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Welcome to our pages of Fall 2016, Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, Fall 2015, Summer 2015, Spring 2015, Winter 2015, Fall 2014, and oh so many more Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME LATE SUMMER / FALL 2016 BOOK READINGS



July 25, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Beth Kissileff “Questioning Return” and Joshua Halberstam “The Blind Angel: New Old Chassidic Tales” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM

August 01, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Lynda Cohen Loigman “Two-Family House” and Jay Neugoboren “Max Baer and the Star of David” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
August 08, 2016: Scribblers on the Roof. Janice Weizman “The Wayward Moon” and Judith Claire Mitchell “A Reunion of Ghosts” read from their works. Congregation Ansche Chesed rooftop, 100 & WEA. NYC 8PM
August 22, 2016: The One Man as read by author Andrew Gross. B&N NYC UWS

September 06, 2016: Gayle Forman reads from Leave Me. A Novel. B&N NYC TriBeCa
September 06, 2016; Jonathan Safran Foer chants with pen pal Natalie Portman on his new novel HERE I AM, as well as Israel, Zionism, marriage, and more. Congregation Beth Elohim. Park Slope. Brooklyn, NY 19:30.
September 07, 2016: Jonathan Safran Foer reads from Here I Am. B&N NYC Union Square
September 09, 2016: Mark Thompson (BBC, NYT) reads from Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong With the Language of Politics? And is interviewed by Frank Bruni (NYT). B&N NYC Union Square
September 11, 2016: Rabbi Dov Lipman (US-born Minister in the Knesset) reads and speaks on the topic of his life as an Oleh in Israel. Congregation Ohab Zedek, NYC 19:30PM
September 11, 2016: A Symposium. Rembrandt and the Jews. Meir Soloveichik and Simon Schama, as well as Leon Wieseltier, Steven Nadler, Michael Zell, Jacob Wisse and… so as not to be one big sausage fest, Professor Shelley Perlove of Univ of Michigan. 9:30AM-2PM. Yeshiva University Museum at the Center for Jewish History. NYC
September 12, 2016: Jonathan Safran Foer reads from Here I Am. Historic Sixth & Eye Synagogue. Washington DC $20
September 14, 2016: Liz Alpern and Jeffrey Yoskowitz In Conversation with Jessica Sidman and read from Gefilteria Cookbook. Historic Sixth & Eye Synagogue. Washington DC $14
September 14, 2016: Mike Leven, CEO, Georgia Aquarium speaks at Greenberg Traurig, ATlanta
September 15, 2016: Maureen Dowd (BBC, NYT) reads from The Year of Voting Dangerously and is interviewed by Frank Bruni (NYT). B&N NYC Union Square
September 20, 2016: Professor Arnold Eisen speaks on “The Blessing of Assimilation.” JTS NYC
September 20, 2016: Jamie Lee Curtis reads from, This Is Me. B&N NYC Upper East Side 4PM
September 21, 2016: US Supreme Court Justice SCOTUS Ruth Bader Ginsburg at Skirball Center, NYC 7PM (author of MY OWN WORDS (see below))
September 24-26, 2016: National Israeli-American Conference. IACkenes.Org Washington DC
September 27, 2016: Author and chef Joan Nathan on High Holy Day foods at the Skirball Center, NYC 11 AM $150
September 27, 2016: Reading Genesis with Dr. Ruth, Beth Kissileff, Dara Horn, Joan Nathanm Kahn at the Skirball Center, NYC 7 PM
September 29, 2016: Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, and Ella Morton in Conversation with David Plotz and read from Atlas Obscura. Historic Sixth & Eye Synagogue. Washington DC

October 02-04, 2016: Rosh Hashana
October 09, 2016: The Blood Libel Then and Now. A YIVO Conference, NYC
October 11-12, 2016: Yom Kippur
October 13, 2016: Jennifer Weiner reads from Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. B&N Willow Grove, PA
October 13, 2016: Masha Gessen reads from Where the Jews Aren't: The Sad and Absurd Story of Birobidzhan, Russia's Jewish Autonomous Region. B&N NYC UWS
October 24, 2016: Mel Brooks reads from Young Frankenstein: The Story of the Making of the Film. B&N Union Square NYC 7PM
October 25, 2016: The German Girl as read by author Armando Lucas Correa. B&N NYC UWS
October 27, 2016: Author Jeffrey Goldberg at the Skirball Center, NYC
October 28-30, 2016: Penn Homecoming Weekend

November 02, 2016: Vilna Shul, a Boston Center for Jewish Culture, presents author Alice Hoffman, for her launch of Faithful, a new novel
November 5-20, 2016: Atlanta GA, Marcus JCC Book Festival featuring Peter Bergen, Andy Cohenm Yael Dayan, Jonathan Safran Foer, Daniel Gordis, Shep Gordon, Alice Hoffman, Carson Kressley, Kenny Loggins, Jeffy Toobin, and more. AtlantaJCC.ORG/BookFestival
November 06-09, 2016: From Brooklyn Avenue to Cesar Chavez. Jewish Histories in Multiethnic Boyle Hieghts. UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies, LA November 10. 2016: Seth M. Siegel reads from Let There Be Water about lessons from Israel on water policy for a water-starved world. Temple Step[hen Wise Free Synagogue, UWS, NYC 7PM
November 16. 2016: Authors Daniel Gordis and Jonathan Greenblatt read from their work on Israel. Skirball Center, NYC 7PM
November 17, 2016: Joshua Zimmerman (Yeshiva University) speaks on Wounds of History: The Polish Underground and the Jews during World War II. UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies. 4PM
November 20, 2016: The People vs. King David. The charge is murder. With Defense Atty Alan Dershowitz, Media personality and prosecutor Chris Cuomo, the honorable Judge Alison J. Nathan, pundit Geraldine Brooks and more. Skirball Center NYC $36.
November 29, 2016: Author Alive Hoffman reads from her works. Skirball Center NYC
November 30, 2016; An evening with Doris Kearns Goodwin. Skirball. NYC

December 08, 2016: Golda Meir. A Retrospective with E. Burkett, P Lahav, M. Medzini, S Rahabi, H. Tsoref, F. Klagsbrun& singer Yehoram Gaon. Skirball Center NYC 7PM $18
December 16, 2016: Attorney Roberta Kaplan. Human Rights Shabbat. Temple Emanu El NYC





SOME LATE AUGUST 2016 BOOKS




FROM ONE OF OUR MOST FAVE WRITERS FOR THE FORWARD... A MEMOIR...
[book] I'm Supposed to Protect
You from All This:
A Memoir
by Nadja Spiegelman
August 2, 2016
Riverhead Books
A memoir of mothers and daughters — and mothers as daughters — traced through four generations, from Paris to New York and back again.

It took opposite journeys for a mother and daughter to each find themselves at the start of their adult lives: one needed to leave France to discover herself; the other needed to return to Paris to discover her family—the side that “didn’t have dealings with the Nazis. They occasionally traded goods with the Nazis,” as her grandmother insists.

For a long time, Nadja Spiegelman believed her mother was a fairy. More than her famous father, Maus creator Art Spiegelman, and even more than most mothers, hers—French-born New Yorker art director Françoise Mouly—exerted a force over reality that was both dazzling and daunting. As Nadja’s body changed and “began to whisper to the adults around me in a language I did not understand,” their relationship grew tense. Unwittingly, they were replaying a drama from her mother’s past, a drama Nadja sensed but had never been told. Then, after college, her mother suddenly opened up to her. Françoise recounted her turbulent adolescence caught between a volatile mother and a playboy father, one of the first plastic surgeons in France. The weight of the difficult stories she told her daughter shifted the balance between them.

It had taken an ocean to allow Françoise the distance to become her own person. At about the same age, Nadja made the journey in reverse, moving to Paris determined to get to know the woman her mother had fled. Her grandmother’s memories contradicted her mother’s at nearly every turn, but beneath them lay a difficult history of her own. Nadja emerged with a deeper understanding of how each generation reshapes the past in order to forge ahead, their narratives both weapon and defense, eternally in conflict. Every reader will recognize herself and her family in this gorgeous and heartbreaking memoir, which helps us to see why sometimes those who love us best hurt us most.




















[book] The Angel
The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel
by Uri Bar-Joseph
(University of Haifa)
August 2016
Harper
A gripping feat of reportage that exposes—for the first time in English—the sensational life and mysterious death of Ashraf Marwan, an Egyptian senior official who spied for Israel, offering new insight into the turbulent modern history of the Middle East.
As the son-in-law of Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser and a close advisor to his successor, Anwar Sadat, Ashraf Marwan had access to the deepest secrets of the country’s government. But Marwan himself had a secret: He was a spy for the Mossad, Israel’s intelligence service. Under the codename “The Angel,” Marwan turned Egypt into an open book for the Israeli intelligence services—and, by ALERTING the Mossad in advance of the joint Egyptian-Syrian attack on Yom Kippur in 1973, saved Israel from a devastating defeat.

Drawing on meticulous research and interviews with many key participants, Uri Bar Joseph pieces together Marwan’s story. In the process, he sheds new light on this volatile time in modern Egyptian and Middle Eastern history, culminating in 2011’s Arab Spring.
Professor Bay-Joseph also chronicles the discord within the Israeli government that brought down Prime Minister Golda Meir.
However, this nail-biting narrative doesn’t end with Israel’s victory in the Yom Kippur War. Marwan eluded Egypt’s ruthless secret services for many years, but then somebody talked. Five years later, in 2007, his body was found in the garden of his London apartment building. Was it suicide in London? Did the people whom he swindled in business deals kill him? Was it Egyptian spies who killed him?
Scotland Yard suspected he had been thrown from his fifth-floor balcony, and thanks to explosive new evidence, Bar-Joseph can finally reveal who, how, and why (or does he?).























[book] Where the Jews Aren't:
The Sad and Absurd Story of
Birobidzhan, Russia's Jewish
Autonomous Region
(Jewish Encounters Series) by Masha Gessen
August 23, 2016
Schocken Books
It was the place built for Jews, at the Biro and Bidzhan rivers, 4000 miles East of Moscow, near China, but then the waves of arrests came... and it is a place that the Jews are not.
The previously untold story of the Jews in twentieth-century Russia that reveals the complex, strange, and heart-wrenching truth behind the familiar narrative that begins with pogroms and ends with emigration.

In 1929, the Soviet Union declared the area of Birobidzhan a homeland for Jews. It was championed by a group of intellectuals who envisioned a place of post-oppression Jewish culture, and by the early 1930s, tens of thousands of Jews had moved there from the shtetls. The state-building ended quickly, in the late 1930s, with arrests and purges of the Communist Party and cultural elite. But by 1935, there were onlyt 14,000 Jews, or 23% of the small population of the area.
In the late 1940s, another wave of arrests swept through Birobidzhan, traumatizing the Jews into silence, and effectively making them invisible. Now Masha Gessen gives us a haunting account of the dream of Birobidzhan—and how it became the cracked and crooked mirror in which we can see the true story of the Jews in twentieth-century Russia.


























[book] WHO STOLE MY RELIGION?
REVITALIZING JUDAISM AND
APPLYING JEWISH VALUES
TO HELP HEAL OUR
IMPERILED PLANET
By Richard H. Schartz, PhD
with Rabbi Yonassan Gershom
Foreword by Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz, PhD
August 2016
URIM PUBLICATIONS
If Rabbi Arthur Ocean Waskow likes it, then I like it.
Who Stole My Religion? is a wake up call to Jews to apply Judaism’s powerful teachings on justice, peace, compassion, kindness, and environmental sustainability to help shift our imperiled planet onto a sustainable path. It extols Judaism, arguing that Judaism is a radical, transformative religion, but many Jews, especially Orthodox Jews, are in denial about climate change and are supporting conservative politicians and policies that are inconsistent with Jewish values. Richard Schwartz provides a thought-provoking read, and he demonstrates that the future of humanity depends on Jews applying Judaism’s highest values in response to today’s crises.









































[book] Parachuting Cats into Borneo:
And Other Lessons from
the Change Café
by Axel Klimek and Alan AtKisson
August 2016
Chelsea Green
A toolkit of proven strategies and practices for building capacity and creating transformation
Recent years have seen a proliferation of information on how to make change-in business, in social and environmental movements, and on a more personal scale. But, even with all this attention, two out of three change efforts fail to achieve their desired result. How can you make your own effort buck this trend?
In Parachuting Cats into Borneo, change-management experts Axel Klimek and Alan AtKisson offer crisp, concise, and targeted advice for success. They expose the most significant impediments-helping readers recognize their habitual patterns of thinking and perceiving a situation, critique their own beliefs regarding change, and then move beyond these unhelpful patterns using improved systems thinking.
Named after a classic tale of unintended consequences, Parachuting Cats into Borneo delivers tools that help leaders and others keep their change initiatives on track. The advice imparted will help you move away from agonizing over immediate problems toward stoking action, identifying collaborators, focusing at the right level for your cause, and aiding others in pursuing their change.
Klimek and AtKisson draw from their decades of helping corporations, networks, governments, and NGOs reach their change goals to demonstrate how to use system-based change tools to their maximum advantage.
A closing section is devoted to change making in the realm of sustainability, where complexity abounds but the right tools, used well, can help us tackle some of the most significant challenges of our time.































SEPTEMBER 2016 BOOKS


[book] in the Darkroom
by Susan Faludi
2016
Metropolitan

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author of Backlash, comes In the Darkroom, an astonishing confrontation with the enigma of her father and the larger riddle of identity consuming our age.
“In the summer of 2004 I set out to investigate someone I scarcely knew, my father. The project began with a grievance, the grievance of a daughter whose parent had absconded from her life. I was in pursuit of a scofflaw, an artful dodger who had skipped out on so many things-obligation, affection, culpability, contrition. I was preparing an indictment, amassing discovery for a trial. But somewhere along the line, the prosecutor became a witness.”
So begins Susan Faludi’s extraordinary inquiry into the meaning of identity in the modern world and in her own haunted family saga. When the feminist writer learned that her 76-year-old father-long estranged and living in Hungary-had undergone sex reassignment surgery, that investigation would turn personal and urgent. How was this new parent who identified as “a complete woman now” connected to the silent, explosive, and ultimately violent father she had known, the photographer who’d built his career on the alteration of images?
Faludi chases that mystery into the recesses of her suburban childhood and her father’s many previous incarnations: American dad, Alpine mountaineer, swashbuckling adventurer in the Amazon outback, Jewish fugitive in Holocaust Budapest. When the author travels to Hungary to reunite with her father, she drops into a labyrinth of dark histories and dangerous politics in a country hell-bent on repressing its past and constructing a fanciful-and virulent-nationhood. The search for identity that has transfixed our century was proving as treacherous for nations as for individuals.
Faludi’s struggle to come to grips with her father’s metamorphosis takes her across borders-historical, political, religious, sexual--to bring her face to face with the question of the age: Is identity something you “choose,” or is it the very thing you can’t escape?



















[book] They Call Me Supermensch LP:
They Call Me Super mensch LP: My Amazing Adventures in Rock 'n' Roll,
Hollywood, and Haute Cuisine
by Shep Gordon
September 2016
ecco
An eye-popping peek into entertainment industry from the magnetic force who has worked with an impeccable roster of stars throughout his storied career.
In the course of his legendary career as a manager, agent, and producer, Shep Gordon has worked with, and befriended, some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry, from Alice Cooper to Bette Davis, Raquel Welch to Groucho Marx, Blondie to Jimi Hendrix, Sylvester Stallone to Salvador Dali, Luther Vandross to Teddy Pendergrass. He is also credited with inventing the "celebrity chef," and has worked with Nobu Matsuhisa, Emeril Lagasse, Wolfgang Puck, Roger Vergé, and many others, including his holiness the Dalai Lama.
In this wonderfully engaging memoir, the charismatic entertainment legend recalls his life, from his humble beginnings as a "shy, no self-esteem, Jewish nebbisher kid with no ambition" in Oceanside, Long Island, to his unexpected rise as one of the most influential and respected personalities in show business, revered for his kindness, charisma—and fondness for a good time.
Gordon shares riotous anecdotes and outrageous accounts of his free-wheeling, globe-trotting experiences with some of the biggest celebrities of the past five decades, including his first meeting with Janice Joplin in 1968, when the raspy singer punched him in the face. Told with incomparable humor and heart, They Call Me Supermensch is a sincere, hilarious behind-the-scenes look at the worlds of music and entertainment from the consummate Hollywood insider.






















NOT SINCE the 1973 war’s SECRET CONVERSATIONS OF HENRY KISSINGER has there been such an exciting behind the scenes book ~ Me.
[book] THE IRAN WARS
Spy Games, Bank Battles,
and the Secret Deals That
Reshaped the Middle East
by Jay Solomon, Wall Street Journal
Summer 2016
From the Wall Street Journal reporter who’s been breaking news on the historic and potentially disastrous Iran nuclear deal comes a deeply reported exploration of the country’s decades-long power struggle with the United States—for readers of Steve Coll’s Ghost Wars and Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Tower
For more than a decade, the United States has been engaged in a war with Iran as momentous as any other in the Middle East—a war all the more significant as it has largely been hidden from public view. Through a combination of economic sanctions, global diplomacy, and intelligence work, successive U.S. administrations have struggled to contain Iran’s aspirations to become a nuclear power and dominate the region—what many view as the most serious threat to peace in the Middle East. Meanwhile, Iran has used regional instability to its advantage to undermine America’s interests. The Iran Wars is an absorbing account of a battle waged on many levels—military, financial, and covert.
Jay Solomon’s book is the product of extensive in-depth reporting and interviews with all the key players in the conflict—from high-ranking Iranian officials to Secretary of State John Kerry and his negotiating team. With a reporter’s masterly investigative eye and the narrative dexterity of a great historian, Solomon shows how Iran’s nuclear development went unnoticed for years by the international community only to become its top security concern. He catalogs the blunders of both the Bush and Obama administrations as they grappled with how to engage Iran, producing a series of both carrots and sticks. And he takes us inside the hotel suites where the 2015 nuclear agreement was negotiated, offering a frank assessment of the uncertain future of the U.S.-Iran relationship.
This is a book rife with revelations, from the secret communications between the Obama administration and the Iranian government to dispatches from the front lines of the new field of financial warfare. For readers of Steve Coll’s Ghost Wars and Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Tower, The Iran Wars exposes the hidden history of a conflict most Americans don’t even realize is being fought, but whose outcome could have far-reaching geopolitical implications.
Gordon shares riotous anecdotes and outrageous accounts of his free-wheeling, globe-trotting experiences with some of the biggest celebrities of the past five decades, including his first meeting with Janice Joplin in 1968, when the raspy singer punched him in the face. Told with incomparable humor and heart, They Call Me Supermensch is a sincere, hilarious behind-the-scenes look at the worlds of music and entertainment from the consummate Hollywood insider.






















[book] LEAVE ME
A NOVEL
By Gayle Forman
September 2016
Algonquin Books
Every woman who has ever fantasized about driving past her exit on the highway instead of going home to make dinner, and every woman who has ever dreamed of boarding a train to a place where no one needs constant attention--meet Maribeth Klein. A harried working mother who’s so busy taking care of her husband and twins, she doesn’t even realize she’s had a heart attack.
Surprised to discover that her recuperation seems to be an imposition on those who rely on her, Maribeth does the unthinkable: she packs a bag and leaves. But, as is often the case, once we get where we’re going we see our lives from a different perspective. Far from the demands of family and career and with the help of liberating new friendships, Maribeth is able to own up to secrets she has been keeping from herself and those she loves.
With bighearted characters--husbands, wives, friends, and lovers--who stumble and trip, grow and forgive, Leave Me is about facing the fears we’re all running from. Gayle Forman is a dazzling observer of human nature. She has written an irresistible novel that confronts the ambivalence of modern motherhood head on and asks, what happens when a grown woman runs away from home?






















WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
[book] Next Generation Judaism:
How College Students and Hillel
Can Help Reinvent Jewish Organizations
by Rabbi Mike Uram
Preface by Eric Fingerhut
Foreword by Dr. Ron Wolfson
September 2016
Jewish Lights
What we're learning on campus can help the Jewish community build better, smarter and faster synagogues, Federations and JCCs.

The Jewish world is changing before our eyes. The traditional notions of what it means to be a Jew, what Jewish organizations look like and what Jewish leadership means are no longer working, leaving many Jewish organizations in a struggle for survival. Many Jewish leaders are afraid that this will only get worse as the millennials the "my way, right away, why pay" generation begin to enter adulthood.

But college campuses are incubators of new and vibrant expressions of Jewish life. With motivation and entrepreneurial spirit, and without the limitations of cynicism or institutional history, students are inventing and reinventing Jewish community, Jewish prayer, Jewish service and Jewish learning, and Hillel is right there with them. Each chapter of this book explores innovations developed on the University of Pennsylvania campus and the entire Hillel system in order to show how they can be applied to synagogues, Federations and JCCs to help them reinvent themselves so that they are better able to meet the changing needs of American Jews.

This is an essential resource for lay leaders, rabbis, cantors and anyone who wants to build a brighter Jewish future for all Jews and the institutions that support them.
























[book] MISCHLING
A debut novel
by Affinity Konar
September 2016
A Lee Boudreaux Book
Little Brown and Company
Pearl is in charge of: the sad, the good, the past.
Stasha must care for: the funny, the future, the bad.
It's 1944 when the twin sisters arrive at Auschwitz with their mother and grandfather. In their benighted new world, Pearl and Stasha Zagorski take refuge in their identical natures, comforting themselves with the private language and shared games of their childhood.
As part of the experimental population of twins known as Mengele's Zoo, the girls experience privileges and horrors unknown to others, and they find themselves changed, stripped of the personalities they once shared, their identities altered by the burdens of guilt and pain.
That winter, at a concert orchestrated by Mengele, Pearl disappears. Stasha grieves for her twin, but clings to the possibility that Pearl remains alive. When the camp is liberated by the Red Army, she and her companion Feliks--a boy bent on vengeance for his own lost twin--travel through Poland's devastation. Undeterred by injury, starvation, or the chaos around them, motivated by equal parts danger and hope, they encounter hostile villagers, Jewish resistance fighters, and fellow refugees, their quest enabled by the notion that Mengele may be captured and brought to justice within the ruins of the Warsaw Zoo. As the young survivors discover what has become of the world, they must try to imagine a future within it.
A superbly crafted story, told in a voice as exquisite as it is boundlessly original, MISCHLING defies every expectation, traversing one of the darkest moments in human history to show us the way toward ethereal beauty, moral reckoning, and soaring hope.





























[book] Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law
by Rabbi Ethan Tucker and
Rabbi Micha'el Rosenberg
September 14, 2016
URIM Publications
As gender equality has spread throughout society, including its religiously observant sectors, traditional communities turn to their guiding sources to re-examine old questions. This book opens the reader’s eyes to the wealth of Jewish legal material surrounding gender and prayer, with a particular focus on who can lead the prayers in a traditional service and who can constitute the communal quorum—or minyan—that they require. With honesty, transparency, and rigor, Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law is a powerful resource for grappling with these complex questions. The authors not only explore this specific issue in depth, but they also model how we can mine the Jewish legal tradition for its underlying values, enabling its complex sources to serve as effective guides for contemporary communal decision-making.



























HiNENI
[book] HERE I AM
A NOVEL
By Jonathan Safran Foer
September 6, 2016
FS&G

I know there are many snarky reviewers who will make fun of the premise, the use of catastrophes and sex, or the lack of depth to criticize this novel, but all I can tell you is that it grabbed my whole attention on page 1 and did not let go, and although parts are uncomfortable to read, I have to laud Foer for providing a great story that felt real,… at least to me.

At the same time, it reminded me of an Upper West Side bar mitzvah I once attended. The 13 year old was great, but he was so great that the rabbis expected even more from him. He was held to a much higher standard than all other 13 years before him that year. So, while book is a joy to read, and it is better than nearly all other novels this year, Foer is expected to be delivering much deeper themes.

Not since his book on prostates; Everything Is Illuminated; and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close has a book of his been so interesting, especially about a contemporary Jewish family and its relation to Israel.

It is the story of an upper middle class American Jewish family in Washington DC, and of their attitudes towards Israel and America, of comfort, place, and discomfort in America.

In the book of Genesis, when God calls out, “Abraham!” before ordering him to sacrifice his son Isaac, Abraham responds, “Here I am.” Later, when Isaac calls out, “My father!” before asking him why there is no animal to slaughter, Abraham responds, “Here I am.”

How do we fulfill our conflicting duties as fathers, husbands, and sons; wives and mothers; children and adults? Jews and Americans? How can we claim our own identities when our lives are linked so closely to others’ lives? These are the questions at the heart of Jonathan Safran Foer’s first published novel in over a decade -- a work of extraordinary scope and heartbreaking intimacy.

Unfolding over four tumultuous weeks in present-day Washington, D.C. (where Foer is from), “HERE I AM” is the story of a fracturing family in a moment of crisis (Foer went through a divorce, but says he wrote this portion of the novel before his own divorce). It is also about a husband sexting (hmm… didn’t Foer carry on a long term email-pal-ship with Natalie Portman during his marriage)

As Jacob and Julia Bloch and their three sons (Foer is one of 3 sons) are forced to confront the distances between the lives they think they want and the lives they are living, a catastrophic earthquake under the Dead Sea sets in motion a quickly escalating conflict in the Middle East. The Arab countries want to attack a crippled Israel. Israel is in peril. At stake is the very meaning of home -- and the fundamental question of how much aliveness one can bear.

Showcasing the same high-energy inventiveness, hilarious irreverence, and emotional urgency that readers and critics loved in his earlier work, HERE I AM is Foer’s most searching, hard-hitting, and grandly entertaining novel yet. It not only confirms Foer’s stature as a dazzling literary talent but reveals a mature novelist who has fully come into his own as one of the most important writers of his generation.

The first few pages grab the reader. It opens with a sentence that is a half page long as great grandfather Isaac Bloch, the patriarch, recounts the holes and homes in which he has lived and his possible next move to senior assisted living. The novel then moves to a rabbi’s office with Jacob and Julia Bloch, meeting the rabbi about their son’s upcoming bar mitzvah and the possibility that it might be cancelled because a paper with the “N” word was found on Jacob’s desk in what may be his handwriting, the same hands that manufactured a pretend vagina from a toilet paper tube. This is not for the squeamish, since by page two, some 12 year old boys at Hebrew School are discussing masturbation or a posterior thermometer; Jacob (when not pulling an Anthony Wiener extramarital type of sexting escapade) might have a fixation wondering about the penis of a famous film director (Jaws, Schindler’s List), and soon enough Jacob and Julia recount how they once stayed in a hotel in Pennsylvania where Julia asked Jacob to stare into her vagina to see if she could achieve orgasm just by being looked at. Or how Julia decides to masturbate with a stolen doorknob.

But I digress.

Publishers Weekly says: “Great-grandfather Isaac Bloch's voice opens Foer's intensely imagined and richly rewarding novel. What follows is a teeming saga of members of the patriarch's family: Isaac's son, Irv, a xenophobic, self-righteous defender of Israel who claims that "the world will always hate Jews"; his grandson, Jacob, achingly aware that his decade-plus marriage to Julia is breaking down; and Jacob and Julia's son Sam, whose imminent bar mitzvah may be cancelled if he doesn't apologize for the obscene material discovered in his desk at Hebrew school. The Blochs are distinctively upper-middle-class American in their needs, aspirations, and place in the 21st century. Foer excels in rendering domestic conversation: the banter and quips, the anger and recrimination, and Jacob and Julia's deeply felt guilt that their divorce will damage their three sons. Things are bad enough in the Bloch family when world events intervene: a major earthquake levels the Middle East, spreading catastrophic damage among the Arab states and Israel. In an imaginative segment, Foer depicts the reaction of the media when Israel ceases helping its Arab neighbors to save its own people and the Arab states unite and prepare for attack. The irony is evident: Irv, the fearmonger, has been proven correct. Foer (Everything Is Illuminated) fuses these complex strands with his never-wavering hand. Throughout, his dark wit drops in zingers of dialogue, leavening his melancholy assessments of the loneliness of human relationships and a world riven by ethnic hatred. He poses several thorny moral questions, among them how to have religious faith in the modern world, and what American Jews' responsibilities are toward Israel. That he can provide such a redemptive denouement, at once poignant, inspirational, and compassionate, is the mark of a thrillingly gifted writer. “














Speaking of doorknobs


[book] Man of the World:
The Further Endeavors
of Bill Clinton
by Joe Conason
September 2016
Simon & Schuster
Usually when a POTUS leaves the White House, he (or she) stops dealing in foreign policy, except at the request of the new POTUS. Would you believe it if you were told that President Bill Clinton did some foreign policy deals after he left office? Or that he counseled Hillary to vote for the Iraq War in the Senate, but then called in his friends (Mexico, Chile, UK) to try to delay or stop the war from ever happening. He did not inform the State Dept of his dealings, but on the ther hand, the NSA and Ricardo Lagos and Vincente Fox surely told POTUS Bush what was going on.

Veteran political journalist Joe Conason brings you along with Bill Clinton, as the forty-second president blazes new paths in his post-presidential career. It is unlike the second career of any other president: “Bill Clinton” is a global brand, rising from the dark days of his White House departure to become one of the most popular names in the world. Conason describes how that happened, examining Clinton’s achievements, his failures, his motivations, and his civilian life. He explains why Clinton’s ambitions for the world continue
to inspire some
(and infuriate others).

Conason, who has covered Clinton for twenty years, interviewed him many times for this book — as well as Hillary and Chelsea and many of Clinton’s friends, aides, rivals, and supporters. He has travelled with Clinton to Africa, Haiti, Israel, and across America.

Clinton has earned tens of millions of dollars and raised billions for philanthropy, much of it from foreign sources, provoking questions about transparency and probity even as Hillary Clinton runs again for the presidency.

Conason closely examines the financial support from other countries, corporations, and wealthy individuals, while assessing the Clinton Foundation’s very real, far reaching achievements. He observes Clinton campaigning for his wife and asks: How would America’s very first First Gentleman fare in a Hillary Clinton White House?

Man of the World—starring the one and only Bill Clinton—tells the engrossing story of an extraordinary man who is still seeking to do good in the world.


























[book] The Gefilte Manifesto
New Recipes for
Old World Jewish Foods
by Jeffrey Yoskowitz and Liz Alpern
September 13, 2016
Flatiron Books
The founders of the world-famous Gefilteria revitalize beloved old-world foods with ingenious new approaches in their debut cookbook.
Liz Alpern and Jeffrey Yoskowitz are on a mission to reclaim and revolutionize Ashkenazi cuisine. Combining the inventive spirit of a new generation and respect for their culinary tradition, they present more than a hundred recipes pulled deep from the kitchens of Eastern Europe and the diaspora community of North America. Their recipes highlight the best of Ashkenazi home and storefront cuisine, tapping into the enduring Jewish values of resourcefulness and seasonality.
Drawing inspiration from aromatic Jewish bakeries (Classic Challah with a Marble Rye Twist, Seeded Honey Rye Pull-Apart Rolls), neighborhood delis (Home-Cured Corned Beef and Pastrami, Rustic Matzo Balls, and Old World Stuffed Gefilte Fish), old-fashioned pickle shops (Crisp Garlic Dilly Beans, Ashkenazi Kimchi), and, of course, their own childhood kitchens, Yoskowitz and Alpern rediscover old-world food traditions, helping you bring simple and comforting recipes into your home.
Dishes like Spiced Blueberry Soup, Kasha Varnishkes with Brussels Sprouts, and Sweet Lokshen Kugel with Plums celebrate flavors passed down from generation to generation in recipes reimagined for the contemporary kitchen. Other recipes take a playful approach to the Old World, like Fried Sour Pickles with Garlic Aioli and Sour Dill Martinis. The Gefilte Manifesto is more than a cookbook. It’s a call to action, a reclamation of time-honored techniques and ingredients, from the mind-blowingly easy Classic Sour Dill Pickles to the Crispy Honey-Glazed Chicken with Tsimmes. Make a stand. Cook the Manifesto. The results are radically delicious.





















[book] Seasoned Moments:
Rosh Hashana & Yom Kippur:
Recipes for a Happy New Year
by Michal Dagan Levison
September 13, 2016
From an Israeli-American cook who is passionate about building family through food comes a vibrant new collection of more than 40 recipes for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. Michal Levison shares bold takes on traditional fare, as well as inventive new dishes that will become hallmarks of your holiday table. Influenced by her childhood in Israel as well as her travels throughout the world, Michal connects cultural traditions with contemporary aesthetics and flavors. Classics rest comfortably between modern, spice-driven dishes. You'll find plenty of tips, tricks and insights that will inspire you to jump into the kitchen.
You don't need to be Jewish to enjoy this cookbook. This is a wonderful resource for the fall months, full of simple, fresh and delicious meals that work well for everyone in the family.





























[book] OUR TABLE:
Time-Tested Recipes,
Memorable Meals
A Kosher Cookbook
by Renee Muller
September 07, 2016
Artscroll/Mesorah
Renee Muller resides in Lakewood, New Jersey, but started to cook in her hometown in Switzerland in the Northern Italian/Swiss style. In OUR TABLE, she invites you to partake of her family s favorite dishes, each vividly presented with an art-quality full-color photo. Refreshingly simple, distinctively delicious, and crafted from common ingredients, the time-tested recipes in Our Table are sure to find a welcome place at your table every day of the year. Through heartwarming stories and culinary wisdom, Our Table is as readable on the couch as it is useful in the kitchen. Renee will become your personal guide, walking you through subtle suggestions that turn good food into great food.
Featuring
Over 100 simply brilliant family-friendly kosher recipes
Magnificent full-color photo for each dish
Cooking insights and techniques throughout
Photo-inspired food plating ideas
Pesach substitutions guide
special selection of unique online video tutorials





















[book] Lean in 15:
15-Minute Meals and Workouts
to Keep You Lean and Healthy
by Joe Wicks
2016
Morrow
(watch his video by clicking the bookcover)
Popular among overweight yeshiva kids in London
Get fits eating carbs and burgers
Eat more, exercise less, and lose fat.

Discover how to SHIFT your body fat and get the lean physique of your dreams by eating better and exercising less in this essential cookbook and exercise guide—an instant bestseller in the UK—that combines 100 delicious recipes and signature HIIT (high intensity interval training) home workouts from personal trainer and Instagram sensation @thebodycoach, Joe Wicks.
Joe Wicks, “The Body Coach” has helped thousands around the world lose weight and achieve the body they’ve always wanted with his proven fat-burning methods. Now, in his first book, he reveals how to SHIFT body fat by eating more and exercising less.
In Lean in 15, Joe gives you 100 recipes for nutritious, delicious, quick-to-prepare meals—ready in just fifteen minutes—and made from ordinary ingredients—lean meat, lots of veggies, some carbs, and smart fats. He shows you how to eat in line with your energy demands every day, as you enjoy such treats as Banana and Blueberry Overnight Oats, Incredible Hulk Smoothie, Big Barbecue Chicken Wrap, Teriyaki Chicken Stir Fry, Quick Tortilla Pizza, Sammy the Sea Bass with Spaghetti, Gnocchi with Sausage Ragu, Thai Beef Stir-Fry, Spiced Tortilla Chips, and Avocado Ranch with Dipping Sticks. Joe then walks you through his signature HIIT—High Intensity Interval Training—home workouts, explaining how to combine his delicious recipes and exercises into a personal plan to increase energy and lean muscle, raise metabolism, and ignite intense fat-burning.
This accessible, appealing, color paperback features gorgeous food shots, helpful how-to photos, and inspiring before and after shots of Joe’s clients and their amazing body transformations throughout. Joe also includes a simple chart breaking down his own weekly regimen to help you plan your own. Lean in 15 “isn’t a strict diet—it’s a lifestyle that will transform your body and the way you eat,” he makes clear. With Joe Wicks and Lean in 15, you’ll discover how to keep your body healthy, strong, and lean—forever.


















[book] Aphrodite and the Rabbis:
How the Jews Adapted Roman Culture
to Create Judaism As We Know It
by Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky
September 13, 2016
St. Martin’s Books
I knew that the seder is modeled on a Roman/Greco banquet/symposium (but no slave, no vomitorium), but is there more?

Professor Visotzky teaches us that The Talmud rabbis presented themselves as Stoic philosophers; Synagogue buildings were modeled on Roman basilicas; Hellenistic rhetoric professors educated sons of well-to-do Jews; Zeus-Helios is depicted in synagogue mosaics across ancient Israel; The Jewish courts were named after the Roman political institution, the Sanhedrin; and In Israel there were synagogues where the prayers were recited in ancient Greek.

Historians have long debated the (re)birth of Judaism in the wake of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple cult by the Romans in 70 CE. What replaced that sacrificial cult was at once something new–indebted to the very culture of the Roman overlords–even as it also sought to preserve what little it could of the old Israelite religion. The Greco-Roman culture in which rabbinic Judaism grew in the first five centuries of the Common Era nurtured the development of Judaism as we still know and celebrate it today.

Arguing that its transformation from a Jerusalem-centered cult to a world religion was made possible by the Roman Empire, Rabbi Burton Visotzky presents Judaism as a distinctly Roman religion. Full of fascinating detail from the daily life and culture of Jewish communities across the Hellenistic world, Aphrodite and the Rabbis will appeal to anyone interested in the development of Judaism, religion, history, art and architecture.
BURTON L. VISOTZKY is Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary.




















[book] The Daily Stoic:
366 Meditations on Wisdom,
Perseverance, and the Art of Living
by Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman
2016
Portfolio
From the team that brought you The Obstacle is The Way and Ego is The Enemy, a beautiful daily devotional of Stoic meditations.
Why have history's greatest minds—from George Washington to Frederick the Great to Ralph Waldo Emerson, along with today's top performers from Super Bowl-winning football coaches to CEOs and celebrities—embraced the wisdom of the ancient Stoics? Because they realize that the most valuable wisdom is timeless and that philosophy is for living a better life, not a classroom exercise.
The Daily Stoic offers 366 days of Stoic insights and exercises, featuring all-new translations from the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the playwright Seneca, or slave-turned-philosopher Epictetus, as well as lesser-known luminaries like Zeno, Cleanthes, and Musonius Rufus. Every day of the year you'll find one of their pithy, powerful quotations, as well as historical anecdotes, provocative commentary, and a helpful glossary of Greek terms.
By following these teachings over the course of a year (and, indeed, for years to come) you'll find the serenity, self-knowledge, and resilience you need to live well.




















[book] Thinner in 30:
Small Changes That Add Up
to Big Weight Loss in Just 30 Days
by Jenna Wolfe and Myatt Murphy
Grand Central Life & Style
A month from now, you'll wish you had started today.
Yes, a month is all it takes to see long-term results.
And seriously-even YOU can lose that weight!

Food and exercise fads come and go, mainly because they just aren't sustainable. After a few days, you're hungry, bored, or hungry AND bored. That's why the Today show's very first lifestyle and fitness correspondent, Jenna Wolfe, created her famous 30-Day Fitness Challenge for her viewers. The challenge was wildly successful because of its unprecedented and simple approach to everyday health and fitness-one small tip a day for 30 days.
Now, in THINNER IN 30, Jenna takes her foolproof program to the next level, giving you the tools and motivation you'll need to achieve your wellness goals with thirty small changes that add up to big results-in as few as 30 days. It's all possible without joining a gym, counting calories, or signing up for a trendy class you can't even pronounce. The perfect plan for busy men and women of all ages and fitness levels, THINNER IN 30 puts the focus on small, bite-size tips which lead to long-term weight loss.
Jenna blends athletic wisdom, laugh-out-loud humor, and easy-to-follow advice, like how many times to chew your food per bite, what the heck carbs are all about, and how to sneak in workouts without any time, money, equipment, or energy (pretty much covering any excuse you may have). THINNER IN 30 will help you discover just how easy it is to get healthy without having to deprive yourself or work out 12 hours a day.

Jenna Wolfe (Jennifer Greenfield Wolfeld) was born in Jamaica and grew up in Pétionville, Haiti. After becoming a Bat Mitzah and college graduation, she was a correspondent for NBC's Today, and Sunday co-anchor for NBC’s Weekend. She lives in NYC with her wife and two children. She is a grad of SUNY Binghamton University.


















[book] THE RYE BAKER
Classic Breads from Europe and America
by Stanley Ginsberg
(The New York Bakers)
September 27, 2016
Norton
To many Americans, rye bread is a bland, store-bought loaf with an oval cross-section and, sometimes, a sprinkling of caraway. But true rye bread… the kind that stands at the center of northern and eastern European food culture is so much more. In The Rye Baker, Stanley Ginsberg brings this overlooked grain into the culinary limelight, introducing readers to the rich and unimaginably diverse world of rye bread.

Readers will find more than 70 classic recipes that span rye’s regions and terroir, from dark, intense Russian Borodinsky and orange-infused Swedish Gotland Rye to near-black Westphalian Pumpernickel (which gets its musky sweetness from a 24-hour bake), Spiced Honey Rye from France’s Auvergne, and the rye breads of America’s melting-pot, such as Boston Brown Bread and Old Milwaukee Rye. Chapters detailing rye’s history, unique chemistry, and centuries-old baking methods round out The Rye Baker, making it the definitive resource for professional and home bakers alike.

























[book] Two She-Bears
A Novel
by Meir Shalev
Translated from Hebrew by Stuart Schoffman
September 13, 2016
Schocken
One of Israel's most celebrated novelists—the acclaimed author of A Pigeon and a Boy — now gives us a story of village love and vengeance in the early days of British Palestine that is still being played out two generations later.

“In the year 1930, three farmers committed suicide here . . . but contrary to the chronicles of our committee and the conclusions of the British policeman, the people of the moshava knew that only two of the suicides had actually taken their own lives, whereas the third suicide had been murdered.” This is the contention of Ruta Tavori, a high school teacher and independent thinker in this small farming community, writing seventy years later about that murder and about two charismatic men she loves and is trying to forgive—her grandfather and her husband—and her son, whom she mourns and misses. In a story rich with the grit, humor, and near-magical evocation of Israeli rural life for which Meir Shalev is beloved by readers, Ruta weaves a tale of friendship between men, of love and betrayal, that carries us from British Palestine to present-day Israel, where forgiveness, atonement, and understanding can finally happen.





























[book] PRAY WITH YOUR LIMBS
& Other Devotions of a Nanach
by Simcha Nanach
September 2016
Self published - Createspace

HH this book is not for everyone, it is only for someone who really wants to go all the way, to absolutely know and abnegate himself to his Creator. Such a person will find great help and hope with this short treatise. The book contains: Prayers addressing each of the main limbs and body parts, addressing their particular attributes and functions, often kabalisticy, and primarily based on the holy teachings revealed by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov - Na Nach Nachma Nachman MeUman. The book also contains A Short List of Holy Tzaddikim spanning the entire creation, so that one can easily merit to mention their names daily. The book also contains a few Prayers Before Prayers which are summaries of entire Torahs of Likutay Moharan. The book also has the english translation of the transcript of the Story of Rabbi Yisroel Dov Odessers becoming a Breslov hassid, and the story of the Miracle of the Petek, as he himself told it over. Finally this book includes the entire book: Rabbi Nachman of Breslov; Who He Was and What He Said (which includes the transliteration of the Tikun Haklalee). Na Nach Nachma Nachman MeUman
























[book] CHASING PORTRAITS
A Great-Granddaughter’s Quest
For Her Lost Art Legacy
By Elizabeth Rynecki
September 2016
NAL New American Library
The memoir of one woman’s emotional quest to find the art of her Polish-Jewish great-grandfather, lost during World War II.
Moshe Rynecki’s (1881-1943) body of work reached close to eight hundred paintings and sculptures before his life came to a tragic end. It was his great-granddaughter Elizabeth who sought to rediscover his legacy, setting upon a journey to seek out what had been lost but never forgotten…
The everyday lives of the Polish-Jewish community depicted in Moshe Rynecki’s paintings simply blended into the background of Elizabeth Rynecki’s life when she was growing up. But the art transformed from familiar to extraordinary in her eyes after her grandfather, Moshe’s son George, left behind journals detailing the loss her ancestors had endured during World War II, including Moshe’s art. Knowing that her family had only found a small portion of Moshe’s art, and that many more pieces remained to be found, Elizabeth set out to find them.
Before Moshe was deported to the ghetto, he entrusted his work to friends who would keep it safe. After he was killed in the Majdanek concentration camp, the art was dispersed all over the world. With the help of historians, curators, and admirers of Moshe’s work, Elizabeth began the incredible and difficult task of rebuilding his collection.
Spanning three decades of Elizabeth’s life and three generations of her family, this touching memoir is a compelling narrative of the richness of one man’s art, the devastation of war, and one woman’s unexpected path to healing.























[book] Selling Hitler
Propaganda and the Nazi Brand
by Nicholas O'Shaughnessy
September 2016
Hurst
Hitler was one of the few politicians who understood that persuasion was everything, deployed to anchor an entire regime in the confections of imagery, rhetoric and dramaturgy. The Nazis pursued propaganda not just as a tool, an instrument of government, but also as the totality, the raison d'être, the medium through which power itself was exercised. Moreover, Nicholas O'Shaughnessy argues, Hitler, not Goebbels, was the prime mover in the propaganda regime of the Third Reich - its editor and first author.

Under the Reich everything was a propaganda medium, a building-block of public consciousness, from typography to communiqués, to architecture, to weapons design. There were groups to initiate rumours and groups to spread graffiti. Everything could be interrogated for its propaganda potential, every surface inscribed with polemical meaning, whether an enemy city's name, an historical epic or the poster on a neighbourhood wall. But Hitler was in no sense an innovator - his ideas were always second-hand.
Rather his expertise was as a packager, fashioning from the accumulated mass of icons and ideas, the historic debris, the labyrinths and byways of the German mind, a modern and brilliant political show articulated through deftly managed symbols and rituals. The Reich would have been unthinkable without propaganda - it would not have been the Reich.





























[book] Chasing Utopia:
The Future of the Kibbutz
in a Divided Israel
by David Leach
September 13, 2016
ECW Canadian Press
A fascinating, non-partisan exploration of an incendiary region
Say the word “Israel” today and it sparks images of walls and rockets and a bloody conflict without end. Yet for decades, the symbol of the Jewish State was the noble pioneer draining the swamps and making the deserts bloom: the legendary kibbutznik. So what ever happened to the pioneers’ dream of founding a socialist utopia in the land called Palestine?
Chasing Utopia: The Future of the Kibbutz in a Divided Israel draws readers into the quest for answers to the defining political conflict of our era. Acclaimed author David Leach revisits his raucous memories of life as a kibbutz volunteer and returns to meet a new generation of Jewish and Arab citizens struggling to forge a better future together. Crisscrossing the nation, Leach chronicles the controversial decline of Israel’s kibbutz movement and witnesses a renaissance of the original vision for a peaceable utopia in unexpected corners of the Promised Land. Chasing Utopia is an entertaining and enlightening portrait of a divided nation where hope persists against the odds.





























