I know you are wondering if this is fiction or non fiction.
That is up to you
Sarah Huckabee Sanders served as White House Press Secretary for President Donald J. Trump from 2017 to 2019. A trusted confidante of the President, Sanders advised him on everything from press and communications strategy to personnel and policy. She was at the President’s side for two and a half years.
The daughter of a governor and media icon, she fought the press, spoke for the President and his administration, she waged battle against reporters trying to create honest reports, she worked with elected lawmakers and CEOs, and accompanied the President on every international trip.

Now, in Speaking for Myself, Sarah Huckabee Sanders describes what it was like on the front lines and inside the White House, focusing on her Christian faith, the challenges of being a working mother at the highest level of American politics, her relationship with the press, and her unique role in the historic fight raging between the Trump administration and who she believes are its critics




















[book] The Ends Game:
How Smart Companies Stop
Selling Products and Start
Delivering Value
by Marco Bertini and Oded Koenigsberg (Technion)
September 8, 2020
MIT Press

How some firms are rewriting the rules of commerce by pursuing “ends”—actual outcomes—rather than selling “means”—their products and services.

Would you rather pay for healthcare or for better health? For school or education? For groceries or nutrition? A car or transportation? A theater performance or entertainment? In The Ends Game, Marco Bertini and Oded Koenigsberg describe how some firms are rewriting the rules of commerce: instead of selling the “means” (their products and services), they adopt innovative revenue models to pursue “ends” (actual outcomes). They show that paying by the pill, semester, food item, vehicle, or show does not necessarily reflect the value that customers actually derive from their purchases. Revenue models anchored on the ownership of products, they argue, are patently inferior.

Bertini and Koenigsberg explain that advances in technology have made it possible for firms to collect “impact data” that tells them when and how customers use their products and how those products perform, and that firms can draw on this data to turn products into seamless services. New revenue models will enable transparency, accountability, and efficiency.

Bertini and Koenigsberg offer real-world examples of how companies in healthcare, transportation, education, and other sectors are already playing “the ends game,” describing, among other things, the successes of Dollar Shave Club, Rent the Runway, and “pay as you fly” insurance for drone flights.

Finally, they outline the challenges in adopting these new models, offering guidance on such issues as criteria for defining an outcome, concerns over data collection, and internal organizational obstacles.

Oded, a leader at London B School and grad of Technion, Cornell and Duke, was the Barbara and Meyer Feldberg Associate Professor of Business at Columbia University (2002-2012).


















[book] No Finish Line:
Lessons on Life and Career
by Meyer Feldberg
2020
Columbia Business School Press

Dean Emeritus Meyer Feldberg is a quintessential storyteller. The source of his stories is his rich and unique life, which took him from South Africa under apartheid to a C-Suite in present-day New York, from the hallowed halls of academia to the frenzy of global investment banking. As with all storytellers, there is a purpose embedded in each of his stories that is specific in its details but universal in its message.

No Finish Line is Meyer Feldberg as his friends and colleagues know him. It is the professor dispensing sage advice. It is the mentor telling a tale about himself that is really about you. In his telling, Feldberg’s story-his successes and his failures-is a lesson plan for how to lead a worthy personal and professional life.

This concise volume reminds the reader of the importance of courage and decency in our relationships. Feldberg shows how values such as self-awareness, personal responsibility, and generosity play out in ways that in retrospect become pivotal. He relates his regrets as well as his triumphs, candidly sharing how our failures to live up to our own expectations can continue to haunt us. Written by a leading fixture of New York’s educational, cultural, and business elite, No Finish Line is an engaging portrait of what matters most in living a good and successful life.
























[book] These Violent Delights:
A Novel
BY MICAH NEMEREVER
September 15, 2020
Harper

Too violent for me, but you might like it

An O Magazine.com LGBTQ Book That Is Changing the Literary Landscape in 2020 • An Electric Lit Most Anticipated Debut of the Second Half of 2020 • A Paperback Paris Best New LGBTQ+ Books To Read This Year Selection
The Secret History meets Lie with Me in Micah Nemerever's compulsively readable debut novel — a feverishly taut Hitchcockian story about two college students, each with his own troubled past, whose escalating obsession with one another leads to an act of unspeakable violence.

When Paul and Julian meet as university freshmen in early 1970s Pittsburgh, they are immediately drawn to one another. A talented artist, Paul is sensitive and agonizingly insecure (Jewish and traumatized by his family's Jewish experience), incomprehensible to his working-class family, and desolate with grief over his father’s recent death.

Paul sees the wealthy, effortlessly charming Julian as his sole intellectual equal—an ally against the conventional world he finds so suffocating. He idolizes his friend for his magnetic confidence. But as charismatic as he can choose to be, Julian is also volatile and capriciously cruel. And admiration isn’t the same as trust.

As their friendship spirals into an all-consuming intimacy, Paul is desperate to protect their precarious bond, even as it becomes clear that pressures from the outside world are nothing compared with the brutality they are capable of inflicting on one another. Separation is out of the question. But as their orbit compresses and their grip on one another tightens, they are drawn to an act of irrevocable violence that will force the young men to confront a shattering truth at the core of their relationship.

Exquisitely plotted, unfolding with a propulsive ferocity, These Violent Delights is a novel of escalating dread and an excavation of the unsettling depths of human desire.




















[book] The Spymasters:
How the CIA Directors Shape
History and the Future
by Chris Whipple
September 15, 2020
Scribner

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Gatekeepers, a remarkable, behind-the-scenes look at what it’s like to run the world’s most powerful intelligence agency, and how the CIA is often a crucial counterforce against presidents threatening to overstep the powers of their office.

Only eleven men and one woman are alive today who have made the life-and-death decisions that come with running the world’s most powerful and influential intelligence service. With unprecedented, deep access to nearly all these individuals plus several of their predecessors, Chris Whipple tells the story of an agency that answers to the United States president alone, but whose activities—spying, espionage, and covert action—take place on every continent. At pivotal moments, the CIA acts as a brake on rogue presidents, starting in the mid-seventies with DCI Richard Helms’s refusal to conceal Richard Nixon’s criminality and continuing to the present as the actions of a CIA whistleblower have ignited impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump.

Since its inception in 1947, the Central Intelligence Agency has been a powerful player on the world stage, operating largely in the shadows to protect American interests. For The Spymasters, Whipple conducted extensive, exclusive interviews with nearly every living CIA director, pulling back the curtain on the world’s elite spy agencies and showing how the CIA partners—or clashes—with counterparts in Britain, France, Germany, Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Russia. Topics covered in the book include attempts by presidents to use the agency for their own ends; simmering problems in the Middle East and Asia; rogue nuclear threats; and cyberwarfare.

A revelatory, behind-the-scenes look, The Spymasters recounts seven decades of CIA activity and elicits predictions about the issues--and threats—that will engage the attention of future operatives and analysts. Including eye-opening interviews with George Tenet, John Brennan, Leon Panetta, and David Petraeus, as well as those who’ve just recently departed the agency, this is a timely, essential, and important contribution to current events.




















[book] CONSCIOUS LEADERSHIP
ELEVATING HUMANITY THROUGH BUSINESS
BY JOHN MACKEY
with STEVE MCINTOSH
CARTER PHILLIPS
(Whole Foods)
September 15, 2020
Portfolio

From Whole Foods CEO John Mackey and his coauthors, a follow-up to groundbreaking bestseller Conscious Capitalism—revealing what it takes to lead a purpose-driven, sustainable business.

John Mackey started a movement when he founded Whole Foods, bringing natural, organic food to the masses and not only changing the market, but breaking the mold. Now, for the first time, Conscious Leadership closely explores the vision, virtues, and mindset that have informed Mackey’s own leadership journey, providing a roadmap for innovative, value-based leadership—in business and in society.

Conscious Leadership demystifies strategies that have helped Mackey shepherd Whole Foods through four decades of incredible growth and innovation, including its recent sale to Amazon. Each chapter will challenge you to rethink conventional business wisdom through anecdotes, case studies, profiles of conscious leaders, and innovative techniques for self-development, culminating in an empowering call to action for entrepreneurs and trailblazers—to step up as leaders who see beyond the bottom line.




















[book] Outside the Box:
How Globalization Changed
from Moving Stuff to Spreading Ideas
by Marc Levinson
September 15, 2020
Princeton University Press

From the acclaimed author of The Box, a new history of globalization that shows us how to navigate its future

Globalization has profoundly shaped the world we live in, yet its rise was neither inevitable nor planned. It is also one of the most contentious issues of our time. While it may have made goods less expensive, it has also sent massive flows of money across borders and shaken the global balance of power. Outside the Box offers a fresh and lively history of globalization, showing how it has evolved over two centuries in response to changes in demography, technology, and consumer tastes.

Marc Levinson, the acclaimed author of The Box, tells the story of globalization through the people who eliminated barriers and pursued new ways of doing business. He shows how the nature of globalization changed dramatically in the 1980s with the creation of long-distance value chains. This new type of economic relationship shifted manufacturing to Asia, destroying millions of jobs and devastating industrial centers in North America, Europe, and Japan. Levinson describes how improvements in transportation, communications, and computing made international value chains possible, but how globalization was taken too far because of large government subsidies and the systematic misjudgment of risk by businesses. As companies began to account properly for the risks of globalization, cross-border investment fell sharply and foreign trade lagged long before Donald Trump became president and the coronavirus disrupted business around the world.

In Outside the Box, Levinson explains that globalization is entering a new era in which moving stuff will matter much less than moving services, information, and ideas.




















[book] HOW TO LEAD
WISDOM FROM THE WORLD'S
CEOs, FOUNDERS, and
GAME CHANGERS
BY DAVID M. RUBENSTEIN
September 1, 2020
Simon and Schuster

The essential leadership playbook. Learn the principles and guiding philosophies of Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Warren Buffet, Oprah, and many others through illuminating conversations about their remarkable lives and careers.

For the past five years, David M. Rubenstein—author of The American Story, visionary cofounder of The Carlyle Group, and host of The David Rubenstein Show—has spoken with the world’s highest performing leaders about who they are and how they became successful. How to Lead distills these revealing conversations into an indispensable leadership guidebook.

Gain advice and wisdom from CEOs, presidents, founders, and master performers from the worlds of finance (Warren Buffet, Jamie Dimon, Christine Lagarde, Ken Griffin), tech (Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Eric Schmidt, Tim Cook), entertainment (Oprah, Lorne Michaels, Renee Fleming, Yo-Yo Ma), sports (Jack Nicklaus, Adam Silver, Coach K, Phil Knight), government (President Bill Clinton, President George W. Bush, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Nancy Pelosi), and many others.

-Jeff Bezos harnesses the power of wandering, discovering that his best decisions have been made with heart and intuition, rather than analysis.
-Richard Branson never goes into a venture looking to make a profit. He aims to make the best in field.
-Phil Knight views Nike as a marketing company whose product is its most important marketing tool.
-Marillyn Hewson, who grew up in a fatherless home with four siblings in Kansas, quickly learned the importance of self-reliance and the value of a dollar.


How to Lead shares the extraordinary stories of these pioneering agents of change. Discover how each luminary got started and how they handle decision making, failure, innovation, change, and crisis. Learn from their decades of experience as pioneers in their field. No two leaders are the same.
























[book] Friday Forward:
Inspiration & Motivation to End
Your Week Stronger Than It Started
by Robert Glazer
September 1, 2020
Simple Truths

FROM USA TODAY AND WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF ELEVATE
Wake up. Get inspired. Change the world. Repeat.

Global business leader and national bestselling author, Robert Glazer, believes we all have a responsibility to each other: to give one another the inspiration and support we need to be our best. What started as a weekly note known as Friday Forward to his team of forty has turned into a global movement reaching over 200,000 leaders across sixty countries and continually forwarded to friends and family.

In FRIDAY FORWARD, Robert shares fifty-two of his favorite stories with real life examples that will motivate you to grow and push you to be your best self. He encourages you to use this book as part of a positive and intentional Friday morning routine to get the weekend started on a forward-looking note that will carry you through the week. At once uplifting and deeply thought-provoking, these stories will challenge you to propel yourself outside your comfort zone to unlock your innate potential. By making small, intentional changes, you have the power to create lasting impact, not only in your own life, but also to inspire those around you to do the same. Today is the perfect day to start.
























[book] Battlegrounds:
The Fight to Defend the Free World
by H. R. McMaster
September 22, 2020
Harper
560 pages

Retired Lt. General H.R. McMaster, was – for 13 months - an NSA Adviser for Donald J. Trump, and the author of “Dereliction of Duty.” For me, he is an immediate turnoff and a bellicose speaker. But his opinions carry weight in Washington DC, so it is important to take a look at this book in terms of future policies.

In his opinion, since the end of the Cold War and the idea of the end of History, American foreign policy has been misconceived, inconsistent, and poorly implemented. Therefore, America and its free world allies have fallen behind its rivals (China) in power and influence. Meanwhile threats to security, freedom, and prosperity, such as nuclear proliferation and jihadist terrorism have grown. In BATTLEGROUNDS, H.R. McMaster describes efforts to reassess and fundamentally shift policies while he was National Security Advisor. And he provides his path to improve strategic competence and prevail in complex competitions against America's adversaries.

SEE ALSO...
[book]































[book] Mother for Dinner:
A Novel
by Shalom Auslander
September 22, 2020
Riverhead Books

By the author of Foreskin's Lament, a novel of identity, tribalism, and mothers.

Seventh Seltzer has done everything he can to break from the past, but in his overbearing, narcissistic mother's last moments he is drawn back into the life he left behind. At her deathbed, she whispers in his ear the two words he always knew she would: "Eat me."

This is not unusual, as the Seltzers are Cannibal-Americans, a once proud and thriving ethnic group, but for Seventh, it raises some serious questions, both practical and emotional. Of practical concern, his dead mother is six-foot-two and weighs about four hundred and fifty pounds. Even divided up between Seventh and his eleven brothers, that's a lot of red meat. Plus Second keeps kosher, Ninth is vegan, First hated her, and Sixth is dead. To make matters worse, even if he can wrangle his brothers together for a feast, the Can-Am people have assimilated, and the only living Cannibal who knows how to perform the ancient ritual is their Uncle Ishmael, whose erratic understanding of their traditions leads to conflict.

