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Kabbalah Recommendations
Note: one should be over forty (Mem) and a scholar before embarking on such studies....
(click on a listing for more information or to purchase it)



NOTE: MyJewishBooks.com and SeferSafari.com do not endorse any of these authors or books, their publishers, or any teachers of what is termed Kabbalah. Buyer Beware. The serious and the not so serious are mixed together, below.

[book] THE ZOHAR
THE PRITZKER EDITION
VOLUME 2
January 2004. Stanford University Press.
This is Volume 2 (Volume 1 was published in Fall 2003)
Finally... the Zohar can be accessible to you and me. Well as close to being accessible as it ever has been in English. The commentaries, the explanations, this is the real thing and not that red string bullshit that kabbalh-entrepreneurs and celebutantes pass off as Judaism.
The 2nd Volume opens with a commentary on Parshat Lekh Lekha (Bereshit Genesis 12:1 - 17:27) and preceeds through Parshat Va-Yetse (Genesis 28:10 - 32:3). It has the feel of a Hertz Chumash. In his commentary he has attempted to go back before Rabbi Luria, to scrape away several hundred years of Lurianic Kabbbalistic readings and recover something closer to "what the Zohar meant" when it first emerged. This, of course, is impossible; you cannot recapture the mentality of a 13th-century kabbalist or totally escape a 21st-century mindset. But still, he has tried to approach what one of his teachers used to call peshat ha-Zohar, its "simple sense."
Professor Matt writes the following about his translation technique: My style of translation is literal yet poetic. I am convinced that a literal rendering of the Zohar is not only the most accurate but also the most colorful and zestful-the best way to transmit the lyrical energy of the Aramaic. Still, at times, the multivalent language invites a certain freedom of expression. Let me cite one example (Zohar 1:83a), where Rabbi Shim'on describes the nighttime journey of the soul, soaring skyward from her sleeping body: "Flying, she encounters those qumrin tehirin of defilement." What does this bizarre term mean? The Sperling-Simon translation renders it as "certain bright but unclean essences." The English translation of Tishby's Wisdom of the Zohar reads: "the deceiving lights of uncleanness," while Tishby's original Hebrew translation reads a bit differently: qimmurei negohot-roughly: "vaulted splendors"-though in his note he acknowledges that the meaning is "doubtful." I render the sentence as follows: "Flying, she encounters those hooded, hunchbacked, dazzling demons of defilement." The accompanying commentary explains that these are malevolent forces who block the ascent of an unworthy soul. Qumrin derives via rabbinic usage from the Greek qamara "arched cover," while tehirin is a cognate of the Aramaic tihara, meaning "brightness, noon." One class of demons is named tiharei, "noonday demons." Although the Zohar's basic vocabulary is limited, its roots generate a rich variety of meanings, which demand a wide range of English renderings. For example, the root tqn spans the following: "establish, institute, mend, restore, correct, perfect, prepare, arrange, array, adorn." The root slq can mean: "rise, raise, culminate, attain, surpass, depart, disappear, die, remove, postpone, reserve, emit (fragrance)." I find that I have to navigate between conflicting meanings and determine the appropriate one-or sometimes to discover how differing meanings pertain simultaneously. The frequent dilemmas of interpretation suggest that in exploring the Zohar, linguistic search and spiritual search go hand in hand. By this I mean that you can't just read the text; you have to contemplate possible meanings. You have to enter openings created by the rich language, travel down the winding paths, try out various potential implications, see how they resonate within yourself. In this quest, the intellect is vital, but so is the spirit; the two must work hand-in-hand, aiding and correcting one another. The Zohar cannot be fully appreciated on a purely academic level; it demands engaging the text and self reflection."
Professor Matt basically restructured his life around the project, which will take about 15 years. He works as much as I can each day, without exhausting or draining himself. He eats very carefully and exercises daily. He feared at the beginning that he might grow tired of the work, but now, after six years, he loves it even more than when he began. He avoids other professional commitments and limits his socializing. The time he spends with his family is precious; he spent the years 1998-2002 in Jerusalem with his wife and two children.
Ever since it emerged mysteriously in Castile, Spain toward the end of the 13th century, the Zohar has enthralled, confounded, challenged, and enraptured readers. Composed mostly in lyrical Aramaic, the Zohar is a mosaic of Bible, medieval homily, spiritual fantasy, and imaginative commentary, or midrash, on the Torah written in the form of a mystical novel. In it a group of rabbis wander through the hills of Galilee, discovering and sharing secrets of Torah: at times they interpret the actions of biblical figures, and at other times, they take center stage themselves through their adventures on the road and their encounters with various astonishing characters. The scope of the Zohar is far greater than a single book; it is virtually an entire body of literature, whose central theme is the intimacy between human beings and God. In this lies one of the Zohar's boldest propositions, the capacity of the human being to effect change in the divine realm. Awestruck by the profundity of its insights, symbolism, and dreamlike images, Jews in many lands over the centuries have come to accept the Zohar as revealed truth-no less sacred than the two other major texts of their religion, the Torah and the Talmud. And yet, until now, there has never been a fully reliable comprehensive, scholarly English translation of this revered work with line-by-line commentary. In a monumental undertaking that has already stirred enormous interest and eager anticipation among scholars and various religious communities, Daniel C. Matt, the son of Rabbi Hershel Matt, is one of the world's foremost authorities on Jewish mysticism. He spent the past four years in Jerusalem completing the first phase of this immense project: a 12-volume, annotated English translation of the Zohar. Click the book cover above to read more.