[book] All Set for Black, Thanks.
A New Look at Mourning
by Miriam Weinstein
September 2016
From a winner of the National Jewish Book Award.
When Miriam Weinstein’s good friend died unexpectedly, and other losses followed close behind, it led to a year of introspection and black outfits. All Set For Black, Thanks ditches the sanctimony to give us the help, and the laughs, that we actually need in times of mourning and grief. She explores such topics as how we keep our dead with us even as we learn to let them go; why we should not bring casseroles; how to write the Best Eulogy Ever. Part memoir, part how-to, this book will help you get through the rough bargain of human existence: none of us gets out of here alive, but we live as if the lives of our loved ones had no end.





























[book] The Spiritual Practice of Good Actions:
Finding Balance Through the Soul Traits of Mussar
by Greg Marcus
September 2016
Bring your everyday life into alignment with your aspirational values through Mussar, a thousand-year-old Jewish practice of spiritual growth based on mindful living. Perfect for anyone, regardless of age or experience, this comprehensive book presents thirteen soul traits-ranging from humility and gratitude to trust and honor-and the simple daily actions you can take to develop them.

Drawing on universal principles and providing grounded instruction, The Spiritual Practice of Good Actions helps you explore soul traits through daily techniques and exercises, including mantras, mindful observation, and journaling. Nurture your spirit with inspiring stories and build a soul trait profile to better understand yourself. By dedicating two weeks of practice to each trait, you'll see major changes in how you approach the world and feel empowered to be your best self.





























[book] Nine Essential Things
I've Learned About Life
by Harold S. Kushner, Rabbi Laureate Emeritus
September 2016
In this compassionate and deeply personal work, Rabbi Harold S. Kushner distills his experiences as a twenty-first-century rabbi into nine essential takeaways. Offering readers a lifetime’s worth of spiritual food for thought, pragmatic advice, and strength for trying times, he gives fresh, vital insight into belief, conscience, mercy, and more. Grounded in Kushner’s brilliant readings of scripture, history, and popular culture, Nine Essential Things I’ve Learned About Life is practical, illuminating, and compulsory advice for living a good life.





























[book] Joseph:
Portraits through the Ages
by Dr. Alan T. Levenson Ph.D.
University of Oklahoma
September 2016
Jewish Publication Society JPS / Nebraska The complex and dramatic story of Joseph is the most sustained narrative in Genesis. Many call it a literary masterpiece and a story of great depth that can be read on many levels. In a lucid and engaging style, Alan T. Levenson brings the voices of Philo, Josephus, Midrash, and medieval commentators, as well as a wide range of modern scholars, into dialogue about this complex biblical figure.
Levenson explores such questions as: Why did Joseph’s brothers hate him so? What is achieved by Joseph’s ups and downs on the path to extraordinary success? Why didn’t Joseph tell his father he was alive and ruling Egypt? What was Joseph like as a husband and father? Was Joseph just or cruel in testing his brothers’ characters?
Levenson deftly shows how an unbroken chain of interpretive traditions, mainly literary but also artistic, have added to the depth of this fascinating and unique character.





























[book] TREYF
My Quest for Identity
in a Forbidden World
My Life as an Unorthodox Outlaw
by Elissa Altman
(Washington Post, columnist)
Winner of the James Bear Award
September 2016
New American Library
From the Washington Post columnist and James Beard Award-winning author of Poor Man’s Feast comes a story of seeking truth, acceptance, and self in a world of contradiction...
Treyf: According to Leviticus, unkosher and prohibited, like lobster, shrimp, pork, fish without scales, the mixing of meat and dairy. Also, imperfect, intolerable, offensive, undesirable, unclean, improper, broken, forbidden, illicit.
A person can eat treyf; a person can be treyf.
In this kaleidoscopic, universal memoir of time and place, Elissa Altman explores the tradition, religion, family expectation, and the forbidden that were the fixed points in her 1970s Queens, New York, childhood. Every part of Altman’s youth was laced with contradiction and hope, betrayal and the yearning for acceptance: synagogue on Saturday and Chinese pork ribs on Sunday; Bat Mitzvahs followed by shrimp-in-lobster-sauce luncheons; her old-country grandparents, whose kindness and love were tied to unspoken rage, and her bell-bottomed neighbors, whose adoring affection hid dark secrets.
While the suburban promise of The Brady Bunch blared on television, Altman searched for peace and meaning in a world teeming with faith, violence, sex, and paradox. Spanning from 1940s wartime Brooklyn to 1960s and '70s Queens to present-day rural New England, Treyf captures the collision of youthful cravings and grown-up identities; it is a vivid tale of what it means to come to yourself both in spite of and in honor to your past.




























[book] The Israel-Arab Reader:
A Documentary History of
the Middle East Conflict:
Eighth Revised and Updated Edition
Edited by Walter Laqueur and Dan Schueftan
September 2016
Penguin
In print for nearly half a century, and now in its eighth edition, The Israel-Arab Reader is an authoritative guide to over a century of conflict in the Middle East. It covers the full spectrum of a violent and checkered history—the origins of Zionism and Arab nationalism, the struggles surrounding Israel’s independence in 1948, the Six-Day War and other wars and hostilities over the decades, and the long diplomatic process and many peace initiatives.

Arranged chronologically and without bias by two veteran historians of the Middle East, this comprehensive reference brings together speeches, letters, articles, and reports involving all the major interests in the area. The eighth edition features a new introduction as well as a large new section—more than 40 pages—recounting developments over the last decade, including the intra-Palestinian factional strife between Fatah and Hamas, the roles played by Egypt and Iran in the region, enduring arguments over a two-state solution and the right of return for Palestinian refugees, and issues of human rights abuse and terrorism.

























[book] Operation Agreement:
Jewish Commandos and the
Raid on Tobruk
(General Military)
by John Sadler
2016
Osprey Publishing/Bloomsbury
The Special Interrogation Group (SIG) was the most exceptional of Special Forces. Created to raid behind enemy lines, posing as German troops, the SIG was largely made up of German Jews who were all too aware of the dangers they faced--capture meant either death or deportation to a concentration camp.
In 1942, Operation Agreement saw the SIG tasked with taking part in a raid on Tobruk, where they were to make up the land-based element of the attack. Disguised as POWs under “escort” by German SIGs, the group covered close to 1,700 miles of desert to reach their target. The ruse worked perfectly and SIG went on to destroy a number of coastal guns before eventually being overwhelmed by Axis forces.
This is the history of the SIG, revealing startling details about the group, and moving insights into the men, many of whom were Jewish volunteers who were putting their lives on the line to fight against the evils of fascism in Europe.























[book] SPRINKLE GLITTER ON MY GRAVE
Observations, Rants and Other
Uplifting Thoughts About Life
by Jill Kargman (Jill Kopelman Kargman)
September 6, 2016
Ballantine
The star of Bravo’s breakout scripted comedy Odd Mom Out shares her razor-sharp wit and backhanded wisdom in a deeply observed and outrageously funny collection of musings, lists, essays, and outrages.
From her unique lingo (things don’t simply frighten her, they “M. Night Shyamalan her out”) to her gimlet-eyed view of narrow-mindedness, to her morbid but curiously life-affirming parenting style, Jill Kargman (daughter of Arie Kopelman of Chanel fame) is nothing if not original. In this hilarious new book, the sharp-elbowed mother of three turns her unconventional lens on life and death and everything in between, including
• the politically correct peer pressure she felt from the new moms in her hood, the women who provided the grist for the mill of her hit television show
• the evolution of her aesthetic from Miami Vice vibrant (a very brief flirtation) to Wednesday Addams–meets–rocker chic
• her deep-seated New Yorker’s discomfort with moving vehicles that aren’t taxis and subways (a.k.a. “suburban panic disorder”)
• the family obsession with reading obituaries for their medical revelations and real estate news value
• the reasons why, in a land of tan-orexic baby-oil beach bakers, she chooses to honor the valor of her ghostly pallor

From a hellish visit to the Happiest Place on Earth to her unusual wedding night with Russell Crowe to her adrenaline-pumping Gay Pride parade experience, Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave is as wonderfully indecent and entertaining as a spring break road trip with your best friend. Assuming your best friend is the kind of gal who still wears a motorcycle jacket to pick up the kids at school.




























[book] LET THERE BE LAUGHTER
A TREAUSRE OF GREAT
JEWISH HUMOR AND WHAT
IT ALL MEANS
Compiled by Michael Krasny
September 2016
William Morrow
From the host of NPR affiliate’s Forum with Michael Krasny, a compendium of Jewish jokes that packs the punches with hilarious riff after riff and also offers a window into Jewish culture.

Michael Krasny has been telling Jewish jokes since his bar mitzvah, and it’s been said that he knows more of them than anyone on the planet. He certainly states his case in this wise, enlightening, and hilarious book that not only collects the best of Jewish humor passed down from generation to generation, but explains the cultural expressions and anxieties behind the laughs.

"What’s Jewish Alzheimer’s?"
"You forget everything but the grudges."

"You must be so proud. Your daughter is the President of the United States!"
"Yes. But her brother is a doctor!"

"Isn’t Jewish humor masochistic?"
"No. And if I hear that one more time I am going to kill myself."

With his background as a scholar and public-radio host, Krasny delves deeply into the themes, topics, and form of Jewish humor: chauvinism undercut by irony and self-mockery, the fear of losing cultural identity through assimilation, the importance of vocal inflection in joke-telling, and calls to communal memory, including the use of Yiddish.

Borrowing from traditional humor and such Jewish comedy legends as Jackie Mason, Mel Brooks, and Joan Rivers, Larry David, Sarah Silverman, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, Let There Be Laughter is an absolute pleasure for the chosen and goyim alike.


























[book] JERUSALEM 1000-1400
Every People Under Heaven
Edited by Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb
Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC
September 2016
A comprehensive and timely exploration of the key role Jerusalem played in shaping the art and culture of the Middle Ages
Medieval Jerusalem was a vibrant international center and home to multiple cultures, faiths, and languages. Harmonious and dissonant influences from Persian, Turkish, Greek, Syrian, Armenian, Georgian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Indian, and European traditions invested Jerusalem with a key role in shaping the art of the Middle Ages. Through compelling essays by international and interdisciplinary experts and detailed discussions of more than 200 works of art, this beautiful, authoritative volume breaks new ground in exploring the relationship between the historical and the archetypal city of Jerusalem, uncovering the ways in which the aesthetic achievements it inspired enhanced and enlivened the medieval world.

Patrons and artists from Christian, Jewish, and Islamic traditions alike focused their attention on the Holy City, endowing and enriching its sacred buildings and creating luxury goods for its residents. This artistic fertility was particularly in evidence between the 11th and the 14th centuries, notwithstanding often devastating circumstances—from the earthquake of 1033 to the fierce battles of the Crusades. Dazzling illustrations featuring new photography complement this unprecedented, panoptic story of Jerusalem in the Middle Ages.



























[book] Frederick Barbarossa:
The Prince and the Myth
by Prof. John Freed
2016
Yale University Press
He was not called Barbarossa until 100 years after his death
Frederick Barbarossa, born of two of Germany’s most powerful families, swept to the imperial throne in a coup d’état in 1152. A leading monarch of the Middle Ages, he legalized the dualism between the crown and the princes that endured until the end of the Holy Roman Empire. He also fought Popes and the Lombardi Italian states winning and ultimately losing. As for the Jews... he gave them some rights in the German states and also decreed that wounding a Jew was punishable by amputation or death, which saved many Jews during the Third Crusade.

This new biography, the first in English in four decades, paints a rich picture of a consummate diplomat and effective warrior. John Freed mines Barbarossa’s recently published charters and other sources to illuminate the monarch’s remarkable ability to rule an empire that stretched from the Baltic to Rome, and from France to Poland. Offering a fresh assessment of the role of Barbarossa’s extensive familial network in his success, the author also considers the impact of Frederick’s death in the Third Crusade as the key to his lasting heroic reputation. In an intriguing epilogue, Freed explains how Hitler’s audacious attack on the Soviet Union in 1941 came to be called “Operation Barbarossa.”


























[book] ALLY
My Journey Across the
American-Israeli Divide
by Michael B. Oren
September 2016
Random House
Now in Paperback
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Includes a new afterword about the Iran nuclear agreement, the 2016 presidential race, and the future of the U.S.-Israel alliance
Michael B. Oren’s memoir of his time as Israel’s ambassador to the United States—a period of transformative change for America and a time of violent upheaval throughout the Middle East—provides a frank, fascinating look inside the special relationship between America and its closest ally in the region.
Michael Oren served as the Israeli ambassador to the United States from 2009 to 2013. An American by birth and a historian by training, Oren arrived at his diplomatic post just as Benjamin Netanyahu, Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton assumed office. During Oren’s tenure in office, Israel and America grappled with the Palestinian peace process, the Arab Spring, and existential threats to Israel posed by international terrorism and the Iranian nuclear program. Forged in the Truman administration, America’s alliance with Israel was subjected to enormous strains, and its future was questioned by commentators in both countries. On more than one occasion, the friendship’s very fabric seemed close to unraveling.
Ally is the story of that enduring alliance—and of its divides—written from the perspective of a man who treasures his American identity while proudly serving the Jewish State he has come to call home. No one could have been better suited to strengthen bridges between the United States and Israel than Michael Oren—a man equally at home jumping out of a plane as an Israeli paratrooper and discussing Middle East history on TV’s Sunday morning political shows. In the pages of this fast-paced book, Oren interweaves the story of his personal journey with behind-the-scenes accounts of fateful meetings between President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu, high-stakes summits with the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas, and diplomatic crises that intensified the controversy surrounding the world’s most contested strip of land.
A quintessentially American story of a young man who refused to relinquish a dream—irrespective of the obstacles—and an inherently Israeli story about assuming onerous responsibilities, Ally is at once a record, a chronicle, and a confession. And it is a story about love—about someone fortunate enough to love two countries and to represent one to the other. But, above all, this memoir is a testament to an alliance that was and will remain vital for Americans, Israelis, and the world.


























[book] Incarnations:
India in Fifty Lives
by Sunil Khilnani
(King's College, London)
September 2016
FS&G
The average Israeli knows more about India than the average American or American Jewish person. - - so many young IDF travel to this nation after their initial service.
So why not learn more about India
An entertaining and provocative account of India’s past, written by one of the country’s leading thinkers

For all of India's myths, its sea of stories and moral epics, Indian history remains a curiously unpeopled place. In Incarnations, Sunil Khilnani fills that space, recapturing the human dimension of how the world's largest democracy came to be. His trenchant portraits of emperors, warriors, philosophers, film stars, and corporate titans--some famous, some unjustly forgotten--bring feeling, wry humor, and uncommon insight to dilemmas that extend from ancient times to our own. As he journeys across the country and through its past, Khilnani uncovers more than just history.

In rocket launches and ayurvedic call centers, in slum temples and Bollywood studios, in California communes and grimy ports, he examines the continued, and often surprising, relevance of the men and women who have made India--and the world--what it is. We encounter the Buddha, “the first human personality”; the ancient Sanskrit linguist who inspires computer programmers today; the wit and guile of India’s Machiavelli; and the medieval poets who mocked rituals and caste. In the twentieth century, Khilnani sets Gandhi and other political icons of the independence era next to actresses, photographers, and entrepreneurs. Incarnations is an ideal introduction to India--and a provocative and sophisticated reinterpretation of its history.


























[book] Peacemakers in Action:
Volume 2:
Profiles in Religious Peacebuilding
Edited by Joyce S. Dubensky, Esq
September 2016
Cambridge University Press
Every day, women and men risk their lives to stop violence in religiously charged conflicts around the world. This book provides a window into the triumphs, the risks, the failures, and the lessons learned of seven remarkable, religiously motivated peacemakers including a Methodist bishop in the Democratic Republic of Congo who welcomes armed warlords into his home, with prayer; a Christian who, despite pleas from her friends, travels to Syria to coordinate medical aid and rebuild war-torn communities; a Muslim woman who struggles against disability and her family to educate women, youth, and even imams in Afghanistan; and an Anglican vicar in Iraq who gets captured while negotiating for the lives of hostages and is thrown into a room with dismembered body parts. The new volume offers students of religious and grassroots peacebuilding tested techniques and methods for organizing community action, establishing trust in conflict, and instilling hope amid


























[book] I Dissent:
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark
by Debbie Levy
Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley
September 2016
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Get to know celebrated Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg—in the first picture book about her life—as she proves that disagreeing does not make you disagreeable.
U.S. Supreme Court SCOTUS Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere.
This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG, tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements.


























[book] MY OWN WORDS
By Ruth Bader Ginsburg
U.S. Supreme Court Justice
With Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams
2016
Simon and Schuster
The first book from Ruth Bader Ginsburg since becoming a Supreme Court Justice in 1993—a witty, engaging, serious, and playful collection of writings and speeches from the woman who has had a powerful and enduring influence on law, women’s rights, and popular culture.
My Own Words offers Justice Ginsburg on wide-ranging topics, including gender equality, the workways of the Supreme Court, being Jewish, law and lawyers in opera, and the value of looking beyond US shores when interpreting the US Constitution. Throughout her life Justice Ginsburg has been (and continues to be) a prolific writer and public speaker. This book’s sampling is selected by Justice Ginsburg and her authorized biographers Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams. Justice Ginsburg has written an introduction to the book, and Hartnett and Williams introduce each chapter, giving biographical context and quotes gleaned from hundreds of interviews they have conducted. This is a fascinating glimpse into the life of one of America’s most influential women.























[book] The Plot to Kill Hitler
Dietrich Bonhoeffer:
Pastor, Spy, Unlikely Hero
by Patricia McCormick
September 2016
Balzer and Bray
Ages 8 – 13
Perfect for fans of suspenseful nonfiction such as books by Steve Sheinkin, this is a page-turning narrative about Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a pastor and pacifist who became an unlikely hero during World War II and took part in a plot to kill Hitler. Written by two-time National Book Award finalist Patricia McCormick, author of Sold and Never Fall Down and coauthor of the young reader’s edition of I Am Malala.
It was April 5, 1943, and the Gestapo would arrive any minute. Dietrich Bonhoeffer had been expecting this day for a long time. He had put his papers in order—and left a few notes specifically for Hitler’s men to see. Two SS agents climbed the stairs and told the boyish-looking Bonhoeffer to come with them. He calmly said good-bye to his parents, put his Bible under his arm, and left. Upstairs there was proof, in his own handwriting, that this quiet young minister was part of a conspiracy to kill Adolf Hitler.
This compelling, brilliantly researched account includes the remarkable discovery that Bonhoeffer was one of the first people to provide evidence to the Allies that Jews were being deported to death camps. It takes readers from his privileged early childhood to the studies and travel that would introduce him to peace activists around the world—eventually putting this gentle, scholarly pacifist on a deadly course to assassinate one of the most ruthless dictators in history. The Plot to Kill Hitler provides fascinating insights into what makes someone stand up for what’s right when no one else is standing with you. It is a question that every generation must answer again and again.
With black-and-white photographs, fascinating sidebars, and thoroughly researched details, this book should be essential reading.



























[book] DEX
By Sheri Lynn FIshbach
2016
Persnickety Press
Ages 11 – 14
Kirkus Reviews writes: A middle schooler discovers that he was born to be a celebrity chef.

Trained in the kitchen from birth by his sorely missed grandpa Poppy, 12-year-old “Dex the Food Dude” Rossi already runs a successful business selling sandwiches and cookies to commuters out of a wheelbarrow in his front yard. But a spell at the stir-fry station at hot classmate Sarah’s bat mitzvah propels the white boy to wider fame and glory as the star of Dine with Dex on the Eatz Network. This meteoric rise ominously earns him the animosity of smarmy rival TV chef Preston LeTray. Distracted by a mad crush on Sarah and also the horrifying news that his grandma Golda is on the verge of losing Poppy’s Kitchen, the family diner, Dex is unaware of his danger even after LeTray’s volunteered “help” on a show leads to on-air volcanoes of vomit. Fortunately, Dex has plenty of more perspicacious allies. Some of these come across as, at best, overboiled, notably Sarah, child of a Chinese Jew; Liza, a biracial (black/white) classmate with white gay dads who run a salon; and “white kid” Jordy, who sports cornrows and speaks in an appalling version of “ghetto” (“Leave da sucka alone. Bad ’nuff he all love-thumped wit a who-dat”). Not so, though, are the references to cookies, cakes, sweet and savory sauces, sumptuous platters, gourmet pizzas, and other mouthwatering fare that Fishbach energetically stirs into her fast and funny tale. A bit underdone in spots but a mostly delectable debut.































[book] TAMIL
A BIOGRAPHY
BY DAVID SHULMAN, PhD
(Professor of Humanistic Studies, Hebrew University.)
September 2016
Harvard University Press / Belknap
Spoken by eighty million people in South Asia and a diaspora that stretches across the globe, Tamil is one of the great world languages, and one of the few ancient languages that survives as a mother tongue for so many speakers. David Shulman presents a comprehensive cultural history of Tamil?language, literature, and civilization?emphasizing how Tamil speakers and poets have understood the unique features of their language over its long history. Impetuous, musical, whimsical, in constant flux, Tamil is a living entity, and this is its biography.
Two stories animate Shulman’s narrative. The first concerns the evolution of Tamil’s distinctive modes of speaking, thinking, and singing. The second describes Tamil’s major expressive themes, the stunning poems of love and war known as Sangam poetry, and Tamil’s influence as a shaping force within Hinduism. Shulman tracks Tamil from its earliest traces at the end of the first millennium BCE through the classical period, 850 to 1200 CE, when Tamil-speaking rulers held sway over southern India, and into late-medieval and modern times, including the deeply contentious politics that overshadow Tamil today.
Tamil is more than a language, Shulman says. It is a body of knowledge, much of it intrinsic to an ancient culture and sensibility. “Tamil” can mean both “knowing how to love”?in the manner of classical love poetry?and “being a civilized person.” It is thus a kind of grammar, not merely of the language in its spoken and written forms but of the creative potential of its speakers.






























[book] Enough Said:
What's Gone Wrong with
the Language of Politics?
by Mark Thompson
CEO of The New York Times Company, Inc.
Former Director Geneeral EIC – BBC News
September 6. 2016
St. Martin’s Press
A story of the poetry of campaigning and the prose of governance. Why some people are brash, harsh, disgusting during the campaign, and the prudent in office. It might be better to start with the epilogue /afterthoughts, since it brings the ideas together. The early chapters are hard to slog through.

According to the author, there is a crisis of trust in politics across the western world. Public anger is rising and faith in conventional political leaders and parties is falling. Anti-politics, and the anti-politicians, have arrived. In Enough Said, President and CEO of The New York Times Company Mark Thompson argues that one of most of significant causes of the crisis is the way our public language has changed.

Enough Said tells the story of how we got from the language of FDR and Churchill to that of Sarah Palin and Donald Trump.

It forensically examines the public language we’ve been left with: compressed, immediate, sometimes brilliantly impactful, but robbed of most of its explanatory power. It studies the rhetoric (public speech) of western leaders from Reagan and Thatcher to Burlesconi, Blair, and today’s political elites on both sides of the Atlantic. And it charts how a changing public language has interacted with real world events – Iraq, the financial crash, the UK's surprising Brexit from the EU, immigration – and a mutual breakdown of trust between politicians and journalists, to leave ordinary citizens suspicious, bitter, and increasingly unwilling to believe anybody.
Drawing from classical as well as contemporary examples and ranging across politics, business, science, technology, and the arts, Enough Said is a smart and shrewd look at the erosion of language by an author uniquely placed to measure its consequences.



























[book] AMERICAN REVOLUTIONS
A CONTINENTAL HISTORY
1750-1804
BY ALAN TAYLOR
September 2016
WW Norton
DONT YOU HATE HISTORY??
It ruins the myths we grew up with
In Taylor's history, we see colonists pushing West into Native American tribal lands, but being stopped by British rules. We see Eastern seaboard businesspeople angry at British taxation, and coaxing mobs to fight the British rule. States were pushing for autonomy. Hamilton and Madison were pushing for greater Federal control over states.

REALITY SUCKS

From the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, a fresh, authoritative history that recasts our thinking about America’s founding period.

The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the ideal framework for a democratic, prosperous nation. Alan Taylor, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history of the nation’s founding.
Rising out of the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, Taylor’s Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain’s mainland colonies, fueled by local conditions, destructive, hard to quell. Conflict ignited on the frontier, where settlers clamored to push west into Indian lands against British restrictions, and in the seaboard cities, where commercial elites mobilized riots and boycotts to resist British tax policies. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. Brutal guerrilla violence flared all along the frontier from New York to the Carolinas, fed by internal divisions as well as the clash with Britain. Taylor skillfully draws France, Spain, and native powers into a comprehensive narrative of the war that delivers the major battles, generals, and common soldiers with insight and power.
With discord smoldering in the fragile new nation through the 1780s, nationalist leaders such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton sought to restrain unruly state democracies and consolidate power in a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of “We the People,” the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But their opponents prevailed in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, whose vision of a western “empire of liberty” aligned with the long-standing, expansive ambitions of frontier settlers. White settlement and black slavery spread west, setting the stage for a civil war that nearly destroyed the union created by the founders.























[book] SHE MADE ME LAUGH
MY FRIEND NORA EPHRON
By Richard Cohen
(Washington Post, columnist)
September 2016
Simon & Schuster
Nora Ephron, one of the most famous writers, film makers, and personalities of her time is captured by her long-time and dear friend in a hilarious, blunt, raucous, and poignant recollection of their decades-long friendship.
Nora Ephron (1941–2012) was a phenomenal personality, journalist, essayist, novelist, playwright, Oscar-nominated screenwriter, and movie director (Sleepless in Seattle; You’ve Got Mail; When Harry Met Sally; Heartburn; Julie & Julia). She wrote a slew of bestsellers (I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman; I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections; Scribble, Scribble: Notes on the Media; Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women). She was celebrated by Hollywood, embraced by literary New York, and adored by legions of fans throughout the world.
Award-winning journalist Richard Cohen, wrote this about his “third-person memoir”: “I call this book a third-person memoir. It is about my closest friend, Nora Ephron, and the lives we lived together and how her life got to be bigger until, finally, she wrote her last work, the play, Lucky Guy, about a newspaper columnist dying of cancer while she herself was dying of cancer. I have interviewed many of her other friends—Mike Nichols, Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Arianna Huffington—but the book is not a name-dropping star turn, but an attempt to capture a remarkable woman who meant so much to so many other women.”































[book] The Universe Has Your Back:
Transform Fear to Faith
by Gabrielle Bernstein
September 2016
Hay House
In her latest book, The Universe Has Your Back, Gabrielle Bernstein teaches readers how to transform their fear into faith in order to live a divinely guided life. Each story and lesson in the book guides readers to release the blocks to what they most long for: happiness, security and clear direction. The lessons help readers relinquish the need to control so they can relax into a sense of certainty and freedom. Readers will learn to stop chasing life and truly live. Gabrielle says, “My commitment with this book is to wake up as many people as possible to their connection to faith and joy. In that connection, we can be guided to our true purpose: to be love and spread love. These words can no longer be cute buzz phrases that we merely post on social media. Rather, these words must be our mission. The happiness, safety, and security we long for lies in our commitment to love.”

Her message: you can be happy, and you must spread your happiness into the world. Those are the goals, and here's the method: meditation, forgiveness and prayer.
The catchphrase of this friend of Oprah is: "Say thank you for your shit. It brings you to where you are and allows you to change."
At age 25, Bernstein broke down after years of multiple addictions (relationships, work, drink and drugs). She recovered. She realized that she wanted to teach others how to achieve serenity. The Jewish Chronicle wrote, “Bernstein's not religious but her Judaism is still evident. She enjoys regular, "very spiritual" Shabbat dinners with friends. ''I think religion is a gateway for spiritual awakening." One example is her wedding to husband Zach Rocklin, who recently quit his banking career to become his wife's business partner. "My best friend, who's my most religious friend, married us in a standard Jewish format but there was no rabbi. We're not religious so what was most authentic to us was a spiritual wedding." … Bernstein's traditional Judaism was stronger in her youth. "I was very into the religion growing up. I went to Jewish summer camp. I led a youth group, which was very similar to the work I do today - I was leading groups of young people in spiritual conversation. It definitely prepared me for the path I'm on today."
























WINNER of the 2016 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction
[book] THE GUSTAV SONATA
A Novel
By Rose Tremin
September 2016
Norton

Winner of the 2016 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction

A breathtakingly radiant story of an unlikely childhood friendship that survives the test of time.
Gustav Perle grows up in a small town in Switzerland, where the horrors of the Second World War seem only a distant echo. An only child, he lives alone with Emilie, the mother he adores but who treats him with bitter severity. He begins an intense friendship with a Jewish boy his age, talented and mercurial Anton Zweibel, a budding concert pianist. The novel follows Gustav’s family, tracing the roots of his mother’s anti-Semitism and its impact on her son and his beloved friend. Moving backward to the war years and the painful repercussions of an act of conscience, and forward through the lives and careers of the two men, one who becomes a hotel owner, the other a concert pianist, The Gustav Sonata explores the passionate love of childhood friendship as it is lost, transformed, and regained over a lifetime. It is a powerful and deeply moving addition to the beloved oeuvre of one of our greatest contemporary novelists.


























FINALIST of the 2016 National Jewish Book Award
[book] Charlotte:
A Novel
by David Foenkinos
Translated by Sam Taylor
2016
The Overlook Press
Internationally literary phenomenon, multiple award-winner, and massive bestseller with over 500,000 copies in print in France and rights sold in 20 countries, Charlotte tells the story of artist Charlotte Salomon?born in pre-World War II Berlin to a Jewish family traumatized by suicide.

Obsessed with art, and with living, Charlotte attended school in Germany until it was too dangerous to remain, fled to France, and was interned in a bleak work camp from which she narrowly escaped. Newly free, she spent two years in almost total solitude, creating a series of autobiographical art?images, words, even musical scores?that together tell her life story. A pregnant Charlotte was killed in Auschwitz at the age of 26, but not before she entrusted her life's work to a friend, who kept it safe until peacetime. The result, an extraordinary novel avant la lettre, was eventually published as Life? or Theatre? (and now reissued by Overlook), a unique, relentlessly complete artistic expression.

In Charlotte, David Foenkinos?with passion, life, humor, and intelligent observation?has written his own utterly original tribute to Charlotte Salomon's tragic life and transcendent art. His gorgeous, haunting, and ultimately redemptive novel is the result of a long-cherished desire to honor this young artist. Infused with the emotion of a writer who connects deeply with his subject, and masterfully and sensitively translated by Sam Taylor, Charlotte is a triumph of creative expression, a monument to genius stilled too soon, and an ode to the will to survive.


























FINALIST of the 2016 National Jewish Book Award
[book] Dreams Deferred:
A Concise Guide to the
Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
and the Movement to Boycott Israel
Edited by Cary Nelson
2016
Indiana University Press
Dreams Deferred arrives as debates about the future of the Middle East and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict intensify under the extraordinary pressure of a region in chaos. The book empowers readers to be informed participants in conversations and debates about developments that increasingly touch all of our lives. Its sixty concise but detailed essays give facts and arguments to assist all who seek justice for both Israelis and Palestinians and who believe the two-state solution can yet be realized. Inspired both by the vision of a democratic Jewish state and by the need for Palestinian political self-determination, the book addresses the long history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its current status. It demonstrates that the division and suspicion promoted by the Boycott, Sanctions, and Divestment (BDS) movement will only undermine the cause of peace.


























[book] A Hat for Mrs. Goldman:
A Story About Knitting and Love
by Michelle Edwards
Illustrated by G. Brian Karas
October 2016
Schwartz and Wade
Here’s a heartwarming winter picture book that’s sure to appeal to families who love knitting.
Mrs. Goldman always knits hats for everyone in the neighborhood, and Sophia, who thinks knitting is too hard, helps by making the pom-poms. But now winter is here, and Mrs. Goldman herself doesn’t have a hat—she’s too busy making hats for everyone else! It’s up to Sophia to buckle down and knit a hat for Mrs. Goldman. But try as Sophia might, the hat turns out lumpy, the stitches aren’t even, and there are holes where there shouldn’t be holes. Sophia is devastated until she gets an idea that will make Mrs. Goldman’s hat the most wonderful of all. Readers both young and old will relate to Sophia’s frustrations, as well as her delight in making something special for someone she loves.
A knitting pattern is included in the back of the book.


























[book] Four of the Three Musketeers:
The Marx Brothers on Stage
by Robert S. Bader
October 2016
Northwestern University Press
Before film made them international comedy legends, the Marx Brothers developed their comic skills on stage for twenty-five years. In Four of the Three Musketeers: The Marx Brothers on Stage, Robert S. Bader offers the first comprehensive history of the foursome’s hardscrabble early years honing their act in front of live audiences.
From Groucho’s debut in 1905 to their final live performances of scenes from A Night in Casablanca in 1945, the brothers’ stage career shows how their characters and routines evolved before their arrival in Hollywood. Four of the Three Musketeers draws on an unmatched array of sources, many not referenced elsewhere. Bader’s detailed portrait of the struggling young actors both brings to vivid life a typical night on the road for the Marx Brothers and also illuminates the inner workings of the vaudeville business, especially during its peak in the 1920s.
As Bader traces the origins of the characters that would later come to be beloved by filmgoers, he also skillfully scrapes away the accretion of rumors and mythology perpetuated not only by fans and writers but by the Marx Brothers themselves. Revealing, vital, and entertaining, Four of the Three Musketeers will take its place as an essential reference for this iconic American act.


























[book] Blood for Blood
(Wolf by Wolf)
by Ryan Graudin
Fall 2016
Little Brown Books for Young Readers
Age: Age 13 and older

Wild and gorgeous, vivid and consuming. I loved it! I can't wait for the sequel."--Laini Taylor, New York Times bestselling author of the Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy, on Wolf by Wolf
The action-packed, thrilling sequel to Ryan Graudin's Wolf by Wolf.
There would be blood.
Blood for blood.
Blood to pay.
An entire world of it.

For the resistance in 1950s Germany, the war may be over, but the fight has just begun.

Death camp survivor Yael, who has the power to skinshift, is on the run: the world has just seen her shoot and kill Hitler. But the truth of what happened is far more complicated, and its consequences are deadly. Yael and her unlikely comrades dive into enemy territory to try to turn the tide against the New Order, and there is no alternative but to see their mission through to the end, whatever the cost.
But dark secrets reveal dark truths, and one question hangs over them all: how far can you go for the ones you love?
This gripping, thought-provoking sequel to Wolf by Wolf will grab readers by the throat with its cinematic writing, fast-paced action, and relentless twists.
























[book] Missing Man:
The American Spy Who
Vanished in Iran
by Barry Meier
2016
FS&G
In late 2013, Americans were shocked to learn that a former FBI agent turned private investigator who disappeared in Iran in 2007 was there on a mission for the CIA. The missing man, Robert Levinson, appeared in pictures dressed like a Guantánamo prisoner and pleaded in a video for help from the United States.
Barry Meier, an award-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times, draws on years of interviews and never-before-disclosed CIA files to weave together a riveting narrative of the ex-agent's journey to Iran and the hunt to rescue him. The result is an extraordinary tale about the shadowlands between crime, business, espionage, and the law, where secrets are currency and betrayal is commonplace. Its colorful cast includes CIA operatives, Russian oligarchs, arms dealers, White House officials, gangsters, private eyes, FBI agents, journalists, and a fugitive American terrorist and assassin.
Missing Man is a fast-paced story that moves through exotic locales and is set against the backdrop of the twilight war between the United States and Iran, one in which hostages are used as political pawns. Filled with stunning revelations, it chronicles a family's ongoing search for answers and one man's desperate struggle to keep his hand in the game.


























[book] The Arab of the Future 2:
A Childhood in the Middle East,
1984-1985: A Graphic Memoir
by Riad Sattouf
September 20, 2016
Metropolitan Books
The highly anticipated continuation of Riad Sattouf’s internationally acclaimed, #1 French bestseller, which was hailed by The New York Times as “a disquieting yet essential read”

In The Arab of the Future: Volume 1, cartoonist Riad Sattouf tells of the first years of his childhood as his family shuttles back and forth between France and the Middle East. In Libya and Syria, young Riad is exposed to the dismal reality of a life where food is scarce, children kill dogs for sport, and his cousins, virulently anti-Semitic and convinced he is Jewish because of his blond hair, lurk around every corner waiting to beat him up.

In Volume 2, Riad, now settled in his father’s hometown of Homs, gets to go to school, where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of the dictator Hafez Al-Assad. Told simply yet with devastating effect, Riad’s story takes in the sweep of politics, religion, and poverty, but is steered by acutely observed small moments: the daily sadism of his schoolteacher, the lure of the black market, with its menu of shame and subsistence, and the obsequiousness of his father in the company of those close to the regime. As his family strains to fit in, one chilling, barbaric act drives the Sattoufs to make the most dramatic of changes.
Darkly funny and piercingly direct, The Arab of the Future, Volume 2 once again reveals the inner workings of a tormented country and a tormented family, delivered through Riad Sattouf’s dazzlingly original talent.
























[book] A Year Without Mom
by Dasha Tolstikova
Age 10-14 Groundwood Books
A Year Without Mom follows 12-year-old Dasha through a year full of turmoil after her mother leaves for America. It is the early 1990s in Moscow, and political change is in the air. But Dasha is more worried about her own challenges as she negotiates family, friendships and school without her mother. Just as she begins to find her own feet, she gets word that she is to join her mother in America — a place that seems impossibly far from everything and everyone she loves. This gorgeous and subtly illustrated graphic novel signals the emergence of Dasha Tolstikova as a major new talent.


































[book] The Return:
Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between
by Hisham Matar
2016
Knopf
From Man Booker Prize and National Book Critics Circle Award finalist Hisham Matar, a memoir of his journey home to his native Libya in search of answers to his father's disappearance.
In 2012, after the overthrow of Qaddafi, the acclaimed novelist Hisham Matar journeys to his native Libya after an absence of thirty years. When he was twelve, Matar and his family went into political exile. Eight years later Matar's father, a former diplomat and military man turned brave political dissident, was kidnapped from the streets of Cairo by the Libyan government and is believed to have been held in the regime's most notorious prison.
Now, the prisons are empty and little hope remains that Jaballa Matar will be found alive. Yet, as the author writes, hope is "persistent and cunning." This book is a profoundly moving family memoir, a brilliant and affecting portrait of a country and a people on the cusp of immense change, and a disturbing and timeless depiction of the monstrous nature of absolute power.

































[book] POWER YOUR HAPPY
WORK HARD,
PLAY NICE, and
BUILD YOUR DREAM LIFE
by Lisa Sugar
September 20, 2016
Dutton
Lisa Sugar is one of six co-founders of PopSugar. She and her husband, serial entrepreneur, Brian Sugar were among the six in 2006. She is now the Editor in Chief and CEO. She lives in San Francisco with Brian and their three daughters... and a picture of Matt Damon. After graduating from George Washington University, Lisa Grimaldi Sugar moved to New York City to begin a career in advertising. Soon after Lisa and her husband married in '99, they headed to San Francisco. In March 2005, she launched her own blog, PopSugar.com, to share stories, reviews and photos.
Lisa Sugar has an amazing job. She spends her days creating content about pop culture, must-have handbags and makeup, healthy recipes, and Instagram-worthy sweets. She manages an enormously successful, growing company with employees who love what they do. And her life is just as great at home. She and her husband have three daughters and she’s the number one soccer mom who loves reading bedtime stories every night.
How did she do it? By figuring out what her dream job was, taking risks, and believing in herself. And now she wants to motivate others to do the same. She wants to show them how to live colorful, interesting lives where every second counts.























[book] REIMAGINED
45 YEARS OF JEWISH ART
BY MARK PODWAL, MD
Preface by Elie Wiesel
Essay by Cynthia Ozick
Essay by Professor Elisheva Carlebach
September 2016
Glitterati
Mark Podwal is today's premiere artist of the Jewish experience, with a prolific portfolio of work lauded by visionaries ranging from Elie Wiesel to Harold Bloom. His paintings and ink-on-paper drawings are not only beautiful but also offer profound and nuanced commentary on Jewish tradition, history, and politics. This unprecedented collection brings together the widest selection of Podwal's work ever published in a single volume in a stunning, lavishly produced, oversized hardcover. With more than 350 works, each beautifully reproduced, Reimagined is a must-have for every Jewish home.



























[book] Do Parents Matter?:
Why Japanese Babies Sleep Soundly,
Mexican Siblings Don’t Fight, and
American Families Should Just Relax
by Robert A. LeVine and Sarah LeVine
(Harvard University professors)
September 2016
Publicaffairs
American parents drive themselves crazy trying to raise perfect children. There is always another news article or scientific finding proclaiming the importance of some factor or other, but it’s easy to miss the bigger picture: that parents can only affect their children so much.
In their decades-long study of global parenting styles, Harvard anthropologists (and grandparents themselves) Robert A. LeVine and Sarah LeVine reveal how culture may affect children more than parents do. Japanese children co-sleep with their parents well into grade school, while women of the Hausa tribe avoid verbal and eye contact with their infants, and yet, they are as likely as any of us to raise happy, well-adjusted children. The LeVines’ fascinating global survey suggests we embrace our limitations as parents, instead of exhausting ourselves by constantly trying to fix them.
Do Parents Matter? is likely the deepest and broadest survey of its kind, with profound lessons for the way we think about our families.



























[book] Welcome to the Universe:
An Astrophysical Tour
by Neil deGrasse Tyson
Michael A. Strauss and
J. Richard Gott
September 2016
Princeton University Press
Welcome to the Universe is a personal guided tour of the cosmos by three of today's leading astrophysicists. Inspired by the enormously popular introductory astronomy course that Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott taught together at Princeton, this book covers it all--from planets, stars, and galaxies to black holes, wormholes, and time travel.
Describing the latest discoveries in astrophysics, the informative and entertaining narrative propels you from our home solar system to the outermost frontiers of space. How do stars live and die? Why did Pluto lose its planetary status? What are the prospects of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe? How did the universe begin? Why is it expanding and why is its expansion accelerating? Is our universe alone or part of an infinite multiverse? Answering these and many other questions, the authors open your eyes to the wonders of the cosmos, sharing their knowledge of how the universe works. Breathtaking in scope and stunningly illustrated throughout, Welcome to the Universe is for those who hunger for insights into our evolving universe that only world-class astrophysicists can provide.



























[book] Oy, Caramba!:
An Anthology of Jewish Stories
from Latin America
Edited by Ilan Stavans
September 2016
University of New Mexico Press

Writers from Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Venezuela, Guatemala, Mexico, and other countries represent an ethnically diverse culture with roots in eastern Europe as well as Spain. . . . The anthology includes tales by such masters as Alberto Gerchunoff, . . . a large number of innovative women writers, and some authors more familiar to English-speaking readers.”-Library Journal
“Reminds us that society south of the border is just as multicultural as in the US, and that Jews have played an important role in it since the time of the Spanish conquest.”-Publishers Weekly
Jewish identity and magical realism are the themes of the tales of adventure and cultural alienation collected here by the leading authority on Jewish Latin American literature. First published in 1994 as Tropical Synagogues: Short Stories by Jewish-Latin American Writers, Ilan Stavans’s classic anthology is expanded and updated in this new edition.
























[book] Sweet Noshings:
New Twists on Traditional
Jewish Desserts
(What Jew Wanna Eat)
by Amy Kritzer
September 5, 2016
Rock Point

Growing up, Amy Kritzer loved to cook traditional foods with her Bubbe Eleanor. Whether they were braiding challah or rolling out rugelach dough, there was always tons of laughter (and a messy kitchen.) These days, inspired by Bubbe's best dishes, Amy puts her own modern twists on everyone's favorite classic Jewish recipes. She incorporates modern ingredients and techniques to make some of the most innovative Jewish creations ever! Her recipes have been featured in The Huffington Post, The Today Show Food Blog, Bon Appetit and more. Jewish food is totally having its moment.
Sweet Noshings takes the ever-evolving world of Jewish desserts to the next level. With stories of life as a Jew in Texas, and plenty of kitsch, Amy's modern interpretations of classic recipes bring new light to old favorites and creates a whole new unique cuisine. You don't have to be Jewish to love these sweets; just enjoy getting creative in the kitchen.
Over 30 delicious recipes including:
Chocolate Halva Hamantaschen
Lemon Ricotta Blintzes with Lavender Cream
Apricot Fig Stuffed Challah
Manischewitz Ice Cream with Brown Butter Charoset and Manischewitz Caramel
Tex Mex Chocolate Rugelach
Honey Pomegranate Whiskey Cake
Dark Chocolate, Peanut Butter and Sea Salt Babka






















[book] 365 Things to Love About
Being Jewish 2017 Day-to-Day Calendar
Universe
Fall 2016
365 Things to Love About Being Jewish 2017 Day-to-Day Calendar serves up, along with a big bowl of chicken soup, a daily reason to celebrate being a member of the tribe!
Each day provides a healthy schmear of Yiddish words and phrases, religious and secular traditions and celebrations, timeless Borscht Belt jokes, trivia about famous Jewish celebrities, and, because you look too thin, mouthwatering entries devoted to enough food to make any Jewish mother proud, including pastrami, matzo, hamantaschen, and chopped liver. From alta cockers to boychiks, this day-to-day calendar will have everyone kibitzing throughout the year.
The only daily calendar that speaks to the total Jewish experience, it includes a curated selection of secular and religious trivia, family-friendly humor, and Yiddish phrases.

