Seventh struggles with his mother's deathbed request. He never loved her, but the sense of guilt and responsibility he feels--to her and to his people and to his "unique cultural heritage"--is overwhelming. His mother always taught him he was a link in a chain, thousands of people long, stretching back hundreds of years. But, as his brother First says, he's getting tired of chains.

Irreverent and written with Auslander's incomparable humor, Mother for Dinner is an exploration of legacy, assimilation, the things we owe our families, and the things we owe ourselves.





















[book] The Last Million:
Europe's Displaced Persons from
World War to Cold War
by David Nasaw
September 15, 2020
Penguin Press


STARRED REVIEWS FROM BOTH KIRKUS AND PW

From bestselling author David Nasaw, a sweeping new history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII

In May 1945, German forces surrendered to the Allied powers, putting an end to World War II in Europe. But the aftershocks of global military conflict did not cease with the German capitulation. Millions of lost and homeless concentration camp survivors, POWs, slave laborers, political prisoners, and Nazi collaborators in flight from the Red Army overwhelmed Germany, a nation in ruins. British and American soldiers gathered the malnourished and desperate refugees and attempted to repatriate them. But after exhaustive efforts, there remained more than a million displaced persons left behind in Germany: Jews, Poles, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Ukrainians, and other Eastern Europeans who refused to go home or had no homes to return to. The Last Million would spend the next three to five years in displaced persons camps, temporary homelands in exile, divided by nationality, with their own police forces, churches and synagogues, schools, newspapers, theaters, and infirmaries.

The international community could not agree on the fate of the Last Million, and after a year of debate and inaction, the International Refugee Organization was created to resettle them in lands suffering from postwar labor shortages. But no nations were willing to accept the 200,000 to 250,000 Jewish men, women, and children who remained trapped in Germany. In 1948, the United States, among the last countries to accept refugees for resettlement, finally passed a displaced persons bill. With Cold War fears supplanting memories of World War II atrocities, the bill granted the vast majority of visas to those who were reliably anti-Communist, including thousands of former Nazi collaborators and war criminals, while severely limiting the entry of Jews, who were suspected of being Communist sympathizers or agents because they had been recent residents of Soviet-dominated Poland. Only after the controversial partition of Palestine and Israel's declaration of independence were the remaining Jewish survivors able to leave their displaced persons camps in Germany.

A masterwork from acclaimed historian David Nasaw, The Last Million tells the gripping yet until now largely hidden story of postwar displacement and statelessness. By 1952, the Last Million were scattered around the world. As they crossed from their broken past into an unknowable future, they carried with them their wounds, their fears, their hope, and their secrets. Here for the first time, Nasaw illuminates their incredible history and, with profound contemporary resonance, shows us that it is our history as well.





















[book] Eli's Promise:
A Novel
by Ronald H. Balson
September 22, 2020
ST. Martin's Press

A "fixer" in a Polish town during World War II, his betrayal of a Jewish family, and a search for justice 25 years later-by the winner of the National Jewish Book Award.

Eli’s Promise is a masterful work of historical fiction spanning three eras?Nazi-occupied Poland, the American Zone of post-war Germany, and Chicago at the height of the Vietnam War. Award-winning author Ronald H. Balson explores the human cost of war, the mixed blessings of survival, and the enduring strength of family bonds.

1939: Eli Rosen lives with his wife Esther and their young son in the Polish town of Lublin, where his family owns a construction company. As a consequence of the Nazi occupation, Eli’s company is Aryanized, appropriated and transferred to Maximilian Poleski an unprincipled profiteer who peddles favors to Lublin’s subjugated residents. An uneasy alliance is formed; Poleski will keep the Rosen family safe if Eli will manage the business. Will Poleski honor his promise or will their relationship end in betrayal and tragedy?

1946: Eli resides with his son in a displaced persons camp in Allied-occupied Germany hoping for a visa to America. His wife has been missing since the war. One man is sneaking around the camps selling illegal visas; might he know what has happened to her?

1965: Eli rents a room in Albany Park, Chicago. He is on a mission. With patience, cunning, and relentless focus, he navigates unfamiliar streets and dangerous political backrooms, searching for the truth. Powerful and emotional, Ronald H. Balson's Eli’s Promise is a rich, rewarding novel of World War II and a husband’s quest for justice.





















[book] Judaism for the World:
Reflections on God,
Life, and Love
by Rabbi Arthur Green, PhD
September 22, 2020
Yale University Press

An internationally recognized scholar and theologian shares a Jewish mysticism for our times
Judaism, one of the world’s great spiritual traditions, is not addressed to Jews alone. In this masterful book, Arthur Green calls out to seekers of all sorts, offering a universal response to the eternal human questions of who we are, why we exist, where we are going, and how to live.

Drawing on over half a century as a Jewish seeker and teacher, he shows us a Judaism that cultivates the life of the spirit, that inspires an inward journey leading precisely toward self-transcendence, to an awareness of the universal Self in whose presence we exist. As a neo-hasidic seeker, he is both devotional and boldly questioning in his understanding of God and tradition. Engaging with the mystical sources, he translates the insights of the Hasidic masters into a new religious language accessible to all those eager to build an inner life and a human society that treasures the divine spark in each person and throughout Creation.




























[book] Thinking about the Prophets:
A Philosopher Reads the Bible
(JPS Essential Judaism)
by Kenneth Seeskin
(Northwestern University)
September 1, 2020
JPS: Jewish Publication Society

Rethinking the great literary prophets whose ministry ran from the eighth to the sixth centuries BCE—Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, and Job—Thinking about the Prophets examines their often-shocking teachings in light of their times, their influence on later Western and Jewish thinkers, and their enduring lessons for all of us. As a noted scholar of Jewish philosophy, Kenneth Seeskin teases out philosophical, ethical, and theological questions in the writings, such as the nature of moral reasoning, the divine persona, divine providence, the suffering of the innocent, the power of repentance, and what it means to believe in a monotheistic conception of God.

Seeskin demonstrates that great ideas are not limited by time or place, but rather once put forth, take on a life of their own. Thus he interweaves the medieval and modern philosophers Maimonides, Kant, Cohen, Buber, Levinas, Heschel, and Soloveitchik, all of whom read the prophets and had important things to say as a result. We come to see the prophets perhaps in equal measure as divinely authorized whistle-blowers and profound thinkers of the human condition.

Readers of all levels will find this volume an accessible and provoking introduction to the enduring significance of biblical prophecy.




























[book] The Man Who Ran Washington:
The Life and Times of James A. Baker III
by Peter Baker and Susan Glasser
May 12, 2020
postponed to September 29, 2020
Doubleday

From two of America's most revered political journalists comes the definitive biography of legendary White House chief of staff and secretary of state James A. Baker III: the man who ran Washington when Washington ran the world.

For a quarter-century, from the end of Watergate to the aftermath of the Cold War, no Republican won the presidency without his help or ran the White House without his advice. James Addison Baker III was the indispensable man for four presidents because he understood better than anyone how to make Washington work at a time when America was shaping events around the world. The Man Who Ran Washington is a page-turning portrait of a power broker who influenced America's destiny for generations.

A scion of Texas aristocracy who became George H. W. Bush's best friend on the tennis courts of the Houston Country Club, Baker had never even worked in Washington until a devastating family tragedy struck when he was thirty-nine. Within a few years, he was leading Gerald Ford's campaign and would go on to manage a total of five presidential races and win a sixth for George W. Bush in a Florida recount. He ran Ronald Reagan's White House and became the most consequential secretary of state since Henry Kissinger. He negotiated with Democrats at home and Soviets abroad, rewrote the tax code, assembled the coalition that won the Gulf War, brokered the reunification of Germany and helped bring a decades-long nuclear superpower standoff to an end. Ruthlessly partisan during campaign season, Baker governed as the avatar of pragmatism over purity and deal-making over division, a lost art in today's fractured nation.

His story is a case study in the acquisition, exercise, and preservation of power in late twentieth-century America and the story of Washington and the world in the modern era--how it once worked and how it has transformed into an era of gridlock and polarization. This masterly biography by two brilliant observers of the American political scene is destined to become a classic.



































[book] MORALITY:
Restoring the Common Good
in Divided Times
by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
Former Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom and Commonweath
September 1, 2020
Basic Books

A distinguished religious leader's stirring case for reconstructing a shared framework of virtues and values

With liberal democracy embattled, public discourse grown toxic, family life breaking down, and drug abuse and depression on the rise, many fear what the future holds.

In Morality, respected faith leader and public intellectual Jonathan Sacks traces today's crisis to our loss of a strong, shared moral code and our elevation of self-interest over the common good. We have outsourced morality to the market and the state, but neither is capable of showing us how to live. Sacks leads readers from ancient Greece to the Enlightenment to the present day to show that there is no liberty without morality and no freedom without responsibility, arguing that we must all must play our part in rebuilding a common moral foundation.

A major work of moral philosophy, Morality is an inspiring vision of a world in which we can all find our place and face the future without fear.




















[book] Judaism's Life-Changing Ideas
by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks
Former Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom and Commonweath
Summer 2020
Maggid

What is Judaism? A religion? A faith? A way of life?
A set of beliefs? A collection of commands? A culture?
A civilization?
It is all these, but it is emphatically something more. It is a way of thinking about life, a constellation of ideas. One might think that the ideas Judaism introduced into the world have become part of the common intellectual heritage of humankind, at least of the West. Yet this is not the case. Some of them have been lost over time; others the West never fully understood. Yet these ideas remain as important as ever before, and perhaps even more so. In this inspiring work, Rabbi Sacks introduces his readers to one Life-Changing Idea from each of the weekly parashot.




















[book] The Crowns on the Letters:
Essays on the Aggada and
the Lives of the Sages
by Rabbi Ari Kahn
Summer 2020
OU Press

Rabbi Ari Kahn's The Crowns on the Letters represents a major achievement in the study of the lives of our sages, as well as in the study of rabbinic aggada.This work is an immensely learned and deeply creative interpretation of many fundamental aggadot relating both to the intellectual biographies of the tannaim and amoraim Hillel and Shammai, Rabbi Akiva and Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, Resh Lakish and Rabbi Yochanan, and many others as well as to major themes in Jewish thought including the nature of the Oral Law, mysticism and its perils, the messianic era, teshuva, and Eretz Yisrael. Rabbi Kahn's work is refreshingly original and he wears his erudition lightly, so that this is not only edifying scholarship but readable as well. Rabbi Menachem Genack





















Speaking of God...



[book] Twilight of the Gods:
War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945
(Volume 3) (Pacific War Trilogy)
by Ian W. Toll
September 1, 2020
WW NORTON

The final volume of the magisterial Pacific War Trilogy from acclaimed historian Ian W. Toll, “one of the great storytellers of War” (Evan Thomas).

In June 1944, the United States launched a crushing assault on the Japanese navy in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. The capture of the Mariana Islands and the accompanying ruin of Japanese carrier airpower marked a pivotal moment in the Pacific War. No tactical masterstroke or blunder could reverse the increasingly lopsided balance of power between the two combatants. The War in the Pacific had entered its endgame.

Beginning with the Honolulu Conference, when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt met with his Pacific theater commanders to plan the last phase of the campaign against Japan, Twilight of the Gods brings to life the harrowing last year of World War II in the Pacific, when the U.S. Navy won the largest naval battle in history; Douglas MacArthur made good his pledge to return to the Philippines; waves of kamikazes attacked the Allied fleets; the Japanese fought to the last man on one island after another; B-29 bombers burned down Japanese cities; and Hiroshima and Nagasaki were vaporized in atomic blasts.

Ian W. Toll’s narratives of combat in the air, at sea, and on the beaches are as gripping as ever, but he also reconstructs the Japanese and American home fronts and takes the reader into the halls of power in Washington and Tokyo, where the great questions of strategy and diplomacy were decided.

Drawing from a wealth of rich archival sources and new material, Twilight of the Gods casts a penetrating light on the battles, grand strategic decisions and naval logistics that enabled the Allied victory in the Pacific. An authoritative and riveting account of the final phase of the War in the Pacific, Twilight of the Gods brings Toll’s masterful trilogy to a thrilling conclusion. This prize-winning and best-selling trilogy will stand as the first complete history of the Pacific War in more than twenty-five years, and the first multivolume history of the Pacific naval war since Samuel Eliot Morison’s series was published in the 1950s.




















[book] God in Gotham:
The Miracle of Religion
in Modern Manhattan
by Jon Butler
September 29, 2020
Belknap/Harvard

A master historian traces the flourishing of organized religion in Manhattan between the 1880s and the 1960s, revealing how faith adapted and thrived in the supposed capital of American secularism.

In Gilded Age Manhattan, Catholic, Jewish, and Protestant leaders agonized over the fate of traditional religious practice amid chaotic and multiplying pluralism. Massive immigration, the anonymity of urban life, and modernity’s rationalism, bureaucratization, and professionalization seemingly eviscerated the sense of religious community.

Yet fears of religion’s demise were dramatically overblown. Jon Butler finds a spiritual hothouse in the supposed capital of American secularism. By the 1950s Manhattan was full of the sacred. Catholics, Jews, and Protestants peppered the borough with sanctuaries great and small. Manhattan became a center of religious publishing and broadcasting and was home to august spiritual reformers from Reinhold Niebuhr to Abraham Heschel, Dorothy Day, and Norman Vincent Peale. A host of white nontraditional groups met in midtown hotels, while black worshippers gathered in Harlem’s storefront churches. Though denied the ministry almost everywhere, women shaped the lived religion of congregations, founded missionary societies, and, in organizations such as the Zionist Hadassah, fused spirituality and political activism. And after 1945, when Manhattan’s young families rushed to New Jersey and Long Island’s booming suburbs, they recreated the religious institutions that had shaped their youth.

God in Gotham portrays a city where people of faith engaged modernity rather than foundered in it. Far from the world of “disenchantment” that sociologist Max Weber bemoaned, modern Manhattan actually birthed an urban spiritual landscape of unparalleled breadth, suggesting that modernity enabled rather than crippled religion in America well into the 1960s.





























[book] Never Alone:
Prison, Politics,
and My People
by Natan Sharansky with
Gil Troy
September 1, 2020
PublicAffairs

A classic account of courage, integrity, and most of all, belonging

In 1977, Natan Sharansky, a leading activist in the democratic dissident movement in the Soviet Union and the movement for free Jewish emigration, was arrested by the KGB. He spent nine years as a political prisoner in the USSR in the gulag, convicted of treason against the state. Every day, Sharansky fought for individual freedom in the face of overt tyranny, a struggle that would come to define the rest of his life.