[book] A GUIDE TO THE ZOHAR
By Rabbi Arthur Green, the Philip W. Lown Professor of Jewish Thought at Brandeis University.
January 2004. Stanford University Press.
The Zohar is the great medieval compendium of Jewish esoteric and mystical teaching, and the basis of the kabbalistic faith. It is, however, a notoriously difficult text, full of hidden codes, concealed meanings, obscure symbols, and ecstatic expression. This illuminating study, based upon the last several decades of modern Zohar scholarship, unravels the historical and intellectual origins of this rich text and provides an excellent introduction to its themes, complex symbolism, narrative structure, and language. A Guide to the Zohar is thus an invaluable companion to the Zohar itself, as well as a useful resource for scholars and students interested in mystical literature, particularly that of the west, from the Middle Ages to the present. Topics include: The Kabbalistic Tradition: A Brief History Until the Zohar; Teachings of the Kabbalists: The Ten Sefirot; The Zohar: Midrash on the Torah; The Zohar Narrative; Mysticism of the Zohar; The Zohar in Historical Context; Selected Themes within the Zohar: Creation and Origins, Between Worlds, Evil and the Demonic, Torah and Revelation, The Commandments, Avodah : The Life of Worship, The Tsaddiq and the Life of Piety, ....; The Question of Authorship; The Language of the Zohar; and the Influence and Canonization of the Zohar. Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] Becoming Like God
by Michael Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (September 2004)
Michael Berg suggests that the time is right for people to break free of "ego nature" and achieve total joy and immortality: in other words, to "become like God." Advising ruthless honesty about human life - its pain, suffering, and death - and then providing an escape plan based on those truths, Berg uses the tools of Kabbalah - such as the Zohar, the key text of the discipline - as well as the collective energy of all the individuals sharing this path to help form that critical mass that will allow everyone to realize their true, joyous nature. Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] KABBALISTIC HEALING
A PATH TO THE AWAKENED SOUL
by JASON SHULMAN
Fall 2004 from Inner Traditions Bear and Company
Ehud Sperling runs the Inner Traditions publishing company in Vermont. He sees Kabbalah and the faddish obsession with it as a shoe in for the self help category of books. He has therefore published this book as a guidebook to using the Kabbalah to transform our consciousness in order to heal the body, mind, and spirit. In it, the author describes a process of unification with God and the healing implications of that process for our daily life; introduces four kabbalistic universes that form a topographical map of reality; and offers a unique perspective on human consciousness and the nature of existence from a leading modern kabbalist. To Jason Shulman, the Kabbalah is the living experience of our real self, the self that is always connected to God, the self that lives in God the way a fish lives in water. It draws upon the author's work at A Society of Souls, which promotes the belief that the ultimate form of healing is to create a unitive or nondual state of consciousness, integrating the healthy human ego into its proper relationship with transcendent reality. As we deepen our understanding of our true selves and enhance our ability to hold new states of consciousness, we are able not only to heal ourselves but to help heal others as well. Jason Shulman states that he is a modern kabbalist who is also a recognized teacher in the Buddhist lineage of Shaka Kendo Rich Hart, Abbot of the Clear Mountain Center. He is also a faculty member at the New York Open Center, Esalen Institute, and Omega Institute. Oh... and he lives in New Jersey. Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] KABBALAh 365
Daily Fruit from the Tree of Life
by Gershon Winkler
Andrews McMeel Publishing; 2004
From the book jacket... Rabbi Gershon Winkler is an interpreter of the Kabbalah.. Every day is a chance for a new beginning - an awakening. Start each day with the gift of time-tested wisdom from the Kabbalah. Kabbalah 365 is a unique collection of rare Jewish mystery and understanding. People from all walks of life are finding their paths illuminated within the Kabbalah. Each selected reading, one for every day of the yearly cycle, encourages honest contemplation, true inspiration, and deep reflection. Here are just a few examples: If you are in a hurry to get to an appointment, and you are riding on a train that is moving too slow, do you think you will arrive at your destination any faster by getting up and running through the train? Likewise, when the time is right for you, you'll be arriving at your destination - no sooner, no later. In the meantime, make sure you are on board. If you are rubbing two sticks together and are having difficulty lighting a fire, move to another place and try again. Likewise, if you are having difficulty in the place where you are, shift to another place. Experience the vastness and riches of the Kabbalah with Kabbalah 365, which ably preserves the integrity of the original texts, some translated here for the first time, and renders insights in easy-to-understand language. .... Oh... and he lives in San Miguel wilderness of New Mexico. Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] The Power of Kabbalah for Teens
by Yehuda Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (October 2004)
Well I guess it was bound to happen. First Madonna becomes Esther, and the Hollywood elite join the Jewish version of Scientology... and now... now.... This book. Don't tell me it is going to be the Bar Mitzvah Bat Mitzvah gift of choice this Fall??? Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] [book] BECOMING GOD By Michael Berg
THE RED STRING BOOK By Yehuda Berg
Fall 2004.
Kabbalah Publishing.
Madonna is promoting these books... they have a lot of $$ behind them for marketing... well then, they must be great.. Nuff said. Okay more to say... if you are into superstition, then don't let us get in your way. Buy them through us. All proceeds to us from the sales of these books will be donated to Jewish anti-cult groups.
Click the book covers above to read more.