[book] Jacob Neusner:
An American Jewish Iconoclast
by Aaron W. Hughes
(Rochester)
September 2016
NYU PRESS

Jacob Neusner (born 1932) is one of the most important figures in the shaping of modern American Judaism. He was pivotal in transforming the study of Judaism from an insular project only conducted by—and of interest to—religious adherents to one which now flourishes in the secular setting of the university. He is also one of the most colorful, creative, and difficult figures in the American academy. But even those who disagree with Neusner’s academic approach to ancient rabbinic texts have to engage with his pioneering methods.
In this comprehensive biography, Aaron Hughes shows Neusner to be much more than a scholar of rabbinics. He is a social commentator, a post-Holocaust theologian, and was an outspoken political figure during the height of the cultural wars of the 1980s. Neusner’s life reflects the story of what happened as Jews migrated to the suburbs in the late 1940s, daring to imagine new lives for themselves as they successfully integrated into the fabric of American society. It is also the story of how American Jews tried to make sense of the world in the aftermath of the extermination of European Jewry and the subsequent creation of the State of Israel in 1948, and how they sought to define what it meant to be an American Jew.
Unlike other great American Jewish thinkers, Neusner was born in the U.S., and his Judaism was informed by an American ethos. His Judaism is open, informed by and informing the world. It is an American Judaism, one that has enabled American Jews—the freest in history—to be fully American and fully Jewish.






















[book] Jewish Salonica:
Between the Ottoman Empire
and Modern Greece
(Stanford Studies in Jewish History
by Devin Naar
September 2016
Stanford University Press

Touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," the Mediterranean port city of Salonica (Thessaloniki) was once home to the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the city's incorporation into Greece in 1912 provoked a major upheaval that compelled Salonica's Jews to reimagine their community and status as citizens of a nation-state. Jewish Salonica is the first book to tell the story of this tumultuous transition through the voices and perspectives of Salonican Jews as they forged a new place for themselves in Greek society.

Devin E. Naar traveled the globe, from New York to Salonica, Jerusalem, and Moscow, to excavate archives once confiscated by the Nazis. Written in Ladino, Greek, French, and Hebrew, these archives, combined with local newspapers, reveal how Salonica's Jews fashioned a new hybrid identity as Hellenic Jews during a period marked by rising nationalism and economic crisis as well as unprecedented Jewish cultural and political vibrancy. Salonica's Jews—Zionists, assimilationists, and socialists—reinvigorated their connection to the city and claimed it as their own until the Holocaust. Through the case of Salonica's Jews, Naar recovers the diverse experiences of a lost religious, linguistic, and national minority at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East.






















[book] Shanghai Sanctuary:
Chinese and Japanese Policy
toward European Jewish Refugees
during World War II
by Gao Bei
September 2016
Oxford University Press

When the world closed its borders to desperate Jews fleeing Europe during World War II, Shanghai became an unexpected last haven for the refugees. An open port that could be entered without visas, this unique city under Western and Japanese control sheltered tens of thousands of Jews. Shanghai Sanctuary is the first major study to examine the Chinese Nationalist government's policy towards the "Jewish issue" as well as the most thorough analysis of how this issue played into Japanese diplomacy. Why did Shanghai's German-allied Japanese occupiers permit this influx of Jewish refugees? Gao illuminates how the refugees' position complicated the relationships between China, Japan, Germany, and the United States before and during World War II. She thereby reveals a great deal about the Great Powers' national priorities, their international agendas, and their perceptions of the global balance of power.
Drawing from both Chinese and Japanese archival sources that no Western scholar has been able to fully use before, Gao tells a rich story about the politics and personalities that brought Jewish refugees into Shanghai. This story, far from being a mere sidebar to the history of modern China and Japan, captures a critical moment when opportunistic authorities in both countries used the incoming Jewish refugees as a tool to win international financial and political support in their war against one another. Shanghai Sanctuary underlines the extent of Holocaust's global repercussions. In the process, the book sheds new light on the intricacies of wartime diplomacy and the far-reaching human consequences of the twentieth century's most documented conflict.






















[book] DRAW TO WIN
A Crash Course On
How to Lead, Sell,
And Innovate With
All Your Visual Mind
By Dan Roam
Penguin Random House Sep 2016
Get ready for the ultimate crash course in communicating and solving problems through simple pictures.
Thirty-two thousand years ago, your many-times-great-grandparents Oog and Aag drew pictures on the wall of a cave. They had an innate need to communicate, but no written language. So they found an easy and natural way to share their thoughts and stories.
Today, after so many years when speaking and writing dominated, we're back in another highly visual age. About 90 percent of everything shared online is now visual—selfies, GIFs, smartphone videos, and more. This explosion of communication through pictures isn't a millenial-driven fad; it's as natural as those lines first drawn by Oog and Aag. Just turbo-charged by the latest technology.
And yet over the past twenty years, as I've taught people from Fortune 500 CE0s to White House staffers how to harness the power of imagery, the biggest objection I've always heard is, "But I can't draw!" Trust me, you can. You don't need to be da Vinci to be an outstanding visual thinker and communicator. The most effective drawings are the simplest, and you can get good at those in three minutes. In this little book, I'll teach you how to use seven basic shapes to explain just about anything to just about anyone.
If you've read my previous books, you'll see one or two familiar tools here, along with a bunch of new tools you can start using right away.
If you're new to my approach—welcome! Get ready to work smarter, communicate more clearly, and get better at whatever you do, just by picking up a pen.

























[book] Karolina's Twins:
A Novel
by Ronald H. Balson
St. Martin’s Press September 2016
Readers who crave more books like Balson’s Once We Were Brothers and Kristin Hannah’s bestselling The Nightingale will be enthralled by Karolina’s Twins.” ?Booklist (starred review)

She made a promise in desperation
Now it's time to keep it

Lena Woodward, elegant and poised, has lived a comfortable life among Chicago Society since she immigrated to the US and began a new life at the end of World War II. But now something has resurfaced that Lena cannot ignore: an unfulfilled promise she made long ago that can no longer stay buried.
Driven to renew the quest that still keeps her awake at night, Lena enlists the help of lawyer Catherine Lockhart and private investigator Liam Taggart. Behind Lena’s stoic facade are memories that will no longer be contained. She begins to recount a tale, harkening back to her harrowing past in Nazi-occupied Poland, of the bond she shared with her childhood friend Karolina. Karolina was vivacious and beautiful, athletic and charismatic, and Lena has cherished the memory of their friendship her whole life. But there is something about the story that is unfinished, questions that must be answered about what is true and what is not, and what Lena is willing to risk to uncover the past. Has the real story been hidden these many years? And if so, why?
Two girls, coming of age in a dangerous time, bearers of secrets that only they could share.
Just when you think there could not be anything new to ferret out from World War II comes Karolina's Twins, a spellbinding new novel by the bestselling author of Once We Were Brothers and Saving Sophie. In this richly woven tale of love, survival and resilience during some of the darkest hours, the unbreakable bond between girlhood friends will have consequences into the future and beyond.

























[book] The Death's Head Chess Club
A Novel
Paperback edition
by John Donoghue
September 2016
A novel of the improbable friendship that arises between a Nazi officer and a Jewish chessplayer in Auschwitz
In 1962, Emil Clément comes face to face with Paul Meissner at a chess tournament in Holland. They haven’t seen one another in almost two decades. Clément, once known only as “the Watchmaker,” is a Jewish former inmate of Auschwitz, where he was forced to play against the Nazi guards. If he won, he could save a fellow prisoner’s life?but if he lost, he would lose his own. Meissner, a soft-spoken bishop, was also at Auschwitz. He was the SS officer who forced the Watchmaker to play, so that the guards might test their superiority against the rumored talents of the “unbeatable Jew.”
As Emil and Meissner begin to search for a modicum of peace, they reflect on their shared history, recalling a gripping tale of survival and, ultimately, of trust. A bold and richly layered novel of an unlikely bond, The Death’s Head Chess Club by John Donoghue is a suspenseful meditation on guilt and the nature of forgiveness.
























Like a spy novel… but real
[book] Adolfo Kaminsky:
A Forger's Life
by Sarah Kaminsky
Photos by Adolfo Kaminsky
Translated by Mike Mitchell
September 2016
Doppel House Press
Best-selling author Sarah Kaminsky takes readers through her father Adolfo Kaminsky's perilous and clandestine career as a real-life forger for the French Resistance, the FLN, and numerous other freedom movements of the twentieth century. Recruited as a young Jewish teenager for his knowledge of dyes, Kaminsky became the primary forger for the French Resistance during the Nazi occupation of Paris. Then, as a professional photographer, Kaminsky spent the next twenty-five years clandestinely producing thousands of counterfeit documents for immigrants, exiles, underground political operatives, and pacifists across the globe. Kaminsky kept his past cloaked in secrecy well into his eighties, until his daughter convinced him to share the details of the life-threatening work he did on behalf of people fighting for justice and peace throughout the world.
































[book] ASYLUM
A Survivor’’s Flight
From Nazi Occupied Vienna
Through Wartime France
By Moriz Scheyer
September 2016
Little, Brown
A recently discovered account of an Austrian Jewish writer's flight, persecution, and clandestine life in wartime France.
As arts editor for one of Vienna's principal newspapers, Moriz Scheyer knew many of the city's foremost artists, and was an important literary journalist. With the advent of the Nazis he was forced from both job and home. In 1943, in hiding in France, Scheyer began drafting what was to become this book. Tracing events from the Anschluss in Vienna, through life in Paris and unoccupied France, including a period in a French concentration camp, contact with the Resistance, and clandestine life in a convent caring for mentally disabled women, he gives an extraordinarily vivid account of the events and experience of persecution.
After Scheyer's death in 1949, his stepson, disliking the book's anti-German rhetoric, destroyed the manuscript. Or thought he did. Recently, a carbon copy was found in the family's attic by P.N. Singer, Scheyer's step-grandson, who has translated and provided an epilogue.
































[book] Eat My Schwartz:
Our Story of NFL Football,
Food, Family, and Faith
by Geoff Schwartz and Mitch Schwartz
and Seth Kaufman
September 2016
St. Martin's Press
Geoff and Mitchell Schwartz are the NFL’s most improbable pair of offensive linemen. They started their football careers late, not playing a down of organized football until they joined their low-key high school program. Despite all that, they wound up at top-tier college programs and became the first Jewish brothers in the league since 1923.
In Eat My Schwartz, Geoff and Mitch talk about the things that have made them the extraordinary people that they are: their close-knit and supportive family, their Jewish faith and traditions, their love of the game and drive for excellence and, last but not least, the food they love to eat, whether at home or on the road. Theirs is an inspiring story not just for every football fan but for everybody wanting to figure out what it takes for dreams to come true-and how to stay well-fed throughout the process.
































[book] Imperfect Strangers:
Americans, Arabs, and
U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s
by Salim Yaqub
(UC Santa Barbara)
September 2016
Cornell University Press
In Imperfect Strangers, Salim Yaqub argues that the 1970s were a pivotal decade for U.S.-Arab relations, whether at the upper levels of diplomacy, in street-level interactions, or in the realm of the imagination. In those years, Americans and Arabs came to know each other as never before. With Western Europe's imperial legacy fading in the Middle East, American commerce and investment spread throughout the Arab world. The United States strengthened its strategic ties to some Arab states, even as it drew closer to Israel. Maneuvering Moscow to the sidelines, Washington placed itself at the center of Arab-Israeli diplomacy. Meanwhile, the rise of international terrorism, the Arab oil embargo and related increases in the price of oil, and expanding immigration from the Middle East forced Americans to pay closer attention to the Arab world.

Yaqub combines insights from diplomatic, political, cultural, and immigration history to chronicle the activities of a wide array of American and Arab actors-political leaders, diplomats, warriors, activists, scholars, businesspeople, novelists, and others. He shows that growing interdependence raised hopes for a broad political accommodation between the two societies. Yet a series of disruptions in the second half of the decade thwarted such prospects. Arabs recoiled from a U.S.-brokered peace process that fortified Israel’s occupation of Arab land. Americans grew increasingly resentful of Arab oil pressures, attitudes dovetailing with broader anti-Muslim sentiments aroused by the Iranian hostage crisis. At the same time, elements of the U.S. intelligentsia became more respectful of Arab perspectives as a newly assertive Arab American community emerged into political life. These patterns left a contradictory legacy of estrangement and accommodation that continued in later decades and remains with us today.
































[book] Kabbalat Shabbat:
the Grand Unification:
At the Sabbath Table
by Debra Band and Raymond P. Scheindlin
Foreword by Jonathan Sacks
September 2016
Honeybee
Kabbalat Shabbat: the Grand Unification: At the Sabbath Table is the smaller companion dinner-table version of Kabbalat Shabbat: the Grand Unification. This "bencher" style book, sold in sets of four copies, offers all the materials needed for the Friday evening Shattat dinner, including the paintings and translations of the Sabbath table liturgy and customs, excerpted from the hardback version of Kabbalat Shabbat: the Grand Unification. These small books are perfect companions to the full illuminated book.Together, the bencher and the illuminated book enhance the Sabbath celebration of the spiritual and physical glories of Creation and the wonder of its physical embodiment as we now see it through the lens of modern science.
































[book] Essays on Ethics:
A Weekly Reading of the Jewish Bible
by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
September 2016
Maggid
Why was Abraham ordered to sacrifice his son? Was Jacob right in stealing the blessings? Why were we commanded to destroy Amalek? What was Moses' sin in hitting the rock? And how did the Ten Commandments change the Jewish people, and humankind, for good?
Essays on Ethics is the second companion volume to Rabbi Jonathan Sacks's celebrated series Covenant & Conversation. Believing the Hebrew Bible to be the ultimate blueprint for Western morality, Rabbi Sacks embarks upon an ethical exploration of the weekly Torah portion, uncovering its message of truth and justice, dignity and compassion, forgiveness and love
































[book] Mamaleh Knows Best:
What Jewish Mothers Do to
Raise Successful, Creative,
Empathetic, Independent Children
by Marjorie Ingall
(Tablet Magazine)
2016
Harmony
We all know the stereotype of the Jewish mother: Hectoring, guilt-inducing, clingy as a limpet. In Mamaleh Knows Best, Tablet Magazine columnist Marjorie Ingall smashes this tired trope with a hammer. Blending personal anecdotes, humor, historical texts, and scientific research, Ingall shares Jewish secrets for raising self-sufficient, ethical, and accomplished children. She offers abundant examples showing how Jewish mothers have nurtured their children’s independence, fostered discipline, urged a healthy distrust of authority, consciously cultivated geekiness and kindness, stressed education, and maintained a sense of humor. These time-tested strategies have proven successful in a wide variety of settings and fields over the vast span of history. But you don't have to be Jewish to cultivate the same qualities in your own children.

Ingall will make you think, she will make you laugh, and she will make you a better parent. You might not produce a Nobel Prize winner (or hey, you might), but you'll definitely get a great human being.






























[book] Alton Brown:
EveryDayCook
by Alton Brown
September 27, 2016
Ballantine

Alton Brown (pronounced Alton like ALAN or ALBERT)
He show the whole book on an iPhone camera
Brown won a Peabody for his cooking show

My name is Alton Brown, and I wrote this book. It’s my first in a few years because I’ve been a little busy with TV stuff and interwebs stuff and live stage show stuff. Sure, I’ve been cooking, but it’s been mostly to feed myself and people in my immediate vicinity—which is really what a cook is supposed to do, right? Well, one day I was sitting around trying to organize my recipes, and I realized that I should put them into a personal collection. One thing led to another, and here’s EveryDayCook. There’s still plenty of science and hopefully some humor in here (my agent says that’s my “wheelhouse”), but unlike in my other books, a lot of attention went into the photos, which were all taken on my iPhone (take that, Instagram) and are suitable for framing. As for the recipes, which are arranged by time of day, they’re pretty darned tasty. Highlights include:
• Morning: Buttermilk Lassi, Overnight Coconut Oats, Nitrous Pancakes
• Coffee Break: Cold Brew Coffee, Lacquered Bacon, Seedy Date Bars
• Noon: Smoky the Meat Loaf, Grilled Cheese Grilled Sandwich, “EnchiLasagna” or “Lasagnalada”
• Afternoon: Green Grape Cobbler, Crispy Chickpeas, Savory Greek Yogurt Dip
• Evening: Bad Day Bitter Martini, Mussels-O-Miso, Garam Masalmon Steaks
• Anytime: The General’s Fried Chicken, Roasted Chile Salsa, Peach Punch Pops
• Later: Cider House Fondue, Open Sesame Noodles, Chocapocalypse Cookie

So let’s review: 101 recipes with mouthwatering photos, a plethora of useful insights on methods, tools, and ingredients all written by an “award-winning and influential educator and tastemaker.” That last part is from the PR office. Real people don’t talk like that.


















[book] [book] My Fat Dad:
A Memoir of Food,
Love, and Family, with Recipes
by Dawn Lerman
September 29, 2015
BerKley

From the author of the New York Times Well Blog series, My Fat Dad. Every story and every memory from my childhood is attached to food…
Dawn Lerman spent her childhood constantly hungry. She craved good food as her father, 450 pounds at his heaviest, pursued endless fad diets, from Atkins to Pritikin to all sorts of freeze-dried, saccharin-laced concoctions, and insisted the family do the same — even though no one else was overweight.

Dawn’s mother, on the other hand, could barely be bothered to eat a can of tuna over the sink. She was too busy ferrying her other daughter to acting auditions and scolding Dawn for cleaning the house (“Whom are you trying to impress?”).

It was chaotic and lonely, but Dawn had someone she could turn to: her grandmother Beauty.
Those days spent with Beauty, learning to cook, breathing in the scents of fresh dill or sharing the comfort of a warm pot of chicken soup, made it all bearable. Even after Dawn’s father took a prestigious ad job in New York City (Campbell’s “SOUP IS GOOD FOOD”) and moved the family away, Grandma Beauty would send a card from Chicago every week — with a recipe, a shopping list, and a $20 bill. She continued to cultivate Dawn’s love of wholesome food, and ultimately taught her how to make her own way in the world—one recipe at a time.

In My Fat Dad, Dawn reflects on her colorful family and culinary-centric upbringing, and how food shaped her connection to her family, her Jewish heritage, and herself. Humorous and compassionate, this memoir is an ode to the incomparable satisfaction that comes with feeding the ones you love.

























READ IT.
BE DISTURBED.
COMPARE IT TO TRUMP.
NO, SERIOUSLY!
[book] HITLER
ASCENT, 1889-1939
BY VOLKER ULLRICH
SEPTEMBER 2016
KNOPF

A major new biography—an extraordinary, penetrating study of the man who has become the personification of evil.

“Ullrich reveals Hitler to have been an eminently practical politician—and frighteningly so. Timely… One of the best works on Hitler and the origins of the Third Reich to appear in recent years.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“An outstanding study… All the huge, and terrible moments of the early Nazi era are dissected…but the real strength of this book is in disentangling the personal story of man and monster.”
—The Guardian (U.K.)
For all the literature about Adolf Hitler there have been just four seminal biographies; this is the fifth, a landmark work that sheds important new light on Hitler himself. Drawing on previously unseen papers and a wealth of recent scholarly research, Volker Ullrich reveals the man behind the public persona, from Hitler's childhood to his failures as a young man in Vienna to his experiences during the First World War to his rise as a far-right party leader. Ullrich deftly captures Hitler's intelligence, instinctive grasp of politics, and gift for oratory as well as his megalomania, deep insecurity, and repulsive worldview.

Many previous biographies have focused on the larger social conditions that explain the rise of the Third Reich. Ullrich gives us a comprehensive portrait of a postwar Germany humiliated by defeat, wracked by political crisis, and starved by an economic depression, but his real gift is to show vividly how Hitler used his ruthlessness and political talent to shape the Nazi party and lead it to power. For decades the world has tried to grasp how Hitler was possible. By focusing on the man at the center of it all, on how he experienced his world, formed his political beliefs, and wielded power, this riveting biography brings us closer than ever to the answer.

Translated from the German by Jefferson Chase.


















[book] Born to Run
by Bruce Springsteen
September 27, 2016
Simon & Schuster

In 2009, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed at the Super Bowl’s halftime show. The experience was so exhilarating that Bruce decided to write about it. That’s how this extraordinary autobiography began. Over the past seven years, Bruce Springsteen has privately devoted himself to writing the story of his life, bringing to these pages the same honesty, humor, and originality found in his songs.
He describes growing up Catholic in Freehold, New Jersey, amid the poetry, danger, and darkness that fueled his imagination, leading up to the moment he refers to as “The Big Bang”: seeing Elvis Presley’s debut on The Ed Sullivan Show. He vividly recounts his relentless drive to become a musician, his early days as a bar band king in Asbury Park, and the rise of the E Street Band. With disarming candor, he also tells for the first time the story of the personal struggles that inspired his best work, and shows us why the song “Born to Run” reveals more than we previously realized.
Born to Run will be revelatory for anyone who has ever enjoyed Bruce Springsteen, but this book is much more than a legendary rock star’s memoir. This is a book for workers and dreamers, parents and children, lovers and loners, artists, freaks, or anyone who has ever wanted to be baptized in the holy river of rock and roll.
Included is the story of his distant angry depressed father and their reconciliation before the birth of Bruce’s first child.
Or his lust for his Jewish neighbors. “In the half (of the duplex house in which he lived) we didn’t occupy, lived a Jewish family,” writes the Boss. “My mom and dad, no racists or anti-Semites, still felt the need to caution my sister and me that these were the folks who … DID NOT BELIEVE IN JESUS! Any theological issues were immediately forgotten when I saw two gorgeous daughters, my new next-door neighbors, who carried with them a fabulous voluptuousness, full mouths, smooth dark sin and weighted breasts – oy!” He continues, “I immediately began imagining warm nights on the front porch, their tan legs pouring out of summer shorts, as we debated the Jesus question. Personally, I would’ve quickly thrown over our savior of two thousand years for one kiss, one run of an index finger over the coffee-colored ankle of either of my new neighbors… One evening when I did bring up the Jesus thing, it was like I’d said, ‘f—k.’ Sweet palms were quickly raised to rose lips, followed by red-faced girl giggling. There would be many restless teenage nights at 68 South Street.”
Paying tribute to the powers of persuasion of his first real manager and producer, the Flushing, Queens-born Mike Appel, Springsteen writes, “Mike could’ve talked Jesus down from the cross…” It was the part-Jewish Appel who was responsible for bringing Springsteen to the attention of patrician talent scout John Hammond, who upon hearing him immediately insisted that Clive Davis — a nice Jewish lawyer who was raised in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and who was then head of Columbia Records — sign him. Which he did.
Rarely has a performer told his own story with such force and sweep. Like many of his songs (“Thunder Road,” “Badlands,” “Darkness on the Edge of Town,” “The River,” “Born in the U.S.A,” “The Rising,” and “The Ghost of Tom Joad,” to name just a few), Bruce Springsteen’s autobiography is written with the lyricism of a singular songwriter and the wisdom of a man who has thought deeply about his experiences.


















[book] How to Understand Israel
in 60 Days or Less
by Sarah Glidden
Summer 2016
Drawn and Quarterly
The award-winning graphic memoir about Israel that offers more questions than answers about identity and politics
Sarah Glidden is a progressive Jewish American twentysomething who is both vocal about and critical of Israeli politics in the Holy Land. When a debate with her mother prods her to sign up for a Birthright Israel tour, Glidden expects to find objective facts to support her strong opinions. During her two weeks in Israel, Glidden takes advantage of the opportunity to ask the people she meets about the fraught and complex issue of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but their answers only lead her to question her own take on the conflict.
Simple linework and gorgeous watercolors spotlight Israel's countryside, urban landscapes, and religious landmarks. With straightforward sincerity, lovingly observed anecdotes, and a generous dose of self-deprecating humor, How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less is accessible while retaining Glidden's distinctive perspective. Over the course of this touching memoir, Glidden comes to terms with the idea that there are no easy answers to the world's problems, and that is okay.
This debut book landed on several best-of-the-year lists, including Entertainment Weekly's; earned a YALSA Great Graphic Novels for Teens distinction; and won an Ignatz Award. Her second book, Rolling Blackouts, which documents her experience shadowing journalists in Turkey, Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria, will also come out this fall from Drawn & Quarterly.

Publishers Weekly writes: Glidden, a progressive American Jew who is sharply critical of Israeli policies vis-à-vis the Occupied Territories, went on an all-expense-paid "birthright" trip to Israel in an attempt to discover some grand truths at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict. This graphic memoir tells the touching and often funny story of her utter failure to do so. As the tour group moves from the Golan Heights to Tel Aviv, Glidden's struggles with propaganda and perspective lead only to a morass of deepening questions and self-doubt. Her neurotic need for objective truths and struggle to reconcile historical perspectives is hugely gratifying for the reader. This is especially true when the group visits Masada, the site of an epic confrontation between a sect of Jewish rebels and a Roman siege army that culminated in mass suicide. Gruesome fanaticism or a stirring clarion call for the burgeoning Zionism movement? You be the judge. As befits a travelogue, Glidden's drawings have the look of something jotted down on the fly; if it weren't for a haircut here or a pair of glasses there, many of the characters would be indistinguishable. Yet the simplicity of the drawing is offset by bright, delicate watercolors that belie our heroine's unresolved struggle with history and heritage.













[book] Black Earth:
The Holocaust as History and Warning
by Timothy Snyder
now in paperback
September 2016
In this epic history of extermination and survival, Timothy Snyder presents a new explanation of the great atrocity of the twentieth century, and reveals the risks that we face in the twenty-first. Based on new sources from eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Black Earth recounts the mass murder of the Jews as an event that is still close to us, more comprehensible than we would like to think, and thus all the more terrifying.
The Holocaust began in a dark but accessible place, in Hitler's mind, with the thought that the elimination of Jews would restore balance to the planet and allow Germans to win the resources they desperately needed. Such a worldview could be realized only if Germany destroyed other states, so Hitler's aim was a colonial war in Europe itself. In the zones of statelessness, almost all Jews died. A few people, the righteous few, aided them, without support from institutions. Much of the new research in this book is devoted to understanding these extraordinary individuals. The almost insurmountable difficulties they faced only confirm the dangers of state destruction and ecological panic. These men and women should be emulated, but in similar circumstances few of us would do so.
By overlooking the lessons of the Holocaust, Snyder concludes, we have misunderstood modernity and endangered the future. The early twenty-first century is coming to resemble the early twentieth, as growing preoccupations with food and water accompany ideological challenges to global order. Our world is closer to Hitler's than we like to admit, and saving it requires us to see the Holocaust as it was -- and ourselves as we are. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and utterly absorbing, Black Earth reveals a Holocaust that is not only history but warning.

























[book] The Commander:
Fawzi al-Qawuqji and the
Fight for Arab Independence 1914–1948
by Laila Parsons
Summer 2016
Hill and Wang
The definitive biography of the military leader who stood at the center of Arab politics for four decades
Revered by some as the Arab Garibaldi, maligned by others as an intriguer and opportunist, Fawzi al-Qawuqji manned the ramparts of Arab history for four decades. As a young officer in the Ottoman Army, he fought the British in World War I and won an Iron Cross. In the 1920s, he mastered the art of insurgency and helped lead a massive uprising against the French authorities in Syria. A decade later, he reappeared in Palestine, where he helped direct the Arab Revolt of 1936. When an effort to overthrow the British rulers of Iraq failed, he moved to Germany, where he spent much of World War II battling his fellow exile, the Mufti of Jerusalem, who had accused him of being a British spy. In 1947, Qawuqji made a daring escape from Allied-occupied Berlin, and sought once again to shape his region’s history. In his most famous role, he would command the Arab Liberation Army in the Arab-Israeli War of 1948.
In this well-crafted, definitive biography, Laila Parsons tells Qawuqji’s dramatic story and sets it in the full context of his turbulent times. Following Israel’s decisive victory, Qawuqji was widely faulted as a poor leader with possibly dubious motives. The Commander shows us that the truth was more complex: although he doubtless made some strategic mistakes, he never gave up fighting for Arab independence and unity, even as those ideals were undermined by powers inside and outside the Arab world. In Qawuqji’s life story we find the origins of today’s turmoil in the Arab Middle East.




























[book] The Inquisitor's Tale: Or,
The Three Magical Children
and Their Holy Dog
by Adam Gidwitz
and Hatem Aly (Illustrator)
September 2016
Dutton
1242. On a dark night, travelers from across France cross paths at an inn and begin to tell stories of three children. Their adventures take them on a chase through France: they are taken captive by knights, sit alongside a king, and save the land from a farting dragon. On the run to escape prejudice and persecution and save precious and holy texts from being burned, their quest drives them forward to a final showdown at Mont Saint-Michel, where all will come to question if these children can perform the miracles of saints.
Join William, an oblate on a mission from his monastery; Jacob, a Jewish boy who has fled his burning village; and Jeanne, a peasant girl who hides her prophetic visions. They are accompanied by Jeanne's loyal greyhound, Gwenforte . . . recently brought back from the dead. Told in multiple voices, in a style reminiscent of The Canterbury Tales, our narrator collects their stories and the saga of these three unlikely allies begins to come together.
Beloved bestselling author Adam Gidwitz makes his long awaited return with his first new world since his hilarious and critically acclaimed Grimm series. Featuring manuscript illuminations throughout by illustrator Hatem Aly and filled with Adam’s trademark style and humor, The Inquisitor's Tale is bold storytelling that’s richly researched and adventure-packed.






























[book] Avid Reader:
A Life
by Robert Gottlieb
September 2016
FS&G
After editing The Columbia Review, staging plays at Cambridge, and a stint in the greeting-card department of Macy's, Robert Gottlieb stumbled into a job at Simon and Schuster. By the time he left to run Alfred A. Knopf a dozen years later, he was the editor in chief, having discovered and edited Catch-22 and The American Way of Death, among other bestsellers. At Knopf, Gottlieb edited an astonishing list of authors, including Toni Morrison, John Cheever, Doris Lessing, John le Carré, Michael Crichton, Lauren Bacall, Katharine Graham, Robert Caro, Nora Ephron, and Bill Clinton--not to mention Bruno Bettelheim and Miss Piggy. In Avid Reader, Gottlieb writes with wit and candor about succeeding William Shawn as the editor of The New Yorker, and the challenges and satisfactions of running America's preeminent magazine. Sixty years after joining Simon and Schuster, Gottlieb is still at it--editing, anthologizing, and, to his surprise, writing.

But this account of a life founded upon reading is about more than the arc of a singular career--one that also includes a lifelong involvement with the world of dance. It's about transcendent friendships and collaborations, "elective affinities" and family, psychoanalysis and Bakelite purses, the alchemical relationship between writer and editor, the glory days of publishing, and--always--the sheer exhilaration of work.





























[book] Irena's Children:
The Extraordinary Story of
the Woman Who Saved 2,500
Children from the Warsaw Ghetto
by Tilar J. Mazzeo
September 2016
Gallery Books

One of Kirkus Reviews' Ten Most Anticipated Nonfiction Books of Fall 2016
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Widow Clicquot comes an extraordinary and gripping account of Irena Sendler—the “female Oskar Schindler”—who took staggering risks to save 2,500 children from death and deportation in Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II.
In 1942, one young social worker, Irena Sendler, was granted access to the Warsaw ghetto as a public health specialist. While there, she reached out to the trapped Jewish families, going from door to door and asking the parents to trust her with their young children. She started smuggling them out of the walled district, convincing her friends and neighbors to hide them. Driven to extreme measures and with the help of a network of local tradesmen, ghetto residents, and her star-crossed lover in the Jewish resistance, Irena ultimately smuggled thousands of children past the Nazis. She made dangerous trips through the city’s sewers, hid children in coffins, snuck them under overcoats at checkpoints, and slipped them through secret passages in abandoned buildings.
But Irena did something even more astonishing at immense personal risk: she kept secret lists buried in bottles under an old apple tree in a friend’s back garden. On them were the names and true identities of those Jewish children, recorded with the hope that their relatives could find them after the war. She could not have known that more than ninety percent of their families would perish.
In Irena’s Children, Tilar Mazzeo tells the incredible story of this courageous and brave woman who risked her life to save innocent children from the Holocaust—a truly heroic tale of survival, resilience, and redemption.
































[book] The German Girl
A Novel
by Armando Lucas Correa
Fall 2016

A stunningly ambitious and beautiful novel, perfect for fans of The Nightingale, Schindler’s List, and All the Light We Cannot See, about twelve-year-old Hannah Rosenthal’s harrowing experience fleeing Nazi-occupied Germany with her family and best friend, only to discover that the overseas asylum they had been promised is an illusion.
Before everything changed, young Hannah Rosenthal lived a charmed life. But now, in 1939, the streets of Berlin are draped with red, white, and black flags; her family’s fine possessions are hauled away; and they are no longer welcome in the places that once felt like home. Hannah and her best friend, Leo Martin, make a pact: whatever the future has in store for them, they’ll meet it together.
Hope appears in the form of the SS St. Louis, a transatlantic liner offering Jews safe passage out of Germany. After a frantic search to obtain visas, the Rosenthals and the Martins depart on the luxurious ship bound for Havana. Life on board the St. Louis is like a surreal holiday for the refugees, with masquerade balls, exquisite meals, and polite, respectful service. But soon ominous rumors from Cuba undermine the passengers’ fragile sense of safety. From one day to the next, impossible choices are offered, unthinkable sacrifices are made, and the ship that once was their salvation seems likely to become their doom.
Seven decades later in New York City, on her twelfth birthday, Anna Rosen receives a strange package from an unknown relative in Cuba, her great-aunt Hannah. Its contents will inspire Anna and her mother to travel to Havana to learn the truth about their family’s mysterious and tragic past, a quest that will help Anna understand her place and her purpose in the world.
The German Girl sweeps from Berlin at the brink of the Second World War to Cuba on the cusp of revolution, to New York in the wake of September 11, before reaching its deeply moving conclusion in the tumult of present-day Havana. Based on a true story, this masterful novel gives voice to the joys and sorrows of generations of exiles, forever seeking a place called home.

























[book] march
(Trilogy Slipcase Set)
by John Lewis (Democrat, Georgia)
and Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell
Summer 2016
Books One, Two, and Three
Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.
Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).
March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.





























[book] The Vanished:
The "Evaporated People" of Japan
in Stories and Photographs
by Léna Mauger and
Stéphane Remael
Translated by Brian Phalen
September 20, 2016
Every year, nearly one hundred thousand Japanese vanish without a trace. Known as the johatsu, or the “evaporated,” they are often driven by shame and hopelessness, leaving behind lost jobs, disappointed families, and mounting debts. In The Vanished, journalist Léna Mauger and photographer Stéphane Remael uncover the human faces behind the phenomenon through reportage, photographs, and interviews with those who left, those who stayed behind, and those who help orchestrate the disappearances. Their quest to learn the stories of the johatsu weaves its way through:
A Tokyo neighborhood so notorious for its petty criminal activities that it was literally erased from the maps
Reprogramming camps for subpar bureaucrats and businessmen to become “better” employees
The charmless citadel of Toyota City, with its iron grip on its employees
The “suicide” cliffs of Tojinbo, patrolled by a man fighting to save the desperate
The desolation of Fukushima in the aftermath of the tsunami

And yet, as exotic and foreign as their stories might appear to an outsider’s eyes, the human experience shared by the interviewees remains powerfully universal.



























OUR TOP SELLERS IN SEPTEMBER:

Here I Am. A Novel by Jonathan Safran Foer. FS&G (Sept 2016)
The Black Widow (Gabriel Allon mystery) by Daniel Silva. Harper (July 2016)
The English Teacher: A Novel by Yiftach Reicher Atir. Translated from Hebrew by Philip Simpson. Penguin (August 2016)
The One Man: A Novel by Andrew Gross. Minotaur Books (August 2016)
A Hero of France: A Novel by Alan Furst. Random House (May 2016)
Leaving Lucy Pear by Anna Solomon. Viking (July 2016)
Mischling. A Novel by Affinity Konar. Lee Boudreaux Books (Sep 2016)
Modern Lovers by Emma Straub. Riverhead Books (May 2015)
The Swans of Fifth Avenue: A Novel by Melanie Benjamin. Delacorte Press (January 2016)


The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer. Gallery Books (August 2016)
You'll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein. Grand Central Publishing (July 2016)
Powerhouse: The Untold Story of Hollywood's Creative Artists Agency by James Andrew Miller (August 2016)
Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi. Ten Speed Press (2012)
Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik. Dey Street Books (2015)
The Angel: The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel by Uri Bar-Joseph and David Hazony (August 2016)
Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2015)








FINALIST - THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Who Rules the Synagogue?
Religious Authority and the
Formation of American Judaism
by Zev Eleff
2016
Oxford University Press
Early in the 1800s, American Jews consciously excluded rabbinic forces from playing a role in their community's development. By the final decades of the century, ordained rabbis were in full control of America's leading synagogues and large sectors of American Jewish life. How did this shift occur?
Who Rules the Synagogue? explores how American Jewry in the nineteenth century was transformed from a lay dominated community to one whose leading religious authorities were rabbis. Zev Eleff traces the history of this revolution, culminating in the Pittsburgh rabbinical conference of 1885 and the commotion caused by it. Previous scholarship has chartered the religious history of American Judaism during this era, but Eleff reinterprets this history through the lens of religious authority. In so doing, he offers a fresh view of the story of American Judaism with the aid of never-before-mined sources and a comprehensive review of periodicals and newspapers.
Eleff weaves together the significant episodes and debates that shaped American Judaism during this formative period, and places this story into the larger context of American religious history and modern Jewish history.


























WINNER – A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Anti-Jewish Riots
in the Crown of Aragon and
the Royal Response, 1391-1392
by Benjamin R. Gampel
Fall 2016
Cambridge University Press
The most devastating attacks against the Jews of medieval Christian Europe took place during the riots that erupted, in 1391 and 1392, in the lands of Castile and Aragon.

For ten horrific MONTHS, hundreds if not thousands of Jews were KILLED, numerous Jewish institutions destroyed, and many Jews forcibly converted to Christianity. (100 years before 1492)
Benjamin Gampel explores why the famed convivencia of medieval Iberian society - in which Christians, Muslims and Jews seemingly lived together in relative harmony - was conspicuously ABSENT.
Using extensive archival evidence, this critical volume explores the social, religious, political, and economic tensions at play in each affected town. The relationships, biographies and personal dispositions of the royal family are explored to understand why monarchic authority failed to protect the Jews during these violent months. Gampel's extensive study is essential for scholars and graduate students of medieval Iberian and Jewish history.


























FINALIST – A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Clepsydra:
Essay on the Plurality of
Time in Judaism
(Stanford Studies in Jewish History
by Sylvie Anne Goldberg
Translated by Benjamin Ivry
2016
The clepsydra is an ancient water clock and serves as the primary metaphor for this examination of Jewish conceptions of time from antiquity to the present. Just as the flow of water is subject to a number of variables such as temperature and pressure, water clocks mark a time that is shifting and relative. Time is not a uniform phenomenon. It is a social construct made of beliefs, scientific knowledge, and political experiment. It is also a story told by theologians, historians, philosophers, and astrophysicists.
Consequently, Clepsydra is a cultural history divided in two parts: narrated time and measured time, recounted time and counted time, absolute time and ordered time. It is through this dialog that Sylvie Anne Goldberg challenges the idea of a unified Judeo-Christian time and asks, "What is Jewish time?" She consults biblical and rabbinic sources and refers to medieval and modern texts to understand the different sorts of consciousness of time found in Judaism. In Jewish time, Goldberg argues, past, present, and future are intertwined and comprise one perpetual narrative.


























FINALIST – A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Sexuality in the
Babylonian Talmud:
Christian and Sasanian
Contexts in Late Antiquity
by Yishai Kiel, PhD
(Yale University)
Fall 2016
Cambridge University Press
Within this close textual analysis of the Babylonian Talmud, Yishai Kiel explores rabbinic discussions of sex in light of cultural assumptions and dispositions that pervaded the cultures of late antiquity and particularly the Iranian world. By negotiating the Iranian context of the rabbinic discussion alongside the Christian backdrop, this groundbreaking volume presents a balanced and nuanced portrayal of the rabbinic discourse on sexuality and situates rabbinic discussions of sex more broadly at the crossroads of late antique cultures.

The study is divided into two thematic sections: the first centers on the broader aspects of rabbinic discourse on sexuality while the second hones in on rabbinic discussions of sexual prohibitions and the classification of permissible and prohibited partnerships, with particular attention to rabbinic discussions of incest. Essential reading for scholars and graduate students of Judaic studies, early Christianity, and Iranian studies, as well as those interested in religious studies and comparative religion.


























WINNER OF A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Extraterritorial Dreams:
European Citizenship, Sephardi
Jews, and the Ottoman
Twentieth Century
by Sarah Abrevaya Stein
(UCLA)
2016
University of Chicago Press
We tend to think of citizenship as something that is either offered or denied by a state. Modern history teaches otherwise. Reimagining citizenship as a legal spectrum along which individuals can travel, Extraterritorial Dreams explores the history of Ottoman Jews who sought, acquired, were denied or stripped of citizenship in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—as the Ottoman Empire retracted and new states were born—in order to ask larger questions about the nature of citizenship itself.

Sarah Abrevaya Stein traces the experiences of Mediterranean Jewish women, men, and families who lived through a tumultuous series of wars, border changes, genocides, and mass migrations, all in the shadow of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the ascendance of the modern passport regime. Moving across vast stretches of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, she tells the intimate stories of people struggling to find a legal place in a world ever more divided by political boundaries and competing nationalist sentiments. From a poor youth who reached France as a stowaway only to be hunted by the Parisian police as a spy to a wealthy Baghdadi-born man in Shanghai who willed his fortune to his Eurasian Buddhist wife, Stein tells stories that illuminate the intertwined nature of minority histories and global politics through the turbulence of the modern era.


























FINALIST - A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Homeless Tongues:
Poetry and Languages of
the Sephardic Diaspora
by Monique Balbuena
Clark Honors College, Univ of Oregon
2016
Stanford University Press
This book examines a group of multicultural Jewish poets to address the issue of multilingualism within a context of minor languages and literatures, nationalism, and diaspora. It introduces three writers working in minor or threatened languages who challenge the usual consensus of Jewish literature: Algerian Sadia Lévy, Israeli Margalit Matitiahu, and Argentine Juan Gelman.

Each of them—Lévy in French and Hebrew, Matitiahu in Hebrew and Ladino, and Gelman in Spanish and Ladino—expresses a hybrid or composite Sephardic identity through a strategic choice of competing languages and intertexts. Monique R. Balbuena's close literary readings of their works, which are mostly unknown in the United States, are strongly grounded in their social and historical context. Her focus on contemporary rather than classic Ladino poetry and her argument for the inclusion of Sephardic production in the canon of Jewish literature make Homeless Tongues a timely and unusual intervention.


























FINALIST - A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Jewish Salonica:
Between the Ottoman Empire
and Modern Greece
(Stanford Studies in Jewish History
by Devin Naar
(Univ of Washington)
Fall 2016
Stanford University Press
Touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," the Mediterranean port city of Salonica (Thessaloniki) was once home to the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the city's incorporation into Greece in 1912 provoked a major upheaval that compelled Salonica's Jews to reimagine their community and status as citizens of a nation-state. Jewish Salonica is the first book to tell the story of this tumultuous transition through the voices and perspectives of Salonican Jews as they forged a new place for themselves in Greek society.
Devin E. Naar traveled the globe, from New York to Salonica, Jerusalem, and Moscow, to excavate archives once confiscated by the Nazis. Written in Ladino, Greek, French, and Hebrew, these archives, combined with local newspapers, reveal how Salonica's Jews fashioned a new hybrid identity as Hellenic Jews during a period marked by rising nationalism and economic crisis as well as unprecedented Jewish cultural and political vibrancy. Salonica's Jews—Zionists, assimilationists, and socialists—reinvigorated their connection to the city and claimed it as their own until the Holocaust. Through the case of Salonica's Jews, Naar recovers the diverse experiences of a lost religious, linguistic, and national minority at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East.


























FINALIST - THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] The Salome Ensemble:
Rose Pastor Stokes, Anzia Yezierska,
Sonya Levien, and Jetta Goudal
by Alan Robert Ginsberg
2016
Syracuse University Press
The Salome Ensemble probes the entangled lives, works, and passions of a political activist, a novelist, a screenwriter, and a movie actress who collaborated in 1920s New York City. Together they created the shape-shifting, genre-crossing Salome of the Tenements, first a popular novel and then a Hollywood movie. The title character was a combination Cinderella and Salome like the women who conceived her. Rose Pastor Stokes was the role model. Anzia Yezierska wrote the novel. Sonya Levien wrote the screenplay. Jetta Goudal played her on the silver screen.

Ginsberg considers the women individually and collectively, exploring how they shaped and reflected their cultural landscape. These European Jewish immigrants pursued their own versions of the American dream, escaped the squalor of sweatshops, knew romance and heartache, and achieved prominence in politics, fashion, journalism, literature, and film.


























FINALIST - THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Love, Marriage, and
Jewish Families: Paradoxes
of a Social Revolution
Edited by Sylvia Barack Fishman
Brandeis University Press
The concepts of gender, love, and family—as well as the personal choices regarding gender-role construction, sexual and romantic liaisons, and family formation—have become more fluid under a society-wide softening of boundaries, hierarchies, and protocols.

Sylvia Barack Fishman gathers the work of social historians and legal scholars who study transformations in the intimate realms of partnering and family construction among Jews. Following a substantive introduction, the volume casts a broad net. Chapters explore the current situation in both the United States and Israel, attending to what once were considered unconventional household arrangements—including extended singlehood, cohabitating couples, single Jewish mothers, and GLBTQ families—along with the legal ramifications and religious backlash. Together, these essays demonstrate how changes in the understanding of male and female roles and expectations over the past few decades have contributed to a social revolution with profound—and paradoxical—effects on partnering, marriage, and family formation.

This diverse anthology—with chapters focusing on demography, ethnography, and legal texts—will interest scholars and students in Jewish studies, women’s and gender studies, Israel studies, and American Jewish history, sociology, and culture.


























WINNER - THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] And After The Fire
by Lauren Belfer
2016
Thorndike Press
The New York Times-bestselling author of A Fierce Radiance and City of Light returns with a new powerful and passionate novel inspired by historical events about two women, one European and one American, and the mysterious choral masterpiece by Johann Sebastian Bach that changes both their lives.
In the ruins of Germany in 1945, at the end of World War II, American soldier Henry Sachs takes a souvenir, an old music manuscript, from a seemingly deserted mansion and mistakenly kills the girl who tries to stop him.
In America in 2010, Henry s niece, Susanna Kessler, struggles to rebuild her life after she experiences a devastating act of violence on the streets of New York City. When Henry dies soon after, she uncovers the long-hidden music manuscript. She becomes determined to discover what it is and to return it to its rightful owner, a journey that will challenge her preconceptions about herself and her family s history and also offer her an opportunity to finally make peace with the past.
In Berlin, Germany, in 1783, amid the city s glittering salons where aristocrats and commoners, Christians and Jews, mingle freely despite simmering anti-Semitism, Sara Itzig Levy, a renowned musician, conceals the manuscript of an anti-Jewish cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, an unsettling gift to her from Bach s son, her teacher. This work and its disturbing message will haunt Sara and her family for generations to come.
Interweaving the stories of Susanna and Sara, and their families, And After the Fire traverses over two hundred years of history, from the eighteenth century through the Holocaust and into today, seamlessly melding past and present, real and imagined. Lauren Belfer s deeply researched, evocative, and compelling narrative resonates with emotion and immediacy."




























WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Anna and the Swallow Man
by Gavriel Savit
2016
Knopf
Kraków, 1939. A million marching soldiers and a thousand barking dogs. This is no place to grow up. Anna ?ania is just seven years old when the Germans take her father, a linguistics professor, during their purge of intellectuals in Poland. She’s alone.

And then Anna meets the Swallow Man. He is a mystery, strange and tall, a skilled deceiver with more than a little magic up his sleeve. And when the soldiers in the streets look at him, they see what he wants them to see.

The Swallow Man is not Anna’s father—she knows that very well—but she also knows that, like her father, he’s in danger of being taken, and like her father, he has a gift for languages: Polish, Russian, German, Yiddish, even Bird. When he summons a bright, beautiful swallow down to his hand to stop her from crying, Anna is entranced. She follows him into the wilderness.

Over the course of their travels together, Anna and the Swallow Man will dodge bombs, tame soldiers, and even, despite their better judgment, make a friend. But in a world gone mad, everything can prove dangerous. Even the Swallow Man.

Destined to become a classic, Gavriel Savit’s stunning debut reveals life’s hardest lessons while celebrating its miraculous possibilities.


























FINALIST OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] The Beautiful Possible:
A Novel
by Amy Gottlieb
2016
Harper
This epic, enthralling debut novel—in the vein of Nicole Krauss’ The History of Love—follows a postwar love triangle between an American rabbi, his wife, and a German-Jewish refugee.

Spanning seventy years and several continents—from a refugee’s shattered dreams in 1938 Berlin, to a discontented American couple in the 1950s, to a young woman’s life in modern-day Jerusalem—this epic, enthralling novel tells the braided love story of three unforgettable characters. In 1946, Walter Westhaus, a German Jew who spent the war years at Tagore’s ashram in India, arrives at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City, where he meets Sol Kerem, a promising rabbinical student. A brilliant nonbeliever, Walter is the perfect foil for Sol’s spiritual questions—and their extraordinary connection is too wonderful not to share with Sol’s free-spirited fiancée Rosalie. Soon Walter and Rosalie are exchanging notes, sketches, and secrets, and begin a transcendent love affair in his attic room, a temple of dusty tomes and whispered poetry. Months later they shatter their impossible bond, retreating to opposite sides of the country—Walter to pursue an academic career in Berkeley and Rosalie and Sol to lead a congregation in suburban New York. A chance meeting years later reconnects Walter, Sol, and Rosalie—catching three hearts and minds in a complex web of desire, heartbreak, and redemption. With extraordinary empathy and virtuosic skill, The Beautiful Possible considers the hidden boundaries of marriage and faith, and the mysterious ways we negotiate our desires.


























WINNER - A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] THE SACRED CALLING:
FOUR DECADES OF WOMEN
IN THE RABBINATE
Edited by Rabbi Rebecca Einstein Schorr
and Rabbi Alysa Mendelson Graf
2016
CCAR Press
In this anthology, rabbis and scholars from across the Jewish world reflect back on the historic significance of women in the rabbinate and explore issues related to both the professional and personal lives of women rabbis. This collection examines the ways in which the reality of women in the rabbinate has impacted on all aspects of Jewish life, including congregational culture, liturgical development, life cycle ritual, the Jewish healing movement, spirituality, theology, and more.

































WINNER - A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] On Blackberry Hill
by Rachel Mann
2016
Createspace

A young adult novel

One daughter. One mother. One summer camp. Twenty years apart.

If only Reena could stay in the city, instead of spending the last summer before high school at her cousin's Jewish sleepaway camp. From morning prayer to Color War to the social pecking order, she is lost from the start, and her cousin Lila is no ally. While working on her survival skills, Reena begins to find clues of the mother she never knew.

Twenty years earlier, Naomi stands on a dock in the middle of the lake. Just finished with her first year of college, camp feels too small to contain her giant dreams. Her sister Mara is all about finding a man, but Naomi believes something more awaits.

A mysterious, barefoot stranger appears on a hill, offering blessings and songs. Can he guide Naomi to her future? Can he help Reena untangle her past?




























FINALIST - A 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD for Young Adults!
[book] Another Me
by Eva Wiseman
2016
Tundra Books

A young adult novel, Ages 12 and up
Set against the backdrop of plague-ravaged Europe, this spellbinding new novel from one of Canada's foremost writers of historical fiction for young people will have readers racing to the electrifying climax.
Seventeen-year-old Natan has a safe and happy life in fourteenth-century Strasbourg, France. He works with his father in his rag trade, helps his mother around the house, and studies the Torah at night with his young brother, Shmuli. He's even feeling the first stirrings of love with Elena, the daughter of the master draper who is his father's best customer.
But something is rotten in the streets of Strasbourg. There is tension between the Jewish community and the rest of the citizens, and there is fear as the deadly plague sweeps through towns and cities nearby. When rumors begin to circulate that Jewish residents are contaminating the town's well water to try to hasten the plague's arrival in their city, Natan knows that there are dangerous days ahead. When he sees who really poisoned Strasbourg's water, he is determined to speak the truth and save his people from the false accusations being made against them. But a moment of violence threatens to derail his plans and change his life in ways he could never have imagined.



























OCTOBER 2016 BOOKS





WINNER OF THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD!
[book] Israel:
A Concise History of
a Nation Reborn
by Daniel Gordis
(Shalem College, Distinguished Fellow)
October 18, 2016
Ecco
The first comprehensive yet accessible history of the state of Israel from its inception to present day, from Daniel Gordis, "one of the most respected Israel analysts" (The Forward) living and writing in Jerusalem.
Israel is a tiny state, and yet it has captured the world’s attention, aroused its imagination, and lately, been the object of its opprobrium. Why does such a small country speak to so many global concerns? More pressingly: Why does Israel make the decisions it does? And what lies in its future?
We cannot answer these questions until we understand Israel’s people and the questions and conflicts, the hopes and desires, that have animated their conversations and actions. Though Israel’s history is rife with conflict, these conflicts do not fully communicate the spirit of Israel and its people: they give short shrift to the dream that gave birth to the state, and to the vision for the Jewish people that was at its core. Guiding us through the milestones of Israeli history, Gordis relays the drama of the Jewish people’s story and the creation of the state. Clear-eyed and erudite, he illustrates how Israel became a cultural, economic and military powerhouse—but also explains where Israel made grave mistakes and traces the long history of Israel’s deepening isolation.
With Israel, public intellectual Daniel Gordis offers us a brief but thorough account of the cultural, economic, and political history of this complex nation, from its beginnings to the present. Accessible, levelheaded, and rigorous, Israel sheds light on the Israel’s past so we can understand its future. The result is a vivid portrait of a people, and a nation, reborn.


























[book] The Last Rabbi
Joseph Soloveitchik and
Talmudic Tradition
(New Jewish Philosophy and Thought)
by William Kolbrener
(Professor Bar Ilan University)
Fall 2016
Indiana University Press
Joseph Soloveitchik (1903–1993) was a major American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist, philosopher, and theologian. In this new work, William Kolbrener takes on Soloveitchik’s controversial legacy and shows how he was torn between the traditionalist demands of his European ancestors and the trajectory of his own radical and often pluralist philosophy. A portrait of this self-professed "lonely man of faith" reveals him to be a reluctant modern who responds to the catastrophic trauma of personal and historical loss by underwriting an idiosyncratic, highly conservative conception of law that is distinct from his Talmudic predecessors, and also paves the way for a return to tradition that hinges on the ethical embrace of multiplicity. As Kolbrener melds these contradictions, he presents Soloveitchik as a good deal more complicated and conflicted than others have suggested. The Last Rabbi affords new perspective on the thought of this major Jewish philosopher and his ideas on the nature of religious authority, knowledge, and pluralism.


























[book] Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary
Bilingual Edition
Edited by Gitl Schaechter-Viswanath
And Paul Glasser
Indiana University Press
Containing nearly 50,000 entries and 33,000 subentries, the Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary emphasizes Yiddish as a living language that is spoken in many places around the world. The late Mordkhe Schaechter collected and researched spoken and literary Yiddish in all its varieties and this landmark dictionary reflects his vision for present-day and future Yiddish usage. The richness of dialect differences and historical developments are noted in entries ranging from "agriculture" to "zoology" and include words and expressions that can be found in classic and contemporary literature, newspapers, and other sources of the written word and have long been used by professionals and tradesmen, in synagogues, at home, in intimate life, and wherever Yiddish-speaking Jews have lived and worked.


























[book] DREIDELS ON THE BRAIN
(A STORY IN EIGHT NIGHTS)
By Joel Ben Izzy
(Professional Storyteller, The Beggar King)
October 2016
Dial Press
Ages 10 and up, Grade 5 and up
(I tried reading it, and I think you need to be 12)
A funny, touching novel of growing up Jewish in the 1970s, has the makings of a holiday classic.
One lousy miracle. Is that too much to ask?
Evidently so for Joel, as he tries to survive Hannukah, 1971 in the suburbs of the suburbs of Los Angeles (or, as he calls it, “The Land of Shriveled Dreams”). That’s no small task when you’re a “seriously funny-looking” twelve-year-old magician who dreams of being his own superhero: Normalman. And Joel’s a long way from that as the only Jew at Bixby School, where his attempts to make himself disappear fail spectacularly. Home is no better, with a family that’s not just mortifyingly embarrassing but flat-out broke.
That’s why Joel’s betting everything on these eight nights, to see whether it’s worth believing in God or miracles or anything at all. Armed with his favorite jokes, some choice Yiddish words, and a suitcase full of magic tricks, he’s scrambling to come to terms with the world he lives in—from hospitals to Houdini to the Holocaust—before the last of the candles burns out.
No wonder his head is spinning: He’s got dreidels on the brain. And little does he know that what’s actually about to happen to him and his family this Hanukkah will be worse than he’d feared . . . And better than he could have imagined.


























[book] HOW THE WISE MEN GOT TO CHELM
HOW THE WISE MEN GOT TO CHE?M
The Life and Times of a Yiddish Folk Tradition
by Ruth von Bernuth, Phd
(Assoc Professor, UNC Chapel Hill)
NYU Press

This is an academic book, not a joke book or short story collection.

From the author of “Wunder, Spott und Prophetie: Natürliche Narrheit in den Historien von Claus Narren (The court fool of Saxony in 1572),” which focused on natural folly and natural fools and miracle men, comes a study of the Yiddish men of Chelm. Professor von Bernuth suffers fools gladly. Ashkenazic Jewish writing about a whole society that is foolish – in the tales of the “wise men” of Chelm represent the motif of the foolish town per excellence in Jewish folk tradition. Chelm remains a major archetype of eastern European Jewish identity to the present day. In How the Wise Men Got to Chelm: The Life and Times of a Yiddish Folk Tradition, she unpacks the connection between German and Yiddish literary traditions and in complicating the assumption that the tales were simply transferred from the German via on Old Yiddish translation into modern Yiddish.

When God created the world, so it is said, he sent out an angel with a bag of foolish souls with instructions to distribute them equally all over the world — one fool per town. But the angel’s bag broke and all the souls spilled out onto the same spot. They built a settlement where they landed: the town is known as Chelm.

The collected tales of these fools, or “wise men,” of Chelm constitute the best-known folktale tradition of the Jews of eastern Europe. This tradition includes a sprawling repertoire of stories about the alleged intellectual limitations of the members of this old and important Jewish community. Chelm did not make its debut in the role of the foolish shtetl par excellence until late in the nineteenth century. Since then, however, the town has led a double life—as a real city in eastern Poland and as an imaginary place onto which questions of Jewish identity, community, and history have been projected.

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm is the first in-depth study of Chelm literature and its relationship to its literary precursors. By placing literary Chelm and its “foolish” antecedents in a broader historical context, it shows how they have functioned for over three hundred years as models of society, somewhere between utopia and dystopia. These imaginary foolish towns have enabled writers both to entertain and highlight a variety of societal problems, a function that literary Chelm continues to fulfill in Jewish literature to this day.

























[book] THE JEWS OF HARLEM
The Rise, Decline, and Revival
Of a Jewish Community
By Jeffrey S. Gurock
October 2016
New York University Press NYU
New York Times columnist David W. Dunlap wrote a decade ago that “on the map of the Jewish Diaspora, Harlem Is Atlantis. . . . A vibrant hub of industry, artistry and wealth is all but forgotten. It is as if Jewish Harlem sank 70 years ago beneath waves of memory beyond recall.” During World War I, Harlem was the home of the second largest Jewish community in America. But in the 1920s Jewish residents began to scatter to other parts of Manhattan, to the outer boroughs, and to other cities. Now nearly a century later, Jews are returning uptown to a gentrified Harlem.
The Jews of Harlem follows Jews into, out of, and back into this renowned metropolitan neighborhood over the course of a century and a half. It analyzes the complex set of forces that brought several generations of central European, East European, and Sephardic Jews to settle there. It explains the dynamics that led Jews to exit this part of Gotham as well as exploring the enduring Jewish presence uptown after it became overwhelmingly black and decidedly poor. And it looks at the beginnings of Jewish return as part of the transformation of New York City in our present era. The Jews of Harlem contributes much to our understanding of Jewish and African American history in the metropolis as it highlights the ever-changing story of America’s largest city.
With The Jews of Harlem, the beginning of Dunlap’s hoped-for resurfacing of this neighborhood’s history is underway. Its contemporary story merits telling even as the memories of what Jewish Harlem once was warrants recall.


























[book] Blood and Sand:
Suez, Hungary, and Eisenhower's
Campaign for Peace
by Alex von Tunzelmann
October 2016
A lively, revelatory popular history that tells the story of both the Suez Crisis and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 — a tale of conspiracy and revolutions, spies and terrorists, kidnappings and assassination plots, the fall of the British Empire and the rise of American hegemony under the heroic leadership of President Dwight D. Eisenhower — which shaped the Middle East and Europe we know today.

The year 1956 was a turning point in history. Over sixteen extraordinary days in October and November of that year, the twin crises involving Suez and Hungary pushed the world to the brink of a nuclear conflict and what many at the time were calling World War III. Blood and Sand delivers this story in an hour-by-hour account through a fascinating international cast of characters:
Anthony Eden, the British prime minister, caught in a trap of his own making;
Gamal Abdel Nasser, the bold young populist leader of Egypt;
David Ben-Gurion, the aging Zionist hero of Israel;
Guy Mollet, the bellicose French prime minister; and
Dwight D. Eisenhower, the American president,
torn between an old world order and a new one in the very same week that his own fate as president was to be decided by the American people.

This is a revelatory history of these dramatic events and people, for the first time setting both crises in the context of the global Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the treacherous power politics of imperialism and oil. Blood and Sand resonates strikingly with the problems of oil control, religious fundamentalism, and international unity that face the world today, and is essential reading for anyone concerned with the state of the modern Middle East and Europe.



























WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY
[book] Almost Complete Poems
by Stanley Moss
Now in paperback
Seven Stories Press & Carcanet Press
Moss is oceanic: his poems rise, crest, crash, and rise again like waves.
His voice echoes the boom of the Old Testament, the fluty trill of Greek mythology, and the gongs of Chinese rituals as he writes about love, nature, war, oppression, and the miracle of language.
He addresses the God of the Jews, of the Christians, and of the Muslims with awe and familiarity, and chants to lesser gods of his own invention. In every surprising poem, every song to life, beautiful life, Moss, by turns giddy and sorrowful, expresses a sacred sensuality and an earthy holiness.
Or putting it another way: here is a mind operating in open air, unimpeded by fashion or forced thematic focus, profoundly catholic in perspective, at once accessible and erudite, inevitably compelling. All of which is to recommend Moss's ability to participate in and control thoroughly these poems while resisting the impulse to center himself in them. This differentiates his beautiful work from much contemporary breast-beating. Moss is an artist who embraces the possibilities of exultation, appreciation, reconciliation, of extreme tenderness. As such he lays down a commitment to a common, worldly morality toward which all beings gravitate..
























FINALIST OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY
[book] Two Worlds Exist
POEMS
by Yehoshua November
Orison
The bard of Teaneck NJ
Finalist for the 2016 National Jewish Book Award in Poetry
Yehoshua November's second poetry collection, Two Worlds Exist, movingly examines the harmonies and dissonances involved in practicing an ancient religious tradition in contemporary America. November's beautiful and profound meditations on work and family life, and the intersections of the sacred and the secular, invite the reader--regardless of background--to imaginatively inhabit a life of religious devotion in the midst of our society's commotion.

'Yehoshua November's poems are deeply felt, carefully crafted, insightful, and moving. While contemporary American literary culture tends to view 'religious' and 'literary' values in opposition, November's poetry brilliantly bridges this divide. He writes with tenderness, understanding, and disarming modesty; at the same time, his characteristic subjects--the challenges posed by married life, child rearing, and suffering, both physical and spiritual--are among the great subjects of literature and life.'' --David Caplan






















FINALIST OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY
[book] GO ON
POEMS
By Ethel Rackin
Parlor Press
Ethel Rackin's Go On immediately calls to mind Beckett's 'in the silence you don't know, you must go on, I can't go on, I'll go on, ' and out of that silence come these brief and powerful poems written 'after centuries of loss/ in the last century.' A visionary, Rackin's preoccupations are seeing and its impossibility. Time is both full of historical weight and the mysterious present, 'as if the before and after had frozen/ and couldn't be tracked down.' Quiet, sure, possessed of a subtle, winning tenderness, and often most at home in the quotidian, the poems dart among truths that startle:
'before I could tell another's lie I was lying in it, '
and
'The grief you imagine/
is easier than the grief you actually/
have to live through.'
These are poems of our time. One marvels at their existence. Carefully, slowly, they carve a path of just how we might go on."--Gillian Conoley

"Recognition is the portal to entity and to something very like godliness. The gentle imperatives of Ethel Rackin's new poems urge us to sustain a longing for 'the face of recognition' and for the resulting entities--all of them wild, all of them free--that fulfill it." --Donald Revell
"I am deeply moved by Ethel Rackin's lyric poems. They continue the great tradition started in China on the one hand and Africa on the other, come together now in Pennsylvania at Rackin's kitchen table." --Gerald Stern
"Go On directs us to notice and to know the world with perfect vulnerability. The delights and difficulties trickling through the chinks of ordinary time swirl through these deceptively simple verses that, like Blake's, hum with the certainty of divine presence always near us but nearly always beyond comprehension. Rackin's expert development of the lyric's oldest properties carries forth the unpredictable relationship between human awareness and the visible world through 'elemental shifts' of spare, simple words that glimpse the unseen and touch its consciousness. 'It's not supposed to make sense, ' these graceful poems inform us, but our responsibility lies in baring ourselves emotionally and intellectually to others and the world as we make and find it. Only in this state of exposure, 'shirt open/ chest full of birds, ' do we gather the often fleeting, sometimes lasting rewards of hope and faith." --Elizabeth Savage
























[book] DOES TERRORISM WORK?
By Richard English
October 2016
Oxford University Press
Does terrorism work?
Does the military response to attacks just create more terrorists and terror attacks?
Terrorism is one of the most significant security threats that we face in the twenty-first century. Not surprisingly, there is now a plethora of books on the subject, offering definitions of what terrorism is and proffering advice on what causes it and how states should react to it.
But one of the most important questions about terrorism has, until now, been left remarkably under-scrutinized: does it work? Richard English now brings thirty years of professional expertise studying terrorism to the task of answering this complex - and controversial - question.
Focussing principally on four of the most significant terrorist organizations of the last fifty years (al-Qaida, the Provisional IRA, Hamas, and ETA), and using a wealth of interview material with former terrorists as well as those involved in counter-terrorism, he argues that we need a far more honest understanding of the degree to which terrorism actually works - as well as a more nuanced insight into the precise ways in which it does so.
Only then can we begin to grapple more effectively with what has become one of the most challenging and eye-catching issues of our time.



























[book] THE PEOPLE AND THE BOOKS
18 CLASSICS OF JEWISH LITERATURE
By Adam Kirsch
October 2016
Norton
From a Tablet columnist comes an examination ..
An essential exploration of a rich literary tradition from the Bible to modern times, by a “rare literary authority” (New York Times Book Review).
Jews have long embraced their identity as “the people of the book.” But outside of the Bible, much of the Jewish literary tradition remains little known. The People and the Books shows how central questions and themes of our history and culture are reflected in the Jewish literary canon: the nature of God, the right way to understand the Bible, the relationship of the Jews to their Promised Land, and the challenges of living as a minority in Diaspora.

Adam Kirsch explores eighteen classic texts including the biblical books of Deuteronomy and Esther, the philosophy of Maimonides, the autobiography of the medieval businesswoman Gluckel of Hameln, and the Zionist manifestos of Theodor Herzl. Also, The Book of Esther, The Jewish War by Josephus, Pirkei Avot, and Tevye the Dairyman. From the Jews of ancient Rome to the mystical devotees of Hasidism in eastern Europe, The People and the Books brings the treasures of Jewish literature to life and offers new ways to think about their enduring power and influence.


























[book] HUNGRY HEART
Adventures in Life,
Love, and Writing
by Jennifer Weiner
October 2016
Atria
Jennifer Weiner is many things: a best-selling author, a Twitter phenomenon, and an "unlikely feminist enforcer" (The New Yorker). She's also a mom, a daughter, and a sister, a former rower and current clumsy yogini, a wife, a friend, and a reality-TV devotee. In her first essay collection, she takes the raw stuff of her life and spins it into a collection of tales of modern-day womanhood as uproariously funny and moving as the best of Nora Ephron and Tina Fey. Born in Louisiana, raised in Connecticut, educated at Princeton, Jennifer spent years feeling like an outsider ("a Lane Bryant outtake in an Abercrombie & Fitch world") before finding her people in newsrooms, and her voice as a novelist, activist, and New York Times columnist.
< No subject is off-limits in these intimate and honest stories: sex, weight, envy, money, her mother's coming out of the closet, her estranged father's death. From lonely adolescence to modern childbirth to hearing her six-year-old daughter say the f-word—fat—for the first time, Jen dives deep into the heart of female experience, with the wit and candor that have endeared her to readers all over the world.
Hilarious and moving, Hungry Heart is about yearning and fulfillment, loss and love, and a woman who searched for her place in the world, and found it as a storyteller.


























[book] Sirius:
A Novel
About the Little Dog
Who Almost Changed History
by Jonathan Crown
October 2016
Scribner
A highly original, tragicomic novel as seen through Sirius, an extraordinary dog who helps his Jewish family escape from Germany to California, becomes a Hollywood star, and ultimately contributes to Hitler’s downfall.
Levi, a fox terrier, lives with his family in a grand townhouse in Berlin. Each day he enjoys a walk through the neighborhood, where people greet him by name. But the year is 1938, and Berlin is no longer safe for Levi or the Liliencrons, his Jewish owners. They rename him Sirius, after the constellation, to protect him.
One night, Nazi troops storm the city and begin to search houses. Sirius alerts the family, and they manage to flee to California. In his new home, Carl Liliencron becomes a chauffeur and Sirius befriends everyone from Humphrey Bogart and Cary Grant to Rita Hayworth and Jack Warner. He is renamed Hercules and becomes a canine movie star. Little does Sirius know that he’ll soon have to perform his most difficult acting role yet, when through a series of exceptional events as World War II unfolds, he winds up at the right hand of Hitler himself. Can Sirius help the German resistance, derail the Führer, and reunite with his family? Or is the cost of peace too high?
With charisma, heart, and delightfully spry prose, Sirius is an enchanting fairy tale about love and humanity and a roving exploration of a momentous historical moment. Like My Dog Skip and The Artist, this feel-good novel will make you stand up and cheer.


























[book] The Attention Merchants:
The Epic Scramble to Get
Inside Our Heads
by Tim Wu
October 2016
Knopf
From Tim Wu, author of the award-winning The Master Switch and who coined the phrase "net neutrality"--a revelatory look at the rise of "attention harvesting," and its transformative effect on our society and our selves.

Attention merchant: an industrial-scale harvester of human attention. A firm whose business model is the mass capture of attention for resale to advertisers.

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. From the pre-Madison Avenue birth of advertising to TV's golden age to our present age of radically individualized choices, the business model of "attention merchants" has always been the same. He describes the revolts that have risen against these relentless attempts to influence our consumption, from the remote control to FDA regulations to Apple's ad-blocking OS. But he makes clear that attention merchants grow ever-new heads, and their means of harvesting our attention have given rise to the defining industries of our time, changing our nature--cognitive, social, and otherwise--in ways unimaginable even a generation ago.
























[book] IKE’S GAMBLE
America’s Rise to Dominance
in the Middle East
by Michael Doran
October 2016
Free Press
This major retelling of the Suez Crisis of 1956—one of the most important events in the history of US policy in the Middle East—shows how President Eisenhower came to realize that Israel, not Egypt, is America’s strongest regional ally.
In 1956 President Nasser of Egypt moved to take possession of the Suez Canal, thereby bringing the Middle East to the brink of war. The British and the French, who operated the canal, joined with Israel in a plan to retake it by force. Despite the special relationship between England and America, Dwight Eisenhower intervened to stop the invasion.
In Ike’s Gamble, Michael Doran shows how Nasser played the US, invoking America’s opposition to European colonialism to drive a wedge between Eisenhower and two British Prime Ministers, Winston Churchill and Anthony Eden. Meanwhile, in his quest to make himself the strongman of the Arab world, Nasser was making weapons deals with the USSR and destabilizing other Arab countries that the US had been courting. The Suez Crisis was his crowning triumph. In time, Eisenhower would conclude that Nasser had duped him, that the Arab countries were too fractious to anchor America’s interests in the Middle East, and that the US should turn instead to Israel.
Affording deep insight into Eisenhower and his foreign policy, this fascinating and provocative history provides a rich new understanding of how the US became the power broker in the Middle East.
























[book] Drawing the Iron Curtain:
Jews and the Golden Age of Soviet Animation
by Maya Balakirsky Katz (Touro College)
2016
Rutgers University Press
In the American imagination, the Soviet Union was a drab cultural wasteland, a place where playful creative work and individualism was heavily regulated and censored. Yet despite state control, some cultural industries flourished in the Soviet era, including animation. Drawing the Iron Curtain tells the story of the golden age of Soviet animation and the Jewish artists who enabled it to thrive.
Art historian Maya Balakirsky Katz reveals how the state-run animation studio Soyuzmultfilm brought together Jewish creative personnel from every corner of the Soviet Union and served as an unlikely haven for dissidents who were banned from working in other industries. Surveying a wide range of Soviet animation produced between 1919 and 1989, from cutting-edge art films like Tale of Tales to cartoons featuring “Soviet Mickey Mouse” Cheburashka, she finds that these works played a key role in articulating a cosmopolitan sensibility and a multicultural vision for the Soviet Union. Furthermore, she considers how Jewish filmmakers used animation to depict distinctive elements of their heritage and ethnic identity, whether producing films about the Holocaust or using fellow Jews as models for character drawings.
Providing a copiously illustrated introduction to many of Soyuzmultfilm’s key artistic achievements, while revealing the tumultuous social and political conditions in which these films were produced, Drawing the Iron Curtain has something to offer animation fans and students of Cold War history alike.
























[book] Does This Book Make
My Butt Look Big?:
A Cheeky Guide to Feeling
Sexier in Your Own
Skin & Unleashing Your Personal Style
by Carson Kressley (Au
October 2016
ST. Martin's Griffin
He isn't Jewish, but he is from the Lehigh Valley, so that is just as good. Plus he uses the Yiddish word tszuj and he has made over several Jewish men. He is also speaking in November 2016 at the Atlanta JCC Book Fest.

Carson Kressley, the Emmy-winning TV star and New York Times bestselling author of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, has spent the last decade transforming thousands of women and connecting with millions more on Oprah Winfrey, Good Morning America, and countless other national broadcasts. He knows what makes women tick. Whether we live in Tacoma or Tallahassee, there is a common thread among all of us: we want to feel beautiful but don’t always know where to start. We’re frequently frustrated by fashion and can’t figure out which trends to follow and which to flee.
Does This Book Make My Butt Look Big? is a roadmap for all of us to build unshakable body and fashion confidence. Nowhere else is there a fun and accessible book created for the underserved masses like us, who just want to get out the door looking and feeling fabulous. Who don’t have gobs of money to drop on our wardrobe and feel left out of the game. And when it comes to how we feel about our bodies, all we see are roadblocks...and signs for Burger King!
We need to be reminded that fashion is FUN. We need to know that with the right tools, we have the power to transform our self-perception by shifting our mindset from woe-is-me to wow-is-me. We need the secrets of playing to our strengths and minimizing our flaws. We need to take more chances, and leave what doesn’t work in the dust. Most of all, we need Carson, our peppy, blond fairy godstylist, to show us the way!






























[book] The Real Madrid Way:
How Values Created the Most
Successful Sports Team on the Planet
by Steven G. Mandis
October 2016
BenBella
The untold story of Real Madrid. One of the most incredible turnarounds in sports and business history.
Real Madrid is the most successful sports franchise on the planet. The soccer club has more trophies than any other sports franchise, including 10 UEFA Champions League trophies. However, the story behind the triumph lies off the field. Generally unnoticed, in the space of fifteen years, a management team, consisting mostly of outsiders, took the team from near bankruptcy to the most valuable sports franchise in the world.
How did Real Madrid achieve such extraordinary success? Columbia Business School professor Steven Mandis investigates. Given unprecedented behind-the-scenes access, Mandis is the first researcher to rigorously analyze both the on-the-field and business aspects of a sports club. What he learns is completely unexpected and challenges the conventional wisdom that Moneyball-fueled data analytics are the primary instruments of success. Instead of relying primarily on computer-generated analysis, Real Madrid relentlessly focuses on the values and expectations of their fans. Real Madrid’s formula stems from a powerful organizational culture built around satisfying the passions and desires of the fan base.
Employing in-depth analysis, Mandis reveals the impact of the “too tired” and “too much talent” effects, with surprising insights into why sports teams can fall short of expectations, and how Real Madrid overcomes these challenges. Chasing the most talented, and most expensive, players can be a recipe for on-the-field success and financial disaster, as it was for Real Madrid in the late 1990s. Real Madrid found a way around that dilemma by centering their strategy on the fans’ values and expectations. By doing so, they created extraordinary passion and loyalty, which has led to amazing marketing and commercial success. This, in turn, attracts and pays for the best players in the world, with the values the fans expect. The management team tries to ensure the fans’ values are the key drivers to player selection, style of play on the field and business strategies in order to create a sustainable economic-sport model.
The Real Madrid Formula explains how Real Madrid has created and maintains a culture that drives both financial and on-the-field success. The book is the first to comprehensively illuminate similarities and differences both on-the-field and business aspects of European soccer and American sports. Filled with data and analysis, and with detailed accounts of the personalities involved, this book is an engrossing account of the lifetime of one of the greatest clubs in the most popular sport in the world. For business and organization leaders, it’s an invaluable inside look at a roadmap for organizational success at the highest level.
























[book] Hate Spin:
The Manufacture of Religious Offense
and Its Threat to Democracy
by Cherian George
October 2016
MIT Press
In the United States, elements of the religious right fuel fears of an existential Islamic threat, spreading anti-Muslim rhetoric into mainstream politics. In Indonesia, Muslim absolutists urge suppression of churches and minority sects, fostering a climate of rising intolerance. In India, Narendra Modi's radical supporters instigate communal riots and academic censorship in pursuit of their Hindu nationalist vision. Outbreaks of religious intolerance are usually assumed to be visceral and spontaneous. But in Hate Spin, Cherian George shows that they often involve sophisticated campaigns manufactured by political opportunists to mobilize supporters and marginalize opponents. Right-wing networks orchestrate the giving of offense and the taking of offense as instruments of identity politics, exploiting democratic space to promote agendas that undermine democratic values. George calls this strategy "hate spin" -- a double-sided technique that combines hate speech (incitement through vilification) with manufactured offense-taking (the performing of righteous indignation). It is deployed in societies as diverse as Buddhist Myanmar and Orthodox Christian Russia. George looks at the world's three largest democracies, where intolerant groups within India's Hindu right, America's Christian right, and Indonesia's Muslim right are all accomplished users of hate spin. He also shows how the Internet and Google have opened up new opportunities for cross-border hate spin.

George argues that governments must protect vulnerable communities by prohibiting calls to action that lead directly to discrimination and violence. But laws that try to protect believers' feelings against all provocative expression invariably backfire. They arm hate spin agents' offense-taking campaigns with legal ammunition. Anti-discrimination laws and a commitment to religious equality will protect communities more meaningfully than misguided attempts to insulate them from insult.


























[book] The Distracted Mind
Ancient brains in a
High-Tech World
By Adam Gazzaley and Larry D. Rosen
UCSF / Cal State DH
October 2016
MIT Press
Most of us will freely admit that we are obsessed with our devices. We pride ourselves on our ability to multitask -- read work email, reply to a text, check Facebook, watch a video clip. Talk on the phone, send a text, drive a car. Enjoy family dinner with a glowing smartphone next to our plates. We can do it all, 24/7! Never mind the errors in the email, the near-miss on the road, and the unheard conversation at the table. In The Distracted Mind, Adam Gazzaley and Larry Rosen -- a neuroscientist and a psychologist -- explain why our brains aren't built for multitasking, and suggest better ways to live in a high-tech world without giving up our modern technology.
The authors explain that our brains are limited in their ability to pay attention. We don't really multitask but rather switch rapidly between tasks. Distractions and interruptions, often technology-related -- referred to by the authors as "interference" -- collide with our goal-setting abilities. We want to finish this paper/spreadsheet/sentence, but our phone signals an incoming message and we drop everything. Even without an alert, we decide that we "must" check in on social media immediately.
Gazzaley and Rosen offer practical strategies, backed by science, to fight distraction. We can change our brains with meditation, video games, and physical exercise; we can change our behavior by planning our accessibility and recognizing our anxiety about being out of touch even briefly. They don't suggest that we give up our devices, but that we use them in a more balanced way.


























[book] My Brother's Keeper:
Christians Who Risked All to
Protect Jewish Targets of the Nazi Holocaust
by Rod Gragg (Coastal Carolina)
October 2016
Center


Thirty captivating profiles of Christians who risked everything to rescue their Jewish neighbors from Nazi terror during the Holocaust.
MY BROTHER'S KEEPER unfolds powerful stories of Christians from across denominations who gave everything they had to save the Jewish people from the evils of the Holocaust. This unlikely group of believers, later honored by the nation of Israel as "The Righteous Among the Nations," ordinary teenage girls, pastors, priests, a German army officer, a former Italian fascist, an international spy, and even a princess.
In one gripping profile after another, these extraordinary historical accounts offer stories of steadfast believers who together helped thousands of Jewish individuals and families to safety. Many of these everyday heroes perished alongside the very people they were trying to protect. There is no doubt that all of their stories showcase the best of humanity--even in the face of unthinkable evil.



























[book] AMONG THE LIVING
A NOVEL
By Jonathan Raab
October 2016
It grabbed me from the first page
A moving novel about a Holocaust survivor's unconventional journey back to a new normal in 1940s Savannah, Georgia.
Think Driving Miss Daisy meets survivorship.
In late summer 1947, two years after the end of WWII, 31 year old Yitzhak Goldah, a Nazi death camp survivor, arrives in Savannah, Georgia at the train station to live with his only remaining relatives. They are Abe and Pearl Jesler, older, childless, and an integral part of the thriving Jewish and commercial community that has been in Georgia since the founding of the colony.
Abe drives Yitzhak to their home, but first shows off the Jewish owned stores as well as his. Black workers are fixing up the front.
In Savannah, Yitzhak discovers a fractured world, where Reform and Conservative Jews live separate lives -- distinctions, to him, that are meaningless given what he has been through. He further complicates things when, much to the Jeslers' dismay, he falls in love with Eva, a young widow within the Reform community. Then, when a woman from Yitzhak's past suddenly appears -- one who is even more shattered by the Holocaust than he is -- Yitzhak must choose between a dark and tortured familiarity and the promise of a bright new life (Didn’t IB Singer have a book like this?).
Set amid the backdrop of America's postwar (and civil rights) South, AMONG THE LIVING (or Among the Loving) grapples with questions of identity and belonging, and steps beyond the Jewish experience as it situates Yitzhak's story during the last gasp of the Jim Crow era.
Yitzhak begins to find echoes of his own experience in the lives of the black family who work for the Jeslers--an affinity he does not share with the Jeslers themselves. This realization both surprises and convinces Yitzhak that his choices are not as clear-cut as he might have thought.





























[book] LAND OF FISH AND RICE
Recipes from the Culinary Heart of China
By Fuchsia Dunlop
October 2016
Norton
Most American and Israeli Jews are familiar with Szechuan, Hunan, Mongolian, and Cantonese/HK cuisines of China. But few known Jiangnan. And even fewer know the coastal cuisine where Technion is building a Chinese campus.
Dunlop’s book is a good introduction.
The lower Yangtze region, or JIANGNAN, with its modern capital Shanghai, has been known since ancient times as a “land of fish and rice.” For centuries, local cooks have harvested the bounty of its lakes, rivers, fields, and mountains to create a cuisine renowned for its delicacy and beauty. In Land of Fish and Rice, Fuchsia Dunlop draws on years of study and exploration to present the recipes, techniques, and ingredients of the Jiangnan kitchen.
You will be inspired to try classic dishes such as Beggar’s Chicken and Clear-Steamed Sea Bass and Fresh Soybeans with Pickled Greens. Evocatively written and featuring stunning recipe photography, this is an important new work celebrating one of China’s most fascinating culinary regions

























[book] DOLCE VITA CONFIDENTIAL
Fellini, Loren, Pucci,
Paparazzi, and the Swingin High Life
Of 1950’s Rome
By Shawn Levy
October 2016
Norton
From Penn grad, author, and former film critic for The Oregonian, comes a romp through the worlds where fashion, film, art, vespas, post-War journalism, and food intersected. In the 1950s, Rome rose from the ashes of World War II to become a movable feast for film, fashion, creative energy, tabloid media, and bold-faced libertinism that made “Italian” a global synonym for taste, style, and flair. Old money, new stars, fast cars, wanton libidos, and brazen news photographers created a way of life captured and exposed in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita. Rome was a playground for film stars (Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Ava Gardner, Sophia Loren), fashionistas, exiles, moguls, and martyrs, all of whom wanted a chance to experience and indulge in the sweet life. It became one of the great cultural capitals of the world?with more than just a trace of the city of the Caesars or the Borgias. Dolce Vita Confidential re-creates Rome’s stunning ascent with vivid and compelling tales of its glitterati and artists, down to every last outrageous detail of the city’s magnificent transformation. Shawn is author of Rat Pack Confidential.

























[book] The Science of Managing Our Digital Stuff
by Ofer Bergman and Steve Whittaker
Bar-Ilan / UC-Santa Cruz
October 2016
MIT Press
Each of us has an ever-growing collection of personal digital data: documents, photographs, PowerPoint presentations, videos, music, emails and texts sent and received. To access any of this, we have to find it. The ease (or difficulty) of finding something depends on how we organize our digital stuff. In this book, personal information management (PIM) experts Ofer Bergman and Steve Whittaker explain why we organize our personal digital data the way we do and how the design of new PIM systems can help us manage our collections more efficiently.
Bergman and Whittaker report that many of us use hierarchical folders for our personal digital organizing. Critics of this method point out that information is hidden from sight in folders that are often within other folders so that we have to remember the exact location of information to access it. Because of this, information scientists suggest other methods: search, more flexible than navigating folders; tags, which allow multiple categorizations; and group information management. Yet Bergman and Whittaker have found in their pioneering PIM research that these other methods that work best for public information management don't work as well for personal information management.
Bergman and Whittaker describe personal information collection as curation: we preserve and organize this data to ensure our future access to it. Unlike other information management fields, in PIM the same user organizes and retrieves the information. After explaining the cognitive and psychological reasons that so many prefer folders, Bergman and Whittaker propose the user-subjective approach to PIM, which does not replace folder hierarchies but exploits these unique characteristics of PIM.






















[book] What’s Wrong With Mindfulness
(and What Isn’t)
Zen Perspectives
Edited by Robert Rosenbaum and Barry Magid
October 18, 2016
Wisdom Books
Mindfulness seems to be everywhere—but are we sure that's a good thing? Teachers Sallie Jiko Tisdale, Gil Fronsdal, Norman Fischer, and more explain how removing mindfulness from Buddhism may set a dangerous precedent.
Mindfulness is in fashion. Oprah loves it, Google teaches it to employees—it has become widespread as a cure-all for stress, health problems and psychological difficulties, interpersonal trouble, and existential anxiety. But when mindfulness is separated from the Buddhist tradition, is something lost?
The Zen teachers gathered here each offer a unique perspective on what “mindfulness” means, its strengths, and the potential pitfalls.
Gil Fronsdal and Max Erdstein thoughtfully explore the rich Pali roots of mindfulness; Barry Magid and Marc Poirier examine the unintended side effects of exposing a spiritual tradition to the demands of capitalism; Norman Fischer demonstrates how mindfulness informs his creative process; Grace Schireson shows how mindfulness allows her to engage fully with the world as a feminist. And more, including essays on mindfulness and environmentalism, science, and psychology. Each chapter offers insights to ground mindfulness in a deeper understanding of both where it comes from, and where it might be headed.

























[book] The Emotionary:
A Dictionary of Words That
Don't Exist for Feelings That Do
by Eden Sher
Illustrated by Julia Wertz
October 2016
Razorbill
From Eden Sher, the award winning actress from THE MIDDLE.
IrrEdependent: Irrational + Independent – unable to ask for help under any circumstances
Contrangst: Control + Angst – anxiety of not being to control..
Losstracize: Loss + Ostracize – pushing others away who try to comfort you after a loss
Disapathy: Disappointed + Apathy
Fauxbration: the feeling that your phone is vibrating even though it is not
Regretrospect: Regret in retrospect

A dictionary of words that don't exist for feelings that do written by The Middle actress Eden Sher and illustrated by acclaimed graphic novelist Julia Wertz.
All her life, Eden Sher has suffered from dyscommunicatia (n. the inability to articulate a feeling through words.). Then, one day, she decided that, whenever she had an emotion for which she had no word, she would make one up.
The result of this is The Emotionary, which lives at the intersection of incredibly funny and very useful. Chock full of words you always wanted/never knew you needed, often accompanied by illustrations of hilarious and all-too-familiar situations, The Emotionary will be a cherished tool for you or the world-class feelings-haver in your life.
At long last, all your complicated feelings can be put into words, so you can recognize them for what they are, speak their names aloud, and move on. Finally!

























[book] Appetites:
A Cookbook
by Anthony Bourdain
October 25, 2016
ecco Press
Anthony Bourdain is man of many appetites. And for many years, first as a chef, later as a world-traveling chronicler of food and culture on his CNN series Parts Unknown, he has made a profession of understanding the appetites of others. These days, however, if he’s cooking, it’s for family and friends.

Appetites, his first cookbook in more than ten years, boils down forty-plus years of professional cooking and globe-trotting to a tight repertoire of personal favorites—dishes that everyone should (at least in Mr. Bourdain’s opinion) know how to cook. Once the supposed "bad boy" of cooking, Mr. Bourdain has, in recent years, become the father of a little girl—a role he has embraced with enthusiasm. After years of traveling more than 200 days a year, he now enjoys entertaining at home. Years of prep lists and the hyper-organization necessary for a restaurant kitchen, however, have caused him, in his words, to have "morphed into a psychotic, anally retentive, bad-tempered Ina Garten."

The result is a home-cooking, home-entertaining cookbook like no other, with personal favorites from his own kitchen and from his travels, translated into an effective battle plan that will help you terrify your guests with your breathtaking efficiency.























[book] Traditional Jewish Baking:
Retro Recipes Your
Grandma Would Make...
If She Had a Mixer
by Carine Goren
October 11, 2016
Page Street
Celebrate Beloved Keepsake Recipes with Modern Techniques with the host of a popular Israeli TV cooking show

Learn the best of Grandma’s baking secrets, and make them approachable with new and simple techniques. Thanks to Carine Goren, a baking phenomenon on Israeli TV, you can learn how to make deliciously nostalgic treats straight from the homeland like Bubbe would. Carine spent years researching and testing grandmothers’ loved and cherished recipes to learn what “as it feels” and “by the eye” really mean.
Carine shows readers how to re-create the best versions of timeless and traditional Jewish baked goods in today’s cutting-edge kitchens-from exceptional cakes, distinctive pies, standout cookies, festive holiday desserts and special homemade candies to some delicious new favorites-all of which are bound to satisfy any sweet tooth. Enjoy a tasty trip down memory lane, and let the incredible flavors of the past go straight to your heart.























[book] Breaking Breads:
A New World of Israeli Baking--
Flatbreads, Stuffed Breads,
Challahs, Cookies, and the
Legendary Chocolate Babka
By Uri Scheft and
Contribution by Raquel Pelzel
October 2016
Artisan
I once took a baking class at BREADS BAKERY near Union Square in Manhattan. And I spied a lovely cookbook that Uri Scheft was using, but it was in Hebrew. One day, I was told, there would be a BREADS BAKERY cookbook in English.

It has arrived

Israeli baking encompasses the influences of so many regions—Morocco, Yemen, Germany, and Georgia, to name a few—and master baker Uri Scheft seamlessly marries all of these in his incredible baked goods at his Breads Bakery in New York City and Lehamim Bakery in Tel Aviv. Nutella-filled babkas, potato and shakshuka focaccia, and chocolate rugelach are pulled out of the ovens several times an hour for waiting crowds. In Breaking Breads, Scheft takes the combined influences of his Scandinavian heritage, his European pastry training, and his Israeli and New York City homes to provide sweet and savory baking recipes that cover European, Israeli, and Middle Eastern favorites. Scheft sheds new light on classics like challah, babka, and ciabatta—and provides his creative twists on them as well, showing how bakers can do the same at home—and introduces his take on Middle Eastern daily breads like kubaneh and jachnun.