Never Alone reveals how Sharansky's years in prison, many spent in harsh solitary confinement, prepared him for a very public life after his release and life in Israel.

As an Israeli politician and the head of the Jewish Agency, Sharansky brought extraordinary moral clarity and uncompromising, often uncomfortable, honesty. His storyis suffused with reflections from his time as a political prisoner, from his seat at the table as history unfolded in Israel and the Middle East, and from his passionate efforts to unite the Jewish people.

Written with frankness, affection, and humor, the book offers us profound insights from a man who embraced the essential human struggle: to find his own voice, his own faith, and the people to whom he could belong.























[book] Those Who Forget:
My Family's Story in Nazi Europe
– A Memoir, A History, A Warning
by Geraldine Schwarz
Laura Marris (Translator)
May 5, 2020
Postponed to September 22, 2020
Scribner

Those Who Forget, published to international awards and acclaim, is journalist Géraldine Schwarz’s riveting account of her German and French grandparents’ lives during World War II, an in-depth history of Europe’s post-war reckoning with fascism, and an urgent appeal to remember as a defense against today’s rise of far-right nationalism.

During World War II, Géraldine Schwarz’s German grandparents were neither heroes nor villains; they were merely Mitlaüfer—those who followed the current. Once the war ended, they wanted to bury the past under the wreckage of the Third Reich.

Decades later, while delving through filing cabinets in the basement of their apartment building in Mannheim, Schwarz discovers that in 1938, her paternal grandfather Karl took advantage of Nazi policies to buy a business from a Jewish family for a low price. She finds letters from the only survivor of this family (all the others perished in Auschwitz), demanding reparations. But Karl Schwarz refused to acknowledge his responsibility. Géraldine starts to question the past: How guilty were her grandparents? What makes us complicit? On her mother’s side, she investigates the role of her French grandfather, a policeman in Vichy.

Weaving together the threads of three generations of her family story with Europe’s process of post-war reckoning, Schwarz explores how millions were seduced by ideology, overcome by a fog of denial after the war, and, in Germany at least, eventually managed to transform collective guilt into democratic responsibility. She asks: How can nations learn from history? And she observes that countries that avoid confronting the past are especially vulnerable to extremism. Searing and unforgettable, Those Who Forget is a riveting memoir, an illuminating history, and an urgent call for remembering.











[book] Game Changer:
How to Be 10x in
the Talent Economy
by Michael Solomon, Rishon Blumberg,
and Daniel Weizmann (Contributor)
September 22, 2020
HarperCollins Leadership series

Whether you’re an employer, employee, freelancer, or part of a management team, you must understand how highly skilled “10x” talent is radically shifting the dynamics of the employment marketplace. Learn how to identify, attract, vet, employ, and retain--or become--the game-changing talent that will make a difference in the work world of tomorrow.

Individuals, companies, and governments around the globe need to understand what tactics are required to employ, attract, and retain the kind of game-changing talent required to survive and thrive in an increasingly global, automated, and distributed economy.

The term “10x” is borrowed from the tech world to describe an extremely talented coder that brings at least ten times the value to whatever business he or she engages with. In Silicon Valley, the big tech companies compete for the services of 10xers by offering outrageous compensation packages and a plethora of perks. Even more crucially, the 10xers demand and expect a level of flexibility, respect, and participation unheard of in the old work world. The lessons presented in Game Changer apply to individuals or companies striving to become 10x in any industry.

Using the tech industry as an example, Game Changer shows companies how to attract and manage 10x talent by ditching traditional business structures, for a more agile approach where 10xers can be plugged in where they will make the most impact--and where they themselves will find the most fulfillment. Offering work flexibility, increased autonomy, and a variety of previously unheard-of freedoms is a small price to pay for the transformative results 10xers deliver. For readers who are confident in their abilities and want to make an impact where they work, Game Changer shows them how to be a 10xer and enjoy the varied rewards that this brings.

See how highly skilled talent is transforming companies of all sizes and industries through real-world stories.
Get an inside glimpse into how companies attract, retain, and manage 10x talent. Recognize the roadblocks to retaining top talent that are inherent in the traditional employer-employee model and learn how these obstacles can be overcome to incredible success.
Learn how to see yourself as both talent and management to achieve the rewards and satisfaction that come with being 10x.



















[book] Chinatown Pretty:
Fashion and Wisdom from
Chinatown's Most Stylish Seniors
by Andria Lo and
Valerie Luu
September 22, 2020
Chronicle Books


Can you imagine a book on stylish elderly Jewish woman, with their advice on looking fabulous??

Chinatown Pretty features beautiful portraits and heartwarming stories of trend-setting seniors across six Chinatowns. Andria Lo and Valerie Luu have been interviewing and photographing Chinatown's most fashionable elders on their blog and Instagram, Chinatown Pretty, since 2014.

Chinatown Pretty is a signature style worn by pòh pohs (grandmas) and gùng gungs (grandpas) everywhere—but it's also a life philosophy, mixing resourcefulness, creativity, and a knack for finding joy even in difficult circumstances.

Photos span Chinatowns in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Chicago, New York City, and Vancouver; The style is a mix of modern and vintage, high and low, handmade and store bought clothing; This is a celebration of Chinese American culture, active old-age, and creative style. Chinatown Pretty shares nuggets of philosophical wisdom and personal stories about immigration and Chinese-American culture. This book is great for anyone looking for advice on how to live to a ripe old age with grace and good humor—and, of course, on how to stay stylish.























[book] Battlegrounds:
The Fight to Defend
the Free World
by H. R. McMaster
September 15, 2020
HARPER

From Lt. General H.R. McMaster, U.S. Army, ret., the former National Security Advisor and author of the bestselling classic Dereliction of Duty, comes a bold and provocative re-examination of the most critical foreign policy and national security challenges that face the United States, and an urgent call to compete to preserve America’s standing and security.

Across multiple administrations since the end of the Cold War, American foreign policy has been misconceived, inconsistent, and poorly implemented. As a result, America and the free world have fallen behind rivals in power and influence. Meanwhile threats to security, freedom, and prosperity, such as nuclear proliferation and jihadist terrorism have grown. In BATTLEGROUNDS, H.R. McMaster describes efforts to reassess and fundamentally shift policies while he was National Security Advisor. And he provides a clear pathway forward to improve strategic competence and prevail in complex competitions against our adversaries.

BATTLEGROUNDS is a groundbreaking reassessment of America’s place in the world, drawing from McMaster’s long engagement with these issues, including 34 years of service in the U.S. Army with multiple tours of duty in battlegrounds overseas and his 13 months as National Security Advisor in the Trump White House. It is also a powerful call for Americans and citizens of the free world to transcend the vitriol of partisan political discourse, better educate themselves about the most significant challenges to national and international security and work together to secure peace and prosperity for future generations.
























DEAR FRIENDS
THE CENTER FOR JEWISH HISTORY IN NYC
HAS AN ONINE COOKBOOK FOR DIGITAL DOWNLOAD
THEY HAVENT SHARED WITH US ANY DETAILS ON IT
BUT
IF YOU VISIT THEIR WEBSTE AT CJH.ORG
YOU CAN FOLLOW THE LINKS AND TAKE A LOOK AT IT






[book] Eating Out Loud:
Bold Middle Eastern Flavors
for All Day, Every Day:
A Cookbook
by Eden Grinshpan
(Top Chef Canada, host)
September 1, 2020
Clarkson Potter

Discover a playful new take on Middle Eastern cuisine with more than 100 fresh, flavorful recipes.

“Finally! Eden Grinshpan is letting us in on her secrets of her healthful and deliriously delicious cooking. Giant flavors, pops of color everywhere and dishes you’ll crave forever. It’s the Eden way!”—Bobby Flay

Eden Grinshpan’s accessible cooking is full of bright tastes and textures that reflect her Israeli heritage and laid-back but thoughtful style. In Eating Out Loud, Eden introduces readers to a whirlwind of exciting flavors, mixing and matching simple, traditional ingredients in new ways: roasted whole heads of broccoli topped with herbaceous yogurt and crunchy, spice-infused dukkah; a toasted pita salad full of juicy summer peaches, tomatoes, and a bevy of fresh herbs; and babka that becomes pull-apart morning buns, layered with chocolate and tahini and sticky with a salted sugar glaze, to name a few.

For anyone who loves a big, boisterous spirit both on the plate and around the table, Eating Out Loud is the perfect guide to the kind of meal—full of family and friends eating with their hands, double-dipping, and letting loose—that you never want to end.
























[book] Tecumseh and the Prophet:
The Shawnee Brothers Who
Defied a Nation
by Peter Cozzens
September 15, 2020
KNOPF

The first biography of the great Shawnee leader in more than twenty years, and the first to make clear that his misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa, was an equal partner in the last great pan-Indian alliance against the United States.

Until the Americans assassinated Tecumseh in 1813, he and his brother Tenskwatawa were the co-architects of the broadest pan-Indian confederation in United States history. In previous accounts of Tecumseh's life, Tenskwatawa has been dismissed as a talentless charlatan and a drunk. But award-winning historian Peter Cozzens now shows us that while Tecumseh was a brilliant diplomat and war leader--admired by the same white Americans he opposed--it was Tenskwatawa, called the "Shawnee Prophet," who created a vital doctrine of religious and cultural revitalization that unified the disparate tribes of the Old Northwest. Detailed research of Native American society and customs provides a window into a world often erased from history books and reveals how both men came to power in different but no less important ways.

Cozzens brings us to the forefront of the chaos and violence that characterized the young American Republic, when settlers spilled across the Appalachians to bloody effect in their haste to exploit lands won from the British in the War of Independence, disregarding their rightful Indian owners. Tecumseh and the Prophet presents the untold story of the Shawnee brothers who retaliated against this threat--the two most significant siblings in Native American history, who, Cozzens helps us understand, should be writ large in the annals of America.


























[book] True Believer:
The Rise and Fall of Stan Lee
by Abraham Riesman
September 29, 2020
Crown

The definitive, revelatory biography of Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee, a writer and entrepreneur who reshaped global pop culture—at a steep personal cost

Stan Lee—born Stanley Martin Lieber in 1922—was one of the most beloved and influential entertainers to emerge from the twentieth century. He served as head editor of Marvel for three decades and, in that time, launched more pieces of internationally recognizable intellectual property than anyone other than Walt Disney: Spider-Man, the Avengers, the X-Men, Black Panther, the Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Thor . . . the list seems to never end. On top of that, his carnival-barker marketing prowess more or less single-handedly saved the comic-book industry and superhero fiction. Without him, the global entertainment industry would be wildly different—and a great deal poorer.

But Lee’s unprecedented career was also filled with spectacular failures, controversy, and bitter disputes. Lee was dogged by accusations from key collaborators such as Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko over who really created Marvel’s signature characters—iconic figures for whom Lee had always been suspected of taking more than his proper share of credit. A major business venture, Stan Lee Media, resulted in stock manipulation, bankruptcy, and criminal charges. A second one, POW! Entertainment, has been repeatedly accused of malfeasance and deceit. And in his final years, after the death of his beloved wife, Joan, rumors swirled that Lee was a virtual prisoner in his own home, beset by abusive grifters and issuing cryptic video recordings as a battle to control his fortune and legacy ensued.

Abraham Riesman is a veteran culture reporter who has conducted more than 150 interviews and investigated thousands of pages of private documents, turning up never-before-published revelations about Lee’s life and work. Lee’s most famous motto was “With great power comes great responsibility.” Stretching from the Romanian shtetls of Lee’s ancestors to his own final moments in Los Angeles, True Believer chronicles the world-changing triumphs and tragic missteps of an extraordinary life, and leaves it to readers to decide whether Lee lived up to the responsibilities of his own talent.





























[book] Nine Quarters of Jerusalem:
New Paths Through the Old City
by Matthew Teller
June 23, 2020
POSTPONED TO SEPTEMBER 29, 2020
New Internationalist

FROM A BBC REPORTER. THEIR SYNOPSIS:
In Jerusalem, what you see and what is true are two different things. Beyond the crush and frenzy of a few tourist sites, the Old City within its medieval walls remains largely unknown to visitors, its people ignored and its stories untold. Nine Quarters of Jerusalem lets the Palestinian and other communities of the Old City speak for themselves. Ranging from past to present, highlighting stories and personalities across faiths and outlooks, it evokes the depth and cultural diversity of Palestinian Jerusalem.

Around the time the British arrived in the Holy Land, the idea began to spread that the ancient Old City could be divided by straight lines into four neat quarters, each defined by a faith community. The idea was false. Jerusalem’s people had always clustered together according to religious belief or ethnicity or geographic origin, but the city was undivided.

Nonetheless, those divisions suited successive rulers, so today – more than a century on – they have become entrenched. Maps show ‘Christian Quarter’ or ‘Muslim Quarter’ as if they were real, defined places within borders. They are not. The reality of Jerusalem is a diversity and inclusion that belies imposed narratives of opposition, separation and exclusivity.

This book evokes a sense of place through Jerusalem’s other, ignored quarters – its African and Indian voices, its Greek and Armenian and Syriac communities, its downtrodden Gypsy families, its Sufi mystics and its lost Moroccan Quarter. It discusses the sources of the city’s holiness and the ideas – often startlingly secular – that have shaped lives within its walls. It links discussions of the city’s finest mosques, libraries, churches and monuments through personal stories that, in many cases, have never been told before in English, and certainly not in an accessible, marketable form.





















[book] THE PARASITIC MIND:
How Infectious Ideas
Are Killing Common Sense
by Gad Saad, PhD
October 6, 2020
Blackstone
Regnery

Professor Saad was born to a Jewish family in 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon, and grew up in Montreal, Quebec. He teaches in Canada at Concordia/Molson and has the popular social media channel “The SAAD Truth.” Dr. Gad Saad exposes how an epidemic of idea pathogens are spreading like a virus and killing common sense in the West.

Serving as a powerful follow-up to Jordan Peterson’s book 12 Rules for Life Dr. Saad unpacks what is really happening in progressive safe zones, why we need to be paying more attention to these trends, and what we must do to stop the spread of dangerous thinking. A professor at Concordia University who has witnessed this troubling epidemic first-hand, Dr. Saad dissects a multitude of these concerning forces (corrupt thought patterns, belief systems, attitudes, etc.) that have given rise to a stifling political correctness in our society and how these have created serious consequences that must be remedied–before it’s too late.

