[book] The 72 Names of God
Technology for the Soul
by Yehudah Berg, Yehuda Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (May 2003)
Publishers Weekly writes, "This self-help book from Rabbi Berg (The Power of Kabbalah) draws upon the "72 names" of God mentioned in the Kabbalah to empower individuals to embrace life more fully. Berg says that when Moses experienced his do-or-die moment on the shores of the Red Sea, God spoke to the Israelites in three verses as recorded in the Book of Exodus-each verse consisting of 72 Hebrew letters. Encoded in those letters was the "technology" the Israelites needed to escape the situation on their own, without further divine assistance. Berg writes that contemporary seekers can also tap into this power and energy by learning about, and calling upon, the 72 names of God. The book can be shallow, particularly in its proof-texting of both Kabbalah and the findings of modern scientists to demonstrate "uncanny congruencies between astrophysics and Kabbalah concerning Creation," or its rapid-fire determination to whiz through each name in a single page. Although the device of using the 72 names is a refreshing addition to self-help literature, the end result is the same: the book offers individuals a relatively quick and painless way to achieve joy, financial prosperity, sexual fulfillment and spiritual enlightenment. The real star here is not the writing but the layout; rarely has a Kabbalah book been so easy on the eyes. Trendy designs, chic photographs and illustrations, and even a little comic-book-style graphic art enhance the book and maintain reader interest." Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] The 72 Names of God
Technology for the Soul
by Yehudah Berg, Yehuda Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (May 2003)
Publishers Weekly writes, "This self-help book from Rabbi Berg (The Power of Kabbalah) draws upon the "72 names" of God mentioned in the Kabbalah to empower individuals to embrace life more fully. Berg says that when Moses experienced his do-or-die moment on the shores of the Red Sea, God spoke to the Israelites in three verses as recorded in the Book of Exodus-each verse consisting of 72 Hebrew letters. Encoded in those letters was the "technology" the Israelites needed to escape the situation on their own, without further divine assistance. Berg writes that contemporary seekers can also tap into this power and energy by learning about, and calling upon, the 72 names of God. The book can be shallow, particularly in its proof-texting of both Kabbalah and the findings of modern scientists to demonstrate "uncanny congruencies between astrophysics and Kabbalah concerning Creation," or its rapid-fire determination to whiz through each name in a single page. Although the device of using the 72 names is a refreshing addition to self-help literature, the end result is the same: the book offers individuals a relatively quick and painless way to achieve joy, financial prosperity, sexual fulfillment and spiritual enlightenment. The real star here is not the writing but the layout; rarely has a Kabbalah book been so easy on the eyes. Trendy designs, chic photographs and illustrations, and even a little comic-book-style graphic art enhance the book and maintain reader interest." Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] The Power of Kabbalah for Teens
by Yehuda Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (October 2004)
Well I guess it was bound to happen. First Madonna becomes Esther, and the Hollywood elite join the Jewish version of Scientology... and now... now.... This book. Don't tell me it is going to be the Bar Mitzvah Bat Mitzvah gift of choice this Fall??? Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] Kabbalah
The Red String Book
(Technology for the Soul)
by Yehuda Berg
Kabbalah Centre publishing; (October 2004)
Oh great... let's go wearing charms against the EVIL EYE.
Let's keep this stuff in Judaism's attic
BERG WRITES.... The Sages of Kabbalah understood that seemingly harmless envious glances and looks of ill will - the evil eye - are, in fact, anything but harmless. They have tangible physical effects and can actually halt progress toward one's potential in every area of life. In this unique book, Yehuda Berg explains the technology powering the Kabbalistic antidote to the evil eye, the Red String. The book shows how and why this simple tool of healing and self-defense has worked for 5,000 years. The book includes a free Red String and a mail-in offer to ward off the Evil Eye. Click the book cover above to read more.