The instructions are detailed and the photos explanatory so that anyone can make Scheft’s Poppy Seed Hamantaschen, Cheese Bourekas, and Jerusalem Bagels, among other recipes. With several key dough recipes and hundreds of Israeli-, Middle Eastern–, Eastern European–, Scandinavian-, and Mediterranean-influenced recipes, this is truly a global baking bible.






























[book] Bubbe and Me
in the Kitchen:
A Kosher Cookbook of
Beloved Recipes and Modern Twists
by Miri Rotkovitz
October 11, 2016
Sonoma Press
A Kosher Cookbook that Reinvigorates Family Recipes and Embraces Our Culinary Future
Jerry Seinfeld's fictional dentist Tim Whatley famously converted to Judaism "for the jokes," but if there's one thing that defines Jewish culture as much as humor it's food. Miri Rotkovitz spent her childhood in the kitchen of her grandmother, Ruth Morrison Simon, whose commitment to international Jewish fare left a lasting impression. Bubbe and me in the Kitchen is a touching, humorous, versatile kosher cookbook, which celebrates the storied recipes that characterize and reinvent Jewish food culture.
Offering time-tested culinary treasures from her grandmother’s recipe box, plus more than 80 original recipes of Miri’s own, this kosher cookbook includes Ashkenazi favorites such as babka, brisket, and matzo ball soup, and more global dishes, from za’atar pita chips and forbidden rice bowls to watermelon gazpacho and Persian chicken stew.
With contributions from Ronnie Fein, Kim Kushner, Paula Shoyer, and other Jewish food professionals, as well as holiday menus, this kosher cookbook is just as likely to spark memories and spur conversation as it is to enliven your meals.
Generational perspectives on keeping kosher Over 100 recipes reflecting the diversity of traditional and modern Ashkenazi, Sephardi, and Mizrahi cuisine
A kosher cookbook with recipe labels in accordance with a kosher diet



























Speaking of INA GARTEN...
[book] Cooking for Jeffrey:
A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook
by Ina Garten
October 25, 2016
Clarkson Potter
For America’s bestselling cookbook author Ina Garten there is no greater pleasure than cooking for the people she loves—and particularly for her husband, Jeffrey. She has been cooking for him ever since they were married forty-eight years ago, and the comforting, delicious meals they shared became the basis for her extraordinary career in food.
Ina’s most personal cookbook yet, Cooking for Jeffrey is filled with the recipes Jeffrey and their friends request most often as well as charming stories from Ina and Jeffrey’s many years together. There are traditional dishes that she’s updated, such as Brisket with Onions and Leeks, and Tsimmes, a vegetable stew with carrots, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, and prunes, and new favorites, like Skillet-Roasted Lemon Chicken and Roasted Salmon Tacos. You’ll also find wonderful new salads, including Maple-Roasted Carrot Salad and Kale Salad with Pancetta and Pecorino. Desserts range from simple Apple Pie Bars to showstoppers like Vanilla Rum Panna Cotta with Salted Caramel. For the first time, Ina has included a chapter devoted to bread and cheese, with recipes and tips for creating the perfect cheese course. With options like Fig and Goat Cheese Bruschettas and Challah with Saffron, there’s something everyone will enjoy.
From satisfying lunches to elegant dinners, here are the recipes Ina has tested over and over again, so you too can serve them with confidence to the people you love.























Speaking of INA GARTEN...
[book] Mexican Today
New and Rediscovered Recipes
for Contemporary Kitchens
by Pati Jinich
2016
Rux Martin/HMH
On her PBS TV series, now in its fifth season, as well as in frequent appearances on shows like The Chew, Pati Jinich, a busy mother of three, has shown a flair for making Mexican cooking irresistibly accessible. In Mexican Today, she shares easy, generous dishes, both traditional ones and her own new spins.
Some are regional recipes she has recovered from the past and updated, like Miners’ Enchiladas with fresh vegetables and cheese or Drunken Rice with Chicken and Chorizo, a specialty of the Yucatán. “Sweaty” Tacos with ripe tomatoes and cheese are so convenient they’re sold on Mexican streets by bicyclists. Her grandmother’s Cornflake Cookies feel just as contemporary now as they did then.
Pati has “Mexed up” other recipes in such family favorites as Mexican Pizza with Grilled Skirt Steak and Onions. Still other dishes show the evolution of Mexican food north and south of the border, including Mexican Dreamboat Hotdogs and Cal-Mex Fish Tacos with Creamy Slaw. This food will draw everyone together—a family at the end of a working day, a book club, or a neighborhood potluck. Throughout, Pati is an infectious cheerleader, sharing stores of the food, people, and places behind the recipes.
With regard to the recipes for Matzo Balls With Mushrooms And Jalapeños In Broth / Bolas de Matza con hongos y chiles, Pati’s Jewish grandparents, came to North America through Mexico. This is the recipe her grandmother used in Mexico. Also her paternal grandmother, Esther Morgenstern, made traditional gefilte fish a la Vera Cruz with red sauce, capers and pickled chiles. Jinich’s maternal grandmother, Lotte Gross — who emigrated to Mexico from Austria — made the reinvented matzo ball soup. Mushrooms and jalapeños aren’t the only surprises in this soup. When Jinich mixes the matzo balls, she adds freshly grated nutmeg.






















[book] Traditional Jewish Baking:
Retro Recipes Your Grandma
Would Make... If She
Had a Mixer
by Carine Goren (A
October 11, 2016
Macmillan / Page Street
Celebrate Beloved Keepsake Recipes with Modern Techniques
Learn the best of Grandma’s baking secrets, and make them approachable with new and simple techniques. Thanks to Carine Goren, a baking phenomenon on Israeli TV, you can learn how to make deliciously nostalgic treats straight from the homeland like Bubbe would. Carine spent years researching and testing grandmothers’ loved and cherished recipes to learn what “as it feels” and “by the eye” really mean.
Carine shows readers how to re-create the best versions of timeless and traditional Jewish baked goods in today’s cutting-edge kitchens?from exceptional cakes, distinctive pies, standout cookies, festive holiday desserts and special homemade candies to some delicious new favorites?all of which are bound to satisfy any sweet tooth. Enjoy a tasty trip down memory lane, and let the incredible flavors of the past go straight to your heart.























[book] Mozza at Home:
More than 150 Crowd-Pleasing
Recipes for Relaxed, Family-Style Entertaining
by Nancy Silverton and Carolynn Carreno
October 25, 2016
Knopf
Nancy Silverton is the co-owner of Osteria Mozza, Pizzeria Mozza, Chi Spacca, and Mozza2Go, in Los Angeles, Singapore, and Newport Beach, California. She is the founder of the La Brea Bakery and is the only chef ever to be awarded both the Outstanding Chef and Outstanding Pastry Chef awards from the James Beard Foundation. She is active in the LA Jewish community. As an award-winning chef and the owner of six busy restaurants across two continents, Nancy Silverton was so consumed by her life in the professional kitchen that for years she almost never cooked at home. With her intense focus on the business of cooking, Nancy had forgotten what made her love to cook in the first place: fabulous ingredients at the height of their season, simple food served family style, and friends and loved ones gathered around the dinner table. Then, on a restorative trip to Italy—with its ripe vegetables, magnificent landscapes, and long summer days—Nancy began to cook for friends and family again, and rediscovered the great pleasures (and great tastes!) of cooking and eating at home.
Now, in Mozza at Home, Nancy shares her renewed passion and provides nineteen menus packed with easy-to-follow recipes that can be prepared in advance (with no fancy restaurant equipment needed!) and are perfect for entertaining. Organized by meal, each menu provides a main dish along with a complementary selection of appetizers and side dishes. Under Nancy’s guidance you can mix and match all the options depending on the size of your gathering. Make a few sides for a small dinner party with friends, or make them all for a delicious family feast! And don’t forget dessert—there’s an entire chapter dedicated to end-of-meal treats such as Devil’s Food Rings with Spiced White Mountain Frosting and Dario’s Olive Oil Cake with Rosemary and Pine Nuts that can be prepared hours before serving so that the host gets to relax during the event too.
Whether it’s Marinated Olives and Fresh Pecorino and other appetizers that can be put out while you’re assembling the rest of the meal . . . salads, such as Endive Salad with Date Anchovy Dressing, composed of sturdy lettuces that won’t wilt . . . simple sides, such as Roasted Carrots and Chickpeas with Cumin Vinaigrette, that are just as delicious served at room temperature as they are warm . . . or show-stopping mains such as the Flattened Chicken Thighs with Charred Lemon Salsa Verde—there is something here for everyone and every occasion. With clever tips on how to organize your table and your time when serving many guests, Mozza at Home helps you throw the perfect dinner party—one that’s positively stress-free and delicious!























[book] Land of Fish and Rice:
Recipes from the Culinary Heart of China
by Fuchsia Dunlop
October 18, 2016
Norton
The lower Yangtze region, or Jiangnan, with its modern capital Shanghai, has been known since ancient times as a “land of fish and rice.” For centuries, local cooks have harvested the bounty of its lakes, rivers, fields, and mountains to create a cuisine renowned for its delicacy and beauty. In Land of Fish and Rice, Fuchsia Dunlop draws on years of study and exploration to present the recipes, techniques, and ingredients of the Jiangnan kitchen. You will be inspired to try classic dishes such as Beggar’s Chicken and sumptuous Dongpo Pork, as well as fresh, simple recipes such as Clear-Steamed Sea Bass and Fresh Soybeans with Pickled Greens. Evocatively written and featuring stunning recipe photography, this is an important new work celebrating one of China’s most fascinating culinary regions.




























[book] Everything I Want to Eat
SQIRL and the New California Cooking
by Jessica Koslow
October 2016
Abrams
The debut cookbook from Jessica Koslow, award-winning chef of LA’s popular restaurant Sqirl, featuring more than 100 fresh, market-driven, healthy, and flavorful recipes.
Jessica Koslow and her restaurant, Sqirl, are at the forefront of the California cooking renaissance, which is all about food that surprises us and engages all of our senses—it looks good, tastes vibrant, and feels fortifying yet refreshing. In Everything I Want to Eat, Koslow shares 100 of her favorite recipes for health-conscious but delicious dishes, all of which always use real foods—no fake meat or fake sugar here—that also happen to be suitable for vegetarians, vegans, or whomever you’re sharing your meal with.
The book is organized into seven chapters, each featuring a collection of recipes centered on a key ingredient or theme. Expect to find recipes for dishes Sqirl has become known for, as well as brand-new seasonal flavor combinations, including:

Raspberry and vanilla bean jam
Sorrel-pesto rice bowl
Burnt brioche toast with house ricotta and seasonal jam
Butternut squash latkes with crème fraîche and applesauce
Lamb merguez, cranberry beans, roasted tomato, and yogurt cheese
Valrhona chocolate fleur de sel cookies
Almond hazelnut milk


Koslow lives in LA, where everyone is known to be obsessively health-conscious and where dietary restrictions are the norm. People come into Sqirl and order dishes with all sorts of substitutions and modifications—hold the feta, please, add extra kale. They are looking to make their own healthy adventures. Others may tack breakfast sausage, cured bacon, or Olli’s prosciutto on to their order. So Koslow has had to constantly think about ways to modify dishes for certain diets, which in a way has made her a better, more adaptable cook.
Throughout this book, Koslow provides notes and thought bubbles that show how just about any dish can be modified for specific tastes and dietary needs, whether it needs to be gluten-free or vegan.
Everything I Want to Eat captures the excitement of the food at Sqirl—think of a classic BLT sandwich turned playful with the substitution of chicken skin “bacon”—while also offering accessible recipes, like tangerine and rosewater semolina cake, that can be easily made in the home kitchen. Moreover, it’s an entirely new kind of cookbook and approach to how we are all starting to think about food, allowing readers to play with the recipes, combining and shaping them to be nothing short of everything you want to eat.























[book] The Saffron Tales:
Recipes from the Persian Kitchen
by Yasmin Khan
Fall 2016
Bloomsbury
Page 109: A trip to Jewish Isfahan
Armed with little more than a notebook and a bottle of pomegranate molasses, and fueled by memories of her family's farm in the lush seaside province of Gilan, British-Iranian cook Yasmin Khan traversed Iran in search of the most delicious recipes.
Her quest took her from the snowy mountains of Tabriz to the cosmopolitan cafés of Tehran and the pomegranate orchards of Isfahan, where she was welcomed into the homes of artists, farmers, electricians, and teachers. Through her travels, she gained a unique insight into the culinary secrets of the Persian kitchen, and the lives of ordinary Iranians today.
In The Saffron Tales, Yasmin weaves together a tapestry of stories from Iranian home kitchens with exclusive photography and fragrant, modern recipes that are rooted in the rich tradition of Persian cooking. All fully accessible for the home cook, Yasmin's recipes range from the inimitable fesenjoon (chicken with walnuts and pomegranates) to kofte berenji (lamb meatballs stuffed with prunes and barberries) and ghalyieh maygoo (prawn, coriander, and tamarind stew). She also offers a wealth of vegetarian dishes, including tahcheen (baked saffron and aubergine rice) and domaj (mixed herb, flatbread, and feta salad), as well as sumptuous desserts such as rose and almond cake, and sour cherry and dark chocolate cookies.
With stunning photography from all corners of Iran and gorgeous recipe images, this lavish cookbook rejoices in the land, life, flavors, and food of an enigmatic and beautiful country.























[book] Dorie's Cookies
by Dorie Greenspan with Davide Luciano
October 2016
All-new collection from a "revered icon" and "culinary guru" (New York Times).

Dorie Greespan is obsessed with cookies. She was recently in Paris and woke up her husband to tell him she had a dream about a great cookie. She made it and gave it to a famous French chef who loved it.

First of all, you must agree that a BROWNIE is a cookie, but just in a cookie bar shape.

Over the course of her baking career, Dorie Greenspan has created more than 300 cookie recipes. Yet she has never written a book about them—until now. To merit her “three purple stars of approval,” every cookie had to be so special that it begged to be made again and again. Cookies for every taste and occasion are here. There are company treats like Portofignos, with chocolate dough and port-soaked figs, and lunch-box Blueberry Buttermilk Pie Bars. They Might Be Breakfast Cookies are packed with goodies—raisins, dried apples, dried cranberries, and oats— while Almond Crackle Cookies have just three ingredients. There are dozens of choices for the Christmas cookie swaps, including Little Rascals (German jam sandwich cookies with walnuts), Italian Saucissons (chocolate log cookies studded with dried fruit), and Snowy-Topped Brownie Drops.

And who but America’s favorite baker could devise a cookie as intriguing as Pink-Peppercorn Thumbprints or as popular as the World Peace Cookie, with its 59 million Internet fans?




























[book] Marbled, Swirled,
and Layered:
150 Recipes and Variations >BR> for Artful Bars, Cookies, Pies,
Cakes, and More
by Irvin Lin
Fall 2016
Irvin was a graphic designer who became a baking blogger. He once blogged about what Jews and Asians jave in common (marry a doctor; eat kreplach or dumplings…)… so this counts as a Jewish book... right?
Incredible desserts with layers and swirls of flavor that are beautiful and delicious--inside and out.

When you marble, layer, and swirl doughs, batters, toppings, or frostings, good looks and good taste come together in one total package. Irvin Lin, creator of the popular blog Eat the Love, shows how these techniques open the door to inventive flavor combinations that look as fantastic as they taste. Bakers of all levels will enjoy recipes ranging from easy brownies and bars to brunch?worthy muffins and morning buns to show-stopping cakes and tarts: cinnamon spiral icebox cookies, pistachio?swirl brownies, triple?chocolate pie, multicolored “Neapolitan” layer cake, and more. Lin offers variations to suit any taste (more than 150 recipes total) plus baking and decorating tips throughout on topics like making your own all?natural food coloring, rolling up jelly roll–style cakes, and discovering the magic of browned butter. Readers (and eaters) are sure to ooh and ahh over every dazzling dessert at first glance—and then again at first bite.




























[book] Classic German Baking:
The Very Best Recipes
for Traditional Favorites,
from Pfeffernüsse to Streuselkuchen
by Luisa Weiss
October 18, 2016
FROM THE AUTHOR OF “MY BERLIN KITCHEN.”
German baking has influenced baking traditions around the world for generations and is a source of great nostalgia for those of German and Central European heritage. Yet the very best recipes for Germany’s cookies, cakes, tortes, and breads, passed down through generations, have never before been collected and perfected for contemporary American home bakers. Enter Luisa Weiss, the Berlin-based creator of the adored Wednesday Chef blog and self-taught ambassador of the German baking canon.
From her cheerful Berlin kitchen, Weiss shares more than 100 rigorously researched and tested recipes, gathered from expert bakers, friends, family, and time-honored sources throughout Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Whether you’re in the mood for the simple yet emblematic Streuselkuchen, crisp and flaky Strudel, or classic breakfast Brötchen, every recipe you’re looking for is here, along with detailed advice to ensure success plus delightful storytelling about the origins, meaning, and rituals behind the recipes. Paired with more than 100 photographs of Berlin and delectable baked goods, such as Elisenlebkuchen, Marmorierter Mohnkuchen, and Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, this book will encourage home bakers of all skill levels to delve into the charm of Germany’s rich baking tradition.
Classic German Baking is an authoritative collection of recipes that provides delicious inspiration for any time of day, whether it’s for a special breakfast, a celebration with friends and family, or just a regular afternoon coffee-and-cake break, an important part of everyday German life.





























[book] FOOD52
A NEW WAY TO DINNER
A Playbook with Recipes and
Strategies for the Week Ahead
by Amanda Hesser
and Merrill Stubbs
October 2016
10 Speed Press
A smart, inspiring cookbook showing how to plan, shop, and cook for dinners (and lunches and desserts) all through the week. The secret? Cooking ahead. The format? It is a playbook that plans out your week of meals and the grocery list you will need

Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, founders of the online kitchen and home destination Food52, pull off home-cooked dinners with their families with stunning regularity. But they don't cook every night.

Starting with flexible base dishes made on the weekend, Amanda and Merrill mix, match, and riff to create new dinners, lunches, and even desserts throughout the week. Blistered tomatoes are first served as a side, then become sauce for spaghetti with corn. Tuna, poached in olive oil on a Sunday, gets paired with braised peppers and romesco for a fiery dinner, with spicy mayo for a hearty sandwich, and with zucchini and couscous for a pack-and-go salad.

Check out the Chocolate Olive Oil Cake (inspired by Maialono near Manhattan's Gramercy Park); Spicy Roasted Cauliflower; Applesauce Cake; Rosy Chicken Thighs and Legs (with rose wine); Meatballs with Tomato and Zucchini; Watermelonade; a Plum Tart; Summer Evening Pasta with squash and corn; Spicy Peach Salad; Blueberry Schlumpf; Lemony Pasta with Asparagus; Loe-Maintenance Fish Tacos; Thai Steak Salad; Pan-Roasted Chicken; Lamb-Blade Chops; and Couscous Salad with Zucchini, Postachios, and Feta.
Amanda (of Scranton and NYT heritage) and Merrill’s seasonal plans give you everything you need to set yourself up well for the week, with grocery lists and cooking timelines. They also share clever tips and tricks for more confident cooking, showing how elements can work across menus and seasons to fit your mood or market, and how to be scrappy with whatever’s left in the fridge. These building blocks form A New Way to Dinner, the key to smarter, happier cooking that leaves you with endless possibilities for the week ahead.























[book] The Adventures of Fat Rice:
Recipes from the Chicago
Restaurant Inspired by Macau
by Abraham Conlon, Adrienne Lo, Hugh Amano
October 2016
Ten Speed Press
With 100 recipes, this is the first book to explore the vibrant food culture of Macau—an east-meets-west melting pot of Chinese, Portuguese, Malaysian, and Indian foodways—as seen through the lens of the cult favorite Chicago restaurant, Fat Rice.
An hour’s ferry ride from Hong Kong, on the banks of the Pearl River in China, lies Macau—a modern, cosmopolitan city with an unexpected history. For centuries, Macau was one of the world’s greatest trading ports: a Portuguese outpost and crossroads along the spice route, where travelers from Europe, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and mainland China traded resources, culture, and food. The Adventures of Fat Rice is the story of how two Chicago chefs discovered and fell in love with this fascinating and, at least until now, unheralded cuisine. With dishes like Minchi (a classic Macanese meat hash), Po Kok Gai (a Portuguese-influenced chicken curry with chouriço and olives), and Arroz Gordo (if paella and fried rice had a baby), now you, too, can bring the eclectic and wonderfully unique—yet enticingly familiar—flavors of Macau into your own kitchen.
























[book] Molly on the Range:
Recipes and Stories from An
Unlikely Life on a Farm
by Molly Yeh
October 4, 2016
Rodale
In 2013, food blogger and classical musician Molly Yeh left Brooklyn to live on a farm on the North Dakota-Minnesota border, where her fiancé was a fifth-generation Norwegian-American sugar beet farmer. Like her award-winning blog My Name is Yeh, Molly on the Range chronicles her life through photos, more than 100 new recipes, and hilarious stories from life in the city and on the farm.

Molly’s story begins in the suburbs of Chicago in the 90s, when things like Lunchables and Dunkaroos were the objects of her affection; continues into her New York years, when Sunday mornings meant hangovers and bagels; and ends in her beloved new home, where she’s currently trying to master the art of the hotdish. Celebrating Molly's Jewish/Chinese background with recipes for Asian Scotch Eggs and Scallion Pancake Challah Bread and her new hometown Scandinavian recipes for Cardamom Vanilla Cake and Marzipan Mandel Bread, Molly on the Range will delight everyone, from longtime readers to those discovering her glorious writing and recipes for the first time.























[book] Cuba!:
Recipes and Stories from
the Cuban Kitchen
by Dan Goldberg, Andrea Kuhn,
and Jody Eddy
October 2016
Ten Speed Press
Cuba continues to captivate visitors with its vibrant culture, colorful cities, and incredible cuisine. Cuba! explores the magic of this country through recipes and stories that will set taste buds on fire and delight even the most well-seasoned traveler.
Brazen, bold, and colorful, Cuba is a country that pulses with life. Fascinated by its people and their endlessly delicious home-cooked cuisine, friends Dan Goldberg and Andrea Kuhn have been visiting this magnetic country, capturing its passion and vibrancy, for the past five years. Dan, an award-winning photographer and Andrea, an acclaimed prop stylist and art director, along with renowned food writer Jody Eddy, bring the best of Cuban food to home kitchens with more than 75 meticulously tested recipes. From Cuban-Style Fried Chicken and Tostones Stuffed with Lobster and Conch, to Squid-ink Empanadas and Mojito Cake with Rum-Infused Whipped Cream, this book offers a unique opportunity to bring a little slice of Cuba into your home and onto your plate.




























[book] My Two Souths
Blending the Flavors of India
into a Southern Kitchen
by Asha Gomez and Martha Hall Foose
October 11, 2016
Running Press
The first South in this book is Kerala, the Indian state on the Arabian Sea. Ms. Gomez learned to grind and combine spices in the kitchen of her family’s compound there. She moved to Queens and later to Atlanta, home base for her second South. There Ms. Gomez ran Cardamom Hill, a well-received, if short-lived, restaurant before opening her current venture, the lunch spot Spice to Table in the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood. Kerala and the American South meet in Ms. Gomez’s kitchen, and that’s where things get interesting. Yellow lentils lace breakfast grits, cutting them the way chicory stretches coffee. A bird’s-eye chile infuses heavy cream with a warming kiss for a gently spiced chocolate tart.
Her singular recipes are rooted in her love of Deep-South cooking, as well as the Southern Indian flavors of her childhood home. These “Two Souths” that are close to her heart are thousands of miles apart, yet share similarities in traditions, seasonings, and most importantly, an abiding appreciation of food as both celebration and comfort. Here she shares more than 125 recipes, including: Vivid Tomato and Cheese Pie, Kerala Fried Chicken and Waffles, Three Spice Carrot Cake.




























[book] MY OWN WORDS
By Ruth Bader Ginsburg
U.S. Supreme Court Justice
With Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams
October 2016
Simon and Schuster
The first book from Ruth Bader Ginsburg since becoming a Supreme Court Justice in 1993—a witty, engaging, serious, and playful collection of writings and speeches from the woman who has had a powerful and enduring influence on law, women’s rights, and popular culture.
My Own Words offers Justice Ginsburg on wide-ranging topics, including gender equality, the workways of the Supreme Court, being Jewish, law and lawyers in opera, and the value of looking beyond US shores when interpreting the US Constitution. Throughout her life Justice Ginsburg has been (and continues to be) a prolific writer and public speaker. This book’s sampling is selected by Justice Ginsburg and her authorized biographers Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams. Justice Ginsburg has written an introduction to the book, and Hartnett and Williams introduce each chapter, giving biographical context and quotes gleaned from hundreds of interviews they have conducted. This is a fascinating glimpse into the life of one of America’s most influential women.























[book] CITY OF DREAMS
THE 400 YEAR EPIC
HISTORY OF IMMIGRANT NEW YORK
By Tyler Anbinder
October 2016
HMH
A defining American story, never before told with such breadth of scope, lavish research, and resounding spirit
With more than three million foreign-born residents today, New York has been America’s defining port of entry for nearly four centuries, a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. These migrants have brought their hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city, and from there to the entire country. More immigrants have come to New York than all other entry points combined.
City of Dreams is peopled with memorable characters both beloved and unfamiliar, whose lives unfold in rich detail: the young man from the Caribbean who passed through New York on his way to becoming a Founding Father; the ten-year-old Angelo Siciliano, from Calabria, who transformed into Charles Atlas, bodybuilder; Dominican-born Oscar de la Renta, whose couture designs have dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Tyler Anbinder’s story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs, all playing out against the powerful backdrop of New York City, at once ever-changing and profoundly, permanently itself. City of Dreams provides a vivid sense of what New York looked like, sounded like, smelled like, and felt like over the centuries of its development and maturation into the city we know today.























[book] AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
A LOVE STORY
BY JOHN KAAG
(U Mass Lowell)
FS&G
October 2016
The epic wisdom contained in a lost library helps the author turn his life around
John Kaag is a dispirited young philosophy professor at sea in his early marriage to his freshman year girlfiend and his academic career when he stumbles upon West Wind, a ruin of an estate in the hinterlands of New Hampshire that belonged to the eminent Harvard philosopher William Ernest Hocking. It was by accident that he found it, when a 93 year old local man in a coffee shop told him of this hidden private library. Professor Hocking was one of the last true giants of American philosophy and a direct intellectual descendent of William James, the father of American philosophy and psychology, with whom Kaag feels a deep kinship. It is James’s question “Is life worth living?” that guides this remarkable book.
The books Kaag discovers in the Hocking library are crawling with insects and full of mold. But he resolves to restore them, as he immediately recognizes their importance. Not only does the library at West Wind contain handwritten notes from Walt Whitman and inscriptions from Robert Frost, but there are startlingly rare first editions of Hobbes, Descartes, and Kant. As Kaag begins to catalog and read through these priceless volumes, he embarks on a thrilling journey that leads him to the life-affirming tenets of American philosophy-self-reliance, pragmatism, and transcendence-and to a brilliant young Kantian who joins him in the restoration of the Hocking books.
Part intellectual history, part memoir, American Philosophy is ultimately about love, freedom, and the role that wisdom can play in turning one’s life around.























[book][book] FILTHY RICH
A Powerful Billionaire, the Sex Scandal
that Undid Him, and All the Justice
that Money Can Buy: The Shocking True
Story of Jeffrey Epstein
by James Patterson, and
John Connolly and Tim Malloy
October 2016
Little Brown
A shocking true crime tale of money, power, and sex from the world's most popular thriller writer.
Jeffrey Epstein rose from humble origins to the rarefied heights of New York City's financial elite. A college dropout with an instinct for numbers--and for people--Epstein amassed his wealth through a combination of access and skill. But even after he had it all, Epstein wanted more. And that unceasing desire--especially a taste for young girls--resulted in his stunning fall from grace. From Epstein himself, to the girls he employed as masseuses at his home, to the cops investigating the appalling charges against him, FILTHY RICH examines all sides of a case that scandalized one of America's richest communities. An explosive true story, FILTHY RICH is a riveting account of wealth, power and the influence they bring to bear on the American justice system.




























[book] The Beauty Queen of Jerusalem:
A Novel
by Sarit Yishai-Levi
Translated from Hebrew by Anthony Berris
2016
Thomas Dunne Books
Gabriela's mother Luna is the most beautiful woman in all of Jerusalem, though her famed beauty and charm seem to be reserved for everyone but her daughter. Ever since Gabriela can remember, she and Luna have struggled to connect. But when tragedy strikes, Gabriela senses there's more to her mother than painted nails and lips.
Desperate to understand their relationship, Gabriela pieces together the stories of her family's previous generations-from Great-Grandmother Mercada the renowned healer, to Grandma Rosa who cleaned houses for the English, to Luna who had the nicest legs in Jerusalem. But as she uncovers shocking secrets, forbidden romances, and the family curse that links the women together, Gabriela must face a past and present far more complex than she ever imagined.
Set against the Golden Age of Hollywood, the dark days of World War II, and the swinging '70s, The Beauty Queen of Jerusalem follows generations of unforgettable women as they forge their own paths through times of dramatic change. With great humor and heart, Sarit Yishai-Levi has given us a powerful story of love and forgiveness-and the unexpected and enchanting places we find each.






















[book] CHANGING THE WORLD
FROM THE INSIDE OUT:
A Jewish Approach to Personal
and Social Change
by Rabbi David Jaffe
October 11, 2016
Trumpeter
An inspiring and accessible guide, drawn from Jewish wisdom, for building the inner qualities necessary to work effectively for social justice.
The world needs changing—and you’re just the person to do it! It’s a matter of cultivating the inner resources you already have. If you are serious about working for social justice and change, this book will help you bring your most compassionate, wise, and courageous self to the job.
Bringing positive social change to any system takes deep self-awareness, caring, determination, and long-term commitment. But polarization, the slow pace of change, and internal conflicts among activists and organizations often leads to burnout and discouragement among the very people needed to make a difference. Changing the World from the Inside Out distills centuries of Jewish wisdom about cultivating and refining the inner life into an accessible program for building the qualities necessary to accomplish sustainable change. Through explorations of deep motivation, inner-drive, and traits like trust and anger, this book engages the reader in a journey of self-development and transformation, demonstrating that sustainable activism is indeed a spiritual practice. Jaffe offers accessible and meaningful guidance for this journey—with exercises, contemplations, and discussion points that can be used individually or in a group.




























FINALIST – NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
[book] The Heart of Loneliness:
How Jewish Wisdom Can Help You
Cope and Find Comfort and Community
by Rabbi Marc Katz
Fall 2016
Jewish Lights
Using the wisdom of the Jewish tradition to better understand and deal with the pain of loneliness in our lives and in the lives of those we love. Long description: Loneliness is pervasive in our society but is rarely addressed. It comes in many forms, from the loneliness of loss to that of sickness; from single life to marriage to divorce. In fact, even the most successful among us are not immune. Even achievement can be an avenue to loneliness. Through sensitivity, compassion and insight, this book provides the stories and tools we need to begin addressing loneliness in our lives and the lives of those we love. With masterful storytelling, Rabbi Marc Katz uses the pains of our ancestors to show us the unique ways loneliness appears in our lives.

Drawing on the stories of
Isaac and Rachel,
King Uzziah and Tamar,
Jeremiah and Honi,
Hagar and Aaron,
Rabbi Katz helps readers understand the nuances of loneliness in their own lives. He helps them understand that although their pain may feel like an island, others have walked there before them. Thoughtful insights on loneliness also help family and friends have a better sense of how and why their friends, children, parents and co-workers suffer. Then, using the tools of the Jewish tradition, Rabbi Katz looks at concrete ways as individuals and as community members we may help those who are lonely in our midst. This book is for anyone who is or has suffered from the pain of loneliness as well as those loved ones who stand on the sideline feeling ill equipped to address the alienation they see.




























[book] WHAT WASHINGTON GETS WRONG
THE UNELECTED OFFICIALS WHO
Actually Run The Government and
Their Misconceptions About The American People
by Jennifer Bachner and Benjamin Ginsberg
October 4, 2016
Prometheus
Each year unelected federal administrators write thousands of regulations possessing the force of law. What do these civil servants know about the American people whom they ostensibly serve? Not much, according to this enlightening and disturbing study.
The authors surveyed federal agency officials, congressional and White House staffers, and employees of various policy-making organizations about their attitudes toward and knowledge of the public. They found a significant chasm between what official Washington assumes they know about average Americans and the actual opinions and attitudes of American citizens. Even in such basic areas as life circumstances (e.g., income levels, employment, racial makeup) the surveys revealed surprising inaccuracies. And when it comes to policy issues--on such crucial issues as defense, crime, social security, welfare, public education, and the environment--officials' perceptions of the public's knowledge and positions are often wide of the mark. Compounding this ignorance is a pervasive attitude of smug dismissiveness toward the citizenry and little sense of accountability. As a result, bureaucrats tend to follow their own preferences without much reference to the opinions of the public.
The authors conclude with recommendations to narrow the gap between official perceptions of the American public and the actual facts. These include shorter terms, rotation from the Washington beltway to local offices, compulsory training in the responsibilities of public office, and better civic education for ordinary citizens in the realities of government and politics.

























[book] Homeward Bound:
The Life of Paul Simon
by Peter Ames Carlin
October 2016
Henry Holt
A revelatory account of the life of beloved American music icon, Paul Simon, by the bestselling rock biographer Peter Ames Carlin

To have been alive during the last sixty years is to have lived with the music of Paul Simon. The boy from Queens scored his first hit record in 1957, just months after Elvis Presley ignited the rock era. As the songwriting half of Simon & Garfunkel, his work helped define the youth movement of the '60s. On his own in the '70s, Simon made radio-dominating hits. He kicked off the '80s by reuniting with Garfunkel to perform for half a million New Yorkers in Central Park. Five years later, Simon’s album “Graceland” sold millions and spurred an international political controversy. And it doesn’t stop there.

The grandchild of Jewish immigrants from Hungary, the nearly 75-year-old singer-songwriter has not only sold more than 100 million records, won 15 Grammy awards and been installed into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame twice, but has also animated the meaning-and flexibility-of personal and cultural identity in a rapidly shrinking world.

Simon has also lived one of the most vibrant lives of modern times; a story replete with tales of Carrie Fisher, Leonard Bernstein, Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Shelley Duvall, Nelson Mandela, the Grateful Dead, drugs, depression, marriage, divorce, and more. A life story with the scope and power of an epic novel, Carlin’s Homeward Bound is the first major biography of one of the most influential popular artists in American history.




























[book] MAYA PRAYS FOR RAIN
By Susan Tarcov
Illustrated by Ana Ochoa
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4–9. PreK-3

It's a sunny fall day in Maya's neighborhood, and all her neighbors are busy with outdoor activities.

But Maya learns that today is Shemini Atzeret, when the Jewish community prays for rain, which puts her in a quandary. Will her neighbor's plans be ruined? Maya rushes to warn them about the rain. Her rabbi explains though, that she need not worry…



























[book] Not This Turkey!
by Jessica Steinberg
Illustrated by Amanda Pike
2016
Albert Whitman
Ages 4–7. PreK-3
Although Mel and his family have lived in America for several years, they have never celebrated Thanksgiving, just the Jewish holidays. But this year, after Papa wins a live turkey at work and brings it home on the subway, Mama invites all their relatives to their Brooklyn tenement for dinner. There’s just one thing?Mel has a soft spot for the turkey!



























[book] Sky-High Sukkah
by Rachel Packer
Illustrated by Deborah Zemke
August 2016
Apples and Honey Press
Leah lives high up in an apartment building overlooking the city, and dreams of having a sukkah of her own. But there is no place to build it. With some help from the neighbors, Leah and her friend Ari find a way to have their own sukkah on the roof. Especially after Ari wins a sukkah in an art contest. It takes a “village” to build a sukkah, including the grocer.

An author’s note at the end explores the Jewish value of kehilla, community, and invites children to think about why kehilla is important and what activities they can do to build kehilla.



























[book] IS IT SUKKOT YET?

Illustrated by Alessandra Psacharopulo
August 2016
Albert Whitman
The first sights of fall arrive?pumpkins, gourds, and colorful leaves?and that means that Sukkot is almost here. Sukkot is the Jewish holiday celebrating the fall harvest and commemorating the time when the children of Israel spent forty years wandering the desert and living in temporary shelters (rebuilt as a sukkah during Sukkot). Soft illustrations and thoughtful gentle text pair for a charming invitation for children to celebrate the joyful holiday.



























[book] ROSH HASHANAh IS COMING
By Tracy Newman
Illustrated by Viviana Garofoli
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 1-4.
A sweet board book
A family celebrates
The geese call
As golden leaves fall
Lots of counds as
they make their challot round



























[book] Yosef's Dream
by Sylvia Rouss
Illustrated by Tamar Blumenfeld
2016
Apples and Honey Press
Behrman House
Now a young man in Israel, Yosef remembers his past in Ethiopia, and the dream he had as a child, in which he was given a choice. Should he climb mountains with Gazelle, never belonging anywhere? Hide in the shadows, with Hyena? Or grab hold of Eagle s wings and be taken far, far away? Yosef chooses the last, along with his family to fly to Israel, the land of their ancestors fulfilling their long-held dream.
An author s note provides background about the Jews of Ethiopia and the 1991 rescue mission, called Operation Solomon, in which 14,000 Ethiopian Jews were flown to Israel.



























[book] A HANUKKAH WITH MaZEL
By Joel Edward Stein
Illustrated by Elisa Vavouri
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 3-8.
Misha, a poor artist, has no one to celebrate Hanukkah with until he discovers a hungry cat in his barn. The lucky little cat, whom Misha names Mazel, inspires Misha to turn each night of Hanukkah into something special. He doesn't have money for Hanukkah candles, but he can use his artistic skills to bring light to his home - as Mazel brings good luck to his life.



























[book] Shmelf the Hanukkah Elf
by Greg Wolfe and
Howard McWilliam (Illustrator)
2016
Bloomsbury
Ages 3-8.
Shmelf is one of Santa's most important elves. He's part of the List Checking department, and he makes sure all the good boys and girls get their presents! But when Shmelf finds out that some children are missing from Santa's list, he goes to investigate.
What Shmelf uncovers is Hanukkah, a wondrous and joyful holiday that Jewish families celebrate each year. As Shmelf observes a family lighting the menorah, playing dreidel, and hearing the Hanukkah story, he sees how special the traditions of the holiday truly are-and he wants to be a part of it! Luckily, Santa just might have a special role in mind for Shmelf....
The rich traditions of Hanukkah come to life in this whimsical and magical story that's perfect for the holiday season.



























[book] Babel
by Marc Lumer, Chaim Burston
and DovBer Naiditch
2016
Apples and Honey Press

Where do children play tower games with tower pieces, wear tower hats and eat tower cakes? In the city of Babel, of course! There, the people are building a tower that will reach up to the heavens. The tower is the most important thing in the world to them. But what will happen when they realize that a tower is just tower?

In this contemporary retelling of the biblical Tower of Babel story, the people of Babel are presented though the lens of a very relatable family and their neighborhood. Illustrated with a fantastic attention to detail, each corner of the city and tower are filled with new discoveries that will delight every reader.






























[book] POTATOES AT TURTLE ROCK
By Susan Schnur and Anna Schnur-Fishman
Illustrated by Alex Steele-Morgan
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 5-9.
Annie leads her family on a nighttime journey around their farm to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah. At each stop along the way Annie uses riddles (and potatoes) to mark old traditions and start new ones. At each stop along the way (the Old log, Squeezy Cave, Billy Goat Bridge… Annie shares a riddle. At Turtle Rock Creek, they give thanks for the light, warmth, and potaoes, and for each other





























[book] HANUKKAH DELIGHT
By Leslea Newman
Illustrated by Amy Husband
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 1-4.
Bunnies and their friends celebrate Hanukkah in a rhyming board book describing many rituals of the holiday, like chocolate gelt and dreidels.





























[book] Avi the Ambulance to the Rescue
by Claudia Carlson
Illustrated by CB Decker
2016
Apples and Honey Press
he second book in the Avi the Ambulance series!
Avi want to help people like the other rescue vehicles, such as Hila the helicopter and Motti the medicycle. But his Mom, the command car, has assigned him and his medic Zach to restock supplies. But along the way to delivering them, there is an emergency...and it is Avi to the rescue! Our favorite ambulance gets to help someone that he never expected would need him.
The story touches on several Jewish values, including caring for animals, Tza'ar Baalei Chaim, (yes, that someone Avi helps is a cute cat named Yoffi!) and helping the injured, P’ikuach Nefesh,..






























[book] L’DOR VADOR
GENERATION TO GENERATION
A KEEPSAKE COLORING BOOK
By Judy Freeman
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 6 and up
A keepsake collection of beautiful black-and-white coloring pages for parents, children and grandparents to color together and share, featuring Hebrew letters and Judaica images by well-known ketubah artist Judy Freeman. Lay-flat binding for easy coloring.





























[book] GABRIELS’S HORN
By Eric A. Kimmel
Illustrated by Maria Surducan
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4 – 9
A mysterious soldier appears at the door hands Gabriel a tarnished horn. As the years go by, Gabriel's family prospers and they, in turn, help their neighbors. Could their good luck have something to do with the horn?

























[book] Little Red Rosie
by Eric Kimmel
Illustrated by Monica Gutierrez
2016
Apples and Honey Press
In this playful version of The Little Red Hen, a young girl enlists her animal friends to help make the challah for Rosh Hashanah. With humorous, lively illustrations, this story captures the values of imagination, responsibility, and welcoming guests.






























[book] THE FLOWER GIRL WORE CELERY
By Meryl G. Gordon
Illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Emma can't wait for her cousin Hannah's wedding. She's going to be the flower girl. That means she'll wear a celery dress and walk down the aisle with the ring bear, leading the way for the happy bride and groom. Or at least, that's what Emma assumes. But nothing turns out to be quite what she's expecting (cuz it is another bride).

























[book] Oy Vey, Life in a Shoe
by Bonnie Grubman
Illustrated by Dave Mottram
2016
Apples and Honey Press
Follow Lou as he appeals to the Rabbi for answers on how to solve his overcrowding problem!
A contemporary mash-up of the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe with the traditional Jewish folktale about a family getting unexpected wisdom from the Rabbi, this high-energy adventure is chock-full of animals, kids, humor, whimsy and silliness. Mottram s illustrations add another level of fun as the animals wear Lou s glasses, gnaw on the furniture, and add to the clutter and mischief.
A laugh-out-loud romp, this tale serves as a fun reminder that sometimes things have to go from bad to worse, before you realize they were wonderful all along!































[book] SAMMY SPIDER’S FIRST BAR MITZVAH
By Sylvia A. Rouss
Illustrated by Katherine Janus Kahn
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Josh's cousin Ben is having his bar mitzvah, and Sammy Spider ends up coming along! He gets a view of the Torah readings, the blessings . . . and one tradition that gets this silly little spider into even more trouble than usual.
(Can you throw a spider instead of hard candy??)



























Why do they make grandmother’s look like they are over 70, when most grandmother’s I know are in their mid fifties?
[book] Chicken Soup, Chicken Soup
By Pamela Mayer
Illustrated by Deborah Melman
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 4-9
Two grandmas. Two delicious recipes. Sophie loves Bubbe's Jewish chicken soup, made with kreplach. She also loves Nai Nai's Chinese chicken soup, with wonton. But don't tell Bubbe and Nai Nai that their soups are the same!




























[book] The Cricket and the Ant
A Shabbat Story
By Naomi Ben-Gur
Illustrated by Shahar Kober
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 3-8
The fun-loving Cricket neglects his Shabbat tasks while the industrious Ant does hers, but Cricket surprises her by coming to the rescue just in time to save her Shabbat celebration. Originally published in Hebrew



























[book] JOSEPH THE DREAMER
By Becky LAFF
2016
Kar-Ben
Ages 5-9
Joseph is his father's favorite son, and he has amazing dreams unlike anyone else's. But when Joseph's jealous brothers decide enough is enough, Joseph finds himself a prisoner in a foreign land, where he must draw strength from within. The well-known Bible story told in graphic novel format!



























[book] The German Girl
A Novel
by Armando Lucas Correa
October 2016
Atria
A stunningly ambitious and beautiful debut novel, perfect for fans of Sarah’s Key and All the Light We Cannot See, the story of a twelve-year-old girl’s harrowing experience fleeing Nazi-occupied Germany with her family and best friend, only to discover that the overseas asylum they had been promised is an illusion.
Before everything changed, Hannah Rosenthal lived a charmed life. But now, in 1939, the streets of Berlin are draped with red, white, and black flags; her family’s fine possessions are hauled away; and they are no longer welcome in the places that once felt like home. Hannah and her best friend, Leo Martin, make a pact: come what may, they promise to have a future together.

A glimmer of hope appears in the form of the St. Louis, a transatlantic liner that can provide Jews safe passage to Cuba. After a frantic search to obtain visas, the Rosenthals and the Martins depart on the luxurious ship bound for Havana. Life on board the St. Louis is like a surreal holiday for these refugees, with masquerade balls, exquisite meals, and polite, respectful service. But soon ominous rumors from Cuba overshadow the celebratory atmosphere, and the ship that once was their salvation seems likely to become their death sentence. Hannah and Leo must make an impossible choice or risk losing everything that matters.
Seven decades later in New York City, on her twelfth birthday, Anna Rosen receives a package from Hannah, a great-aunt she has never met but who raised her deceased father. In an attempt to piece together her father’s mysterious past, Anna and her mother travel to Havana to meet this elderly relative. Hannah tells them of her astonishing journey on the St. Louis and, for the first time, reveals how she and Leo honored the solemn pact they had made. By connecting the pain of the past to the mysteries of the present, Hannah gives her young great-niece a sense of their shared histories, forever intertwining their lives, honoring those they loved and cruelly lost.



