[book] The Good American:
The Epic Life of Bob Gersony,
the U.S. Government's Greatest Humanitarian
by Robert D. Kaplan
October 6, 2020
Random House

You are probably used to reading Kaplan on Naval Affairs, Geopolitics, and the Oceans of Asia. But in this book, he applies his brilliance to the story of the most influential humanitarian you’ve never heard of — Bob Gersony, who spent four decades in crisis zones around the world, as America's SHO (Chief Humanitarian Officer).

“For anyone who has stopped believing that one person can make a difference, or that government service is still a noble calling, or that facts still matter, or that the American brand can still hold fast to practical idealism, this book is the antidote to those fears.”—Jim Mattis, general, U.S. Marines (ret.), and former secretary of defense, author of Call Sign Chaos

Author Robert D. Kaplan often found himself crossing paths with Bob Gersony, a consultant for the U.S. State Department whose quiet dedication and consequential work made a deep impression on Kaplan. Gersony, the son of a wealthy Jewish family, dropped out of high school, and was later awarded a Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam. After Vietnam, he founded a network of Mayan language schools in Guatemala. In Guatemala hew was recruited by U.S. AID and began a 40-year odyssey through virtually every war and disaster zone on every continent, interviewing hundreds of refugees and displaced persons in every location. By providing high decision-makers with a second opinion on momentous events, in almost every case he improved policy for the better, saving countless lives. It is an inspiring story about someone who always worked alone, spending much of his life in refugee camps, and who remained obscure and unrecognized.

In Thailand, Central and South America, Sudan, Chad, Mozambique, Rwanda, Gaza, Bosnia, North Korea, Iraq, and beyond, Gersony never flinched from entering dangerous areas that diplomats could not reach, sometimes risking his own life.

Gersony’s behind-the scenes fact-finding, which included interviews with hundreds of refugees and displaced persons from each war zone and natural-disaster area, often challenged the assumptions and received wisdom of the powers that be, on both the left and the right. In nearly every case, his advice and recommendations made American policy at once smarter and more humane—often dramatically so.

In 1994, his "Gersony Report" was suppressed by the United Nations, who had originally commissioned it, because it had reached the politically embarrassing conclusion that the Rwandan Patriotic Front, which had taken control of the country after the Rwandan genocide, was carrying out politically-motivated mass killings.

In Gersony, Kaplan saw a powerful example of how American diplomacy should be conducted. In a work that exhibits Kaplan’s signature talent for combining travel and geography with sharp political analysis, The Good American tells Gersony’s powerful life story. Set during the State Department’s golden age, this is a story about the loneliness, sweat, and tears and the genuine courage that characterized Gersony’s work in far-flung places. It is also a celebration of ground-level reporting: a page-turning demonstration, by one of our finest geopolitical thinkers, of how getting an up-close, worm’s-eye view of crises and applying sound reason can elicit world-changing results.

























[book] The Code for Love
and Heartbreak
by Jillian Cantor
October 6, 2020
Inkyard Press

In this contemporary romcom retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma by USA TODAY bestselling author Jillian Cantor, there’s nothing more complex—or unpredictable—than love.

When math genius Emma and her coding club co-president, George, are tasked with brainstorming a new project, The Code for Love is born.

George disapproves of Emma’s idea of creating a matchmaking app, accusing her of meddling in people’s lives. But all the happy new couples at school are proof that the app works. At least at first.

Emma’s code is flawless. So why is it that perfectly matched couples start breaking up, the wrong people keep falling for each other, and Emma’s own feelings defy any algorithm?























[book] Jamie and Bubbie:
A Book About People’s Pronouns
by Afsaneh Moradian
Maria Bogade (Illustrator)
October 6, 2020
Ages 4-8
Free Spirit Publishing

Jamie teaches respectful use of personal pronouns in this lighthearted, multigenerational story. Jamie is excited to spend the day walking around the neighborhood with great-grandma Bubbie. They meet so many friends and neighbors throughout the day, along the way...
but Jamie has to correct Bubbie when she incorrectly assumes Ms. Wallace is a he and their server is a she.

“You can’t always know if someone goes by he or she or something else. Sometimes a person will tell you. If they don’t, you can use the person’s name or you can say they.”

Jamie helps Bubbie understand that it’s important not to assume a person’s pronouns based on appearance, and to always use the name and pronouns they go by: he, she, they, or something else.

Jamie and Bubbie introduces children, through an accessible fictional narrative, to the nonbinary experience, the use of gender-neutral pronouns, and how to respectfully use personal pronouns. They will learn the importance of using the correct pronouns, and that sometimes a person’s name and pronouns can change.

The story stays lighthearted and sweet, while diving into an often misunderstood, evolving topic, so children can build empathy and begin to explore their own feelings about gender identity. A section at the back of the book includes tips for teachers, parents, and caregivers for expanding on the concepts in the book and for talking with children about gender.
















[book] Noah Green Saves the World
by Laura Toffler-Corrie
Macky Pamintuan (Illustrator)
October 1, 2020
Ages 9-13
KAR-BEN

Noah is a would-be filmmaker who has trouble making friends and understanding people. In Noah Green Saves the World, by Laura Toffler-Corrie, Noah thinks that this summer, the best place for him is the David Lynch Film Camp, to work on his film “opus,” and not his parents’ choice, Camp Challah, to work on his bar mitzvah project. But before camp starts, Noah’s grandfather, “Pops” takes him aside, along with Simon, a new arrival but not quite friend, and tells them both “It’s up to you to save the world!” Is Pops just confused, or is he onto something? When a pigeon flies into camp carrying mysterious messages, Noah and Simon wonder if maybe they do really have to save the world.

With help from his new friends, Josh, Tyler, environmentalist and upcoming singer-songwriter Mia, and even his popular sister Lily, Noah finds that he can make films, make friends, do his bar mitzvah project, and maybe even save the world after all.






















[book] The Missing:
The True Story of My Family
in World War II
by Michael Rosen
October 6, 2020
Ages 10-14
Candlewick

An award-winning author and poet traces the history of his relatives lost in the Holocaust in a personal, powerful narrative with resonance for readers today.

“They were there at the beginning of the war, but they were gone by the end. I suppose they died in the camps.”

That’s all young Michael Rosen, born in England just after the end of the Second World War, was told about the six great-aunts and great-uncles who had been living in Poland or France at the beginning of that war. This wasn’t enough for him. So, as an adult, he started to search. He asked relatives for any papers they might have. He read book after book. He searched online, time and again, as more information was digitized and suddenly there to be found. In a unique mix of memoir, history, and poetry, scholar and children’s literature luminary Michael Rosen explores his family history, digging up more details than he ever thought he would and sharing them with readers so that now, a lifetime after the Nazis tried to make the world forget the Rosen family and the rest of Europe’s Jews, his readers can do something essential: remember.

With an extensive list of titles for further reading, maps of France and Poland, a family tree, and an introduction by lauded author and anthologist Marc Aronson, this immensely readable narrative offers a vital tool for talking to children about the Holocaust against the background of the ongoing refugee crisis.


















[book] Let Love Rule
by Lenny Kravitz
October 6, 2020
Henry Holt and Company

“I see my story as a suite of songs that have a magical connection. I never understood that connection until I sat down to write. It was then that the magic started to flow.”

Let Love Rule is a work of deep reflection. Lenny Kravitz looks back at his life with candor, self-scrutiny, and humor.

“My life is all about opposites,” he writes. “Black and white. Jewish and Christian. The Jackson 5 and Led Zeppelin. I accepted my Gemini soul. I owned it. I adored it. Yins and yangs mingled in various parts of my heart and mind, giving me balance and fueling my curiosity and comfort.”

Let Love Rule covers a vast canvas stretching from Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant, Los Angeles’s Baldwin Hills, Beverly Hills, and finally to France, England and Germany.

It’s the story of a wildly creative kid who, despite tough struggles at school and extreme tension at home, finds salvation in music. We see him grow as a musician and ultimately a master songwriter, producer, and performer. We also see Lenny’s spiritual growth-and the powerful way in which spirit informs his music. The cast of characters surrounding Lenny is extraordinary: his father, Sy, a high-powered news executive; his mother, Roxie Roker, a television star; and Lisa Bonet, the young actress who becomes his muse.

The central character, of course, is Lenny, who, despite his great aspirational energy, turns down record deal after record deal until he finds his true voice. The creation of that voice, the same voice that is able to declare “Let Love Rule” to an international audience, is the very heart of this story. “Whether recording, performing, or writing a book,” says Lenny, “my art is about listening to the inspiration inside and then sharing it with people. Art must bring the world closer together.”

























[book] The Blessing and the Curse:
The Jewish People and Their
Books in the Twentieth Century
by Adam Kirsch
October 6, 2020
W W NORTON

An erudite and accessible survey of Jewish life and culture in the twentieth century, as reflected in seminal texts.

Following The People and the Books, which "covers more than 2,500 years of highly variegated Jewish cultural expression" (Robert Alter, New York Times Book Review), poet and literary critic Adam Kirsch now turns to the story of modern Jewish literature. From the vast emigration of Jews out of Eastern Europe to the Holocaust to the creation of Israel, the twentieth century transformed Jewish life. The same was true of Jewish writing: the novels, plays, poems, and memoirs of Jewish writers provided intimate access to new worlds of experience.

Kirsch surveys four themes that shaped the twentieth century in Jewish literature and culture: Europe, America, Israel, and the endeavor to reimagine Judaism as a modern faith. With discussions of major books by over thirty writers-ranging from Franz Kafka to Philip Roth, Elie Wiesel to Tony Kushner, Hannah Arendt to Judith Plaskow-he argues that literature offers a new way to think about what it means to be Jewish in the modern world. With a wide scope and diverse, original observations, Kirsch draws fascinating parallels between familiar writers and their less familiar counterparts. While everyone knows the diary of Anne Frank, for example, few outside of Israel have read the diary of Hannah Senesh. Kirsch sheds new light on the literature of the Holocaust through the work of Primo Levi, explores the emergence of America as a Jewish home through the stories of Bernard Malamud, and shows how Yehuda Amichai captured the paradoxes of Israeli identity.

An insightful and engaging work from "one of America’s finest literary critics" (Wall Street Journal), The Blessing and the Curse brings the Jewish experience vividly to life.



























[book] Is This Anything?
by Jerry Seinfeld
October 6, 2020
Simon and Schuster

The first book in twenty-five years from Jerry Seinfeld features his best work across five decades in comedy.

Since his first performance at the legendary New York nightclub “Catch a Rising Star” as a twenty-one-year-old college student in fall of 1975, Jerry Seinfeld has written his own material and saved everything. “Whenever I came up with a funny bit, whether it happened on a stage, in a conversation, or working it out on my preferred canvas, the big yellow legal pad, I kept it in one of those old school accordion folders,” Seinfeld writes. “So I have everything I thought was worth saving from forty-five years of hacking away at this for all I was worth.”

For this book, Jerry Seinfeld has selected his favorite material, organized decade by decade. In page after hilarious page, one brilliantly crafted observation after another, readers will witness the evolution of one of the great comedians of our time and gain new insights into the thrilling but unforgiving art of writing stand-up comedy.

























[book] Humor, Seriously:
Why Humor Is a Secret Weapon
in Business and Life
(And how anyone can harness
it. Even you.)
by Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas
October 6, 2020
Currency

Anyone—even you!—can learn how to harness the power of humor in business (and life), based on the popular class at Stanford's Graduate School of Business. (But at Stanford, you would pay over $6000 for the credit

Working professionals have fallen off a humor cliff. In fact, around the time we enter the workforce, the number of times we laugh and smile on an average day statistically starts to plummet.

And yet, research shows that humor is one of the most powerful tools we have for accomplishing serious work. Studies reveal that humor makes us appear more competent and confident, strengthens relationships, unlocks creativity, and boosts our resilience during difficult times. Plus, it fends off a permanent and unsightly frown known as “resting boss face”.

Top executives are in on the secret: 98 percent prefer employees with a sense of humor, and 84 percent believe that these employees do better work. But even for those who intuitively understand humor’s power, few know how to wield it with intention. As a result, humor is vastly underleveraged in most workplaces today, impacting our performance, relationships, and health.

That’s why Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas teach the popular course Humor: Serious Business at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where they help some of the world’s most hard-driving, blazer-wearing business minds build levity into their organizations and lives. In Humor, Seriously, they draw on findings by behavioral scientists, world-class comedians, and inspiring business leaders to reveal how humor works and—more important—how you can use it more often and effectively

Aaker and Bagdonas unpack the theory and application of humor: what makes something funny and how to mine your life for material. They show how to use humor to make a strong first impression, deliver difficult feedback, persuade and motivate others, and foster cultures where levity and creativity can thrive—not to mention, how to keep it appropriate and recover if you cross a line.

President Dwight David Eisenhower once said, “A sense of humor is part of the art of leadership, of getting along with people, of getting things done.” If Eisenhower, the second least naturally funny president ever (after Franklin Pierce), thought humor was necessary to win wars, build highways, and warn against the military-industrial complex, then you might consider learning it too. Seriously.

And yes, she is the daughter of Professor David Aaker.

And yes, here is a story that Joel Stein (Stanford B School grad and contributor to the course wrote on the course a few years ago:
http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/humor-serious-business





















[book] The 99% Invisible City:
A Field Guide to the
Hidden World of Everyday Design
by Roman Mars and Kurt Kohlstedt
October 6, 2020
HMH

A beautifully designed guidebook to the unnoticed yet essential elements of our cities, from the creators of the wildly popular 99% Invisible podcast

Have you ever wondered what those bright, squiggly graffiti marks on the sidewalk mean?

Or stopped to ponder who gets to name the streets we walk along?

Or what the story is behind those dancing inflatable figures in car dealerships?

99% Invisible is a big-ideas podcast about small-seeming things, revealing stories baked into the buildings we inhabit, the streets we drive, and the sidewalks we traverse. The show celebrates design and architecture in all of its functional glory and accidental absurdity, with intriguing tales of both designers and the people impacted by their designs.

Now, in The 99% Invisible City: A Field Guide to Hidden World of Everyday Design, host Roman Mars and coauthor Kurt Kohlstedt zoom in on the various elements that make our cities work, exploring the origins and other fascinating stories behind everything from power grids and fire escapes to drinking fountains and street signs. With deeply researched entries and beautiful line drawings throughout, The 99% Invisible City will captivate devoted fans of the show and anyone curious about design, urban environments, and the unsung marvels of the world around them.

