[book] Practical Kabbalah : A Guide to Jewish Wisdom for Everyday Life by Laibl Wolf
Paperback - 288 pages (June 1999)
Kabbalah is reserved for those who only after years of scholarship and practice are allowed to enter this mystical realm. Rabbi Wolf, however, shares some insights and key concepts to enrich one's life. By learning to understand the ten Sefirot--the ten spiritual properties that flow from the cosmic source into our heart--we can connect to the universe and profoundly transform our experience of daily life. For example, Hessed, or "loving-kindness," represents the desire to be generous, while Gevurah is the desire to focus intently or withhold. These properties must be balanced in order for harmony and well-being to occur. Rabbi Laibl Wolf shows how to maintain that balance and enjoy a healthy and productive life by using simple meditation and creative visualization techniques to grasp the spiritual nature of our life. Click to read more.
Click here to read more about it, see the cover art, to review it, or to purchase it from Amazon (net proceeds are donated to charity)



[bookcover click me] Dreams of Being Eaten Alive. The Literary Core of Kabbalah. By David Rosenberg
(March 2000). Do you desire to be eaten alive by a form of knowledge, a belief, a concept that devours you? David Rosenberg, past author of The Book of J and A Poet's Bible reveals the literary basis for the Kabbalah, which is part fiction, part history, past philosophy, and part psychology. Weaving the mysteries of identity, storytelling, and life after death, these complex stories provide a spellbinding journey from the modern world to the world of our origins.
Click here to order this book from Amazon.com, read more reviews, or to add your own review.


[book] Endless Light: The Ancient Path of the Kabbalah to Love, Spiritual Growth, and Personal Power by David Aaron
Paperback - 176 pages Berkley (November 1998)
An easy-to-read introduction to Jewish Kabbalah teachings, Endless Light uses stories from everyday life to teach about the five stages of the soul and how realization of these can lead to a more peaceful, productive life. David Aaron is a rabbi, poet, pianist, composer, popular lecturer, and founder of the Isralight Institute in Jerusalem. Click to read more.
Click here to read more about it, see the cover art, to review it, or to purchase it from Amazon (net proceeds are donated to charity)



Dreams of Being Eaten Alive. The Literary Core of Kabbalah. By David Rosenberg
(March 2000). Do you desire to be eaten alive by a form of knowledge, a belief, a concept that devours you? David Rosenberg, past author of The Book of J and A Poet's Bible reveals the literary basis for the Kabbalah, which is part fiction, part history, past philosophy, and part psychology. Weaving the mysteries of identity, storytelling, and life after death, these complex stories provide a spellbinding journey from the modern world to the world of our origins.