[book] The Battle for Syria
International Rivalry in the
New Middle East
by Christopher Phillips
(Queen Mary University, London)
October 2016
Yale
An unprecedented analysis of the crucial but underexplored roles the United States and other nations have played in shaping Syria’s ongoing civil war
Most accounts of Syria’s brutal, long-lasting civil war focus on a domestic contest that began in 2011 and only later drew foreign nations into the escalating violence. Christopher Phillips argues instead that the international dimension was never secondary but that Syria’s war was, from the very start, profoundly influenced by regional factors, particularly the vacuum created by a perceived decline of U.S. power in the Middle East. This precipitated a new regional order in which six external protagonists—the United States, Russia, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Qatar—have violently competed for influence, with Syria a key battleground.
Drawing on a plethora of original interviews, Phillips constructs a new narrative of Syria’s war. Without absolving the brutal Bashar al-Assad regime, the author untangles the key external factors which explain the acceleration and endurance of the conflict, including the West’s strategy against ISIS. He concludes with some insights on Syria and the region's future.



























[book] KING CALM
Mindful Gorilla in the City
by Susan D. Sweet and Brenda S. Miles
October 2016
Magination Press
Meet Marvin. He's a calm and mindful gorilla living in the Great Big City. He is peaceful and composed and enjoys every minute of his day—unlike his thumping, roaring, and former Empire State-climbing Grandpa! Readers are introduced to the concept of living mindfully in a creative, practical, and easy-to-apply way. Includes a "Note to Parents and Caregivers" by the authors.



































[book] We Were The Future:
A Memoir of the Kibbutz
by Yael Neeman
Translated from Hebrew by Sondra Silverston
October 25, 2016
The Overlook Press
The beautiful, understated memoir by bestselling Israeli author Yael Neeman detailing the intimate, collective memories of children raised on the kibbutz. Yael Neeman was born in Kibbutz Yehiam. Yehi'am is an in the western Upper Galilee, 8 miles east of Nahariya. Neeman is the internationally bestselling author of two novels, Orange Tuesday and Rumors About Love, and a collection of stories, The Option.
The kibbutz is one of the greatest stories in Israeli history. These collective settlements have been written about extensively over the years: The kibbutz has been the subject of many sociological studies, and has been praised as the only example in world history of entire communities attempting, voluntarily, to live in total equality. But there's a dark side to the kibbutz, which has been criticized in later years, mainly by children who were raised in these communities, as an institution which victimized its offspring for the sake of ideology.
In this spare and lucid memoir, Neeman--a child of the kibbutz--draws on the collective memory of hundreds of thousands of Israelis who grew up in a kibbutz during their height and who intimately share their memories with her.
We Were the Future is more than merely a compelling personal account of growing up in the kibbutz movement; it is an unstintingly honest examination of the perils of pioneering and a new lens through which to see the history of Israel.

























[book] Stepping Stones:
A Refugee Family's Journey
(Arabic and English Edition)
by Margriet Ruurs
Illustrated by Nizar Badr
October 2016
Orca Books
This unique picture book was inspired by the stone artwork of Syrian artist Nizar Ali Badr, discovered by chance by Canadian children’s writer Margriet Ruurs. The author was immediately impressed by the strong narrative quality of Mr. Badr’s work, and, using many of Mr. Badr’s already-created pieces, she set out to create a story about the Syrian refugee crisis. Stepping Stones tells the story of Rama and her family, who are forced to flee their once-peaceful village to escape the ravages of the civil war raging ever closer to their home. With only what they can carry on their backs, Rama and her mother, father, grandfather and brother, Sami, set out to walk to freedom in Europe. Nizar Ali Badr’s stunning stone images illustrate the story.

























[book] Why They Do It:
Inside the Mind of the
White-Collar Criminal
by Eugene Soltes
(Harvard Business School)
October 2016
PublicAffairs
Rarely does a week go by without a well-known executive being indicted for engaging in a white-collar crime. Perplexed as to what drives successful, wealthy people to risk it all, Harvard Business School professor Eugene Soltes took a remarkable journey deep into the minds of these white-collar criminals, spending seven years in the company of the men behind the largest corporate crimes in history--from the financial fraudsters of Enron, to the embezzlers at Tyco, to the Ponzi schemers Bernie Madoff and Allen Stanford. Drawing on intimate details from personal visits, letters, and phone calls with these former executives, as well as psychological, sociological, and historical research, Why They Do It is a breakthrough look at the dark side of the business world.
Soltes refutes popular but simplistic explanations of why seemingly successful executives engage in crime. White-collar criminals, he shows, are not merely driven by excessive greed or hubris, nor do they usually carefully calculate the costs and benefits before breaking the law and see it's worth the risk. Instead, he shows that most of these executives make decisions the way we all do--on the basis of their intuitions and gut feelings. The trouble is, these gut feelings are often poorly suited for the modern business world.
Based on extensive interaction with nearly fifty former executives--many of whom have never spoken about their crimes--Soltes provides insights into why some saw the immediate effects of misconduct as positive, why executives often don't feel the emotions (angst, guilt, shame) most people would expect, and how acceptable norms in the business community can differ from those of the broader society.






























[book] Isra-Isle:
A Novel
by Nava Semel
Translation by Jessica Cohen
October 2016
Mandel Vilar Press
This novel is inspired by a true historical event. Before Theodore Herzl there was Mordecai Manuel Noah, an American journalist, diplomat, playwright, and visionary. In September 1825 he bought Grand Island, downriver from Niagara Falls, from the local Native Americans as a place of refuge for the Jewish people and called it “Ararat.” But no Jews came. What if they had followed Noah’s call? In Nava Semel’s alternate history Jews from throughout the world flee persecution and come to Ararat. Isra Isle becomes the smallest state in the US. Israel does not exist, and there was no Holocaust. In exploring this what-if scenario, Semel stimulates new thinking about memory, Jewish/Israeli identity, attitudes toward minorities, women in top political positions, and the place of cultural heritage.

The novel is divided into three parts. Part 1, a detective story, opens in September 2001 when Liam Emanuel, an Israeli descendant of Noah, learns about and inherits this island. He leaves Israel intending to reclaim this “Promised Land” in America. Shortly after he arrives in America Liam disappears. Simon T. Lenox, a Native American police investigator, tries to recover Israel’s “missing son.” Part 2 flashes back to the time and events surrounding Mordecai Noah’s purchase of the island from the local Native Americans. Part 3 poses an alternate history: the rise of a successful modern Jewish city-state, Isra Isle, on the northern New York and Canadian border—a metropolis that looks remarkably like New York City both before and after 9/11—in which the Jewish female governor campaigns to become president of the United States.






















[book] Jewish Life in Austria
and Germany Since 1945:
Identity and Communal Reconstruction
by Susanne Cohen-Weisz
(Bar Ilan, Hebrew Univ)
October 2016
Central European Univ Press
Based on published primary and secondary materials and oral interviews with some eighty communal and organizational leaders, experts and scholars, this book provides a comparative account of the reconstruction of Jewish communal life in both Germany and in Austria (where 98% live in the capital, Vienna) after 1945. The author explains the process of reconstruction over the next six decades, and its results in each country.
The monograph focuses on the variety of prevailing perceptions about topics such as: the state of Israel, one s relationship to the country of residence, the Jewish religion, the aftermath of the Holocaust, and the influx of post-soviet immigrants. Cohen-Weisz examines the changes in Jewish group identity and its impact on the development of communities. The study analyzes the similarities and differences in regard to the political, social, institutional and identity developments within the two countries, and their changing attitudes and relationships with surrounding societies. The study seeks to show the evolution of these two country s Jewish communities in diverse national political circumstances and varying post-war governmental policies.

























[book] A Plague on All Our Houses:
Medical Intrigue, Hollywood,
and the Discovery of AIDS
by Bruce J. Hillman MD
(Univ of Virginia School of Medicine)
October 4, 2016
ForeEdge Press
A frightening new plague. A medical mystery. A pioneering immunologist.
In A Plague on All Our Houses, Dr. Bruce J. Hillman dissects the war of egos, money, academic power, and Hollywood clout that advanced AIDS research even as it compromised the career of the scientist who discovered the disease.
At the beginning of the worldwide epidemic soon to be known as AIDS, Dr. Michael Gottlieb was a young immunologist new to the faculty of UCLA Medical Center. In 1981 he was brought in to consult on a battery of unusual cases: four formerly healthy gay men presenting with persistent fever, weight loss, and highly unusual infections. Other physicians around the country had noted similar clusters of symptoms, but it was Gottlieb who first realized that these patients had a new and deadly disease. He also identified the defect in their immune system that allowed the disease to flourish. He published his findings in a now-iconic lead article in the New England Journal of Medicine—an impressive achievement for such a young scientist—and quickly became the focal point of a whirlwind of panic, envy, desperation, and distrust that played out against a glittering Hollywood backdrop.
Courted by the media, the gay community, and the entertainment industry, Gottlieb emerged as the medical face of the terrifying new epidemic when he became personal physician to Rock Hudson, the first celebrity AIDS patient. With Elizabeth Taylor he cofounded the charitable foundation amfAR, which advanced public awareness of AIDS and raised vast sums for research, even as it struggled against political resistance that began with the Reagan administration and trickled down through sedimentary layers of bureaucracy. Far from supporting him, the UCLA medical establishment reacted with dismay to Gottlieb’s early work on AIDS, believing it would tarnish the reputation of the Medical Center. Denied promotion and tenure in 1987, Gottlieb left UCLA for private practice just as the National Institutes of Health awarded the institution a $10 million grant for work he had pioneered there. In the thirty-five years since the discovery of AIDS, research, prevention, and clinical care have advanced to the point that the disease is no longer the death sentence it once was. Gottlieb’s seminal article is now regarded by the New England Journal of Medicine as one of the most significant publications of its two-hundred-year history.
A Plague on All Our Houses offers a ringside seat to one of the most important medical discoveries and controversies of our time.















[book] Self-Esteem in the Talmud
by Rabbi Yisroel Roll
2016
Feldheim
Make the world a better place by virtue of your presence... The greatness of man lies in that a person can refine his or her character traits and further emulate the Creator by acting in accordance with God s will. Throughout life, you can develop a greater awareness of God and thereby engage in a dynamic, personal relationship with the Creator. This is the foundation upon which the volume, Self-Esteem in the Talmud: the Pathway to Self-confidence and Resilience is built.
Culling from a rich array of Talmudic sources as well as the teachings of many great Torah sages, the author creates a step-by-step ladder of personal growth that leads from self-discovery to authentic self-esteem to self-actualization. The process involves building fortitude and Divine awareness from within in order to successfully meet life s challenges in the real world.
The author of over half a dozen books is a YU grad with a law degree from Ontario and psychotherapy training from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. He is a divorce mediator, motivational speaker and psychotherapist, and his work offers a carefully thought-out, Torah-based approach to actualizing the Divine spark within us all. Self-Esteem in the Talmud is a contemporary guide to life that combines character development with academic, social, and career success.





















[book] Tzippy the Thief:
A Novel
by Patricia Striar Rohner
October 18, 2016
She Writes Press
Tzippy is a wealthy widow, feisty, determined, vain and living in Florida. Her three children will be visiting for Tzippy's 80th birthday celebration and will be bringing with them the old wounds that Tzippy did more than her fair share to inflict. As her birthday approaches, the death of a close friend as well as the aches, pains and daily indignities of aging are preying on her mind. Tzippy wonders how she will be remembered?
Her relationship with her children is not good, particularly with Shari, her youngest and most screwed up. Shari is a problem drinker and still plagued by the eating disorder she's had since adolescence. She always blamed her mother for her problems and lately Tzippy has had the uncomfortable feeling Shari may be right.
On the day of the party, on edge and anxious, Tzippy decides on a shopping trip to Saks which is always her quick fix, and while there, sees a brooch she wants, but not enough to pay for it. It finds its way into her purse and as she is making her get away-unlike the other times-she is caught and hauled off to the police station.
Now that Tzippy is turning 80, there is not an infinite amount of time left. Will She be able to repair the damage that has taken a lifetime to create?








































[book] Caliphate:
The History of an Idea
by Hugh Kennedy
October 11, 2016
Basic Books.
Worth reading sso we can speak intelligently about ISIS

In Caliphate, Islamic historian Hugh Kennedy dissects the idea of the caliphate and its history, and explores how it became used and abused today. Contrary to popular belief, there is no one enduring definition of a caliph; rather, the idea of the caliph has been the subject of constant debate and transformation over time.
Kennedy offers a grand history of the caliphate since the beginning of Islam to its modern incarnations. Originating in the tumultuous years following the death of the Mohammad in 632, the caliphate, a politico-religious system, flourished in the great days of the Umayyads of Damascus and the Abbasids of Baghdad.
From the seventh-century Orthodox caliphs to the nineteenth-century Ottomans, Kennedy explores the tolerant rule of Umar, recounts the traumatic murder of the caliph Uthman, dubbed a tyrant by many, and revels in the flourishing arts of the golden eras of Abbasid Baghdad and Moorish Andalucía. Kennedy also examines the modern fate of the caliphate, unraveling the British political schemes to spur dissent against the Ottomans and the ominous efforts of Islamists, including ISIS, to reinvent the history of the caliphate for their own malevolent political ends.
In exploring and explaining the great variety of caliphs who have ruled throughout the ages, Kennedy challenges the very narrow views of the caliphate propagated by extremist groups today. An authoritative new account of the dynasties of Arab leaders throughout the Islamic Golden Age, Caliphate traces the history—and misappropriations—of one of the world’s most potent political ideas.































[book] The Borscht Belt
Revisiting the Remains of
America's Jewish Vacationland
by Marisa Scheinfeld
with Stefan Kanfer and Professor Jenna Weissman Joselit
Cornell University Press
October 2016
Today the Borscht Belt is recalled through the nostalgic lens of summer swims, Saturday night dances, and comedy performances. But its current state, like that of many other formerly glorious regions, is nothing like its earlier status. Forgotten about and exhausted, much of its structural environment has been left to decay. The Borscht Belt, which features essays by Stefan Kanfer and Jenna Weissman Joselit, presents Marisa Scheinfeld's photographs of abandoned sites where resorts, hotels, and bungalow colonies once boomed in the Catskill Mountain region of upstate New York.

The book assembles images Scheinfeld has shot inside and outside locations that once buzzed with life as year-round havens for generations of people. Some of the structures have been lying abandoned for periods ranging from four to twenty years, depending on the specific hotel or bungalow colony and the conditions under which it closed. Other sites have since been demolished or repurposed, making this book an even more significant documentation of a pivotal era in American Jewish history.

The Borscht Belt presents a contemporary view of more than forty hotel and bungalow sites. From entire expanses of abandoned properties to small lots containing drained swimming pools, the remains of the Borscht Belt era now lie forgotten, overgrown, and vacant. In the absence of human activity, nature has reclaimed the sites, having encroached upon or completely overtaken them. Many of the interiors have been vandalized or marked by paintball players and graffiti artists. Each ruin lies radically altered by the elements and effects of time. Scheinfeld’s images record all of these developments.

























[book] Young Frankenstein:
A Mel Brooks Book:
The Story of the Making of the Film
by Mel Brooks
Foreword by Judd Apatow
October 2016
Mel Brooks' own words telling all about the players, the filming, and studio antics during the production of this great comedy classic. The book is alive and teeming with hundreds of photos, original interviews, and hilarious commentary.
Young Frankenstein was made with deep respect for the craft and history of cinema-and for the power of a good schwanzstucker joke. This picture-driven book, written by one of the greatest comedy geniuses of all time, takes readers inside the classic film's marvelous creation story via never-before-seen black and white and color photography from the set and contemporary interviews with the cast and crew, most notably, legendary writer-director Mel Brooks.
With access to more than 225 behind-the-scenes photos and production stills, and with captions written by Brooks, this book will also rely on interviews with gifted director of photography Gerald Hirschfeld, Academy Award-winning actress Cloris Leachman and veteran producer Michael Gruskoff.
Mel Brooks is an American film director, screenwriter, comedian, actor, producer, composer and songwriter. Brooks is best known as a creator of broad film farces and comic parodies including The Producers, The Twelve Chairs, Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, Silent Movie, High Anxiety, History of the World, Part I, Spaceballs and Robin Hood: Men in Tights. More recently, he had a smash hit on Broadway with the musical adaptation of his first film, The Producers. An EGOT winner, he received a Kennedy Center Honor in 2009, the 41st AFI Life Achievement Award in June 2013, and a British Film Institute Fellowship in March 2015. Three of Brooks' classics have appeared on AFI's 100 Years...100 Laughs list. Blazing Saddles at number 6, The Producers at number 11, and Young Frankenstein at number 13.
































[book] RULES FOR OTHERS
TO LIVE BY
Comments and Self Contradictions
By Richard Greenberg
(Take Me Out)
October 2016
Blue Rider Press

Between stressing about his theater friends and reconciling his complicated feelings about an inconsistently wonderful New York City, Tony Award–winning playwright and Pulitzer finalist Richard Greenberg also maintains a reputation for being something of a hermit. He takes the time to privately process the absurdity of the world outside, and the result is this hysterically funny and daringly thoughtful collection of original essays. In Rules for Others to Live By, he shares lessons from his highly successful writing career, observations from two long decades of residence on a three-block stretch of Mannhattan, and musings from a complicated and occasionally taxing social life. Firmly sympathetic to the struggles of the more bizarre and unstable among us, Greenberg tackles a range of topics—from the difficulties of friendship to the art of writing, the pain of heartbreak to the curiously unpredictable weather of his neighborhood, and the moderate hypochondria that comes with age, as well as the more serious health crises that unfortunately also come with age. In essays that are at turns quietly subversive and thoroughly hopeful and life-affirming, Greenberg’s distinct and hilarious voice articulates our own mild obsessions and the idiosyncrasies that we can only hope will go unnoticed in a crowd.























[book] Competing Against Luck:
The Story of Innovation
and Customer Choice
by Clayton M. Christensen (HBS)
and Karen Dillon, Taddy Hall,
and David S. Duncan
October 4, 2016
A HORRIBLE TITLE. It would sell more if they let me change the title
The foremost authority on innovation and growth presents a path-breaking book every company needs to transform innovation from a game of chance to one in which they develop products and services customers not only want to buy, but are willing to pay PREMIUM prices for.

How do companies (or charities, or JCC’s and synagogues) know how to grow?
How can they create products that they are sure customers want to buy?
Can innovation be more than a game of hit and miss? (Do you know how many new products fail, because we think of them competing against other products IN THE PRODUCT CLASS?

Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen has the answer. A generation ago, Christensen revolutionized business with his groundbreaking theory of disruptive innovation. Now, he goes further, offering powerful new insights. After years of research, Christensen and his co-authors have come to one critical conclusion: our long held maxim -- that understanding the customer is the crux of innovation -- is wrong. Customers don't buy products or services; they "HIRE" them to do a job.
YOU DON’T BUY SHAKE at McDONALDS… You HIRE the SHAKE to do a job for you
Do you join NYC’s Temple Emanuel to pray? Or are you HIRING the synagogue and affiliating with it for much deeper needs. And what other things would that compete with?

Understanding customers does not drive innovation success, he argues. Understanding customer jobs does. The "Jobs to Be Done" approach can be seen in some of the world's most respected companies and fast-growing startups, including Amazon, Intuit, Uber, Airbnb, and Chobani yogurt, to name just a few. But this book is not about celebrating these successes--it's about predicting new ones.
Christensen, Hall, Dillon, and Duncan contend that by understanding what causes customers to "hire" a product or service, any business can improve its innovation track record, creating products that customers not only want to hire, but that they'll pay premium prices to bring into their lives. Jobs theory offers new hope for growth to companies frustrated by their hit and miss efforts. This book carefully lays down the authors' provocative framework, providing a comprehensive explanation of the theory and why it is predictive, how to use it in the real world--and, most importantly, how not to squander the insights it provides.


The book is best understood by a project for McDonald’s that was in a Harvard B School working paper in 2011. About 95 percent of new products fail. The problem often is that their creators are using an ineffective market segmentation mechanism. When they should be looking at products the way customers do: as a way to GET A JOB DONE. Why do commuters HIRE A MILK SHAKE? They found that they bought milkshakes not for the taste, but the thickness, since they were cold and last 20 minutes or more during a car commute. When planning new products, companies often start by segmenting their markets and positioning their merchandise accordingly. This segmentation involves either dividing the market into product categories, such as function or price, or dividing the customer base into target demographics, such as age, gender, education, or income level. Unfortunately, neither way works very well. “THE JOBS-TO-BE-DONE POINT OF VIEW CAUSES YOU TO CRAWL INTO THE SKIN OF YOUR CUSTOMER AND GO WITH HER AS SHE GOES ABOUT HER DAY, ALWAYS ASKING THE QUESTION AS SHE DOES SOMETHING: WHY DID SHE DO IT THAT WAY?” The problem is that consumers usually don't go about their shopping by conforming to particular segments. Rather, they take life as it comes. And when faced with a job that needs doing, they essentially "hire" a product to do that job. "The fact that you're 18 to 35 years old with a college degree does not cause you to buy a product," Christensen says. "It may be correlated with the decision, but it doesn't cause it. We developed this idea because we wanted to understand what causes us to buy a product, not what's correlated with it. We realized that the causal mechanism behind a purchase is, 'Oh, I've got a job to be done.' And it turns out that it's really effective in allowing a company to build products that people want to buy."
Background: Hiring A Milkshake
In his MBA course, Christensen shares the story of a fast-food restaurant chain that wanted to improve its milkshake sales. The company started by segmenting its market both by product (milkshakes) and by demographics (a marketer's profile of a typical milkshake drinker). Next, the marketing department asked people who fit the demographic to list the characteristics of an ideal milkshake (thick, thin, chunky, smooth, fruity, chocolaty, etc.). The would-be customers answered as honestly as they could, and the company responded to the feedback. But alas, milkshake sales did not improve.
They did win when they learned to "Integrate Around the Job to be Done." The milkshake was hired in lieu of a bagel or doughnut because it was relatively tidy and appetite-quenching, and because trying to suck a thick liquid through a thin straw gave customers something to do with their boring commute. Understanding the job to be done, the company could then respond by creating a morning milkshake that was even thicker (to last through a long commute) and more interesting (with chunks of fruit) than its predecessor. Christensen also cites the importance of "purpose branding"—building an entire brand around a particular job-to-be-done. Quite simply, purpose branding involves naming the product after the purpose it serves. Kodak, for example, has seen great success with its FunSaver brand of single-use cameras, which performs the job of preserving fun memories. Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp. has cornered the market on reciprocating saws with its trademarked Sawzall, which does the job of helping consumers safely saw through pretty much anything. Its Hole-Hawg drills, which make big holes between studs and joists, are also quite popular. Furthermore, it's difficult for product developers to break the mold when many of their customers organize their store shelves around traditional marketing metrics. Christensen gives the example of a company that developed a novel tool designed to help carpenters with the daunting task of installing a door in a doorframe, a job that usually took several tools to do. But a major home goods store refused to sell the tool because its shelves were organized by product category—and there was no shelf in the store dedicated to the singular job of hanging a door. "Most organizations are already organized around product categories or customer categories," Christensen says, "and therefore people only see opportunities within this little frame that they've stuck you in. So you have to think inside of a category as opposed to getting out. You've just got to make the decision to divorce yourself from the constraints that are arbitrarily created by the design of the old org chart."














[book] Golem:
Modern Wars and Their Monsters
by Maya Barzilai
(University of Michigan)
October 2016
NYU Press
In the 1910s and 1920s, a “golem cult” swept across Europe and the U.S., later surfacing in Israel. Why did this story of a powerful clay monster molded and animated by a rabbi to protect his community become so popular and pervasive? The golem has appeared in a remarkable range of popular media: from the Yiddish theater to American comic books, from German silent film to Quentin Tarantino movies. This book showcases how the golem was remolded, throughout the war-torn twentieth century, as a muscular protector, injured combatant, and even murderous avenger. This evolution of the golem narrative is made comprehensible by, and also helps us to better understand, one of the defining aspects of the last one hundred years: mass warfare and its ancillary technologies.

In the twentieth century the golem became a figure of war. It represented the chaos of warfare, the automation of war technologies, and the devastation wrought upon soldiers’ bodies and psyches. Golem: Modern Wars and Their Monsters draws on some of the most popular and significant renditions of this story in order to unravel the paradoxical coincidence of wartime destruction and the fantasy of artificial creation. Due to its aggressive and rebellious sides, the golem became a means for reflection about how technological progress has altered human lives, as well as an avenue for experimentation with the media and art forms capable of expressing the monstrosity of war.


















[book] Earning It:
Hard-Won Lessons from
Trailblazing Women at the
Top of the Business World
by Joann S. Lublin
October 2016
HarperBusiness

More than fifty trailblazing executive women who broke the corporate glass ceiling offer inspiring and surprising insights and lessons in this essential, in-the-trenches career guide from Joann S. Lublin, a Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist and management news editor for The Wall Street Journal.

One of the first female reporters at the Wall Street Journal, Ms. Lublin created its first career column more than 20 years ago. “Your Executive Career,’’ the advice column she writes now, appears every month. She also writes about issues such as executive compensation, corporate governance, recruiting, and management succession.

Her new book, which includes several chapters of her own stories and grew out of an essay she wrote for an earlier WSJ blog, contains many “funny stories.” Some, however, are more serious, dealing with such issues as sexual harassment. The book is broken down by various topics with stories about many different women and the different ways they cope, whether with sexual harassment, or managing men well, or in facing the ‘career couple conundrum.’ Each chapter ends with leadership lessons drawn from the chapter or from women whose stories have not been included. One lesson, dealing with the career couple conundrum, suggests taking a “tag team approach in deciding whose career takes priority,” with one partner pursuing a professional surge for five years before deferring to the other

Lublin combines her fascinating story of breaking into the WSJ with insightful tales from more than fifty women who reached the highest rungs of the corporate ladder—most of whom became chief executives of public companies —in industries as diverse as retailing, manufacturing, finance, high technology, publishing, advertising, automobiles, and pharmaceuticals. Leaders like Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard, as well as Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors, and Brenda Barnes, former CEO of Sara Lee, were the first women to run their huge employers. Earning It reveals obstacles such women faced as they fought to make their mark, choices they made, and battles they won—and lost. She cited “the wonderful Abbe Raven, who wanted to break into the TV business and knew nothing.” Wanting to get a job interview at the startup company that ultimately became A&E, she learned the name of the man she had to talk to “and called the guy five times a day for 10 days. On the tenth day, she did the old trick of calling at 6:30 or 7 at night.” He answered. She later became the CEO at A&E.

Lublin chronicles the major milestones and dilemmas of the work world unique to women, providing candid advice and practical inspiration for women of all ages and at every stage of their careers. The extraordinary women we meet in the pages of Earning It and the hard-won lessons they share provide a compelling career compass that will help all women reach their highest potential without losing a meaningful personal life.

















[book] THE RAG RACE
How Jews Sewed Their Way
to Success in America and
the British Empire
(Goldstein-Goren Series in
American Jewish History)
by Adam D. Mendelsohn
(University of Cape Town)
Now in paperback
October 2016
NYU Press - reprint
The majority of Jewish immigrants who made their way to the United States between 1820 and 1924 arrived nearly penniless; yet today their descendants stand out as exceptionally successful. How can we explain their dramatic economic ascent? Have Jews been successful because of cultural factors distinct to them as a group, or because of the particular circumstances that they encountered in America?
The Rag Race argues that the Jews who flocked to the United States during the age of mass migration were aided appreciably by their association with a particular corner of the American economy: the rag trade. From humble beginnings, Jews rode the coattails of the clothing trade from the margins of economic life to a position of unusual promise and prominence, shaping both their societal status and the clothing industry as a whole.
Comparing the history of Jewish participation within the clothing trade in the United States with that of Jews in the same business in England, The Rag Race demonstrates that differences within the garment industry on either side of the Atlantic contributed to a very real divergence in social and economic outcomes for Jews in each setting.


















[book] Adolfo Kaminsky:
A Forger's Life
by Sarah Kaminsky and Mike Mitchell
Photos by Adolfo Kaminsky
October 2016
DoppelHouse
Adolfo Kaminsky: A Forger's Life is "worthy of the best spy novels" and tells the story of Sarah Kaminsky's father, “the genius-forger who committed his know-how and convictions to serve the French Resistance during World War II, saving thousands of Jewish families, and many others over the course of 30 years for various causes around the world.” - TED.com

Best-selling author Sarah Kaminsky takes readers through her father Adolfo Kaminsky's perilous and clandestine career as a real-life forger for the French Resistance, the FLN, and numerous other freedom movements of the twentieth century. Recruited as a young Jewish teenager for his knowledge of dyes, Kaminsky became the primary forger for the French Resistance during the Nazi occupation of Paris. Then, as a professional photographer, Kaminsky spent the next twenty-five years clandestinely producing thousands of counterfeit documents for immigrants, exiles, underground political operatives, and pacifists across the globe. Kaminsky kept his past cloaked in secrecy well into his eighties, until his daughter convinced him to share the details of the life-threatening work he did on behalf of people fighting for justice and peace throughout the world.




















[book] The Waiting Room:
A Novel
in Paperback
by Leah Kaminsky
Fall 2016
The Waiting Room unfolds over the course of a single, life-changing day, but the story it tells spans five decades, three continents, and one family’s compelling history of love, war, and survival
As the daughter of Holocaust survivors, Dina’s present has always been haunted by her parents’ pasts. She becomes a doctor, emigrates, and builds a family of her own, yet no matter how hard she tries to move on, their ghosts keep pulling her back. A dark, wry sense of humor helps Dina maintain her sanity amid the constant challenges of motherhood and medicine, but when a terror alert is issued in her adopted city, her coping skills are pushed to the limit.
Interlacing the present and the past over a span of twenty-four hours, The Waiting Room is an intense exploration of what it means to endure a day-to-day existence defined by conflict and trauma, and a powerful reminder of just how fragile life can be. As the clock counts down to a shocking climax, Dina must confront her parents’ history and decide whether she will surrender to fear, or fight for love.


























NOVEMBER 2016 BOOKS




[book] The Chosen
THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY EDITION
by Chaim Potok
A Novel
November 1, 2016
Simon and Schuster
This fiftieth-anniversary edition commemorates Chaim Potok’s coming-of-age classic with a new introduction, critical essays, rare papers and photos, and much more. It’s the spring of 1944 and fifteen-year-olds Reuven Malter and Danny Saunders have lived five blocks apart all their lives. But they’ve never met, not until the day an accident during a softball game sparks an unlikely friendship. Soon these two boys—one expected to become a Hasidic rebbe, the other at ease with secular America—are drawn into one another’s worlds despite one father’s strong opposition. Set against the backdrop of WWII and the creation of the state of Israel, The Chosen is a poignant novel about transformation and tradition, growing up and growing wise, and finding yourself—even if that might mean leaving your community.

























[book] FAITHFUL
A Novel
By Alice Hoffman
(author of The Marriage of Opposites)
November 1, 2016
Simon & Schuster
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Marriage of Opposites and The Dovekeepers comes a soul-searching story about a young woman struggling to redefine herself and the power of love, family, and fate.
Growing up on Long Island, Shelby Richmond is an ordinary girl until one night an extraordinary tragedy changes her fate. Her best friend’s future is destroyed in an accident, while Shelby walks away with the burden of guilt.
What happens when a life is turned inside out? When love is something so distant it may as well be a star in the sky? Faithful is the story of a survivor, filled with emotion—from dark suffering to true happiness—a moving portrait of a young woman finding her way in the modern world. A fan of Chinese food, dogs, bookstores, and men she should stay away from, Shelby has to fight her way back to her own future. In New York City she finds a circle of lost and found souls—including an angel who’s been watching over her ever since that fateful icy night.
Here is a character you will fall in love with, so believable and real and endearing, that she captures both the ache of loneliness and the joy of finding yourself at last. For anyone who’s ever been a hurt teenager, for every mother of a daughter who has lost her way, Faithful is a roadmap.
Alice Hoffman’s “trademark alchemy” (USA TODAY) and her ability to write about the “delicate balance between the everyday world and the extraordinary” (WBUR) make this an unforgettable story. With beautifully crafted prose, Alice Hoffman spins hope from heartbreak in this profoundly moving novel.

























[book] Frantumaglia:
A Writer's Journey
by Elena Ferrante
Translated from Italian by Ann Goldstein & others
November 1, 2016
Europa Editions
This book invites readers into Elena Ferrante’s workshop. It offers a glimpse into the drawers of her writing desk, those drawers from which emerged her three early standalone novels and the four installments of My Brilliant Friend, known in English as the Neapolitan Quartet. Consisting of over 20 years of letters, essays, reflections, and interviews, it is a unique depiction of an author who embodies a consummate passion for writing.
In these pages Ferrante answers many of her readers’ questions. She addresses her choice to stand aside and let her books live autonomous lives. She discusses her thoughts and concerns as her novels are being adapted into films. She talks about the challenge of finding concise answers to interview questions. She explains the joys and the struggles of writing, the anguish of composing a story only to discover that that story isn’t good enough. She contemplates her relationship with psychoanalysis, with the cities she has lived in, with motherhood, with feminism, and with her childhood as a storehouse for memories, impressions, and fantasies. The result is a vibrant and intimate self-portrait of a writer at work.

























[book] OUR REVOLUTION
A Future to Believe In
by Bernie Sanders
November 15, 2016
Thomas Dunne Books
When Bernie Sanders began his race for the presidency, it was considered by the political establishment and the media to be a “fringe” campaign, something not to be taken seriously. After all, he was just an independent senator from a small state with little name recognition. His campaign had no money, no political organization, and it was taking on the entire Democratic Party establishment.

By the time Sanders’s campaign came to a close, however, it was clear that the pundits had gotten it wrong. Bernie had run one of the most consequential campaigns in the modern history of the country. He had received more than 13 million votes in primaries and caucuses throughout the country, won twenty-two states, and more than 1.4 million people had attended his public meetings. Most important, he showed that the American people were prepared to take on the greed and irresponsibility of corporate America and the 1 percent.

In Our Revolution, Sanders shares his personal experiences from the campaign trail, recounting the details of his historic primary fight and the people who made it possible. And for the millions looking to continue the political revolution, he outlines a progressive economic, environmental, racial, and social justice agenda that will create jobs, raise wages, protect the environment, and provide health care for all-and ultimately transform our country and our world for the better. For him, the political revolution has just started. The campaign may be over, but the struggle goes on.



























[book] Instructions Within
by Ashraf Fayadh
November 1, 2016
Operating System Press
Ashraf Fayadh is a Palestinian artist and poet born in Saudi Arabia in 1980. He attended college at Al-Azhar University in Gaza City in 2001, and has been active in the art scene in Saudi Arabia with organizations like Edge of Arabia, a British-Arabian art collaboration. Ashraf has also curated exhibitions of Saudi art during Jeddah Art week in Saudi Arabia and Europe at the 55th Venice Biennale. He is currently imprisoned in Saudi Arabia for apostasy, for the language in these poems.

Poetry. Middle Eastern Studies. Art. Translated from the Arabic by Mona Kareem, with Mona Zaki, and Jonathan Wright; and with Ammiel Alcalay, Pierre Joris and Lynne DeSilva-Johnson assisting/editing. The Operating System is honored to publish the first Arabic-English full translation of Ashraf Fayadh's singular volume of poetry, INSTRUCTIONS WITHIN, which was published by the Beirut- based Dar al-Farabi in 2008 and later banned from distribution in Saudi Arabia. This special edition includes two paintings by Ashraf Fayadh on its front and back covers, and is right bound, asking the reader to consider their estrangement from Arabic language, literature, and life, inviting a new relationship to beginning to form. The Operating System will donate proceeds from sales of this book to support Fayadh's ongoing case for his release from imprisonment for apostasy as a response to these very verses in Saudi Arabia.























[book] Have I Got a Story for You
More Than a Century of Fiction
from the Forward
Edited by Ezra Glinter
Intro by Dara Horn
November 1, 2016
Norton
Forty-two stories from America’s most famous Yiddish newspaper, published in English for the first time.
The Forward is the most renowned Yiddish newspaper in the world. It welcomed generations of immigrants to the United States, brought them news of Europe and the Middle East, and provided them with everything from comic strips to noodle kugel recipes. It also published some of the most acclaimed Yiddish fiction writers of all time, including Nobel Prize laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer, Forward editor Abraham Cahan, and novelists Sholem Asch and Chaim Grade. Ezra Glinter and the Forward staff have combed through the archives to find the best stories published during the newspaper’s 120-year history, from wartime novellas to avant-garde fiction to satirical sketches about immigrant life in New York. These stories, now in English for the first time, expressed the concerns of Yiddish writers and their millions of readers, including the challenges of immigration, both World Wars, and changing forms of Jewish identity.

























[book] QUESTIONING RETURN
A NOVEL
BY BETH KISSILEFF
November 2016
Mandel Vilar Press
From Yaddo alum Kissileff, a novel set in Jerusalem, where questioning American Jews who "return" to Israel and to traditional religion changes Wendy Goldberg's life forever.
Every year, 700,000 Americans visit Israel. Wendy Goldberg spends a year in Jerusalem questioning the lives of American Jews who do "Aliya"—a return both to Israel itself and to traditional religious practices. Are they sincere? Are they happier? The unexpected answers and Wendy's experiences (a bus bombing, a funeral, an unexpected suicide, a love affair, and a lawsuit) lead her to reconsider her own true Jewish identity.
The ambitious graduate student is certain she's on the path to academic glory. But from the moment her plane takes off Wendy is confronted with unanswerable questions of faith and identity. As she becomes immersed in the rhythm of Israeli life, her sense of distance from it fades. Her ability to be an outside observer terminates abruptly when a student commits a horrible act immediately after his interview with her. Wendy is not sure how or if she is implicated in his action, but in her search for understanding, she is led to knowledge and love in unforeseen places.




















SEE ALSO:


[book] Reading Genesis:
Beginnings
by Beth Kissileff
2016
“A marvelous collection of insights, provocations and apercus on the founding book of the human family.” – Rabbi David Wolpe, Sinai Temple, LA, USA

Deuteronomy 32:47 says the Pentateuch should not be 'an empty matter.' This new anthology from Beth Kissileff fills Genesis with meaning, gathering intellectuals and thinkers who use their professional knowledge to illuminate the Biblical text. These writers use insights from psychology, law, political science, literature, and other scholarly fields, to create an original constellation of modern Biblical readings, and receptions of Genesis: A scientist of appetite on Eve's eating behavior; law professors on contracts in Genesis, and on collective punishment; an anthropologist on the nature of human strife in the Cain and Abel story; political scientists on the nature of Biblical games, Abraham's resistance, and collective action.

The highly distinguished contributors include Alan Dershowitz and Ruth Westheimer, the novelists Rebecca Newberger Goldstein and Dara Horn, critics Ilan Stavans and Sander Gilman, historian Russell Jacoby, poets Alicia Suskin Ostriker and Jacqueline Osherow, and food writer Joan Nathan.






















[book] The Murderous History
of Bible Translations:
Power, Conflict, and the
Quest for Meaning
by Harry Freedman, PhD
November 15, 2016
Bloomsbury
In 1535, William Tyndale, the first man to produce an English version of the Bible in print, was captured and imprisoned in Belgium. A year later he was strangled and then burned at the stake. His co-translator was also burned. In that same year the translator of the first Dutch Bible was arrested and beheaded. These were not the first, nor were they the last instances of extreme violence against Bible translators. The Murderous History of Bible Translations tells the remarkable, and bloody, story of those who dared translate the word of God.
The Bible has been translated far more than any other book. To our minds it is self-evident that believers can read their sacred literature in a language they understand. But the history of Bible translations is far more contentious than reason would suggest. Bible translations underlie an astonishing number of religious conflicts that have plagued the world.
Harry Freedman describes brilliantly the passions and strong emotions that arise when deeply held religious convictions are threatened or undermined. He tells of the struggle for authority and orthodoxy in a world where temporal power was always subjugated to the divine, a world in which the idea of a Bible for all was so important that many were willing to give up their time, security, and even their lives.

























[book] DK Eyewitness Travel Guide:
Jerusalem, Israel,
Petra & Sinai
by DK
November 15, 2016
DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Jerusalem, Israel, Petra & Sinai will lead you straight to the best attractions the region has to offer.
Experience this beautiful and sacred part of the world, from the green hills and sun-drenched coast of Galilee to the holy sites of Jerusalem's Old City, and from the dramatic desert of Wadi Rum to the vibrant reefs of Dahab.
Discover DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Jerusalem, Israel, Petra & Sinai.
• Detailed itineraries and "don't-miss" destination highlights at a glance.
• Illustrated cutaway 3-D drawings of important sights.
• Floor plans and guided visitor information for major museums.
• Guided walking tours, local drink and dining specialties to try, things to do, and places to eat, drink, and shop by area.
• Area maps marked with sights.
• Detailed city maps each include a street finder index for easy navigation.
• Insights into history and culture to help you understand the stories behind the sights.
• Hotel and restaurant listings highlight DK Choice special recommendations. With hundreds of full-color photographs, hand-drawn illustrations, and custom maps that illuminate every page, DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Jerusalem, Israel, Petra & Sinai truly shows you what others only tell you.
























[book] OEDIPUS IN BROOKLYN A BY BLUME LEMPEL
Translated from Yiddish
Yermeyahu Ahron Taub
November 2016
Mandel Vilar Press
Ellen Cassedy and Yermiyahu Ahron Taub (the translators) on encountering Blume Lempel’s stories wrote: "When we began reading and translating, we didn’t know we were going to find a mother drawn into an incestuous relationship with her blind son. We didn’t know we’d meet a young woman lying on the table at an abortion clinic. We didn’t know we’d meet a middle-aged woman full of erotic imaginings as she readies herself for a blind date. Buried in this forgotten Yiddish-language material, we found modernist stories and modernist story-telling techniques – imagine reading Gabriel Garcia Marquez with the conversational touch of Grace Paley."

Lempel (1907–1999) was one of a small number of writers in the United States who wrote in Yiddish into the 1990s. Though many of her stories opened a window on the Old World and the Holocaust, she did not confine herself to these landscapes or themes. She often wrote about the margins of society, and about subjects considered untouchable. her prize-winning fiction is remarkable for its psychological acuity, its unflinching examination of erotic themes and gender relations, and its technical virtuosity. Mirroring the dislocation of mostly women protagonists, her stories move between present and past, Old World and New, dream and reality.

While many of her stories opened a window on the Old World and the Holocaust, she also wrote about the margins of society, about subjects considered untouchable, among them abortion, prostitution, women's erotic imaginings, and even incest. She illuminated the inner lives of her characters—mostly women. Her storylines migrate between past and present, Old World and New, dream and reality, modern-day New York and prewar Poland, bedtime story and passionate romance, and old-age dementia and girlhood dreams.

Immigrating to New York when Hitler rose to power, Blume Lempel began publishing her short stories in 1945. By the 1970s her work had become known throughout the Yiddish literary world. When she died in 1999, the Yiddish paper Forverts wrote: "Yiddish literature has lost one of its most remarkable women writers."

Ellen Cassedy, translator, is author of the award-winning study "We Are Here", about the Lithuanian Holocaust. With her colleague Yermiyahu Ahron Taub, they received the Yiddish Book Center 2012 Translation Prize for translating Blume Lempel. Yermiyahu Ahron Taub is the author of several books of poetry, including "Prayers of a Heretic/Tfiles fun an apikoyres" (2013),"Uncle Feygele"(2011), and "What Stillness Illuminated/Vos shtilkayt hot baloykhtn (2008)."






















[book] Where Memory Leads:
My Life
by Professor Saul Friedländer
November 8, 2016
Other Press
Winner of a Pulitzer Prize. Recipient of a MacArthur grant
A follow-up to his WHEN MEMORY COMES (1978) memoir, which he wrote in his 40s.

Imagine you decided to embark on a memoir when you have a Senior moment and can’t remember the Hebrew for eggplant salad while in a Paris hotel…

A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian's return to memoir, a tale of intellectual coming-of-age on three continents, published in tandem with his classic work of Holocaust literature, When Memory Comes
Forty years after his acclaimed, poignant first memoir, Friedländer returns with WHEN MEMORY COMES: THE LATER YEARS, bridging the gap between the ordeals of his childhood and his present-day towering reputation in the field of Holocaust studies. After abandoning his youthful conversion to Catholicism, he rediscovers his Jewish roots as a teenager and builds a new life in Israeli politics.

Friedländer's initial loyalty to Israel turns into a lifelong fascination with Jewish life and history. He struggles to process the ubiquitous effects of European anti-Semitism while searching for a more measured approach to the Zionism that surrounds him. Friedländer goes on to spend his adulthood shuttling between Israel, Europe, and the United States, armed with his talent for language and an expansive intellect. His prestige inevitably throws him up against other intellectual heavyweights. In his early years in Israel, he rubs shoulders with the architects of the fledgling state and brilliant minds such as Gershom Scholem and Carlo Ginzburg, among others.

Most importantly, this memoir led Friedländer to reflect on the wrenching events that induced him to devote sixteen years of his life to writing his Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945.

























[book] Thinking about the Torah:
A Philosopher Reads the Bible
(JPS Essential Judaism)
In paperback
by Kenneth Seeskin Ph.D.
Northwestern University, Professor
Klutznick Professor of Jewish Civilization
November 1, 2016
JPS Jewish Publication Society
The Bible is an enduring source of inspiration for the human heart and mind, and readers of Thinking about the Torah will be rewarded with an enhanced understanding of this great work’s deeper meanings. Drawing on Western philosophy and particularly Jewish philosophy, Kenneth Seeskin delves into ten core biblical verses and the powerful ideas that emerge from them. He speaks to readers on every page and invites conversation about topics central to human existence: how finite beings can relate to the infinite, what love is, the role of ethics in religion, and the meaning of holiness.
Seeskin raises questions we all ask and responds to them with curiosity and compassion, weaving into his own perceptive commentary insights from great Jewish thinkers such as Maimonides, Spinoza, Buber, Rosenzweig, and Levinas, as well as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Luther, Kant, and Kierkegaard.
The Bible is concerned with how we think as well as how we follow the commandments, rituals, and customs. Seeskin inspires us to read the Torah with an open mind and think about the lessons it teaches us.























[book] MOONGLOW
A NOVEL
BY MICHAEL CHABON
November 2016
Harper Collins

Ever since Michael Chabon severely criticized the State of Israel and its policies, and embarked on a collection of writings critical of the State of Israel, his popularity among Jewish readers has diminished. But here is his latest novel. Will it be rejected by several Jewish book clubs? I wonder.

The keeping of secrets and the telling of lies; sex and desire and ordinary love; existential doubt and model rocketry - all feature in the new novel from the author of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay and The Yiddish Policeman's Union.