[book] Dancing in God's Earthquake:
The Coming Transformation
of Religion
by Arthur Ocean Waskow, Rabbi
October 14, 2020
Orbis Books

Here is a book of deep wisdom from a prophetic rabbi who has for fifty years worked to promote a progressive spirit of renewal that connects Jews, Christians, and people of other faiths. We all experience earthquakes in our lives--social, personal, religious. From those earthquakes renewal and new life can come forth if we learn to dance in the midst of the earthquake.


























[book] Matthew, Mark,
Luke, John...and Me:
Growing Up Jewish in
a Christian World
by Arthur Ullian
October 13, 2020
Bauhan

An upbringing in the WASP enclaves of suburban Boston gave Arthur D. Ullian an early taste of antisemitism, and later sent him on a search through Judeo-Christian history for the roots of discrimination against the Jewish people.

Following a successful career in New England real estate and a life-changing accident that left him paralyzed at age 51, Arthur Ullian began to realize that not only did life in a wheelchair make him feel “different,” but he had always felt like an outsider to some degree. This sent him on a multi-year research project investigating antisemitism from the New Testament to the Inquisition to the Holocaust. He came to see that over the course of his life he had, paradoxically, internalized the prevailing Christian view of the “Jewish character” and unconsciously attempted to replicate the social and material trappings of those who excluded him.

From the world of private schools, cotillion classes, sailing yachts, and restricted clubs to the Halls of Congress where he successfully advocated for medical research with Christopher Reeve, Ullian’s life is one that illustrates the Jewish concept of Tikkun Olam, or “Repair the World.” In Matthew, Mark, Luke, John...and Me — a thoughtful, historically-grounded, and often humorous memoir — he interweaves personal experience with his exploration of the roots of stereotypes, ending with reasons to hope that historic Jewish–Christian enmities will fade and brotherhood prevail.



























[book] Science and Cooking:
Physics Meets Food,
From Homemade to Haute Cuisine
by Michael Brenner, Pia Sörensen,
and David Weitz
(Harvard University)
October 20, 2020
Norton

Based on the popular Harvard University and edX course, Science and Cooking explores the scientific basis of why recipes work.

Why do we knead bread?
What determines the temperature at which we cook a steak
Or the amount of time our chocolate chip cookies spend in the oven?
What is the viscosity of cheese sauce?
Can you break a chocolate chip cookie down to its molecular level?
What do Chinese soup dumplings have in common with polymer chains of hydrocolloids?
Discuss carrot soup and sugar caramelization?
What does over temperature for baking have to do with the melting point of sugar?
You now about lemon juice and apples... but what about lemon juice and pesto?
Coalescance? Barrier? Oil and Water?

The spectacular culinary creations of modern cuisine are the stuff of countless articles and social media feeds. But to a scientist they are also perfect pedagogical explorations into the basic scientific principles of cooking. In Science and Cooking, Harvard professors Michael Brenner, Pia Sörensen, and David Weitz bring the classroom to your kitchen to teach the physics and chemistry underlying every recipe.

Science and Cooking answers these questions and more through hands-on experiments and recipes from renowned chefs such as Christina Tosi, Joanne Chang, and Wylie Dufresne, all beautifully illustrated in full color. With engaging introductions from revolutionary chefs and collaborators Ferran Adria and José Andrés, Science and Cooking will change the way you approach both subjects-in your kitchen and beyond.


























[book] DESSERT PERSON:
Recipes and Guidance for
Baking with Confidence
by Claire Saffitz
October 20, 2020
Clarkson Potter

In her first cookbook, Bon Appétit and YouTube star of the show Gourmet Makes offers wisdom, problem-solving strategies, and more than 100 meticulously tested, creative, and inspiring recipes.

Claire Saffitz, an Upper West Sider, is a baking hero for a new generation. In Dessert Person, fans will find Claire's signature spin on sweet and savory recipes like Babkallah (a babka-Challah mashup), Apple and Concord Grape Crumble Pie, Strawberry-Cornmeal Layer Cake, Crispy Mushroom Galette, and Malted Forever Brownies.

She outlines the problems and solutions for each recipe--like what to do if your pie dough for Sour Cherry Pie cracks (patch it with dough or a quiche flour paste!)--as well as practical do's and don'ts, skill level, prep and bake time, and foundational know-how. With Claire at your side, everyone can be a dessert person.

Hailing from St Louis, this Harvard and McGill educated baker studied French cuisine and pastry at École Grégoire-Ferrandi in Paris, France.
























[book] [book] The Nom Wah Cookbook:
Recipes and Stories from
100 Years at New York City's Iconic Dim Sum Restaurant
by Wilson Tang
Joshua David Stein
October 20, 2020
Ecco

For the last 100 years, Nom Wah Tea Parlor has been slinging some of the world’s greatest dim sum from New York’s Chinatown. Now owner Wilson Tang tells the story of how the restaurant came to be—and how to prepare their legendary dishes in your own home.

Nom Wah Tea Parlor isn’t simply the story of dumplings, though there are many folds to it. It isn’t the story of bao, though there is much filling. It’s not just the story of dim sum, although there are scores and scores of recipes. It’s the story of a community of Chinese immigrants who struggled, flourished, cooked, and ate with abandon in New York City. (Who now struggle, flourish, cook, and eat with abandon in New York City.) It’s a journey that begins in Toishan, runs through Hong Kong, and ends up tucked into the corner of a street once called The Bloody Angle.

In this book, Nom Wah’s owner, Wilson Tang, takes us into the hardworking kitchen of Nom Wah and emerges with 75 easy-to-make recipes: from bao to vegetables, noodles to desserts, cakes, rice rolls, chef’s specials, dumplings, and more. We’re also introduced to characters like Mei Lum, the fifth-generation owner of porcelain shop Wing on Wo, and Joanne Kwong, the lawyer-turned-owner of Pearl River Mart. He paints a portrait of what Chinatown in New York City is in 2020. As Wilson, who quit a job in finance to take over the once-ailing family business, struggles with the dilemma of immigrant children—to jettison tradition or to cling to it—he also points to a new way: to savor tradition while moving forward. A book for har gow lovers and rice roll junkies, The Nom Wah Cookbook portrays a culture at a crossroads.
























[book] [book] Xi'an Famous Foods:
The Cuisine of Western China,
from New York’s Favorite Noodle Shop
by Jason Wang (CEO)
with Jenny Huang and Jessica Chou
October 13, 2020
Abrams

Years ago, Jewish New Yorkers in the know went to Flushing, to the basement of a building, and sought out the cuisine of Western China in a dank cellar food court. I went several times, but it was too authentic for me.... and it remains too authentic. But nearly everyone else loves it. When Jason Wang graduated from Washington University in St Louis, he convinced his family to let him grow the business. Now it is a multi-unit chain.

If you can handle the spice level of Xi-an, then you will like this long awaited book.

Since its humble opening in 2005, Xi’an Famous Foods has expanded from one stall in Flushing to 14 locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. CEO Jason Wang divulges the untold story of how this empire came to be, alongside the never-before-published recipes that helped create this New York City icon. From heavenly ribbons of liang pi doused in a bright vinegar sauce to cumin lamb over hand-pulled Biang Biang noodles, this cookbook helps home cooks make the dishes that fans of Xi’an Famous Foods line up for while also exploring the vibrant cuisine and culture of Xi’an.

Transporting readers to the streets of Xi’an and the kitchens of New York’s Chinatown, Xi’an Famous Foods is the cookbook that fans of Xi’an Famous Foods have been waiting for.






















[book] Chasing Flavor:
Techniques and Recipes
to Cook Fearlessly
by Dan Kluger
October 13, 2020
HMH

In his debut cookbook, James Beard Award–winning chef Dan Kluger shares 190 recipes to help home cooks master flavor and technique

Dan Kluger, a chef celebrated for his simple yet flavorful food, knows there’s more to mastering cooking than just following directions. So with each of the innovative, elegant recipes in his debut cookbook, he includes a valuable lesson that applies beyond the tasty dish. For example, master the art of mixing raw and cooked versions of the same ingredient while preparing a Sugar Snap Pea Salad with Manchego Vinaigrette.

From homemade pantry items to vegetable mains, meats, and grains, this book is not just sophisticated recipes but a master class of lessons for more flexibility and innovation in the kitchen.


























[book] In Bibi's Kitchen:
The Recipes and Stories of Grandmothers
from the Eight African Countries
that Touch the Indian Ocean
by Hawa Hassan and Julia Turshen
October 13, 2020
Ten Speed Press

Grandmothers from eight eastern African countries welcome you into their kitchens to share flavorful recipes and stories of family, love, and tradition in this transporting cookbook-meets-travelogue.

“Their food is alive with the flavors of mangoes, cinnamon, dates, and plantains and rich with the history of the continent that had been a culinary unknown for much too long.”—Jessica B. Harris, food historian, journalist, and public speaker

In this incredible volume, Somali chef Hawa Hassan and renowned food writer Julia Turshen present 75 recipes and stories gathered from bibis (or grandmothers) from eight African nations: South Africa, Mozambique, Madagascar, Comoros, Tanzania, Kenya, Somalia, and Eritrea. Most notably, these eight countries are at the backbone of the spice trade, many of them exporters of things like pepper and vanilla. We meet women such as Ma Shara, who helps tourists “see the real Zanzibar” by teaching them how to make her famous Ajemi Bread with Carrots and Green Pepper; Ma Vicky, who now lives in suburban New York and makes Matoke (Stewed Plantains with Beans and Beef) to bring the flavor of Tanzania to her American home; and Ma Gehennet from Eritrea who shares her recipes for Kicha (Eritrean Flatbread) and Shiro (Ground Chickpea Stew).

Through Hawa’s writing—and her own personal story—the women, and the stories behind the recipes, come to life. With evocative photography shot on location by Khadija Farah, and food photography by Jennifer May, In Bibi's Kitchen uses food to teach us all about families, war, loss, migration, refuge, and sanctuary.


























[book] Modern Comfort Food:
A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook
by Ina Garten
October 6, 2020
Clarkson Potter

A collection of all-new soul-satisfying dishes from America's favorite home cook!

In Modern Comfort Food, Ina Garten shares 85 new recipes that will feed your deepest cravings. Many of these dishes are inspired by childhood favorites--but with the volume turned way up, such as Cheddar and Chutney Grilled Cheese sandwiches (the perfect match for Ina's Creamy Tomato Bisque), Smashed Hamburgers with Caramelized Onions, and the crispiest hash browns that are actually made in a waffle iron!

There are few things more comforting than gathering for a meal with the ones you love, especially when dishes like Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas are at the center of the table. Old-fashioned crowd pleasers like Roasted Sausages, Peppers, and Onions are even more delicious and streamlined for quick cleanup. For dessert? You'll find the best Boston Cream Pie, Banana Rum Trifle, and Black and White Cookies you'll ever make. Home cooks can always count on Ina's dependable, easy-to-follow instructions, with lots of side notes for cooking and entertaining--it's like having Ina right there beside you, helping you all the way.

From cocktails to dessert, from special weekend breakfasts to quick weeknight dinners, you'll find yourself making these cozy and delicious recipes over and over again.


























[book] OTTOLENGHI FLAVOR:
A Cookbook
by Yotam Ottolenghi
Ixta Belfrage
October 13, 2020
Ten Speed Press

The New York Times bestselling author of Plenty joins up with the Ottolenghi Test Kitchen's Ixta Belfrage to reveal how flavor is amplified in more than 100 innovative, super-delicious plant-based recipes.

Yotam Ottolenghi--the beloved chef and influencer who has captured the hearts of home cooks looking for inspiration and great-tasting vegetable cooking--is back. In Ottolenghi Flavor, Yotam collaborates with longtime colleague Ixta Belfrage to identify the principles behind his stylish, innovative brand of cooking with a new collection of revolutionary plant-based recipes. Yotam and Ixta build on the vegetarian cooking that made Plenty and Plenty More phenomenal bestsellers, this time adding Italian and Mexican influences and revealing how to understand, build, and amplify flavor through more than 100 vegetarian recipes (half are also vegan). In essence, Yotam and Ixta show how to evolve creatively, be intuitive in the kitchen, and become ever-better cooks through the "three P's":

• Process: Key reactions that happen when vegetables or supporting ingredients are cooked.
• Pairing: Matching vegetables with flavorings to accentuate their qualities.
• Produce: Identifying key ingredients that make vegetables shine.


With surefire hits, such as Stuffed Eggplant in Curry and Coconut Dal, Spicy Mushroom Lasagna, and Vegetable Schnitzel, plus stunning photographs of nearly every recipe, Ottolenghi Flavor is the exciting, next-level approach to vegetable cooking that Yotam's fans, home cooks of all levels, and vegetable lovers everywhere have been craving.
























[book] The Character Edge:
Leading and Winning with Integrity
by Robert L. Caslen Jr.
Michael D. Matthews
October 13, 2020
St. Martin's Press

The former superintendent at West Point and a psychologist explain why all successful leaders rely on a foundation of strong character. Among the most successful leaders throughout history-from Abe Lincoln to Rosa Parks, Mahatma Gandhi to Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King, Jr. to Nelson Mandela-some were brilliant mathematicians and economists, others were creative visionaries, still others were masterful at strategic planning. Their mastery of their field wasn’t the secret to their highly effective leadership. All of their skill, grit, resilience, charisma, and courage emanated from one thing: their strength of character.

1 Character-the moral values and habits of an individual-is in the spotlight now more than perhaps at any other point in modern history. Politicians distort facts. Corporations cheat customers and investors. Athletes are caught using illegal supplements. In addition to harming our culture at large, these failures of character have a profound and undermining impact on leadership.

The authors of this book are experts on the value of character, its correlation with successful leadership, and how to build it in individuals and prospective leaders. General Robert L. Caslen, Jr. served the US Army for over 43 years and served as Superintendent at the US Military Academy at West Point. Psychologist Dr. Michael D. Matthews is a Professor of Engineering Psychology at West Point who has focused on the psychology of character for years. Together they witnessed firsthand that raw talent is not enough to stand on its own; successful leadership relies on the critical foundation of a strong character.