[book] The Essential Kabbalah: The Heart of Jewish Mysticism by Daniel Chanan Matt
Hardcover - 221 pages (October 1997)
Less than $8. A compact presentation of all the primary texts of Kabbalah, elegantly rendered with poetic nuances, exotic imagery, and bold innovation--from one of the foremost authorities on Jewish mysticism. Click to read more.
Click here to read more about it, see the cover art, to review it, or to purchase it from Amazon (net proceeds are donated to charity)



[book] Origins of the Kabbalah by Gershom Scholem, Allan Arkush (Translator), R. J. Zwi Werblowsky (Editor)
Paperback (October 1991). One of the most important scholars of our century, Gershom Scholem (1897- 1982) opened up a once esoteric world of Jewish mysticism, the Kabbalah, to concerned students of religion. The Kabbalah is a rich tradition of repeated attempts to achieve and portray direct experiences of God: its twelfth- and thirteenth-century beginnings in southern France and Spain are probed in Origins of the Kabbalah, a work crucial in Scholem's oeuvre. The book is a contribution not only to the history of Jewish medieval mysticism but also to the study of medieval mysticism in general and will be of interest to historians and psychologists, as well as to students of the history of religion. Click to read more.
Click here to read more about it, see the cover art, to review it, or to purchase it from Amazon (net proceeds are donated to charity)