Moonglow unfolds as a deathbed confession. An old man, tongue loosened by powerful painkillers, memory stirred by the imminence of death, tells stories to his grandson, uncovering bits and pieces of a history long buried. (The novel is inspired by Chabon’s visits with his dying grandfather)

From the Jewish slums of prewar South Philadelphia to the invasion of Germany, from a Florida retirement village to the penal utopia of a New York Prison, from the heyday of the space program to the twilight of "the American Century," Moonglow collapses an era into a single life and a lifetime into a single week. A lie that tells the truth, a work of fictional non-fiction, an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir, Moonglow is Chabon at his most daring and his most moving.

PW writes: Chabon’s (Telegraph Avenue) charming and elegantly structured novel is presented as a memoir by a narrator named Mike who shares several autobiographical details with Chabon (for one, they’re both novelists who live in the Bay Area). Mike’s memoir is concerned less with his own life than with the lives of his deceased maternal Jewish grandparents, who remain unnamed. His grandfather—whose deathbed reminisces serve as the novel’s main narrative engine—is a WWII veteran with an anger streak (the stint he does in prison after a workplace assault is one of the novel’s finest sections) and a fascination with V-2 rockets, astronomy, space travel, and all things celestial or skyward. Mike’s grandmother, born in France, is alluring but unstable, “a source of fire, madness, and poetry” whose personal history overlaps in unclear ways with the Holocaust, and whose fits of depression and hallucination result in her institutionalization (also one of the novel’s finest sections). Chabon imbricates his characters’ particular histories with broader, detail-rich narratives of war, migration, and technological advances involving such figures as Alger Hiss and Wernher von Braun. This move can sometimes feel forced. What seduces the reader is Chabon’s language, which reinvents the world, joyously, on almost every page. Listening to his grandfather’s often-harrowing stories, Mike thinks to himself, “What I knew about shame... would fit into half a pistachio shell.”






















[book] The Waiting Room
A Novel
by Leah Kaminsky
November 15, 2016
Harper
The Waiting Room unfolds over the course of a single, life-changing day, but the story it tells spans five decades, three continents, and one family’s compelling history of love, war, and survival

As the daughter of Holocaust survivors, Dina’s present has always been haunted by her parents’ pasts. She becomes a doctor, emigrates, and builds a family of her own, yet no matter how hard she tries to move on, their ghosts keep pulling her back. A dark, wry sense of humor helps Dina maintain her sanity amid the constant challenges of motherhood and medicine, but when a terror alert is issued in her adopted city, her coping skills are pushed to the limit.

Interlacing the present and the past over a span of twenty-four hours, The Waiting Room is an intense exploration of what it means to endure a day-to-day existence defined by conflict and trauma, and a powerful reminder of just how fragile life can be. As the clock counts down to a shocking climax, Dina must confront her parents’ history and decide whether she will surrender to fear, or fight for love.

























[book] JUDAS
A Novel
By Amos Oz
Translated from Hebrew by Nicholas de Lange
November 2016
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Winner of the International Literature Prize, the new novel by Amos Oz is his first full-length work since the best-selling A Tale of Love and Darkness.

Jerusalem, 1959. Shmuel Ash, a biblical scholar, is adrift in his young life when he finds work as a caregiver for a brilliant but cantankerous old man named Gershom Wald. There is, however, a third, mysterious presence in his new home. Atalia Abarbanel, the daughter of a deceased Zionist leader, a beautiful woman in her forties, entrances young Shmuel even as she keeps him at a distance. Piece by piece, the old Jerusalem stone house, haunted by tragic history and now home to the three misfits and their intricate relationship, reveals its secrets.

At once an exquisite love story and coming-of-age novel, an allegory for the state of Israel and for the biblical tale from which it draws its title, Judas is Amos Oz's most powerful novel in decades.

PW writes: Oz raises fundamental questions concerning Israeli politics, religion, ethics, and history in this novel about a young Jewish scholar adrift in 1959 Jerusalem. Graduate student Shmuel Ash decides to abandon his studies and perhaps leave Jerusalem; when his parents can no longer support him, his girlfriend marries her ex-boyfriend, and even his Socialist discussion group breaks up. Answering an advertisement for a live-in companion in an old Jerusalem neighborhood, Shmuel finds a welcome retreat in the home of Gershom Wald, a 70-year-old retired schoolteacher suffering from an unnamed degenerative disease. Gershom’s primary caregiver is his son’s widow, Atalia, and Shmuel’s job consists mainly in providing Gershom with spirited debate. The old man’s favorite topic—the formation of the state of Israel—proves somewhat sensitive in that Atalia’s father, David Ben-Gurion opponent Shealtiel Abravanel, had opposed the idea of establishing a Jewish state without first addressing Arab concerns adequately, a position for which he was deemed a traitor. Gershom and Shmuel also discuss the famous traitor that Shmuel has been studying, Judas Iscariot. As Shmuel researches Abravanel and Judas, Oz (A Tale of Love and Darkness) suggests each might be less a traitor than an idealist with an alternate point of view. Oz’s appreciation for multiple perspectives underlies powerful descriptions of Judas at the crucifixion, the brutal murder of Atalia’s husband’s during Israel’s War of Independence, and Shmuel with Atalia at King David’s tomb. Through the story of one young man at a crossroads, Oz presents thought-provoking ideas about traitors, a moving lament for the cost of Israeli-Arab conflict, and a heartfelt call for compassion.



BY THE WAY… AMOS OZ Recommends the following books for November 2016:

FIVE SEASONS by A. B. Yehoshua

LENIN’S KISSES by Yan Lianke

Ben-Gurion: Father of Modern Israel by Anita Shaira

Khirbet Khizeh: A Novel by S. Yizhar

Infiltration: A Novel by Yehoshua Kenaz
















[book] The Némirovsky Question:
THE NEMIROVSKY QUESTION
The Life, Death, and Legacy of a
Jewish Writer in Twentieth-Century France
by Susan Rubin Suleiman
November 22, 2016
Yale University Press
A fascinating look into the life and work of controversial French novelist Irène Némirovsky

Irène Némirovsky succeeded in creating a brilliant career as a novelist in the 1930s, only to have her life cut short: a “foreign Jew” in France, she was deported in 1942 and died in Auschwitz. But her two young daughters survived, and as adults they brought their mother back to life. In 2004, Suite française, Némirovsky’s posthumous novel, became an international best seller; some critics, however, condemned her as a “self-hating Jew” whose earlier works were rife with anti-Semitic stereotypes. Informed by personal interviews with Némirovsky’s descendants and others, as well as by extensive archival research, this wide-ranging intellectual biography situates Némirovsky in the literary and political climate of interwar France and recounts, for the first time, the postwar lives of her daughters. Némirovsky's Jewish works, Suleiman argues, should be read as explorations of the conflicted identities that shaped the lives of secular Jews in twentieth-century Europe and beyond.























[book] Game of Queens:
The Women Who Made
Sixteenth-Century Europe
by Sarah Gristwood
November 29, 2016
Basic Books
Sixteenth-century Europe saw an explosion of female rule. From Isabella of Castile and her granddaughter Mary Tudor, to Catherine de Medici, Anne Boleyn, and Elizabeth Tudor, women wielded enormous power over their territories for more than a hundred years. In the sixteenth century, as in our own, the phenomenon of the powerful woman offered challenges and opportunities. Opportunities, as when in 1529 Margaret of Austria and Louise of Savoy negotiated the “Ladies’ peace” of Cambrai. Challenges, as when both Mary Queen of Scots and her kinswoman Elizabeth I came close to being destroyed by sexual scandal.
A fascinating group biography of some of the most beloved (and reviled) queens in history, Game of Queens tells the story of the powerful women who drove European history.






















[book] Thank You for Being Late:
An Optimist's Guide to Thriving
in the Age of Accelerations
by Thomas L. Friedman
(NYT Columnist)
November 22, 2016
FS&G
A field guide to the twenty-first century, written by one of its most celebrated observers
In his most ambitious work to date, Thomas L. Friedman shows that we have entered an age of dizzying acceleration--and explains how to live in it. Due to an exponential increase in computing power, climbers atop Mount Everest enjoy excellent cell-phone service and self-driving cars are taking to the roads. A parallel explosion of economic interdependency has created new riches as well as spiraling debt burdens. Meanwhile, Mother Nature is also seeing dramatic changes as carbon levels rise and species go extinct, with compounding results.
How do these changes interact, and how can we cope with them? To get a better purchase on the present, Friedman returns to his Minnesota childhood and sketches a world where politics worked and joining the middle class was an achievable goal. Today, by contrast, it is easier than ever to be a maker (try 3-D printing) or a breaker (the Islamic State excels at using Twitter), but harder than ever to be a leader or merely "average." Friedman concludes that nations and individuals must learn to be fast (innovative and quick to adapt), fair (prepared to help the casualties of change), and slow (adept at shutting out the noise and accessing their deepest values). With vision, authority, and wit, Thank You for Being Late establishes a blueprint for how to think about our times.






















[book] My Halal Kitchen:
Global Recipes, Cooking Tips,
and Lifestyle Inspiration
by Yvonne Maffei
2016
Surrey
Yvonne Maffei is the founder of the hugely popular cooking blog and Islamic lifestyle website My Halal Kitchen. Her new book, My Halal Kitchen: Global Recipes, Cooking Tips, and Lifestyle Inspiration, celebrates halal cooking and shows readers how easy it can be to prepare halal meals. Her cookbook collects more than 100 recipes from a variety of culinary traditions, proving that halal meals can be full of diverse flavors. Home cooks will learn to make classic American favorites and comfort foods, as well as international dishes that previously may have seemed out of reach: Coq without the Vin, Shrimp Pad Thai, Chicken Tamales, and many more.
The book also includes resources that break down the basics of halal cooking and outline common non-halal ingredients, their replacements, and how to purchase (or make) them. As Maffei often says to her million-plus social media followers, halal cooking elegantly dovetails with holistic living and using locally sourced, organic ingredients. In the halal tradition, every part of the farm-to-fork cycle has importance. This book is an ideal resource not only for Muslim home cooks, but also for any home cook looking to find delicious and healthy recipes from around the globe.





















[book] The Science of Selling:
Proven Strategies to Make Your
Pitch, Influence Decisions, and
Close the Deal
by David Hoffeld
Nov 2016
The Revolutionary Sales Approach Scientifically Proven to Dramatically Improve Your Sales and Business Success
One in nine Americans work in sales, and even more in persuasion fields
Did you know that nearly half of salespeople fail to meet their quotas every year? Or that many of the most common sales behaviors drive down sales performance? In today’s fiercely competitive marketplace you can’t afford to lose sales that should be yours. But with so much conflicting advice from self-proclaimed “gurus,” how do you know which sales strategies actually work?
Leading sales trainer, researcher and CEO of his own firm, the Hoffeld Group, David Hoffeld, has the answer.
Blending research in social psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, The Science of Selling shows you how to align the way you sell with how our brains naturally form buying decisions, dramatically increasing your ability to earn more sales. Hoffeld’s evidence-based approach connects the dots between science and situations salespeople and business leaders face every day to help you consistently succeed, including proven ways to:
- Engage buyers’ emotions to increase their receptiveness to you and your ideas
- Ask questions that line up with how the brain discloses information
- Lock in the incremental commitments that lead to a sale
- Create positive influence and reduce the sway of competitors
- Discover the underlying causes of objections and neutralize them
- Guide buyers through the necessary mental steps to make purchasing decisions
Packed with advice and anecdotes, The Science of Selling is an essential resource for anyone looking to succeed in today's cutthroat selling environment, advance their business goals, or boost their ability to influence others.



























[book] The Scout's Guide to
Wild Edibles:
Learn How To Forage,
Prepare & Eat 40 Wild Foods
by Mike Krebill
Nov 2016
Ingram/St Lynn Press
Ever seen a tasty-looking plant or mushroom in a yard or forest but weren’t sure if it would taste good…or even be edible? In The Scout’s Guide to Wild Edibles, renowned forager Mike Krebill profiles 40 widely-found edible wild plants and mushrooms of North America, in a guide small enough to fit right in a pocket. The author offers clear color photos and positive-ID tips for each plant, along with 15 recipes and 10 DIY activities for all skill levels. The Scout’s Guide will help foragers locate, identify and safely enjoy wild edibles – with the added satisfaction of knowing exactly where their food came from.
























[book] Revolutionary Yiddishland:
A History of Jewish Radicalism
by Alain Brossat
November 2016
Verso
Recovering the history of the revolutionary Jewish tradition They were on the barricades from the avenues of Petrograd to the alleys of the Warsaw ghetto, from the anti-Franco struggle to the anti-Nazi resistance. Before the Holocaust, Yiddishland was a vast expanse of Eastern Europe running from the Baltic Sea to the western edge of Russia and featured hundreds of Jewish communities, numbering some 11 million people. Within this territory, revolutionaries arose from the Jewish misery of Eastern and Central Europe; they were raised in the fear of God and respect for religious tradition, but were then caught up in the great current of revolutionary utopian thinking. Socialists, Communists, Bundists, Zionists, Trotskyists, manual workers and intellectuals, they embodied the multifarious activity and radicalism of a Jewish working class that glimpsed the Messiah in the folds of the red flag Today, the world from which they came has disappeared, dismantled and destroyed by the Nazi genocide. After this irremediable break, there remain only survivors, and the work of memory for red Yiddishland. This book traces the struggles of these militants, their singular trajectories, their oscillation between great hope and doubt, their lost illusions—a red and Jewish gaze on the history of the twentieth century.

























[book] MOSES:
A Human Life
(Jewish Lives series)
by Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg
November 2016
Yale University Press
An unprecedented portrait of Moses's inner world and perplexing character, by a distinguished biblical scholar
No figure looms larger in Jewish culture than Moses, and few have stories more enigmatic. Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg, acclaimed for her many books on Jewish thought, turns her attention to Moses in this remarkably rich, evocative book.
Drawing on a broad range of sources—literary as well as psychoanalytic, a wealth of classical Jewish texts alongside George Eliot, W. G. Sebald, and Werner Herzog—Zornberg offers a vivid and original portrait of the biblical Moses. Moses's vexing personality, his uncertain origins, and his turbulent relations with his own people are acutely explored by Zornberg, who sees this story, told and retold, as crucial not only to the biblical past but also to the future of Jewish history.



























[book] Assassination Generation:
Video Games, Aggression,
and the Psychology of Killing
by Dave Grossman (Lt. Col, US Army, Retired)
and Kristine Paulsen
as well as Katie Miserany
Nov 2016
Little Brown
The author of the 400,000-copy bestseller “On Killing” reveals how violent video games have ushered in a new era of mass homicide--and what we must do about it.
Paducah, Kentucky, 1997: a 14-year-old boy shoots eight students in a prayer circle at his school. Littleton, Colorado, 1999: two high school seniors kill a teacher, twelve other students, and then themselves. Utoya, Norway, 2011: a political extremist shoots and kills sixty-nine participants in a youth summer camp. Newtown, Connecticut, 2012: a troubled 20-year-old man kills 20 children and six adults at the elementary school he once attended.

What links these and other horrific acts of mass murder?
A young person's obsession with video games that teach to kill.

Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, who in his perennial bestseller On Killingrevealed that most of us are not "natural born killers" - and who has spent decades training soldiers, police, and others who keep us secure to overcome the intrinsic human resistance to harming others and to use firearms responsibly when necessary - turns a laser focus on the threat posed to our society by violent video games.
Drawing on crime statistics, cutting-edge social research, and scientific studies of the teenage brain, Col. Grossman shows how video games that depict antisocial, misanthropic, casually savage behavior can warp the mind - with potentially deadly results. His book will become the focus of a new national conversation about video games and the epidemic of mass murders that they have unleashed.

























[book] Last Girl Before Freeway:
The Life, Loves,
Losses, and Liberation
of Joan Rivers
by Leslie Bennetts
November 15, 2016
Little Brown
The definitive book about Joan Rivers' tumultuous, victorious, tragic, hilarious, and fascinating life.

Joan Rivers was more than a legendary comedian; she was an icon and a role model to millions, a fearless pioneer who left a legacy of expanded opportunity when she died in 2014. Her life was a dramatic roller-coaster of triumphant highs and devastating lows: the suicide of her husband, her feud with Johnny Carson, her estrangement from her daughter, her many plastic surgeries, her ferocious ambition and her massive insecurities. But Rivers' career was also hugely significant in American cultural history, breaking down barriers for her gender and pushing the boundaries of truth-telling for women in public life.

A juicy, intimate biography of one of the greatest comedians ever-a performer whose sixty year career was borne, simply, out of a desire to make people laugh so she could feel loved-LAST GIRL BEFORE FREEWAY delves into the inner workings of a woman who both reflected and redefined the world around her.
























[book] The Man Who Wanted to Know Everything:
A Novel
(Avraham Avraham Series)
by D A MISHANI
Translated from Hebrew
November 2016
Harper paperbacks
Inspector Avraham Avraham is back in this sequel to the acclaimed thrillers A Possibility of Violence and The Missing File—internationally bestselling author D. A. Mishani’s The Man Who Wanted to Know Everything is a hauntingly psychological domestic noir, perfect for fans of Alafair Burke or Liad Shoham.
Called on a stormy night to the scene of his first murder investigation as the new commander of investigations, Inspector Avraham Avraham is shocked to discover that he knows the victim: Leah Yeger, a widow found brutally murdered in her home and the victim of a rape that he investigated some years prior. But with her rapist still behind bars, Avraham’s only lead is an eyewitness claiming he saw a policeman leave the scene of the crime—a policeman who seems to have since vanished into thin air.
Risking the cooperation of his police force, Avraham is determined to follow the lead, working feverishly to solve the case—no matter the cost. But when his investigation leads him to Mazal Bengtson—a young woman struggling to escape a tortured past and salvage a marriage gone horribly wrong—the complex case takes on an even more baffling, disturbing turn...
Told through the dual perspectives of Inspector Avraham and Mazal Bengtson, The Man Who Wanted To Know Everything is a chilling investigation of secrets, family, and what happens when the people you love may not be who you think.































[book] THE MENORAH
From the Bible to Modern Israel
by Steven Fine
November 2016
The menorah, the seven-branched candelabrum, has traversed millennia as a living symbol of Judaism and the Jewish people. Naturally, it did not pass through the ages unaltered. The Menorah explores the cultural and intellectual history of the Western world’s oldest continuously used religious symbol. This meticulously researched yet deeply personal history explains how the menorah illuminates the great changes and continuities in Jewish culture, from biblical times to modern Israel.
Though the golden seven-branched menorahs of Moses and of the Jerusalem Temple are artifacts lost to history, the best-known menorah image survives on the Arch of Titus in Rome. Commemorating the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE, the arch reliefs depict the spoils of the Temple, the menorah chief among them, as they appeared in Titus’s great triumphal parade in 71 CE. Steven Fine recounts how, in 2012, his team discovered the original yellow ochre paint that colored the menorah?an event that inspired his search for the history of this rich symbol from ancient Israel through classical history, the Middle Ages, and on to our own tumultuous times.
Surveying artifacts and literary sources spanning three thousand years?from the Torah and the ruins of Rome to yesterday’s news?Fine presents the menorah as a source of fascination and illumination for Jews, Samaritans, Christians, and even Freemasons. A symbol for the divine, for continuity, emancipation, national liberation, and redemption, the menorah features prominently on Israel’s state seal and continues to inspire and challenge in surprising ways.
























[book] Spoiling the Stories:
The Rise of Israeli Women's Fiction
by Tamar Merin
November 2016
Northwestern University Press
In Spoiling the Stories, Tamar Merin presents the as yet untold story of the rise of prose by Israeli women, while further exploring and expanding the gendered models of literary influence in modern Hebrew literature. The theoretical idea upon which this book is based is that of intersexual dialogue, a term that refers to the various literary strategies employed by Israeli female fiction writers expressing their voice within a male-dominated and (still) inherently Oedipal literary tradition. Spoiling the Stories focuses on intersexual dialogue as it evolved in the first three decades after the establishment of the state of Israel in the works of Yehudit Hendel, Amalia Kahana Carmon, and Rachel Eytan. According to Merin, these three women writers were the most important in the history of modern Hebrew literature: each was a significant participant in the poetic development of her time.























[book] Connecting with the Enemy:
A Century of Palestinian-Israeli
Joint Nonviolence
by Sheila H. Katz
November 2016
University of Texas Press
Thousands of ordinary people in Israel and Palestine have engaged in a dazzling array of daring and visionary joint nonviolent initiatives for more than a century. They have endured despite condemnation by their own societies, repetitive failures of diplomacy, harsh inequalities, and endemic cycles of violence.
Connecting with the Enemy presents the first comprehensive history of unprecedented grassroots efforts to forge nonviolent alternatives to the lethal collision of the two national movements. Bringing to light the work of over five hundred groups, Sheila H. Katz describes how Arabs and Jews, children and elders, artists and activists, educators and students, garage mechanics and physicists, and lawyers and prisoners have spoken truth to power, protected the environment, demonstrated peacefully, mourned together, stood in resistance and solidarity, and advocated for justice and security. She also critiques and assesses the significance of their work and explores why these good-will efforts have not yet managed to end the conflict or occupation. This previously untold story of Palestinian-Israeli joint nonviolence will challenge the mainstream narratives of terror and despair, monsters and heroes, that help to perpetuate the conflict. It will also inspire and encourage anyone grappling with social change, peace and war, oppression and inequality, and grassroots activism anywhere in the world.































[book] Searching for John Hughes:
Or Everything I Thought I
Needed to Know about Life
I Learned from Watching '80s Movies
by Jason Diamond
November 2016
William Morrow
For all fans of John Hughes and his hit films such as National Lampoon’s Vacation, Sixteen Candles, and Home Alone, comes Jason Diamond’s hilarious memoir of growing up obsessed with the iconic filmmaker’s movies—a preoccupation that eventually convinces Diamond he should write Hughes’ biography and travel to New York City on a quest that is as funny as it is hopeless.
For as long as Jason Diamond can remember, he’s been infatuated with John Hughes’ movies. From the outrageous, raunchy antics in National Lampoon’s Vacation to the teenage angst in The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink to the insanely clever and unforgettable Home Alone, Jason could not get enough of Hughes’ films. And so the seed was planted in his mind that it should fall to him to write a biography of his favorite filmmaker. It didn’t matter to Jason that he had no qualifications, training, background, platform, or direction. Thus went the years-long, delusional, earnest, and assiduous quest to reach his goal. But no book came out of these years, and no book will. What he did get was a story that fills the pages of this unconventional, hilarious memoir.
In Searching for John Hughes, Jason tells how a Jewish kid from a broken home in a Chicago suburb—sometimes homeless, always restless—found comfort and connection in the likewise broken lives in the suburban Chicago of John Hughes’ oeuvre. He moved to New York to become a writer. He started to write a book he had no business writing. In the meantime, he brewed coffee and guarded cupcake cafes. All the while, he watched John Hughes movies religiously.
Though his original biography of Hughes has long since been abandoned, Jason has discovered he is a writer through and through. And the adversity of going for broke has now been transformed into wisdom. Or, at least, a really, really good story.
In other words, this is a memoir of growing up. One part big dream, one part big failure, one part John Hughes movies, one part Chicago, and one part New York. It’s a story of what comes after the “Go for it!” part of the command to young creatives to pursue their dreams—no matter how absurd they might seem at first.































[book] Michelangelo's Tomb for Julius II:
Genesis and Genius
by Christoph Luitpold Frommel
with Claudia Echinger-Maurach,
Antonio Forcellino and Maria Forcellino
November 2016
Getty
In 1505, Michelangelo (1475–1564) began planning the magnificent tomb for Pope Julius II, which would dominate the next forty years of his career. Repeated failures to complete the monument were characterized by Condivi, Michelangelo’s authorized biographer, as “the tragedy of the tomb.” This definitive book thoroughly documents the art of the tomb and each stage of its complicated evolution. Authored by Christoph Luitpold Frommel, who also acted as the lead consultant on the recent restoration campaign, this volume offers new post-restoration photography that reveals the beauty of the tomb overall, its individual statues, and its myriad details.
This book traces Michelangelo’s stylistic development; documents the dialogue between the artist and his great friend and exacting patron Pope Julius II; unravels the complicated relationship between the master and his assistants, who executed large parts of the design; and sheds new light on the importance of neoplatonism in Michelangelo’s thinking.
A rich trove of documents in the original Latin and archaic Italian relates the story through letters, contracts, and other records covering Michelangelo’s travels, purchase of the marble, and concerns that arose as work progressed. The book also catalogues fifteen sculptures designed for the tomb and more than eighty related drawings, as well as an extensive and up-to-date bibliography.







































[book] An Extraordinary Time:
The End of the Postwar Boom
and the Return of the Ordinary Economy
by Marc Levinson
November 8, 2016
Basic Books  
The decades after World War II were a golden age across much of the world. It was a time of economic miracles, an era when steady jobs were easy to find and families could see their living standards improving year after year. And then, around 1973, the good times vanished. The world economy slumped badly, then settled into the slow, erratic growth that had been the norm before the war. The result was an era of anxiety, uncertainty, and political extremism that we are still grappling with today.
In An Extraordinary Time, acclaimed economic historian Marc Levinson describes how the end of the postwar boom reverberated throughout the global economy, bringing energy shortages, financial crises, soaring unemployment, and a gnawing sense of insecurity. Politicians, suddenly unable to deliver the prosperity of years past, railed haplessly against currency speculators, oil sheikhs, and other forces they could not control. From Sweden to Southern California, citizens grew suspicious of their newly ineffective governments and rebelled against the high taxes needed to support social welfare programs enacted when coffers were flush.
Almost everywhere, the pendulum swung to the right, bringing politicians like Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan to power. But their promise that deregulation, privatization, lower tax rates, and smaller government would restore economic security and robust growth proved unfounded. Although the guiding hand of the state could no longer deliver the steady economic performance the public had come to expect, free-market policies were equally unable to do so. The golden age would not come back again.
A sweeping reappraisal of the last sixty years of world history, An Extraordinary Time offers forces us to come to terms with how little control we actually have over the economy.



























[book] Threading My Prayer Rug:
One Woman's Journey from
Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim
by Sabeeha Rehman
2016
Arcade / Skyhorse
ONE OF BOOKLIST'S TOP TEN RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY BOOKS OF 2016
This enthralling story of the making of an American is also a timely meditation on being Muslim in America today.
Threading My Prayer Rug is a richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. It is also the luminous story of many journeys: from Pakistan to the United States in an arranged marriage that becomes a love match lasting forty years; from secular Muslim in an Islamic society to devout Muslim in a society ignorant of Islam, and from liberal to conservative to American Muslim; from student to bride and mother; and from an immigrant intending to stay two years to an American citizen, business executive, grandmother, and tireless advocate for interfaith understanding.
Beginning with a sweetly funny, moving account of her arranged marriage, the author undercuts stereotypes and offers the refreshing view of an American life through Muslim eyes. In chapters leavened with humor, hope, and insight, she recounts an immigrant’s daily struggles balancing assimilation with preserving heritage, overcoming religious barriers from within and distortions of Islam from without, and confronting issues of raising her children as Muslims—while they lobby for a Christmas tree! Sabeeha Rehman was doing interfaith work for Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the driving force behind the Muslim community center at Ground Zero, when the backlash began. She discusses what that experience revealed about American society.































[book] Surge of Piety:
Norman Vincent Peale
and the Remaking of
American Religious Life
by Christopher Lane
November 2016
Yale University Press
The dramatic untold story of how Norman Vincent Peale and a handful of conservative allies fueled the massive rise of religiosity in the United States during the 1950s
Near the height of Cold War hysteria, when the threat of all-out nuclear war felt real and perilous, Presbyterian minister Norman Vincent Peale published The Power of Positive Thinking. Selling millions of copies worldwide, the book offered a gospel of self-assurance in an age of mass anxiety.
Despite Peale's success and his ties to powerful conservatives such as Dwight D. Eisenhower, J. Edgar Hoover, and Joseph McCarthy, the full story of his movement has never been told. Christopher Lane shows how the famed minister's brand of Christian psychology inflamed the nation's religious revival by promoting the concept that belief in God was essential to the health and harmony of all Americans. We learn in vivid detail how Peale and his powerful supporters orchestrated major changes in a nation newly defined as living "under God." This blurring of the lines between religion and medicine would reshape religion as we know it in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.































[book] HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE
The Inside Story of How
Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS
By David France
November 2016
Knopf
The definitive history of the successful battle to halt the AIDS epidemic—from the creator of, and inspired by, the seminal documentary How to Survive a Plague.
A riveting, powerful telling of the story of the grassroots movement of activists, many of them in a life-or-death struggle, who seized upon scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Ignored by public officials, religious leaders, and the nation at large, and confronted with shame and hatred, this small group of men and women chose to fight for their right to live by educating themselves and demanding to become full partners in the race for effective treatments. Around the globe, 16 million people are alive today thanks to their efforts.
Not since the publication of Randy Shilts’s classic And the Band Played On has a book measured the AIDS plague in such brutally human, intimate, and soaring terms.
In dramatic fashion, we witness the founding of ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group), and the rise of an underground drug market in opposition to the prohibitively expensive (and sometimes toxic) AZT. We watch as these activists learn to become their own researchers, lobbyists, drug smugglers, and clinicians, establishing their own newspapers, research journals, and laboratories, and as they go on to force reform in the nation’s disease-fighting agencies.
With his unparalleled access to this community David France illuminates the lives of extraordinary characters, including the closeted Wall Street trader-turned-activist, the high school dropout who found purpose battling pharmaceutical giants in New York, the South African physician who helped establish the first officially recognized buyers’ club at the height of the epidemic, and the public relations executive fighting to save his own life for the sake of his young daughter.
Expansive yet richly detailed, this is an insider’s account of a pivotal moment in the history of American civil rights. Powerful, heart-wrenching, and finally exhilarating, How to Survive a Plague is destined to become an essential part of the literature of AIDS.






































[book] The Daily Show
(The Book):
An Oral History as Told
by Jon Stewart, the Correspondents,
Staff and Guests
by Chris Smith
Foreword by Jon Stewart
November 2016
Hachette/Grand Central
The complete, uncensored history of the award-winning The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, as told by its correspondents, writers, and host.
For almost seventeen years, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart brilliantly redefined the borders between television comedy, political satire, and opinionated news coverage. It launched the careers of some of today's most significant comedians, highlighted the hypocrisies of the powerful, and garnered 23 Emmys. Now the show's behind-the-scenes gags, controversies, and camaraderie will be chronicled by the players themselves, from legendary host Jon Stewart to the star cast members and writers-including Samantha Bee, Stephen Colbert, John Oliver, Steve Carell, Lewis Black, Jessica Williams, John Hodgman, and Larry Wilmore-plus some of The Daily Show's most prominent guests and adversaries: John and Cindy McCain, Glenn Beck, Tucker Carlson, and many more.
This oral history takes the reader behind the curtain for all the show's highlights, from its origins as Comedy Central's underdog late-night program hosted by Craig Kilborn to Jon Stewart's long reign to Trevor Noah's succession, rising from a scrappy jester in the 24-hour political news cycle to become part of the beating heart of politics-a trusted source for not only comedy but also commentary, with a reputation for calling bullshit and an ability to effect real change in the world.
Through years of incisive election coverage, Jon Stewart's emotional monologue in the wake of 9/11, his infamous confrontation on Crossfire, passionate debates with President Obama and Hillary Clinton, feuds with Bill O'Reilly and Fox, the Indecisions, Mess O'Potamia, and provocative takes on Wall Street and racism, The Daily Show has been a cultural touchstone. Now, for the first time, the people behind the show's seminal moments come together to share their memories of the last-minute rewrites, improvisations, pranks, romances, blow-ups, and moments of Zen both on and off the set of one of America's most groundbreaking shows.




































[book] Testimony:
A Memoir
by Robbie Robertson
November 2016
Crown
On the fortieth anniversary of The Band’s legendary The Last Waltz concert, Robbie Robertson finally tells his own spellbinding story of the band that changed music history, his extraordinary personal journey, and his creative friendships with some of the greatest artists of the last half-century.
Robbie Robertson’s singular contributions to popular music have made him one of the most beloved songwriters and guitarists of his time. With songs like “The Weight,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” and “Up on Cripple Creek,” he and his partners in The Band fashioned music that has endured for decades, influencing countless musicians.

Oh… why is this book on the site? Because Robertson was born in Canada. His mother was a member of the Mohawk nation, and his father was Jewish and a professional gambler. Unfortunately, his father was killed by a driver while changing a flat tire, and Robbie’s mother remarried Mr. Robertson.

In this captivating memoir, written over five years of reflection, Robbie Robertson employs his unique storyteller’s voice to weave together the journey that led him to some of the most pivotal events in music history. He recounts the adventures of his half-Jewish, half-Mohawk upbringing on the Six Nations Indian Reserve and on the gritty streets of Toronto; his odyssey at sixteen to the Mississippi Delta, the fountainhead of American music; the wild, early years on the road with rockabilly legend Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks; his unexpected ties to the Cosa Nostra underworld; the gripping trial-by-fire “going electric” with Bob Dylan on his 1966 world tour, and their ensuing celebrated collaborations; the formation of The Band and the forging of their unique sound, culminating with history’s most famous farewell concert, brought to life for all time in Martin Scorsese’s great movie The Last Waltz.
This is the story of a time and place—the moment when rock ?n? roll became life, when legends like Buddy Holly and Bo Diddley crisscrossed the circuit of clubs and roadhouses from Texas to Toronto, when The Beatles, Hendrix, The Stones, and Warhol moved through the same streets and hotel rooms. It’s the story of exciting change as the world tumbled through the ?60s and early ?70s, and a generation came of age, built on music, love, and freedom. Above all, it’s the moving story of the profound friendship among five young men who together created a new kind of popular music. Testimony is Robbie Robertson’s story, lyrical and true, as only he could tell it.







































[book] Payoff:
The Hidden Logic That
Shapes Our Motivations
by Dan Ariely
November 15, 2016
TED Books
People are committed to work and want to achieve and contribute to a mission. And salaries are a very large expense. Yet many companies end up DE-Motivating their workers through rules and regulations and unnecessary procedures.

What is important is the connection between the person and the company. Ariely says that big cash bonuses are a distraction and block “flow.”

In Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations, Ariely recounts an experiment involving employees at a semiconductor factory at Intel in Israel. Workers got one of those three messages at the start of their workweek (a pizza voucher, a message from the CEO, a $30 bonus), though about a quarter of them got no message and no promise of a bonus (the control group). Ariely measured their output in chips produced.

After the first day, pizza proved to be the top motivator, increasing productivity by 6.7% over the control group, thereby just barely edging out the promise of a compliment (in the form of a text message from the boss that said “Well done!”). Those in the compliment condition increased their productivity by 6.6 percent as compared to the control group. But the worst motivator, much to the company’s surprise, was the cash bonus, which increased productivity by just 4.9 percent as compared to the control group.

Even so, what happened over the next several days was surprising: On the second day of the workweek, those in the money condition performed 13.2 percent worse than those in the control group. This leveled out over the next several days, but for the week overall, the cash bonus ended up costing the company more and resulted in a 6.5 percent drop in productivity. From the employer’s perspective, a cash bonus is worse than offering no incentive at all. As for pizza and compliments… over the course of the workweek, the output of the workers in these conditions slowed a little, becoming by the end of the week closer to the productivity level of the control group (but still better than no incentive). All told, the compliment proved to be the very best motivator, though Ariely thinks that if the experiment had gone the way he wanted, pizza would’ve fared best. (His initial suggestion was to deliver a pizza to the home of any employee who hit their target. “This way … we not only would give them a gift, but we would also make them heroes in the eyes of their families,” he writes.)

It’s a funny, clever little study. But it’s also a rather effective way of looking at what truly motivates people, as the results indicate that people are not moved to work by money alone. Social factors such as gratitude also play a substantial role in happiness and motivation at work; a 2011 review of 50 studies on workplace motivation, for instance, found that people tend to work harder when they felt like their work was being appreciated; performance-based pay incentives, on the other hand, tended to backfire.
Bestselling author Dan Ariely reveals fascinating new insights into motivation—showing that the subject is far more complex than we ever imagined.
Every day we work hard to motivate ourselves, the people we live with, the people who work for and do business with us. In this way, much of what we do can be defined as being “motivators.” From the boardroom to the living room, our role as motivators is complex, and the more we try to motivate partners and children, friends and coworkers, the clearer it becomes that the story of motivation is far more intricate and fascinating than we’ve assumed.
Payoff investigates the true nature of motivation, our partial blindness to the way it works, and how we can bridge this gap. With studies that range from Intel to a kindergarten classroom, Ariely digs deep to find the root of motivation—how it works and how we can use this knowledge to approach important choices in our own lives. Along the way, he explores intriguing questions such as: Can giving employees bonuses harm productivity? Why is trust so crucial for successful motivation? What are our misconceptions about how to value our work? How does your sense of your mortality impact your motivation?












[book] THE MAYAKOVSKY TAPES
A Novel
BY ROBERT LITTELL
November 22, 2016
Thomas Dunne Books
In March 1953, four women meet in Room 408 of Moscow’s deluxe Hotel Metropol. (sexually explicit conversation, warning) They have gathered to reminisce about Vladimir Mayakovsky, the poet who in death had become a national idol of Soviet Russia. In life, however, he was a much more complicated figure.
The ladies, each of whom could claim to have been a muse to the poet, loved or loathed Mayakovsky in the course of his life, and as they piece together their conflicting memories of him, a portrait of the artist as a young idealist emerges. From his early years as a leader of the Futurist movement to his work as a propagandist for the Revolution and on to the censorship battles that turned him against the state (and, more ominously, the state against him), their recollections reveal Mayakovsky as a passionate, complex, sexually obsessed creature trapped in the epicenter of history, struggling to hold onto his ideals in the face of a revolution betrayed.
Written by Robert Littell, whom The Washington Post called “one of the most talented, most original voices in American fiction today, period,” The Mayakovsky Tapes is an ambitious, impressive novel that brings to life the tumultuous Stalinist era and the predicament of the artists ensnared in it.




























[book] Final Solution:
The Fate of the Jews 1933-1949
by David Cesarani, OBE
(University of London)
November 8, 2016
St. Martin's Press
David Cesarani’s Final Solution is a magisterial work of history that chronicles the fate of Europe’s Jews. Based on decades of scholarship, documentation newly available from the opening of Soviet archives, declassification of western intelligence service records, as well as diaries and reports written in the camps, Cesarani provides a sweeping reappraisal challenging accepted explanations for the anti-Jewish politics of Nazi Germany and the inevitability of the Final Solution. The persecution of the Jews, as Cesarani sees it, was not always the Nazis’ central preoccupation, nor was it inevitable.

He shows how, in German-occupied countries, it unfolded erratically, often due to local initiatives. For Cesarani, war was critical to the Jewish fate. Military failure denied the Germans opportunities to expel Jews into a distant territory and created a crisis of resources that led to the starvation of the ghettos and intensified anti-Jewish measures. Looking at the historical record, he disputes the iconic role of railways and deportation trains. From prisoner diaries, he exposes the extent of sexual violence and abuse of Jewish women and follows the journey of some Jewish prisoners to displaced persons camps. David Cesarani’s Final Solution is the new standard chronicle of the fate of a heroic people caught in the hell that was Hitler’s Germany.




























[book] The Resistible Rise
of Benjamin Netanyahu
by Neill Lochery
November 8, 2016
Bloomsbury
It is all about survival according to the author. To live another day in office. For the nation to exist another day at the status quo

The first major English-language profile of Benjamin Netanyahu, the divisive and controversial Prime Minister of Israel.
NOTICE THE WORDS used in the description... divisive... controversial... you can see where the author is heading....

Benjamin Netanyahu is one of the longest-serving Prime Ministers of Israel. For many, Netanyahu is a right-wing nationalist zealot; for some Israelis he is a centrist who is too soft on Arabs and backs down too easily in a fight.

If he can make it to Fall 2018, he will have served longer than David Ben Gurion

Love him or loathe him, Netanyahu has been at the very center of Arab-Israeli politics since 1990, when he became the telegenic Israeli spokesman for CNN's coverage of the Persian Gulf War, arguably ushering in the Americanization of the Israeli media. Netanyahu is famous for his TV skills, but there is so much more to reveal--good and bad--about the man and his place in Israeli, Middle Eastern and world political history.

At present there is no major profile of Netanyahu in the English language, so the publication of this book is a landmark of considerable importance, especially as in March 2015 he was re-elected for a further term in office. Using the juncture of the Oslo Accords to take the reader back to Netanyahu's formative years, Neill Lochery, a renowned scholar of Middle Eastern politics and history, chronicles not only the Prime Minister's life but also the issues his career has encompassed, from the rise of militant Islam to the politics of oil; from the transformation of Israeli politics by the 24/7 cable news cycle to the US's changing role in the Middle East.




























[book] A PATH TO PEAVE
A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian
Negotiations and a Way Forward
in the Middle East
by Senator George J. Mitchell and Alon Sachar
November 27, 2016
Simon & Schuster
Finally, a way forward in the Middle East: The answer to why Israel and Palestine’s attempts at negotiation have failed and a practical roadmap for bringing peace to this complicated, troubled region.
George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland. But when he served as US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009 to 2011 — working to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — diplomacy did not prevail.

Now, for the first time, Mitchell offers his insider account of how the Israelis and the Palestinians have progressed (and regressed) in their negotiations through the years and outlines the specific concessions each side must make to finally achieve lasting peace. This unflinching look at why the peace process has failed, and what must happen for it to succeed, is an important, essential, and valuable read.

There are three parts: a condensed version of the conflict with cultural and deep historical drivers and roadblocks; a detailed account of Mitchell’s efforts from 2009-2011 including Abbas’s refusal to negotiate unless there was a settlement freeze, and Israel’s building with full knowledge that it would ruin negotiations, and Netanyahu’s pre-condition that Israeli troops be allowed to remain in the West Bank for decades to come (the poison pills on both sides); and the plan for a two state solution. Also included is the inside story on Israel’s March 2010 announcement that it would build 1,600 housing units in East Jerusalem as VP Biden was visiting, which was seen as a “direct and astonishing insult” to Biden and the U.S. Yet Obama did not recall the U.S> Ambassador, plus in 2016, he agreed to a 10 year, $38 billion military aid package for Israel, America’s largest ever.
George J. Mitchell served as a Democratic senator from Maine from 1980 to 1995 and Senate majority leader from 1989 to 1995. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland; chairman of The Walt Disney Company; US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace; and the author of the Mitchell Report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball; as well as the books The Negotiator and A Path to Peace. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1999.

Alon Sachar has worked to advance Middle East peace under two US administrations. He served as an adviser to the US Ambassador to Israel, Daniel B. Shapiro in Tel Aviv from 2011-2012, and to President Obama’s Special Envoys for Middle East Peace, George J. Mitchell and David Hale, from 2009 to 2011. In those capacities, Alon participated in negotiations with Israelis, Palestinians, and Arab states. From 2006 to 2009, he served in the State Department’s Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, focusing on the US bilateral relationships with Israel and the Palestinians as well as Arab-Israeli relations. Alon has also worked out of the US Consulate in Jerusalem, which serves as the US diplomatic mission to the Palestinians. Today, Alon is a lawyer based in California where he was born and raised.


























[book] East West Street:
On the Origins of "Genocide"
and "Crimes Against Humanity"
by Philippe Sands
2016
Knopf
Some say the Best Books of 2016
A profound and profoundly important book—a moving personal detective story, an uncovering of secret pasts, and a book that explores the creation and development of world-changing legal concepts that came about as a result of the unprecedented atrocities of Hitler’s Third Reich.
East West Street looks at the personal and intellectual evolution of the two men who simultaneously originated the ideas of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity,” both of whom, not knowing the other, studied at the same university with the same professors, in a city little known today that was a major cultural center of Europe, “the little Paris of Ukraine,” a city variously called Lemberg, Lwów, Lvov, or Lviv.
The book opens with the author being invited to give a lecture on genocide and crimes against humanity at Lviv University. Sands accepted the invitation with the intent of learning about the extraordinary city with its rich cultural and intellectual life, home to his maternal grandfather, a Galician Jew who had been born there a century before and who’d moved to Vienna at the outbreak of the First World War, married, had a child (the author’s mother), and who then had moved to Paris after the German annexation of Austria in 1938. It was a life that had been shrouded in secrecy, with many questions not to be asked and fewer answers offered if they were.
As the author uncovered, clue by clue, the deliberately obscured story of his grandfather’s mysterious life, and of his mother’s journey as a child surviving Nazi occupation, Sands searched further into the history of the city of Lemberg and realized that his own field of humanitarian law had been forged by two men—Rafael Lemkin and Hersch Lauterpacht—each of whom had studied law at Lviv University in the city of his grandfather’s birth, each considered to be the father of the modern human rights movement, and each, at parallel times, forging diametrically opposite, revolutionary concepts of humanitarian law that had changed the world.
In this extraordinary and resonant book, Sands looks at who these two very private men were, and at how and why, coming from similar Jewish backgrounds and the same city, studying at the same university, each developed the theory he did, showing how each man dedicated this period of his life to having his legal concept—“genocide” and “crimes against humanity”—as a centerpiece for the prosecution of Nazi war criminals.
And the author writes of a third man, Hans Frank, Hitler’s personal lawyer, a Nazi from the earliest days who had destroyed so many lives, friend of Richard Strauss, collector of paintings by Leonardo da Vinci. Frank oversaw the ghetto in Lemberg in Poland in August 1942, in which the entire large Jewish population of the area had been confined on penalty of death. Frank, who was instrumental in the construction of concentration camps nearby and, weeks after becoming governor general of Nazi-occupied Poland, ordered the transfer of 133,000 men, women, and children to the death camps.
Sands brilliantly writes of how all three men came together, in October 1945 in Nuremberg—Rafael Lemkin; Hersch Lauterpacht; and in the dock at the Palace of Justice, with the twenty other defendants of the Nazi high command, prisoner number 7, Hans Frank, who had overseen the extermination of more than a million Jews of Galicia and Lemberg, among them, the families of the author’s grandfather as well as those of Lemkin and Lauterpacht.
A book that changes the way we look at the world, at our understanding of history and how civilization has tried to cope with mass murder. Powerful; moving; tender; a revelation.


