In The Character Edge they leverage their perspectives to offer an empowering, story-driven argument-backed by the latest scientific research-that character is vital to success. They give readers the tools to build and sustain character in themselves and their organizations by testing readers' strengths of the gut, head and heart and teaching how to build trust and nurture the seeds of character.






















[book] The Language of Thieves:
My Family's Obsession with a
Secret Code the Nazis Tried
to Eliminate
by Martin Puchner
(Harvard University)
October 13, 2020
NORTON

Tracking an underground language and the outcasts who depended on it for their survival.

Centuries ago in middle Europe, a coded language appeared, scrawled in graffiti and spoken only by people who were "wiz" (in the know). This hybrid language, dubbed Rotwelsch, facilitated survival for people in flight-whether escaping persecution or just down on their luck.

It was a language of the road associated with vagabonds, travelers, Jews, and thieves that blended words from Yiddish, Hebrew, German, Romani, Czech, and other European languages and was rich in expressions for police, jail, or experiencing trouble, such as "being in a pickle." (HEAR THAT SETH ROGEN?!?!?)

This renegade language unsettled those in power, who responded by trying to stamp it out, none more vehemently than the Nazis.

As a boy, Martin Puchner learned this secret language from his father and uncle. Only as an adult did he discover, through a poisonous 1930s tract on Jewish names buried in the archives of Harvard’s Widener Library, that his own grandfather had been a committed Nazi who despised this "language of thieves."

Interweaving family memoir with an adventurous foray into the mysteries of language, Puchner, a professor of comp lit at Harvard, crafts an entirely original narrative. In a language born of migration and survival, he discovers a witty and resourceful spirit of tolerance that remains essential in our volatile present.






















[book] Culture Warlords:
My Journey Into the
Dark Web of White Supremacy
by Talia Lavin
October 13, 2020
Hachette

A Jewish reporter makes an immersive dive into white supremacy's explosive metastasis online, exploring the undercurrents of propaganda, religion, misogyny and history that led us to where we are now -- and how to fight back.
Talia Lavin is every skinhead's worst nightmare: a loud and unapologetic Jewish woman, acerbic, smart, and profoundly anti-racist, with the investigative chops to expose the tactics and ideologies of online hatemongers.

Culture Warlords is the story of how Lavin, a frequent target of extremist trolls (including those at Fox News), dove into a byzantine online culture of hate and learned the intricacies of how white supremacy proliferates online. Within these pages, she reveals the extremists hiding in plain sight online: Incels. White nationalists. White supremacists. National Socialists. Proud Boys. Christian extremists. In order to showcase them in their natural habitat, Talia assumes a range of identities, going undercover as a blonde Nazi babe, a forlorn incel, and a violent Aryan femme fatale.

Along the way, she discovers a whites-only dating site geared toward racists looking for love, a disturbing extremist YouTube channel run by a 14-year-old girl with over 800,000 followers, the everyday heroes of the antifascist movement, and much more. By combining compelling stories chock-full of catfishing and gatecrashing with her own in-depth, gut-wrenching research, she also turns the lens of anti-Semitism, racism, and white power back on itself in an attempt to dismantle and decimate the online hate movement from within.

Shocking, humorous, and merciless in equal measure, Culture Warlords explores some of the vilest subcultures on the Web -- and shows us how we can fight back.






















[book] The Lost Shtetl:
A Novel
by Max Gross
October 13, 2020
HarperVia

A remarkable debut novel—written with the fearless imagination of Michael Chabon and the piercing humor of Gary Shteyngart—about a small Jewish village in the Polish forest that is so secluded no one knows it exists . . . until now.

What if there was a town that history missed? For decades, the tiny Jewish shtetl of Kreskol existed in happy isolation, virtually untouched and unchanged. Spared by the Holocaust and the Cold War, its residents enjoyed remarkable peace. It missed out on cars, and electricity, and the internet, and indoor plumbing. But when a marriage dispute spins out of control, the whole town comes crashing into the twenty-first century.

Pesha Lindauer, who has just suffered an ugly, acrimonious divorce, suddenly disappears. A day later, her husband goes after her, setting off a panic among the town elders. They send a woefully unprepared outcast named Yankel Lewinkopf out into the wider world to alert the Polish authorities.

Venturing beyond the remote safety of Kreskol, Yankel is confronted by the beauty and the ravages of the modern-day outside world – and his reception is met with a confusing mix of disbelief, condescension, and unexpected kindness. When the truth eventually surfaces, his story and the existence of Kreskol make headlines nationwide.

Returning Yankel to Kreskol, the Polish government plans to reintegrate the town that time forgot. Yet in doing so, the devious origins of its disappearance come to the light. And what has become of the mystery of Pesha and her former husband? Divided between those embracing change and those clinging to its old world ways, the people of Kreskol will have to find a way to come together . . . or risk their village disappearing for good.






















[book] Losing the Long Game:
The False Promise of Regime Change
in the Middle East
by Philip H. Gordon
October 6, 2020
St. Martin's Press

The definitive account of how regime change in the Middle East has proven so tempting to American policymakers for decades-and why it always seems to go wrong.
"Must reading-by someone who saw it first-hand-for all interested in America’s foreign policy and its place in the world.” -Robin Wright

Since the end of World War II, the United States has set out to oust governments in the Middle East on an average of once per decade-in places as diverse as Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan (twice), Egypt, Libya, and Syria. The reasons for these interventions have also been extremely diverse, and the methods by which the United States pursued regime change have likewise been highly varied, ranging from diplomatic pressure alone to outright military invasion and occupation. What is common to all the operations, however, is that they failed to achieve their ultimate goals, produced a range of unintended and even catastrophic consequences, carried heavy financial and human costs, and in many cases left the countries in question worse off than they were before.

Philip H. Gordon's Losing the Long Game is a thorough and riveting look at the U.S. experience with regime change over the past seventy years, and an insider’s view on U.S. policymaking in the region at the highest levels. It is the story of repeated U.S. interventions in the region that always started out with high hopes and often the best of intentions, but never turned out well. No future discussion of U.S. policy in the Middle East will be complete without taking into account the lessons of the past, especially at a time of intense domestic polarization and reckoning with America's standing in world.






















[book] The Cap:
How Larry Fleisher and
David Stern Built the Modern NBA
by Joshua Mendelsohn
October 1, 2020
University of Nebraska Press

Today the salary cap is an NBA institution, something fans take for granted as part of the fabric of the league or an obstacle to their favorite team’s chances to win a championship. In the early 1980s, however, a salary cap was not only novel but nonexistent. The Cap tells the fascinating, behind-the-scenes story of the deal between the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association that created the salary cap in 1983, the first in all of sports, against the backdrop of a looming players’ strike on one side and threatened economic collapse on the other.

Joshua Mendelsohn illustrates how the salary cap was more than just professional basketball’s economic foundation—it was a grand bargain, a compromise meant to end the chaos that had gripped the sport since the early 1960s. The NBA had spent decades in a vulnerable position financially and legally, unique in professional sports. It entered the 1980s badly battered, something no one knew better than a few legendary NBA figures: Larry Fleisher, general counsel and negotiator for the National Basketball Players Association; Larry O’Brien, the commissioner; and David Stern, who led negotiations for the NBA and would be named the commissioner a few months after the salary cap deal was reached.

As a result, in 1983 the NBA and its players made a novel settlement. The players gave up infinite pay increases, but they gained a guaranteed piece of the league’s revenue and free agency to play where they wished—a combination that did not exist before in professional sports but as a result became standard for the NBA, NFL, and NHL as well.

The Cap explores in detail not only the high-stakes negotiations in the early 1980s but all the twists and turns through the decades that led the parties to reach a salary cap compromise. It is a compelling story that involves notable players, colorful owners, visionary league and union officials, and a sport trying to solidify a bright future despite a turbulent past and present. This is a story missing from the landscape of basketball history.






















[book] The Rise and Fall of
Jewish American Literature
by Benjamin Schreier
(Jewish Studies, Penn State Univ)
October 16, 2020
University of Pennsylvania Press

Benjamin Schreier argues that Jewish American literature's dominant cliché of "breakthrough"—that is, the irruption into the heart of the American cultural scene during the 1950s of Jewish American writers like Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, and Grace Paley—must also be seen as the critically originary moment of Jewish American literary study. According to Schreier, this is the primal scene of the Jewish American literary field, the point that the field cannot avoid repeating and replaying in instantiating itself as the more or less formalized academic study of Jewish American literature. More than sixty years later, the field's legibility, the very condition of its possibility, remains overwhelmingly grounded in a reliance on this single ethnological narrative.

In a polemic against what he sees as the unexamined foundations and stagnant state of the field, Schreier interrogates a series of professionally powerful assumptions about Jewish American literary history—how they came into being and how they hardened into cliché. He offers a critical genealogy of breakthrough and other narratives through which Jewish Studies has asserted its compelling self-evidence, not simply under the banner of the historical realities Jewish Studies claims to represent but more fundamentally for the intellectual and institutional structures through which it produces these representations. He shows how a historicist scholarly narrative quickly consolidated and became hegemonic, in part because of its double articulation of a particular American subject and of a transnational historiography that categorically identified that subject as Jewish. The ethnological grounding of the Jewish American literary field is no longer tenable, Schreier asserts, in an argument with broad implications for the reconceptualization of Jewish and other identity-based ethnic studies.

























[book] Our Last Season:
A Writer, a Fan, a Friendship
by Harvey Araton
October 20, 2020
Penguin Press

The moving story of a bond between sportswriter and fan that was forged in a shared love of basketball and grew over several decades into an extraordinary friendship

"This is a story about friendship, sports, aging, and ultimately time itself--the things it strips away and the things it cannot touch. I loved it."--Wright Thompson, author of The Cost of These Dreams

Harvey Araton is one of New York's--and the nation's--best-known sports journalists, having covered thousands of Knicks games over the course of a long and distinguished career. But the person at the heart of Our Last Season, Michelle Musler, is largely anonymous--except, that is, to the players, coaches, and writers who have passed through Madison Square Garden, where she held season tickets behind the Knicks bench for 45 years. In that time, the daughter of a Jewish steamfitter father and Irish mother, she juggled a successful career as a corporate executive and single parenthood of five children. She missed only a handful of home games. The Garden was her second home – and the place where an extraordinary friendship between fan and sportswriter was forged.

That relationship soon grew into something much bigger than basketball, with Michelle serving as a cherished mentor and friend to Harvey as he weathered life's inevitable storms: illness, aging, and professional challenges and transitions. During the 2017-18 NBA season, as Michelle faces serious illness that prevents her from attending more than a few Knicks games, Harvey finally has the chance to give back to Michelle everything she has given him: reminders of all she's accomplished, the blessings she's enjoyed, and the devoted friend she has been to him.

Chock-full of anecdotes from behind the scenes and cameos from Knicks legends--from Frazier, King, and Ewing to Riley, Van Gundy, and many more--the story of Harvey and Michelle's nearly four decades of friendship is a delight for basketball fans. But at its core, Our Last Season is a book for all of us, offering a poignant and inspiring message about how to live with passion, commitment, and optimism.


























[book] The Bible With and Without Jesus:
How Jews and Christians Read
the Same Stories Differently
by Amy-Jill Levine and
Marc Zvi Brettler
October 27, 2020
HarperOne

The editors of The Jewish Annotated New Testament explore how Jews and Christians can learn from and understand each other better by exploring how they read many of the same Bible stories through different lens.

Esteemed Bible scholars Amy-Jill Levine (Vanderbilt Divinity, the Jewish Feminist Bible Scholar who teaches New Testament at a predominantly Christian school) and Marc Brettler (Duke University, Jewish Study Bible) take readers on a guided tour of the most popular Old Testament stories referenced in the New Testament to explore how Christians, Jews, and scholars read these ancient texts differently. Among the passages analyzed are the creation story, the role of Adam and Eve, the suffering servant passages in Isaiah, the sign of "Jonah" Jesus refers to, and the words Jesus quotes from Psalm 22 as he is dying on the cross, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Comparing Jewish, Christian, and academic interpretations of each ancient narrative, Levine and Brettler offer a deeper understanding of these contrasting faiths, and illuminate the historical and literary significance of the Bible and its place in our culture. Revealing not only what Jews and Christians can learn from each other, The Bible With and Without Jesus also shows how to appreciate the distinctive perspectives of each. By understanding the depth and variety of reading these passages, we not only enhance our knowledge of each other, but also see more clearly the beauty and power of Scripture itself.


























[book] How Millennials Can Lead Us
Out of the Mess We're In:
A Jew, a Muslim, and a Christian
Share Leadership Lessons from
the Life of Moses
by Iqbal Unus, Mordecai Schreiber,
and Ian Case Punnett
October 20, 2020
Rowman and Littlefield

During troubled times, millions have been inspired by the stories and spiritual lessons of the selfless leadership of Moses. In a world increasingly affected by political, social, and racial imbalance, we need strong, innovative leaders who have not forgotten or ignored these valuable lessons.

How Millennials Can Lead Us Out of the Mess We're In: A Jew, a Muslim, and a Christian Share Leadership Lessons from the Life of Moses brings together an Israeli-born rabbi (Bnai Brith Intnl), a Pakistani-born Muslim scholar (ISNA), and an ordained Midwestern American (Episcopal movement) to inspire the next generation of leaders with a timeless story of the ancient prophet Moses.

Written in an easy and accessible style, this book is meant for sincerely spiritual but church-resistant Bible readers as well as those who are familiar with the Moses narrative. No leadership book has ever attempted to synthesize the religious views of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity into one unified, harmonious voice singing a single hymnal.


























[book] Max Jacob:
A Life in Art and Letters
by Rosanna Warren
(University of Chicago)
October 20, 2020
Norton

A comprehensive and moving biography of Max Jacob, a brilliant cubist poet who lived at the margins of fame.

Though less of a household name than his contemporaries in early twentieth century Paris, Jewish homosexual poet Max Jacob was Pablo Picasso’s initiator into French culture, Guillaume Apollinaire’s guide out of the haze of symbolism, and Jean Cocteau’s loyal friend. As Picasso reinvented painting, Jacob helped to reinvent poetry with compressed, hard-edged prose poems and synapse-skipping verse lyrics, the product of a complex amalgamation of Jewish, Breton, Parisian, and Roman Catholic influences.