[book] On the Kabbalah and Its Symbolism by Gershom Gerhard Scholem,
Paperback (1996). In "On the Kabbalah and Its Symbolism," Gershom Scholem guides the reader through the central themes in the intricate history of the Kabbalah, clarifying the relations between mysticism and established religious authority, the mystics' interpretation of the Torah and their attempts to discover the hidden meaning underlying Scripture, the tension between the philosophical and the mystical concepts of God, and the symbolism employed in mystical religion. Click to read more.
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[book] Zohar: The Book of Splendor: Basic Readings from the Kabbalah by Gershom Scholem,
Paperback Reissue edition (February 1995). One of the great masterpieces of Western religious thought, the Zohar represents an attempt to uncover hidden meanings behind the world of appearances. It is the central work in the literature of the Kabbalah, the Jewish mystical tradition. This volume of selected passages from the Zohar, culled by the greatest authority on Jewish mysticism, offers a sampling of its unique vision of the esoteric wonders of creation; the life and destiny of the soul; the confluence of physical and divine love; suffering and death; exile and redemption. Click to read more.
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[book] Jewish Meditation: A Practical Guide by Aryeh Kaplan
Paperback Rep edition (March 1995). Aryeh Kaplan, who died in 1983, was a well-known Orthodox rabbi and teacher of Jewish meditation. He is the author of many books, including a translation of the Torah commentary Me'am Lo'ez. Click to read more.
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[book] Black Fire on White Fire : An Essay on Jewish Hermeneutics : From Midrash to Kabbalah (Contraversions, Critical Studies in Jewish Literature, Culture) by Betty Rojtman, Steven Rendall (Translator), Moshe Idel (Preface)
Paperback - 205 pages (February 1998) Univ California Press. Click to read more.
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[book] Jewish Mystical Leaders and Leadership in the 13th Century by Moshe Idel (Editor), Mortimer Ostow (Editor), Ivan G. Marcus (Editor), J. N. Hillgarth
Paperback (October 1998) Jason Aronson. Click to read more.
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[book] Through a Speculum That Shines : Vision and Imagination in Medieval Jewish Mysticism by Elliot R. Wolfson
Paperback - 462 pages Reprint edition (November 1997), Princeton Univ Press. Elliot Wolfson's triple award-winning study examines Jewish mystical texts from late antiquity, pre-kabbalistic sources from the 10th to the 12th centuries, and 12th- and 13th-century kabbalistic literature, describing Jewish mysticism and the overwhelmingly visual nature of religious experience in Jewish spirituality from antiquity through the late Middle Ages. Click to read more.
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[book] The Early Kabbalah (Classics of Western Spirituality) by Ronald Kiener, Joseph Dan (Editor), Moshe Idel (Designer)
From The Paulist Press, one of the best Presses for Jewish reprints. Paperback - 205 pages (June 1986) Paulist Press. Click to read more.
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[book] Messianic Mystics by Moshe Idel
From The Yale University Press, 1998. Hardcover - 608 pages (December 1998). A running controversy with fellow Judaic scholar Gershom Scholem drives Idel's wide-ranging argument about the relationship between messianism and mysticism. Scholem sees the two as incompatible, but Idel offers substantial evidence that they can coexist and, for a number of important thinkers, have coexisted. Click to read more.
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[book] The Kabbalah of Envy : Transforming Hatred, Anger, and Other Negative Emotions by Rabbi Nilton Bonder
Hardcover - 224 pages (May 1997). Advice from the Jewish tradition teaches us how to deal with destructive emotions and behavior and turn an enemy into our best friend. Rabbi Nilton Bonder shows that whether we are on the giving or the receiving end of envy, jealousy, hatred, and anger, we can transform them and live peacefully in the spirit of "Love thy neighbor as thyself." Click to read more.
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[book] The Kabbalah of Money : Insights on Livelihood, Business, and All Forms of Economic Behavior by Nilton Bonder
Hardcover - 176 pages (1996). I first met Rabbi Bonder via email when he emailed me for some info on Jewish films when he was preparing of Jewish Film Fest in South America. I then took some lectures from Rabbi Bonder on his visits to NYC. This star of South American television has written a guide to the spirituality of our economic life. The Kabbalah Of Money challenges the reader to take a broad and ethical view of economic behavior, which includes all forms of exchange and human interaction, from how we spend our money to how we fulfill our role as responsible human beings in a global ecological framework. Drawing on Jewish ethical teachings, mystical lore, and tales of the Hasidic masters, Rabbi Nilton Bonder examines a wide range of subjects including competition, partnerships and contracts, loans and interest, the laws of fair exchange, tips, and presents.." Click to read more.
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[book] The Kabbalah of Food : Conscious Eating for Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual Health by Nilton Bonder
Hardcover - 160 pages (April 1998). Why does a Jew eat? For sustenance? For good health? Do the laws of kashrut allow us to be more conscious of what and why we eat. When you say the Ha-Motzi over bread, do you connect with the environment? Are you an Esser or a Fresser? "The Kabbalah of Food" unearths Jewish wisdom on the art of receiving health and sustenance through conscious eating. The rabbi draws on parables and teachings of the Talmudic sages and Hasidic masters and examines the "Shulhan Aruch" for its practical insights . It's a good book to read, especially since most people believe that Jewish holidays and gatherings all revolve around food (like the joke... "we suffered, we triumphed, okay now let's eat). In this third volume of his trilogy, Rabbi Bonder teaches us about creating a healthy exchange between ourselves and our environment. The discussion include how to eat consciously, with ecological and political awareness; how to connect with the energetic essence of our food; how to avoid becoming overweight - in the emotional, spiritual, and moral as well as physical sense; and the inner meaning of religious customs and laws concerning food and eating. Click to read more.
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[book] Yiddishe Kop: Creative Problem Solving in Jewish Learning, Lore, and Humor by Rabbi Nilton Bonder
Paperback - 112 pages (July 1999). The fourth translated book from South American rabbi, Nilton Bonder, the author of The Kabbalah of Envy, The Kabbalah of Food, and the Kabbalah of Money. The title says it all. Click to read more.
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[book] AUDIO SET OF The Essential Kabbalah, the Jew in the Lotus, and the Legend of the Baal-Shem (Jewish Wisdom) by Rodger Kamenetz, Martin Buber, Edward Asner (Reader), Daniel Chanan Matt
Audio Cassette Boxed edition (April 1998). Click to read more.
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[book] God Is a Verb : Kabbalah and the Practice of Mystical Judaism by David A. Cooper
Paperback - 333 pages (September 1998). Embraced by celebrities from Madonna to Jeff Goldblum to Elizabeth Taylor, covered extensively in the pages of Time and Entertainment Weekly, Kabbalah--a Jewish mystical tradition dating back centuries--has taken its place alongside Buddhism as a spiritual practice for modern Western seekers. This book--written by the rabbi who authored the bestselling audiotape series The Mystical Kabbalah--is the first to bring Kabbalah to a wide audience. Earning great praise from critics, God Is a Verb promises to do for Judaism what The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying did for Buddhism, infusing an ancient tradition with new life and popularizing its ideas among an entirely new generation. Click to read more.
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[book] Sabbatai Sevi; The Mystical Messiah, 1626-1676 by Gershom Gerhard Scholem
Paperback (October 1973). Click to read more.
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