In Max Jacob, the poet’s life plays out against the vivid backdrop of bohemian Paris from the turn of the twentieth century through the divisions of World War II. Acclaimed poet Rosanna Warren transports us to Picasso’s ramshackle studio in Montmartre, where Cubism was born; introduces the artists gathered at a seedy bar on the left bank, where Max would often hold court; and offers a front-row seat to the artistic squabbles that shaped the Modernist movement.

Jacob’s complex understanding of faith, art, and sexuality animates this sweeping work. In 1909, he saw a vision of Christ in his shabby room in Montmartre, and in 1915 he converted formally from Judaism to Catholicism-with Picasso as his godfather. In his later years, Jacob split his time between Paris and the monastery of Benoît-sur-Loire. In February 1944, he was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Drancy, where he would die a few days later.

More than thirty years in the making, this landmark biography offers a compelling, tragic portrait of Jacob as a man and as an artist alongside a rich study of his groundbreaking poetry-in Warren’s own stunning translations. Max Jacob is a nuanced, deeply researched, and essential contribution to Modernist scholarship.


























[book] When Rabbis Bless Congress:
The Great American Story
of Jewish Prayers on Capitol Hill
by Howard Mortman
October 20, 2020
Cherry Orchard Press

Congress opens each session with a prayer offered by a chaplain or guest chaplain. Among the guest chaplains: Rabbis.

This book is about the rabbis. It’s an unprecedented examination of 160 years of Jewish prayers delivered in the literal and figurative center of American democracy. With exhaustive research written in approachable prose, it uniquely tells the story of over 400 rabbis giving over 600 prayers since the Civil War days-who they are and what they say.

Few written works examine the tradition of prayers in government. This new angle will appeal to students and lovers of American history, Congress, American Jewish history, and religion. It’s a welcome, important addition to our understanding of Congress and Jewish contribution to America.


























[book] The Greatest Beer Run Ever:
A Memoir of Friendship, Loyalty, and War
by John "Chick" Donohue
and J. T. Molloy (NYC journalist)
November 10, 2020
William Morrow

When you hear the story, you wonder why it isn ta film.. well it will be... Soon to be a major motion picture written and directed by Peter Farrelly, who won two Academy Awards for Green Book—a wildly entertaining, feel-good memoir of an Irish-American New Yorker and former U.S. marine who embarked on a courageous, hare-brained scheme to deliver beer to his pals serving Vietnam in the late 1960s.

One night in 1967, twenty-six-year-old John Donohue—known as Chick—was out with friends, drinking in a New York City bar. He was from a tight Irish-Jewish neighborhood. The friends gathered there had lost loved ones in Vietnam. Now, they watched as anti-war protesters turned on the troops themselves.

One neighborhood patriot came up with an inspired—some would call it insane—idea. Someone should sneak into Vietnam, track down their buddies there, give them messages of support from back home, and share a few laughs over a can of beer.

It would be the Greatest Beer Run Ever.

But who’d be crazy enough to do it?

One man was up for the challenge—a U. S. Marine Corps veteran turned merchant mariner who wasn’t about to desert his buddies on the front lines when they needed him.

Chick volunteered.

A day later, he was on a cargo ship headed to Vietnam, armed with Irish luck and a backpack full of alcohol. Landing in Qui Nho’n, Chick set off on an adventure that would change his life forever—an odyssey that took him through a series of hilarious escapades and harrowing close calls, including the Tet Offensive. But none of that mattered if he could bring some cheer to his pals and show them how much the folks back home appreciated them.

This is the story of that epic beer run, told in Chick’s own words and those of the men he visited in Vietnam.

























[book] TO BE A MAN
A collection of stories
By Nicole Krauss
November 3, 2020
Harper

In this dazzling collection of short fiction, the National Book Award Finalist and New York Times bestselling author of The History of Love—“one of America’s most important novelists and an international literary sensation” (New York Times)—explores what it means to be in a couple, and to be a man and a woman in that perplexing relationship and beyond.

In one of her strongest works of fiction yet, Nicole Krauss plunges fearlessly into the struggle to understand what it is to be a man and what it is to be a woman, and the arising tensions that have existed from the very beginning of time. Set in our contemporary moment, and moving across the globe from Switzerland, Japan, and New York City to Tel Aviv, Los Angeles, and South America, the stories in To Be a Man feature male characters as fathers, lovers, friends, children, seducers, and even a lost husband who may never have been a husband at all.

The way these stories mirror one other and resonate is beautiful, with a balance so finely tuned that the book almost feels like a novel. Echoes ring through stages of life: aging parents and new-born babies; young women’s coming of age and the newfound, somewhat bewildering sexual power that accompanies it; generational gaps and unexpected deliveries of strange new leases on life; mystery and wonder at a life lived or a future waiting to unfold. To Be a Man illuminates with a fierce, unwavering light the forces driving human existence: sex, power, violence, passion, self-discovery, growing older. Profound, poignant, and brilliant, Krauss’s stories are at once startling and deeply moving, but always revealing of all-too-human weakness and strength.

























There is a story of a student who arrives at the House of Study and he is more concerned about the lesson than he is about his study partner. His teacher/rabbi admonishes the student, telling to go inquire to make sure his study partner is well and to get his priorities in order. Was it attributed to the Maggid of Mezritch? Reb Zusya of Annapoli/Hanapol? I forget... but... this book remind me of the story... when people are more concerned with Finding Waldo or Fergus than they are WITH how Waldo and Fergus are:
[book] Find Fergus
by Mike Boldt
November 3, 2020
Doubleday

"Think of it as a Where's Waldo? book if Waldo were really, really bad at hiding." - author/illustrator Mike Boldt's pitch for Find Fergus.
The hilarious mind behind I Don't Want to Be a Frog and Bad Dog brings picture book fans the super-funny, interactive story of Fergus the bear, who loves to play hide-and-seek with the reader . . . but can't really seem to get the hang of it.
Children will giggle from start to finish as they follow huge, loveable Fergus and see all the silly ways in which he is TERRIBLE at playing hide-and-seek -- such as hiding behind a VERY tiny tree ("Found you, Fergus! That was too easy!") or hiding in a giant crowd of bunnies and squirrels ("Try bears, Fergus. Bears!").
But wait -- the game isn't over yet! The last two pages fold out into a giant panoramic look-and-find scene, where Fergus is well and truly hidden, and young readers can have fun looking for him and lots of other silly details in the the crowd. There's a ton of play value in this adorable book, and children will want to come back to it again and again.

Fergus wants to play hide and seek. But, look, there he is, hiding right in the middle of a big blank page!
"Found you, Fergus! That was too easy. Try hiding behind something." (Giant, furry Fergus hides behind a very tiny tree.)
"Oh, Fergus. Start by hiding in a crowd." (Fergus hides next to duck and a fox, who don't seem impressed.)
"A crowd is more than THREE, Fergus!"

























[book] THE TAHINI TABLE
Go Beyond Hummus with
100 Recipes for Every Meal
by Amy Zitelman
Andrew Schloss,
Jillian Guyette (Photographer)
Forewords by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook
November 10, 2020
Agate Surrey

Most people who know about tahini understand the sesame paste as simply one of the building blocks of hummus. But for Amy Zitelman, CEO and cofounder of woman-owned Soom Foods—the leading purveyor of tahini and tahini products in the American market—the culinary potential of tahini goes far beyond hummus. In The Tahini Table: Go Beyond Hummus with 100 Recipes for Every Meal, tahini is introduced to home cooks as a new pantry staple that can be used in recipes from dips to desserts.

Tahini, made from pressed roasted sesame seeds, is a healthy, vegan, dairy-free, gluten-free, and low-sugar superfood rich in Omega fatty acids, protein, and calcium. Although tahini’s historical roots are in the Middle East, Zitelman aims to stretch the culinary borders of tahini outside of traditional Middle-Eastern fare. The Tahini Table contains 100 recipes that showcase tahini’s wide range of uses. This “cult condiment” is mild enough to step in as an inspiring replacement for the eggs, cheese, mayo, and cream called for in recipes that American home cooks are making for their families every day. The Tahini Table provides tahini hacks for reimagined American classics, including vegan “queso,” eggless mayonnaise, and gluten-free brownies.

From Vegan Mac and “Cheese” and Tahini Chicken Schnitzel, to Chocolate Halvah French Toast and Tahini Flan, Zitelman writes with the home cook in mind, incorporating tahini into everyday cooking in delicious and unexpected ways. With beautiful color photos, contributions from top restaurant chefs, and easy substitutions for a variety of diets, The Tahini Table proves that tahini is the next must-have pantry staple for home cooks everywhere.




















[book] Fruit Cake:
Recipes for the Curious Baker
by Jason Schreiber
November 10, 2020
Morrow

Jason Schreiber, one of New York City’s most influential and popular food stylists, combines aesthetic flair and flavor in 75 whimsical recipes that celebrate fruit and cake in all their festive and delicious glory.

In gorgeous photos and dozens of fresh and flavorful recipes, acclaimed food stylist Jason Schreiber shatters misconceptions about that most maligned of desserts—fruitcake—by imaginatively breaking with convention as he pays homage to the delicious combination of fruit and cake. Forget those dried artificially dyed candied doorstops that everyone regifts and passes on. Fruit Cake is a tasty epicurean tour through dozens of cakes and other pastries that use a variety of fruits, combining them with diverse fillings, as well as liquor, nuts, and more. Interwoven with the recipes are stories, anecdotes and asides that are just as charming and intriguing as the lush, full-color photos that accompany them.

Each recipe in Fruit Cake showcases one of thirty-eight fruit, whose natural sweetness and juice make desserts that are perfectly moist and sweet without being overpowering. Indulge your taste buds with his beautiful, fanciful creations, including:

Constant Cravings—cakes like Raspberry Tea Cake and Polenta Pound Cake with Spiced Mandarins that will satisfy your cravings at any hour of day
Out of Hand—finger-focused treats perfect for pocketing or dressing to impress, such as Mango Coconut Cashew Bites and Blueberry Ginger Studmuffins
Showstoppers—cakes for the spotlight that you can humblebrag about “just throwing together,” including Passionfruit Lime Pavlova and Horchata and Roasted Plum Sorbet Cake
All Rise—the next best thing to eating sumptuous creations like the Blood Orange Bee Sting Cake or Bourbon Peach Kugelhopf, and other sumptuous creations is smelling the just-risen yeasted dough
Soaked—try one slice of these decadent cakes that marinate in booze for days—whether it’s the likes of the Pomegranate Molasses Cake or the Fig, Port, and Chocolate Cake—and you’ll need a designated driver
Filled with divine desserts for all seasons, this wonderful cookbook will forever change the way you think about fruit and cake.




























[book] A Good Bake:
The Art and Science
of Making Perfect Pastries,
Cakes, Cookies, Pies, and
Breads at Home:
A Cookbook
by Melissa Weller
Carolynn Carreno
November 17, 2020
Knopf

From the mind behind Sadelle's in SoHO NY

From the James Beard Award nominee who redefined American baking, a comprehensive baking bible for the twenty-first century, with 120 scientifically grounded recipes for sweet and savory baked goods anyone can master.

Melissa Weller is the baking superstar of our time. As the head baker at some of the best restaurants in the country, her takes on chocolate babka and sticky buns brought these classics back to life and kicked off a nationwide movement. In A Good Bake, Weller shares her meticulously honed, carefully detailed recipes for producing impossibly delicious--and impossibly beautiful--baked goods. A chemical engineer before she became a baker, Weller uses her scientific background to explain the whys and hows of baking, so home cooks can achieve perfect results every time. Here are recipes both sweet (Pumpkin Layer Cake with Salted Caramel Buttercream and Brown Sugar Frosting) and savory (Khachapuri with Cheese, Baked Egg, and Nigella Seeds); beloved classics (Croissants and Chocolate Babka) and new sure-to-be favorites (Milk Chocolate and Raspberry Blondies)--as well as Salted Caramel Sticky Buns, of course . . . all written and tested for even the most novice home baker to re-create.

With gorgeous photographs by the award-winning Johnny Miller, and tutorials that demystify all of the stuff that sounds complicated, like working with yeast, sourdough starters, and laminating dough Weller's book is the one guide every home baker needs.
























[book] Red Sands:
Reportage and Recipes through
Central Asia, from Hinterland to Heartland
by Caroline Eden
November 17, 2020
Quadrille

Red Sands, the follow-up to Caroline Eden's multi-award-winning Black Sea, is a reimagining of traditional travel writing using food as the jumping-off point to explore Central Asia. In a quest to better understand this vast heartland of Asia, Caroline navigates a course from the shores of the Caspian Sea to the sun-ripened orchards of the Fergana Valley.

A book filled with human stories, forgotten histories and tales of adventure, Caroline is a reliable guide using food as her passport to enter lives, cities and landscapes rarely written about. Lit up by emblematic recipes, Red Sands is an utterly unique book, delving into 'the last blank on the map' while bringing in universal themes that relate to us all: hope, hunger, longing, love and the joys of eating well on the road.

See also:
[book] Black Sea:
Dispatches and Recipes,
Through Darkness and Light
by Caroline Eden
































[book] This Is Not My Memoir
by André Gregory
with Todd London
May 5, 2020
Postponed until November 17, 2020
FS&G

The autobiography-of-sorts of André Gregory, an iconic figure in American theater and the star of My Dinner with André

Remember My Dinner with Andre? All the wild stories that Andre shared with Wallace Shawn? Well here is his life story

This is Not My Memoir tells the life story of André Gregory, iconic theatre director, writer, and actor. For the first time, Gregory shares memories from a life lived for art, including stories from the making of My Dinner with André. Taking on the dizzying, wondrous nature of a fever dream, This is Not My Memoir includes fantastic and fantastical stories that take the reader from wartime Paris to golden-age Hollywood, from avant-garde theaters to monasteries in India. Along the way we meet Jerzy Grotowski, Helene Weigel, Gregory Peck, Gurumayi Chidvilasananda, Wallace Shawn, and many other larger-than-life personalities.

The book opens with young Gregory and his globe trotting parents. He makes it to America and is enrolled in St Bernard's prep school. The family says they are escaped aristocratic Russians and not Jews, and the school either believes them or was desperate for tuition from Andre and his brother. Andre discovers the power of theater. The family summers in Westwood, Los Angeles, at a time when it was undeveloped. They rent from Thomas Mann and other Jewish emigres. His mother has a few affairs with celebrities, including Errol Flynn, who back in NYC, his mother has to rouse from his hotel bed where he is passed out with a prostitute. At Harvard he gets a job in a theater working for a stipper.

This is Not My Memoir is a collaboration between Gregory and Todd London who together create a portrait of an artist confronting his later years. Here, too, are the reflections of a man who rehearses shows for decades, and only recently learned how to love. What does it mean to create art in a world that often places little value on the process of creating it? And what does it mean to confront the process of aging when your greatest work of art may well be your own life?





















[book] Paper Bullets:
Two Artists Who Risked Their
Lives to Defy the Nazis
by Jeffrey H. Jackson
November 10, 2020
ALONGONQUIN

Paper Bullets is the first book to tell the history of an audacious anti-Nazi campaign undertaken by an unlikely pair: two French women, Lucy Schwob and Suzanne Malherbe, who drew on their skills as Parisian avant-garde artists to write and distribute “paper bullets”—wicked insults against Hitler, calls to rebel, and subversive fictional dialogues designed to demoralize Nazi troops occupying their adopted home on the British Channel Island of Jersey. Devising their own PSYOPS campaign, they slipped their notes into soldier’s pockets or tucked them inside newsstand magazines.

Hunted by the secret field police, Lucy and Suzanne were finally betrayed in 1944, when the Germans imprisoned them, and tried them in a court martial, sentencing them to death for their actions. Ultimately they survived, but even in jail, they continued to fight the Nazis by reaching out to other prisoners and spreading a message of hope.

Better remembered today by their artist names, Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, the couple’s actions were even more courageous because of who they were: lesbian partners known for cross-dressing and creating the kind of gender-bending work that the Nazis would come to call “degenerate art.” In addition, Lucy was half Jewish, and they had communist affiliations in Paris, where they attended political rallies with Surrealists and socialized with artists like Gertrude Stein.

Paper Bullets is a compelling World War II story that has not been told before, about the galvanizing power of art, and of resistance.





















[book] These Violent Delights
a novel
by Chloe Gong
November 17, 2020


Perfect for fans of The Last Magician and Descendant of the Crane, this heart-stopping debut is an imaginative Romeo and Juliet retelling set in 1920s Shanghai, with rival gangs and a monster in the depths of the Huangpu River.

The year is 1926, and Shanghai hums to the tune of debauchery.

A blood feud between two gangs runs the streets red, leaving the city helpless in the grip of chaos. At the heart of it all is eighteen-year-old Juliette Cai, a former flapper who has returned to assume her role as the proud heir of the Scarlet Gang—a network of criminals far above the law. Their only rivals in power are the White Flowers, who have fought the Scarlets for generations. And behind every move is their heir, Roma Montagov, Juliette’s first love…and first betrayal.

But when gangsters on both sides show signs of instability culminating in clawing their own throats out, the people start to whisper. Of a contagion, a madness. Of a monster in the shadows. As the deaths stack up, Juliette and Roma must set their guns—and grudges—aside and work together, for if they can’t stop this mayhem, then there will be no city left for either to rule.





















[book] No Time Like the Future:
An Optimist Considers Mortality
by Michael J. Fox
November 17, 2020
Flatiron

Although not Jewish, Fox is Jewish adjacent. Coronavirus, pandemic, and quarantines have forced many to face mortality and life goals. Fox's book helps readers add a new perspective

A moving account of resilience, hope, fear and mortality, and how these things resonate in our lives, by actor and advocate Michael J. Fox.

The entire world knows Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly, the teenage sidekick of Doc Brown in Back to the Future; as Alex P. Keaton in Family Ties; as Mike Flaherty in Spin City; and through numerous other movie roles and guest appearances on shows such as The Good Wife and Curb Your Enthusiasm. Diagnosed at age 29, Michael is equally engaged in Parkinson’s advocacy work, raising global awareness of the disease and helping find a cure through The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, the world’s leading non-profit funder of PD science. His two previous bestselling memoirs, Lucky Man and Always Looking Up, dealt with how he came to terms with the illness, all the while exhibiting his iconic optimism. His new memoir reassesses this outlook, as events in the past decade presented additional challenges.

In No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality, Michael shares personal stories and observations about illness and health, aging, the strength of family and friends, and how our perceptions about time affect the way we approach mortality. Thoughtful and moving, but with Fox’s trademark sense of humor, his book provides a vehicle for reflection about our lives, our loves, and our losses.

Running through the narrative is the drama of the medical madness Fox recently experienced, that included his daily negotiations with the Parkinson’s disease he’s had since 1991, and a spinal cord issue that necessitated immediate surgery. His challenge to learn how to walk again, only to suffer a devastating fall, nearly caused him to ditch his trademark optimism and “get out of the lemonade business altogether.”





















[book] Fodor's Essential Israel
(Full-color Travel Guide)
by Fodor's Travel Guides
June 23, 2020
postponed to DECEMBER 2020
Fodor's Books

Whether you want to visit Jerusalem’s Old City, float in the Dead Sea, or party in Tel Aviv, the local Fodor’s travel experts in Israel are here to help! Fodor’s Essential Israel is part of the award-winning Fodor’s Essential series recognized by Booklist as the “Best Travel Guide in 2019.” guidebook is packed with maps, carefully curated recommendations, and everything else you need to simplify your trip-planning process and make the most of your time.

This new edition has been fully-redesigned with an easy-to-read layout, fresh information, and beautiful color photos.

Fodor’s Essential Israel includes: AN ILLUSTRATED ULTIMATE EXPERIENCES GUIDE to the top things to see and do MULTIPLE ITINERARIES to effectively organize your days and maximize your time MORE THAN 40 DETAILED MAPS to help you navigate confidently COLOR PHOTOS throughout to spark your wanderlust!
UP-TO-DATE and HONEST RECOMMENDATIONS for the best sights, restaurants, hotels, nightlife, shopping, performing arts, activities, side-trips, and more PHOTO-FILLED “BEST OF” FEATURES on “Most Sacred Sites,” “Best Museums,” and “Israel’s Natural Wonders”
TRIP-PLANNING TOOLS AND PRACTICAL TIPS including when to go, getting around, beating the crowds, and saving time and money
SPECIAL FEATURES on “Israel Through the Ages,” “Jerusalem: Keeping the Faith,” “The Dead Sea, A Natural Wonder,” “Masada: Desert Fortress,” “The Wines of Israel,” and “Jesus in the Galilee”
HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL INSIGHTS providing rich context on the local people, politics, art, architecture, cuisine, geography and more
LOCAL WRITERS to help you find the under-the-radar gems
HEBREW AND PALESTINIAN ARABIC LANGUAGE PRIMERS with useful words and essential phrases
COVERS: Jerusalem, Jaffa, Bethlehem, Tel Aviv, the Dead Sea, Masada, Haifa, Nazareth, Tiberias, the Sea of Galilee, the Golan Heights, Eilat, the Negev, Beersheva, Petra, and more


*Important note for digital editions: The digital edition of this guide does not contain all the images or text included in the physical edition.










[book] Putin's People:
How the KGB Took Back Russia
and Then Took On the West
by Catherine Belton
June 23, 2020
FS&G

Interference in American elections. The sponsorship of extremist politics in Europe. War in Ukraine. In recent years, Vladimir Putin’s Russia has waged a concerted campaign to expand its influence and undermine Western institutions. But how and why did all this come about, and who has orchestrated it?

In Putin’s People, the investigative journalist and former Moscow correspondent Catherine Belton reveals the untold story of how Vladimir Putin and the small group of KGB men surrounding him rose to power and looted their country. Delving deep into the workings of Putin’s Kremlin, Belton accesses key inside players to reveal how Putin replaced the freewheeling tycoons of the Yeltsin era with a new generation of loyal oligarchs, who in turn subverted Russia’s economy and legal system and extended the Kremlin's reach into the United States and Europe. The result is a chilling and revelatory exposé of the KGB’s revanche-a story that begins in the murk of the Soviet collapse, when networks of operatives were able to siphon billions of dollars out of state enterprises and move their spoils into the West. Putin and his allies subsequently completed the agenda, reasserting Russian power while taking control of the economy for themselves, suppressing independent voices, and launching covert influence operations abroad.

Ranging from Moscow and London to Switzerland and Brooklyn’s Brighton Beach-and assembling a colorful cast of characters to match-Putin’s People is the definitive account of how hopes for the new Russia went astray, with stark consequences for its inhabitants and, increasingly, the world.




























[book] Belonging:
The Key to Transforming
and Maintaining Diversity,
Inclusion and Equality at Work
by Sue Unerman,
Kathryn Jacob, Mark Edwards
January 19, 2021
Bloomsbury

A groundbreaking investigation into diversity and equality in the workplace, arguing that both men and women need to be active participants to promote meaningful progress.

There's never been more discussion and activity around diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Every week, ever more high-profile statistics, stories and initiatives are swirling around: from gender and ethnicity pay gap differentials to #MeToo fallout, and from the focus on more diverse company boards to the prevalence of company-wide unconscious bias training, it seems that every company and organization has finally grasped that change needs to happen.

Following interviews at over 200 businesses about the irrefutable business case for diversity at work, Sue Unerman, Kathryn Jacob and Mark Edwards have discovered one major problem that is holding back the move towards greater diversity: where are all the men?

The book sets out to understand why more men aren't engaged with D&I initiatives in organizations--at one extreme they may be feeling actively hostile, and threatened by the changing cultural landscape. Others may be unmotivated to change: they may see diversity as a good thing in the abstract but can't see what's in it for them. Many will be open-minded and supportive, while still feeling unsure about what to do.

Belonging will speak to both men and women, because:

- Men need to understand how they can benefit from more diverse cultures and how they can become champions of new ways of working; and
- Women need to have an awareness of where men are right now, and identify the most effective ways of bringing them on board to ensure that diversity initiatives do not fall at the first hurdle.





















[book] The Passover Guest
by Susan Kusel
Sean Rubin (Illustrator)
January 19, 2021
Neal Porter Books

Muriel assumes her family is too poor to hold a Passover Seder this year, but an act of kindness and a mysterious magician change everything.

It's the Spring of 1933 in Washington D.C., and the Great Depression is hitting young Muriel's family hard. Her father has lost his job, and her family barely has enough food most days, let alone for a Passover Seder. They don't even have any wine to leave out for the prophet Elijah's ceremonial cup.

With no feast to rush home to, Muriel wanders by the Lincoln Memorial, where she encounters a mysterious magician in whose hands juggled eggs become lit candles. After she makes a kind gesture, he encourages her to run home for her Seder, and when she does, she encounters a holiday miracle, a bountiful feast of brisket, soup, and matzah. But who was this mysterious benefactor? When Muriel sees Elijah's ceremonial cup is empty, she has a good idea.

This fresh retelling of the classic I.L. Peretz story, best known through Uri Shulevitz's 1973 adaptation The Magician, has been sumptuously illustrated by noted graphic novelist Sean Rubin, who based his art on photographs of D.C. in the 1930s. An author note with information about the holiday is included. Susan Kusel is a synagogue librarian and children's book buyer for an independent bookstore. She has served as a member of the Caldecott Medal selection committee and the chair of the Sydney Taylor Book Award Committee. The Passover Guest is Kusel's first picture book. She lives in Arlington, VA.





















[book] Being Ram Dass
by Ram Dass
Rameshwar Das
Anne Lamott (Introduction)
January 12, 2021
Sounds True Press

Perhaps no other teacher has sparked the fires of as many spiritual seekers in the West as Ram Dass. While many know of his transformation from Harvard psychology professor Richard Alpert to psychedelic and spiritual icon, Ram Dass tells here for the first time the full arc of his remarkable life.

Being Ram Dass begins at the moment he was fired from Harvard for giving drugs to an undergraduate. We then circle back to his privileged youth, education, and the path that led him inexorably away from conventional life and ultimately to his guru, Neem Karoli Baba. Populated by a cast of luminaries ranging from Timothy Leary to Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Allen Ginsberg to Jack Kornfield, Aldous Huxley to Charles Mingus-this intimate memoir chronicles Ram Dass's experience of the cultural and spiritual transformations that resonate with us to this day.

Ram Dass's life and work prefigured many current trends: the conscious aging and death movement, the healing potential of psychedelics, the use of meditation and yoga in prisons, the ubiquity of those same practices in the wider culture, and more. Here, with his characteristic mix of earthiness and transcendence, Ram Dass finally tells all.





















[book] Milk Fed:
A Novel
by Melissa Broder
February 21, 2021
Scribner

Rachel is twenty-four, a lapsed Jew who has made calorie restriction her religion. By day, she maintains an illusion of existential control, by way of obsessive food rituals, while working as an underling at a Los Angeles talent management agency. At night, she pedals nowhere on the elliptical machine. Rachel is content to carry on subsisting—until her therapist encourages her to take a ninety-day communication detox from her mother, who raised her in the tradition of calorie counting.

Early in the detox, Rachel meets Miriam, a zaftig young Orthodox Jewish woman who works at her favorite frozen yogurt shop and is intent upon feeding her. Rachel is suddenly and powerfully entranced by Miriam—by her sundaes and her body, her faith and her family—and as the two grow closer, Rachel embarks on a journey marked by mirrors, mysticism, mothers, milk, and honey.

Pairing superlative emotional insight with unabashed vivid fantasy, Broder tells a tale of appetites: physical hunger, sexual desire, spiritual longing, and the ways that we as humans can compartmentalize these so often interdependent instincts. Milk Fed is a tender and riotously funny meditation on love, certitude, and the question of what we are all being fed, from one of our major writers on the psyche—both sacred and profane.





















[book] KAJZER
PLUNDER
A Memoir of Family Property
and Nazi Treasure
A Quest for Memory, Property, and Treasure
By Menachem Kaiser
March 16, 2021
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

From a gifted young writer, the story of his quest to reclaim his family’s apartment building in Poland—and of the astonishing entanglement with Nazi treasure hunters that follows

The project description states that the book focuses on the author’s “mission to reclaim ownership of the apartment building his Jewish family was forced to abandon during WWII, a search that expands to encounters with a bizarre subculture of explorers hunting for Nazi gold; their astounding connection to an unknown Kaiser relative who survived the war after years as a slave laborer who excavated a vast system of secret underground tunnels; and finally to controversial questions that challenge the meaning of reclamation and of family obligation.
Brooklyn based Kaiser is a Fulbright Fellow (Lithuania) and has an MFA from the University of Michigan. His works has appeared in WSJ.











































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