[book] Sababa
A novel
by Yamin Levy
November 2016
Berwick Court
Hamas militants have abducted Lior Samet, the grandson of Israeli national war hero Brigadier General Avigdor Cohen, but the Israeli government does not negotiate with terrorists. Cohen's inner world is turned upside down as he does what he must to bring Lior home.

Less than forty miles away, but more than two millennia earlier, Alexander the Great descends upon Jerusalem, ready to attack, but after a highly charged confrontation with Simon the High Priest, he spares the town. As the controversial story unfolds, the Maccabees, priestly militant warriors, are raised to fight off the Greek imperialists.

Yamin Levy's ambitious debut novel explores the inner-world of warriors, reluctant soldiers, zealots, and freedom fighters. The parallel storylines describe both the early origins and modern versions of Israeli nationalism and military zeal and how the Kohen clan has left its mark on the spiritual landscape of the Jewish psyche and on the battlefield. Levy gives voice to a range of perspectives associated with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and with Israeli society's evolving attitudes regarding their physical, spiritual and existential survival.




















Now in Paperback:
[book] As Close to Us as Breathing
A Novel
by Elizabeth Poliner
November 2016
Back Bay Books
Reviewers of this wonderful, moving novel will surely compare it to the works of Allegra Goodman, whose Kaaterskill Falls, in particular, introduced many readers to the world of ultra-observant Jewish families, their traditions and their guarded relationship with the secular, non- Jewish society. And this book does follow some of the same themes. But as I read it (in two obsessive sessions--remember binge-reading?), the book it more readily brought to mind was To Kill a Mockingbird. Like the late Harper Lee’s masterpiece, As Close To Us as Breathing, revolves around the events of one summer, is told from the point of view of a pre-adolescent girl, and shows how a single terrible event forever changes her, her family and her community. “The summer of 1948 my brother Davy was killed in an accident,” 12 year old Molly says on page 1-- and so I was hooked. Yes, of course, I wanted to know the how’s and when’s and where’s of what happened to this little boy, whom we come to know as a beloved annoyance to his siblings--they actually call him “squirt” sometimes. But what held my attention as much as the wondering about Davy was the unfurling of the back story of this matriarchal family. Set on a strip of Connecticut beach that welcomed Jews at a time when most did not--it was affectionately known as Bagel Beach--Davy’s mother and her two adult sisters share a cottage with their children for the summer. (The men, involved in a family business in New Haven, only come on weekends.) And what wonderful, proud, competitive, loving and demanding women these sisters are! One of them is married to another’s old boyfriend, one is having a love affair with a non Jewish person, all are trying to preserve their traditions and still live their lives. Occasionally, readers may be confused about exactly what is happening when--Molly is narrating as a modern adult, the story goes back and forth over several decades-- but that’s a minor quibble in a novel this layered and deep. As Close to Us as Breathing is full of characters who are at once typical and original and whose story of faith, guilt and family is timeless. -


















[book] TOWARD A HOT JEW
A collection of stories
by Miriam Libicki
November 2016
Fantagraphics
In her first collection of graphic essays, Miriam Libicki investigates what it means globally and culturally to be Jewish, dating from her time in the Israeli military to her tenure as an art professor. Toward a Hot Jew is a new high watermark in autobiographical comics and shows Miriam Libicki as a powerful witness to history in the tradition of Martjane Satrapi and Joe Sacco.

The collection consists of first-person essays in comic form, created between 2005 and 2016. The essays, drawn in graphite, inkwashes, and lush watercolour, use the self as a launching pad to explore larger, mostly Jewish issues. The topics range from the stereotypes American Jews hold about Israeli soldiers, the effects on ordinary Israelis of the Second Lebanon war, Sudanese asylum seekers in Tel Aviv, and the symbolic and historical intersections of Jewishness and black identity. The work uses autobiography, journalism, sociology, and cultural and media theory, balancing research with dry humor to explore how identity is both internally and externally determined, shifting intentionally or unintentionally depending on the context.
















[book] These Are the Names
A Literary Thriller
by Tommy Wieringa
November 2016
Melville House
A moody, atmospheric literary thriller and “a timeless tale of migration” (The Guardian), from one of Europe’s biggest-selling authors.

Despite its Biblical title—which comes from the opening lines of the Book of Exodus—award-winning novelist Tommy Wieringa has crafted perhaps his most timely book yet, as he traces two stories doomed to collide.
In one, we follow a group of starving, near-feral Eurasian refugees on a harrowing quest for survival; in the other, we follow Pontus Beg, a policeman from a small border town on the steppe, as he investigates the death of a rabbi, one of the town’s two remaining Jews.
What follows is a gripping saga in which the two stories race toward each other, and Beg will be shaken to his core by what each one reveals about man’s dark nature, and the possibility—or impossibility—of his own redemption. A virtual parable for our times, These Are the Names offers a suspenseful reading of a crisis that continues to dominate headlines, and simultaneously explores the enduring questions of faith, identity, and what it means to be “home.”

















[book] The House of the Mother:
The Social Roles of Maternal
Kin in Biblical Hebrew
Narrative and Poetry
(The Anchor Yale
Bible Reference Library
by Professor Cynthia R. Chapman
(Oberlin College)
November 2016
Anchor Yale
novel approach to Israelite kinship, arguing that maternal kinship bonds played key social, economic, and political roles for a son who aspired to inherit his father’s household

Upending traditional scholarship on patrilineal genealogy, Cynthia Chapman draws on twenty years of research to uncover an underappreciated yet socially significant kinship unit in the Bible: “the house of the mother.” In households where a man had two or more wives, siblings born to the same mother worked to promote and protect one another’s interests. Revealing the hierarchies of the maternal houses and political divisions within the national house of Israel, this book provides us with a nuanced understanding of domestic and political life in ancient Israel.






















WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
[book] Holocaust, Genocide,
and the Law: A Quest
for Justice in a
Post-Holocaust World
by Michael Bazyler
November 2016
Oxford University Press
A great deal of contemporary law has a direct connection to the Holocaust. That connection, however, is seldom acknowledged in legal texts and has never been the subject of a full-length scholarly work. This book examines the background of the Holocaust and genocide through the prism of the law; the criminal and civil prosecution of the Nazis and their collaborators for Holocaust-era crimes; and contemporary attempts to criminally prosecute perpetrators for the crime of genocide. It provides the history of the Holocaust as a legal event, and sets out how genocide has become known as the "crime of crimes" under both international law and in popular discourse. It goes on to discuss specific post-Holocaust legal topics, and examines the Holocaust as a catalyst for post-Holocaust international justice. Together, this collection of subjects establishes a new legal discipline, which the author Michael Bazyler labels "Post-Holocaust Law."




















WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
[book] Never Better!:
The Modern Jewish Picaresque
by Miriam Udel
(Emory University)
2016
University of Michigan Press
Never Better! concerns the polit ("fugitive"), a literary type-an "unheroic hero"-who is rather like the picaro ("rogue") from whom the Picaresque genre takes its name. Focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on Yiddish literature, Udel puts that literature into productive conversation with European and American texts, as well as critical and theoretical sources. If the bildungsroman is the novel form that is most clearly associated with nineteenth-century European novels, the polit is the figure more appropriate for the post-Jewish Enlightenment era, and especially its critique of the nineteenth century. More than a study of a particular genre or literary type, Udel's work considers what may happen when a minority author or a "minor literature" (in the Deleuze-Guattari sense, where a minority writer positions himself/herself as "a sort of stranger within his own [major] language") adopts what Udel refers to as the picaresque sensibility. She examines how embedded such writers may be within the broader national, literary, and linguistic contexts in which they find themselves, and also how they interrupt, counter, and sometimes undermine those contexts.




















FINALIST OF THE 2016 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD
[book] Modern Orthodox Judaism:
A Documentary History
by Zev Eleff
Foreword by Dr. Jacob J Schacter Ph.D
2016
JPS – Jewish Publication Society
Modern Orthodox Judaism offers an extensive selection of primary texts documenting the Orthodox encounter with American Judaism that led to the emergence of the Modern Orthodox movement. Many texts in this volume are drawn from episodes of conflict that helped form Modern Orthodox Judaism. These include the traditionalists’ response to the early expressions of Reform Judaism, as well as incidents that helped define the widening differences between Orthodox and Conservative Judaism in the early twentieth century. Other texts explore the internal struggles to maintain order and balance once Orthodox Judaism had separated itself from other religious movements.

Zev Eleff combines published documents with seldom-seen archival sources in tracing Modern Orthodoxy as it developed into a structured movement, established its own institutions, and encountered critical events and issues—some that helped shape the movement and others that caused tension within it. A general introduction explains the rise of the movement and puts the texts in historical context. Brief introductions to each section guide readers through the documents of this new, dynamic Jewish expression.


















DECEMBER 2016 BOOKS




[book] Vulture in a Cage:
Poems by Solomon Ibn Gabirol
by Solomon Ibn Gabirol
Translated by Rabbi Raymond P. Scheindlin, PhD
December 2016
Archipelago 
Vulture in a cage," Solomon Ibn Gabirol's own self-description, is an apt image for a poet who was obsessed with the impediments posed by the body and the material world to the realization of his spiritual ambition of elevating his soul to the empyrean. Ibn Gabirol's poetry is enormously influential, laying the groundwork for generations of Hebrew poets who follow him--rocky and harsh, full of original imagery and barbed wit, and yet no one surpassed him for the limpid beauty of his devotional verse. His poetry is at once a record of the inner life of a tormented poet and a monument to the Judeo-Arabic culture that produced him. This book contains the most extensive collection of Ibn Gabirol's poetry ever published in English.

Solomon ben Judah Ibn Gabirol (sometimes Latinized as Avicebron) was a Andalusian-Hebrew theologian, philosopher, and poet from the 11th century, who left behind a body of work that contains singularly profound meditations on the nature of the sacred, and the relationship between the subject and divinity. These poetic writings on himself are far from solipsistic, rather, through the lens of selfhood, Solomon Ibn Gabirol works to understand the realms of the transcendental and the mystical as experiences that are inseparable from the personal reality of the individual. What links all of his work is an expressionistic descriptiveness and for this, the poetry of Solomon ibn Gabirol has been acclaimed for almost a millennium; his ability to portray the grand majesty of the cosmos through the complexity of the individual, is truly timeless.




















[book] More Than Managing:
The Relentless Pursuit of Effective Jewish Leadership
Edited by Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, PhD.
Fall 2016
Jewish Lights
Jewish organizational life is inundated with publications on organizational change and effective leadership, but from mutually exclusive sources: business and organizational studies, on the one hand; and Jewish studies, on the other. One addresses leadership but not the religious soul. The other speaks from its Jewish soul but is only secondarily engaged in the study of leadership. More Than Managing thoughtfully combines both to be immediately applicable to Jewish organizational life.Inspired by thirty years of pioneering work by retail giant Leslie Wexner’s philanthropic focus on Jewish leadership, More Than Managing brings together diverse and remarkable thinkers to address challenges facing communal life and the skills and strategies demanded by them. Contributors include professors at Harvard University’s Center for Public Leadership and The Harvard Business School who have worked over the past three decades with Israel’s rising leadership in the public sector. These internationally known voices are matched by alumni and faculty of The Wexner Foundation’s professional and volunteer programs, who lead and advise Jewish communities throughout North America and Israel. The book features diverse strategies for twenty-first-century leadership, critical lessons for organizational and communal success, and the questions vital to our changing and challenging times. Questions include how leaders may overcome the mediocrity of bureaucratic organizations; how organizations can harness volunteer leadership for transformative change; and how professionals can sustain core values in the midst of daily routine. Its diverse array of writers with international reputations in their fields makes it the only book of its kind. Potential readers include leaders of any religious not-for-profits—not just Jewish. The almost 50 contributors, including Leslie Wexner, combine secular insights on leadership with innovative insights drawn from Judaism’s spiritual heritage.






















[book] Einstein and Twentieth-Century Politics:
'A Salutary Moral Influence'
by Richard Crockatt
December 2016
Oxford University Press
Albert Einstein, world-renowned as a physicist, was also publicly committed to radical political views. Despite the vast literature on Einstein, Einstein and Twentieth Century Politics is the first comprehensive study of his politics, covering his opinions and campaigns on pacifism, Zionism, control of nuclear weapons, world government, freedom, and racial equality. Most studies look at Einstein in isolation but here he is viewed alongside a 'liberal international' of global intellectuals, including Gandhi, Albert Schweitzer, Bertrand Russell, H.G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw, Romain Rolland, Thomas Mann, and John Dewey. Frequently called upon to join campaigns on great issues of war, peace, and social values, they all knew or corresponded with Einstein. This volume examines how Einstein and comparable intellectuals sought to exert a 'salutary influence', as Einstein put it in a letter to Freud. Close attention is given to the unique qualities Einstein brought to his interventions in political debate. His influence derived in the first instance from his celebrity status as the scientist of genius whose theory of relativity was both incomprehensible to most and seemingly relevant to many aspects of aspects of culture and the cosmos. Einstein's complex and enigmatic personality, which combined intense devotion to privacy and a capacity to perform on the public stage, also contributed to the Einstein myth. Studying Einstein's politics, it is argued here, takes us not only into the mind of Einstein but to the heart of the great public issues of the twentieth century.






















[book] EINSTEIN'S GREATEST MISTAKE
(a biography)
By DAVID BODANIS
Fall 2016
HMH
From the best-selling author of E=mc2, a brisk, accessible biography of Albert Einstein that reveals the genius and hubris of the titan of modern physics
Widely considered the greatest genius of all time, Albert Einstein revolutionized our understanding of the cosmos with his general theory of relativity and helped lead us into the atomic age. Yet in the final decades of his life, he was ignored by most working scientists, and his ideas were opposed by even his closest friends.
How did this happen? Einstein's imagination and self-confidence served him well when he was young. But when it came to the new field of quantum mechanics, the same traits undermined him. Bestselling biographer David Bodanis traces Einstein from the skeptical, erratic student to the world's most brilliant physicist—and then to the desolate, fallen-from-grace celebrity.
An intimate biography touching on the romances and rivalries of the celebrated physicist, as much as on his scientific goals, Einstein's Greatest Mistake reveals what we owe Einstein today—and how much more he might have achieved if not for his all-too-human flaws.



























[book] The Undoing Project:
A Friendship That
Changed Our Minds
by Michael Lewis
December 2016
Oxford University Press
How a Nobel Prize–winning theory of the mind altered our perception of reality.
Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis’s own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms.
The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield?both had important careers in the Israeli military?and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn’t remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter.
This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind’s view of its own mind.






















[book] The Holocaust, Israel
and the "Jew":
Histories of Antisemitism in
Postwar Dutch Society
Edited by Remco Ensel and Evelien Gans
December 2016
Amsterdam University Press
We tend to think of the Dutch as a tolerant people, open to cultural and religious diversity. Yet in 1934 the Dutch government was forced to pass laws explicitly designed to protect Jews against attacks, just one manifestation of the antisemitism that emerged before and during World War II. Both the Shoah and Israel have become crucial points of attachment for postwar antisemitism in the Netherlands. This collection brings together a group of historians to show how that historical prejudice continued to resonate through the postwar years, from anti-Jewish chants among native Dutch at football matches to a variety of antisemitic manifestations among Dutch Moroccans and Turks that reveal the transference of traditional and new anti-Jewish stereotypes among migrant communities






















[book] Innovating:
A Doer's Manifesto for Starting
from a Hunch, Prototyping Problems,
Scaling Up, and Learning to Be
Productively Wrong
by Luis Perez-Breva
Illustrated by Nick Fuhrer
Foreword by Edward Roberts
December 2016
MIT Press
Innovation is the subject of countless books and courses, but there's very little out there about how you actually innovate. Innovation and entrepreneurship are not one and the same, although aspiring innovators often think of them that way. They are told to get an idea and a team and to build a show-and-tell for potential investors. In Innovating, Luis Perez-Breva describes another approach -- a doer's approach developed over a decade at MIT and internationally in workshops, classes, and companies. He shows that to start innovating it doesn't require an earth-shattering idea; all it takes is a hunch. Anyone can do it. By prototyping a problem and learning by being wrong, innovating can be scaled up to make an impact. Perez-Breva shows at the outset of what we later celebrate as "innovations" nothing is new.
In Innovating, the process -- illustrated by unique and dynamic artwork -- is shown to be empirical, experimental, nonlinear, and incremental. You give your hunch the structure of a problem. Anything can be a part. Your innovating accrues other people's knowledge and skills. Perez-Breva describes how to create a kit for innovating, and outlines questions that will help you think in new ways. Finally, he shows how to systematize what you've learned: to advocate, communicate, scale up, manage innovating continuously, and document -- "you need a notebook to converse with yourself," he advises. Everyone interested in innovating also needs to read this book.






















[book] Krazy:
George Herriman,
a Life in Black
and White
by Michael Tisserand
December 2016
Harper
In the tradition of Schulz and Peanuts, an epic and revelatory biography of Krazy Kat creator George Herriman that explores the turbulent time and place from which he emerged—and the deep secret he explored through his art.

The creator of the greatest comic strip in history finally gets his due—in an eye-opening biography that lays bare the truth about his art, his heritage, and his life on America’s color line. A native of nineteenth-century New Orleans, George Herriman came of age as an illustrator, journalist, and cartoonist in the boomtown of Los Angeles and the wild metropolis of New York. Appearing in the biggest newspapers of the early twentieth century—including those owned by William Randolph Hearst—Herriman’s Krazy Kat cartoons quickly propelled him to fame. Although fitfully popular with readers of the period, his work has been widely credited with elevating cartoons from daily amusements to anarchic art.

Herriman used his work to explore the human condition, creating a modernist fantasia that was inspired by the landscapes he discovered in his travels—from chaotic urban life to the Beckett-like desert vistas of the Southwest. Yet underlying his own life—and often emerging from the contours of his very public art—was a very private secret: known as "the Greek" for his swarthy complexion and curly hair, Herriman was actually African American, born to a prominent Creole family that hid its racial identity in the dangerous days of Reconstruction.

Drawing on exhaustive original research into Herriman’s family history, interviews with surviving friends and family, and deep analysis of the artist’s work and surviving written records, Michael Tisserand brings this little-understood figure to vivid life, paying homage to a visionary artist who helped shape modern culture.



















[book] Overcrowded:
Designing Meaningful Products in a World Awash with Ideas
(Design Thinking, Design Theory)
by Roberto Verganti
December 2016
MIT Press
The standard text on innovation advises would-be innovators to conduct creative brainstorming sessions and seek input from outsiders -- users or communities. This kind of innovating can be effective at improving products but not at capturing bigger opportunities in the marketplace. In this book Roberto Verganti offers a new approach -- one that does not set out to solve existing problems but to find breakthrough meaningful experiences. There is no brainstorming -- which produces too many ideas, unfiltered -- but a vision, subject to criticism. It does not come from outsiders but from one person's unique interpretation.
The alternate path to innovation mapped by Verganti aims to discover not how things work but why we need things. It gives customers something more meaningful -- something they can love. Verganti describes the work of companies, including Nest Labs, Apple, Yankee Candle, and Philips Healthcare, that have created successful businesses by doing just this. Nest Labs, for example, didn't create a more advanced programmable thermostat, because people don't love to program their home appliances. Nest's thermostat learns the habits of the household and bases its temperature settings accordingly. Verganti discusses principles and practices, methods and implementation. The process begins with a vision and proceeds through developmental criticism, first from a sparring partner and then from a circle of radical thinkers, then from external experts and interpreters, and only then from users.
Innovation driven by meaning is the way to create value in our current world, where ideas are abundant but novel visions are rare. If something is meaningful for both the people who create it and the people who consume it, business value follows.























[book] LE CALENDRIER
DES AGRICULTEURS 2017
(French Edition)
Hardcover-spiral
December 2016
Shot by Fred Goudon


Maybe an Israeli photographer will publish the men and women of kibbutzim, etc.






























[book] The Book of Joy:
Lasting Happiness in a
Changing World
by His Holiness The Dalai Lama
and Archbishop Rev. Desmond Tutu
and Douglas Abrams
2016
When not writing about multiple orgasms, Abrams edits book on spirituality including this new one by two religious leaders

Two spiritual giants. Five days. One timeless question. Nobel Peace Prize Laureates His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have survived more than fifty years of exile and the soul-crushing violence of oppression. Despite their hardships—or, as they would say, because of them—they are two of the most joyful people on the planet.
In April 2015, Archbishop Tutu traveled to the Dalai Lama's home in Dharamsala, India, to celebrate His Holiness's eightieth birthday and to create what they hoped would be a gift for others. They looked back on their long lives to answer a single burning question: How do we find joy in the face of life's inevitable suffering?
They traded intimate stories, teased each other continually, and shared their spiritual practices. By the end of a week filled with laughter and punctuated with tears, these two global heroes had stared into the abyss and despair of our time and revealed how to live a life brimming with joy.
This book offers us a rare opportunity to experience their astonishing and unprecendented week together, from the first embrace to the final good-bye.
We get to listen as they explore the Nature of True Joy and confront each of the Obstacles of Joy—from fear, stress, and anger to grief, illness, and death. They then offer us the Eight Pillars of Joy, which provide the foundation for lasting happiness. Throughout, they include stories, wisdom, and science. Finally, they share their daily Joy Practices that anchor their own emotional and spiritual lives.
The Archbishop has never claimed sainthood, and the Dalai Lama considers himself a simple monk. In this unique collaboration, they offer us the reflection of real lives filled with pain and turmoil in the midst of which they have been able to discover a level of peace, of courage, and of joy to which we can all aspire in our own lives.






























[book] How Propaganda Works
in Paperback
by Jason Stanley
December 2016
Princeton University Press
Our democracy today is fraught with political campaigns, lobbyists, liberal media, and Fox News commentators, all using language to influence the way we think and reason about public issues. Even so, many of us believe that propaganda and manipulation aren't problems for us--not in the way they were for the totalitarian societies of the mid-twentieth century. In How Propaganda Works, Jason Stanley demonstrates that more attention needs to be paid. He examines how propaganda operates subtly, how it undermines democracy--particularly the ideals of democratic deliberation and equality--and how it has damaged democracies of the past.
Focusing on the shortcomings of liberal democratic states, Stanley provides a historically grounded introduction to democratic political theory as a window into the misuse of democratic vocabulary for propaganda's selfish purposes. He lays out historical examples, such as the restructuring of the US public school system at the turn of the twentieth century, to explore how the language of democracy is sometimes used to mask an undemocratic reality. Drawing from a range of sources, including feminist theory, critical race theory, epistemology, formal semantics, educational theory, and social and cognitive psychology, he explains how the manipulative and hypocritical declaration of flawed beliefs and ideologies arises from and perpetuates inequalities in society, such as the racial injustices that commonly occur in the United States.
How Propaganda Works shows that an understanding of propaganda and its mechanisms is essential for the preservation and protection of liberal democracies everywhere.




















[book] The Rabbi’s Athiest Daughter
Ernestine Rose,
International Feminist Pioneer
By Bonnie S. Anderson
Brooklyn College and CUNY Graduate Center
January 2017
Oxford University Press
Known as "the queen of the platform," Ernestine Rose was more famous than her women's rights co-workers, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. By the 1850s, Rose had become an outstanding orator for feminism, free thought, and anti-slavery. Yet, she would gradually be erased from history for being too much of an outlier: an immigrant, a radical, and an atheist.

In The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter, Bonnie S. Anderson recovers the unique life and career of Ernestine Rose. The only child of a Polish rabbi, Ernestine Rose rejected religion at an early age, successfully sued for the return of her dowry after rejecting an arranged betrothal, and left her family, Judaism, and Poland forever. In London, she became a follower of socialist Robert Owen and met her future husband, William Rose. Together they emigrated to New York in 1836. In the United States, Ernestine Rose rapidly became a leader in movements against slavery, religion, and women's oppression and a regular on the lecture circuit, speaking in twenty-three of the thirty-one states. She challenged the radical Christianity that inspired many nineteenth-century women reformers and yet, even as she rejected Judaism, she was both a victim and critic of antisemitism, as well as nativism. In 1869, after the Civil War, she and her husband returned to England, where she continued her work for radical causes. By the time women achieved the vote, for which she tirelessly advocated throughout her long career, her pioneering contributions to women's rights had been forgotten.
























[book] NONE FOLDS MAKE A PAPER SWAN
A NOVEL
BY RUTH GILLIGAN
January 2017
paperback edition
Tin House Books
Few people talk about the Jews of Ireland and how many got off in an Irish port before making it to Ellis Island.. And so I was drawn to this novel
Three intertwining voices span the twentieth century to tell the unknown story of the Jews in Ireland. A heartbreaking portrait of what it means to belong, and how storytelling can redeem us all.
At the start of the twentieth century, a young girl and her family emigrate from Lithuania in search of a better life in America, only to land on the Emerald Isle instead. In 1958, a mute Jewish boy locked away in a mental institution outside of Dublin forms an unlikely friendship with a man consumed by the story of the love he lost nearly two decades earlier. And in present-day London, an Irish journalist is forced to confront her conflicting notions of identity and family when her Jewish boyfriend asks her to make a true leap of faith. These three arcs, which span generations and intertwine in revelatory ways, come together to tell the haunting story of Ireland’s all-but-forgotten Jewish community. Ruth Gilligan’s beautiful and heartbreaking Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan explores the question of just how far we will go to understand who we really are, and to feel at home in the world.
























[book] The Genius of Judaism
By Bernard-Henri Levy
January 2017
Translated from French
Random House
From world-renowned public intellectual Bernard-Henri Lévy comes an incisive and provocative look at the heart of Judaism.

For more than four decades, Bernard-Henri Lévy has been a singular figure on the world stage—one of the great moral voices of our time. Now Europe's foremost philosopher and activist confronts his spiritual roots and the religion that has always inspired and shaped him—but that he has never fully reckoned with.

The Genius of Judaism is a breathtaking new vision and understanding of what it means to be a Jew, a vision quite different from the one we’re used to. It is rooted in the Talmudic traditions of argument and conflict, rather than biblical commandments, borne out in struggle and study, not in blind observance. At the very heart of the matter is an obligation to the other, to the dispossessed, and to the forgotten, an obligation that, as Lévy vividly recounts, he has sought to embody over decades of championing “lost causes,” from Bosnia to Africa’s forgotten wars, from Libya to the Kurdish Peshmerga’s desperate fight against the Islamic State, a battle raging as we speak. Lévy offers a fresh, surprising critique of a new and stealthy form of anti-Semitism on the rise as well as a provocative defense of Israel from the left. He reveals the overlooked Jewish roots of Western democratic ideals and confronts the current Islamist threat while intellectually dismantling it. Jews are not a “chosen people,” Lévy explains, but a “treasure” whose spirit must continue to inform moral thinking and courage today.

Lévy’s most passionate book, and in many ways his most personal, The Genius of Judaism is a great, profound, and hypnotic intellectual reckoning—indeed a call to arms—by one of the keenest and most insightful writers in the world.
























[book] Carry Me
A Novel
by Peter Behrens
January 2017
Anchor
During Billy Lange’s childhood on the Isle of Wight, he is entranced by Karin, the wild and elusive daughter of a German-Jewish baron who employs Billy’s parents. Years later, after the upheavals of World War I, the two children are reunited on the baron’s Frankfurt estate. Billy and Karin first bond over the popular Wild West stories of Karl May, and later over their passion for jazz and Berlin nightclubs. But they also come to share a fantasy of escape from the 1930s Germany that is rapidly darkening around them—escape to the high plains of Texas and New Mexico they’d read about as children. Against the backdrop of Hitler’s rise to power, their friendship deepens into a love affair with extraordinarily high stakes. Brilliantly conceived and elegantly written, Peter Behrens’s Carry Me is both an epic love story and a lucid meditation on Europe’s violent twentieth century.
























[book] If You're in a Dogfight,
Become a Cat!:
Strategies for Long-Term Growth
(Columbia Business School Publishing)
by Leonard Sherman
January 2017
Columbia University Press
When Yellow Tail wines launched in 2001, they battled 6,500 other wineries for a share of the American market. By 2007, Yellow Tail sales in the United States exceeded the sales of all French wineries combined. How did this new business enter such a crowded market and succeed?
If You're in a Dogfight, Become a Cat! explains how businesses such as Yellow Tail survive and thrive in industries embroiled in "dogfights"-intense competition among established companies for a small piece of the market. Leonard Sherman, a longtime business consultant and faculty member at Columbia Business School, has developed a three-part strategy based on years of consulting for such companies as Audi, Toyota, and United Technologies. His advice: compete on different terms to attract new customers. FedEx, Apple, Southwest Airlines, and Starbucks have thrived as cats by differentiating their businesses, aligning their goals and practices, and continuously innovating their products. Rather than compete head-on with other PC manufacturers, Apple introduced a new category of tablet devices to unlock latent demand for mobile computing. Yellow Tail turned beer- and liquor-lovers on to casual, inexpensive, drinkable wines through youthful packaging. In this book, managers of companies big and small encounter dozens of model strategies for product design and forward-thinking organization that have resulted in real long-term, profitable growth.




















[book] 4321
4 3 2 1
A Novel
By Paul Auster
January 2017
Henry Holt

The first page introduces us to a character named FERGUSON.. Could it be that old Jewish joke about the Jewish immigrant at Ellis Island who says Ich schon vergessen… and they think he says his name is Sean Ferguson? YES!

Paul Auster’s greatest, most heartbreaking and satisfying novel. A sweeping and surprising story of birthright and possibility, of love and of life itself: a masterpiece.
Nearly two weeks early, on March 3, 1947 (one month after the author Paul Auster), in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths.

Four identical Fergusons made of the same DNA, four boys who are the same boy, go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. (Many people fantasize, what if? Auster has many times contemnplated chance and fate. It may be rooted in the time he was 14 at summer camp and saw a fellow camper struck and killed by lightning)

Family fortunes diverge. Athletic skills and sex lives and friendships and intellectual passions contrast. Each Ferguson falls under the spell of the magnificent Amy Schneiderman, yet each Amy and each Ferguson have a relationship like no other. Meanwhile, readers will take in each Ferguson’s pleasures and ache from each Ferguson’s pains, as the mortal plot of each Ferguson’s life rushes on.
As inventive and dexterously constructed as anything Paul Auster has ever written, yet with a passion for realism and a great tenderness and fierce attachment to history and to life itself that readers have never seen from Auster before. 4 3 2 1 is a marvelous and unforgettably affecting tour de force.




















[book] THE COOKING GENE
A Journey Through African-American
Culinary History in the Old South
by Michael W. Twitty
2017
Amistad
A renowned culinary historian of Jewish and African American cuisine offers a fresh perspective on our most divisive cultural issue, race, in this illuminating memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food, from Africa to America and slavery to freedom.

Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine.
From the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields, Twitty tells his family story through the foods that enabled his ancestors’ survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and travels from Civil War battlefields in Virginia to synagogues in Alabama to Black-owned organic farms in Georgia.
As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the Southern past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep—the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.



























[book] God's Generals:
The Military Lives of Moses, the Buddha,
and Muhammad Hardcover – January 3, 2017 by Richard A. Gabriel
January 2017
Skyhorse
Examines how the military experience of three religious founders shaped their spiritual legacy.
It is one of the more startling facts of military history that the founders of three of the four “great religions”—Judaism, Buddhism, and Islam—were also accomplished field generals with extensive experience in commanding men in battle. One of these, Muhammad, fought eight battles and was wounded twice, once almost fatally. Another, Siddhartha Gautama (later to become the Buddha), witnessed so much battlefield carnage that he suffered a psychological collapse. Moses had become so much a “god-intoxicated” personality that it is a reasonable suspicion that he, like the Buddha, was murdered.
Indeed, had the experiences of these men in war not been so successful, it is quite possible that their achievements as religious leaders would never have occurred. For all three, war and religion were so closely intertwined in their personalities that it is difficult to discern where the influence of one ended and the other began.
This book attempts to explore the military lives of Moses, the Buddha, and Muhammad, and the role their war experiences played in their religious lives.
Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.




















[book] The Big Stick:
The Limits of Soft Power
and the Necessity of Military Force
by Eliot A. Cohen
Johns Hopkins SAIS
January 2017
Basic Books
In The Big Stick, Eliot A. Cohen argues that the United States must use military power in support of its foreign policy, but that doing so will be increasingly difficult. The United States must continue to assume primary responsibility for maintaining world order, or risk a chaotic international environment reminiscent of the 1920’s and 1930’s -- but this time with far more devastating weapons.in dangerous hands. America faces major national security challenges: a rising China, enduring jihadi movements, states like Russia and Iran that attempt to upend regions they seek then to dominate, and precarious ungoverned regions from anarchic lands such as Libya to the intangible arena of cyberspace. To confront these problems, our government must revive old concepts such as mobilization and in some cases, preemption and, more importantly, engage in original thinking about how, and under what conditions, the United States should use force – as it will undoubtedly find itself compelled to do.
Combining the scholarship of a prize-winning historian, the experience of a former senior diplomat, and the fluency of a gifted essayist, Cohen shows how America must rethink and reorder its armed strength to meet the needs of a world in flux.



















[book] The Arc of a Covenant:
The United States, Israel,
and the Fate of the Jewish People
by Walter Russell Mead
(Bard College)
2017
Knopf
From the acclaimed author of God and Gold and Special Providence, a groundbreaking new work that overturns the conventional understanding of the Israeli-American relationship and explores the fate of the Jewish people.

In this investigation, a scholar of American foreign policy contends that both pro-Zionists and anti-Zionists have unintentionally collaborated in a myth of monolithic American-Jewish support for Israel that exaggerates Jewish unity concerning Israel, overstates the influence of Jewish lobbyists, and underestimates the potential for change in the Israeli-American relationship.

Mead writes about non-Jews such as J.P. Morgan and John D. Rockefeller who lobbied for a Jewish homeland well before the foundation of the modernist Zionist movement. He makes clear how, in contrast, many Jewish Americans feel at odds with Israel's right-wing nationalists; and how developments under both Presidents George W. Bush and Obama have driven the most heated American debate over Israel since the 1940s. Throughout, Mead's singular intelligence and lively prose penetrate layers of opaque history and politics, illuminating what the author believes is a better way forward.

The author is the James Clark Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College, Distinguished Scholar in American Strategy and Statesmanship at the Hudson Institute, and the editor-at-large of The American Interest. He served as the Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow in American Foreign Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations and as a Brady-Johnson Fellow in Grand Strategy at Yale University.


















[book] Own It:
The Power of Women at Work
by Sallie Krawcheck
January 2017
Crown Business
Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level….by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths.

So much advice for women talks about how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world is rapidly changing, and these changes are empowering women in unprecedented ways. Because in the increasingly complex, connected, and technology-driven world of tomorrow where communication and collaboration rule the day the skills and qualities needed for success are ones that women inherently possess: in spades.
By owning those qualities – qualities that make women amazing collaborators, extraordinary leaders and invaluable assets in the business world - you have more power and potential than you realize.
Here Krawcheck draws on her experiences at the highest levels of business, both as one of the lone women at the top rungs of the biggest boys club in the world, and as an entrepreneur, to show how women can tap into these skills – and their enormous economic power – to elevate their careers: everything from getting the raise, to new takes on networking and mentoring, to navigating career breaks and curveballs and forging non-traditional career paths, to how to initiate the “courageous conversations” about true flexibility and diversity in the workplace. We can have a more significant role than ever in shaping our companies – and building new companies – into places we want to work.
Lighting the path to complete the revolution ignited by Gloria Steinem, Krawcheck shows how each one of us can leverage our growing power to own our careers and our futures.




















The Mediocrity of the Suit and Tie
[book] The Valley of the Gods:
A Silicon Valley Story
by Alexandra Wolfe
January 2017
Simon & Schuster
Some coddled and on coddled Ivy League grads come to Manhattan and work in banking and consulting. Others venture to the Bay Area to strike it rich another way. In a riveting, hilarious account, Wall Street Journal reporter and East Hampton habitue Alexandra Wolfe exposes a world that is not flat but bubbling — the men and women of Silicon Valley, whose hubris and ambition are changing the world.

Each year, young people from around the world go to Silicon Valley to hatch an idea, start a company, strike it rich, and become powerful and famous. In The Valley of the Gods, Wolfe follows three of these upstarts who have “stopped out” of college and real life to live and work in Silicon Valley in the hopes of becoming the next Mark Zuckerberg or Elon Musk.
She documents the battle for the brightest kids, (unlike the TV series, Silicon Valley) kids whose goals are no less than making billions of dollars—and the fight they wage in turn to make it there. They embody an American cultural transformation: A move away from the East Coast hierarchy of Ivy Leagues and country clubs toward the startup life and a new social order.
Meet the billionaires who go to training clubs for thirty-minute “body slams” designed to fit in with the start-up schedule; attend parties where people devour peanut butter-and-jelly sushi rolls; and date and seduce in a romantic culture in which thick glasses, baggy jeans, and a t-shirt is the costume of any sex symbol (and where a jacket and tie symbolize mediocrity). Through Wolfe’s eyes, we discover how they date and marry, how they dress and live, how they plot and dream, and how they have created a business world and an economic order that has made us all devotees of them.
A blistering, brilliant, and hysterical examination of this new ruling class, The Valley of the Gods presents tomorrow’s strange new normal where the only outward signs of tech success are laptops and ideas.

If you enjoyed her VF profile of Thursday Night Cougar Night at the Rosewood in Menlo Park, you'll enjoy this





























[book] Loving vs. Virginia:
A Documentary Novel of the
Landmark Civil Rights Case
by Patricia Hruby Powell
Illustrated by Shadra Strickland
January 2017
Chronicle books
From acclaimed author Patricia Hruby Powell comes the story of a landmark civil rights case, told in spare and gorgeous verse. In 1955, in Caroline County, Virginia, amidst segregation and prejudice, injustice and cruelty, two teenagers fell in love. Their life together broke the law, but their determination would change it. Richard and Mildred Loving were at the heart of a Supreme Court case that legalized marriage between races, and a story of the devoted couple who faced discrimination, fought it, and won.




























[book] When An Elephant
Falls in Love
By Davide Cali
Illustrated by Alice Lotti
K - 4
Chronicle books
From the bestselling author of I Didn't Do My Homework Because... comes an irresistible meditation on the quest for connection. When an elephant falls in love, he does many foolish things. He hides when the elephant-object of his affection is around. He writes dozens of letters that he will never send. And he tries to be healthy, but ends up finishing the cheesecake. This soulful book is at once relatable and revealing, a reminder that love is worth striving for, and that the very best things in life will come to those who wait.




























[book] Confessions of a Wall Street Insider
A Cautionary Tale of Rats, Feds, and Banksters
by Michael Kimelman
January 2017
Skyhorse
Although he was a suburban husband and father, living a far different life than the “Wolf of Wall Street,” Michael Kimelman had a good run as the cofounder of a hedge fund. He had left a cushy yet suffocating job at a law firm to try his hand at the high-risk life of a proprietary trader — and he did pretty well for himself. But it all came crashing down in the wee hours of November 5, 2009, when the Feds came to his door—almost taking the door off its hinges. While his wife and children were sequestered to a bedroom, Kimelman was marched off in embarrassment in view of his neighbors and TV crews who had been alerted in advance. He was arrested as part of a huge insider trading case, and while he was offered a “sweetheart” no-jail probation plea, he refused, maintaining his innocence.

The lion’s share of Confessions of a Wall Street Insider was written while Kimelman was an inmate at Lewisburg Penitentiary. In nearly two years behind bars, he reflected on his experiences before incarceration—rubbing elbows and throwing back far too many cocktails with financial titans and major figures in sports and entertainment (including Leonardo DiCaprio, Alex Rodriguez, Ben Bernanke, and Alan Greenspan, to drop a few names); making and losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in daily gambles on the Street; getting involved with the wrong people, who eventually turned on him; realizing that none of that mattered in the end. As he writes: “Stripped of family, friends, time, and humanity, if there’s ever a place to give one pause, it’s prison . . . Tomorrow is promised to no one.” In Confessions of a Wall Street Insider, he reveals the triumphs, pains, and struggles, and how, in the end, it just might have made him a better person.

























[book] The Dumpling Galaxy ookbook
By Helen You
And Max Falkowitz
January 2017
Clarkson Potter
Recipes for one of New York City's favorite Asian dumplings purveyors, who originally started in a basement shop in Queens.
From the restaurant where adventurous foodies get the freshest dumplings in New York City, comes the ultimate Chinese cookbook with 60 recipes for classic and unexpected dumplings and dim sum-like side dishes. New York Times critic Pete Wells calls Helen You "a kind of genius for creating miniature worlds of flavor" and, indeed her recipes redefine the dumpling: Lamb and Green Squash with Sichuan pepper; Spicy Shrimp and Celery; Wood Ear Mushroom and Cabbage; and desserts such as Sweet Pumpkin and Black Sesame Tang Yuan. With information on the elements of a great dumpling, stunning photography, and detailed instructions for folding and cooking dumplings, this cookbook is a jumping-off point for creating your own galaxy of flavors.

























[book] A Really Good Day:
How Microdosing Made a Mega
Difference in My Mood,
My Marriage, and My Life
by Ayelet Waldman
January 24, 2017
Knopf
A revealing, courageous, fascinating, and funny account of the author's experiment with microdoses of LSD in an effort to treat a debilitating mood disorder, of her quest to understand a misunderstood drug, and of her search for a really good day.

When a small vial arrives in her mailbox from "Lewis Carroll," Ayelet Waldman is at a low point. Her mood storms have become intolerably severe; she has tried nearly every medication possible; her husband and children are suffering with her. So she opens the vial, places two drops on her tongue, and joins the ranks of an underground but increasingly vocal group of scientists and civilians successfully using therapeutic microdoses of LSD. As Waldman charts her experience over the course of a month--bursts of productivity, sleepless nights, a newfound sense of equanimity--she also explores the history and mythology of LSD, the cutting-edge research into the drug, and the byzantine policies that control it. Drawing on her experience as a federal public defender, and as the mother of teenagers, and her research into the therapeutic value of psychedelics, Waldman has produced a book that is eye-opening, often hilarious, and utterly enthralling.

























[book] Hey Harry, Hey Matilda:
A Novel
by Rachel Hulin
January 2017
Doubleday
Hey Harry, Hey Matilda is the story—told entirely in hilarious emails—of fraternal twins Harry and Matilda Goodman as they fumble into adulthood, telling lies and keeping secrets, and finally confronting their complicated twinship.
Matilda Goodman is an underemployed wedding photographer grappling with her failure to live as an artist and the very bad lie she has told her boyfriend (that she has a dead twin). Harry, her (totally alive) brother, is an untenured professor of literature, anxiously contemplating his publishing status (unpublished) and sleeping with a student. When Matilda invites her boyfriend home for Thanksgiving to meet the family, and when Harry makes a desperate—and unethical—move to save his career, they set off an avalanche of shame, scandal, and drunken hot tub revelations that force them to examine the truth about who they really are. A wonderfully subversive, sensitive novel of romantic entanglement and misguided ambition, Hey Harry, Hey Matilda is a joyful look at love and family in all its forms.

























[book] WHY?
EXPLAINING THE HOLOCAUST
BY PETER HAYES
January 2017
Norton
A bold new exploration that answers the most commonly asked questions about the Holocaust.
Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. Numerous theories have sprouted in an attempt to console ourselves and to point the blame in emotionally satisfying directions?yet none of them are fully convincing. As witnesses to the Holocaust near the ends of their lives, it becomes that much more important to unravel what happened and to educate a new generation about the horrors inflicted by the Nazi regime on Jews and non-Jews alike.
Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic?yet vexing?questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help? While responding to the questions he has been most frequently asked by students over the decades, world-renowned Holocaust historian and professor Peter Hayes brings a wealth of scholarly research and experience to bear on conventional, popular views of the history, challenging some of the most prominent recent interpretations. He argues that there is no single theory that “explains” the Holocaust; the convergence of multiple forces at a particular moment in time led to catastrophe.
In clear prose informed by an encyclopedic knowledge of Holocaust literature in English and German, Hayes weaves together stories and statistics to heart-stopping effect. Why? is an authoritative, groundbreaking exploration of the origins of one of the most tragic events in human history.


























[book] THE PATRIOTS
A Novel
by Sana Krasikov
January 2017
Spiegel & Grau
An astonishing first novel, epic in scope—that takes us from Brooklyn in the 1930s to Soviet Moscow and Siberia, and back to New York in the 1980s and beyond—about the price of loyalty, the lure of betrayal, and the bonds between a mother and a son

A sweeping multigenerational debut novel about idealism, betrayal, and family secrets that takes us from Brooklyn in the 1930s to Soviet Russia to post-Cold War America
When the Great Depression hits, Florence Fein leaves Brooklyn College for what appears to be a plum job in Moscow—and the promise of love and independence. But once in Russia, she quickly becomes entangled in a country she can’t escape. Many years later, Florence’s son, Julian, will make the opposite journey, immigrating back to the United States. His work in the oil industry takes him on frequent visits to Moscow, and when he learns that Florence’s KGB file has been opened, he arranges a business trip to uncover the truth about his mother, and to convince his son, Lenny, who is trying to make his fortune in the new Russia, to return home. What he discovers is both chilling and heartbreaking: an untold story of what happened to a generation of Americans abandoned by their country.
The Patriots is a riveting evocation of the Cold War years, told with brilliant insight and extraordinary skill. Alternating between Florence’s and Julian’s perspectives, it is at once a mother-son story and a tale of two countries bound in a dialectic dance; a love story and a spy story; both a grand, old-fashioned epic and a contemporary novel of ideas. Through the history of one family moving back and forth between continents over three generations, The Patriots is a poignant tale of the power of love, the rewards and risks of friendship, and the secrets parents and children keep from one another.























[book] Storm in a Teacup:
The Physics of Everyday Life
by Helen Czerski
(BBC Focus, Univ College London)
January 2017
Norton
A physicist explains daily phenomena from the mundane to the magisterial. Take a look up at the stars on a clear night and you get a sense that the universe is vast and untouchable, full of mysteries beyond comprehension. But did you know that the key to unveiling the secrets of the cosmos is as close as the nearest toaster?
Our home here on Earth is messy, mutable, and full of humdrum things that we touch and modify without much thought every day. But these familiar surroundings are just the place to look if you’re interested in what makes the universe tick. In Storm in a Teacup, Helen Czerski provides the tools to alter the way we see everything around us by linking ordinary objects and occurrences, like popcorn popping, coffee stains, and fridge magnets, to big ideas like climate change, the energy crisis, or innovative medical testing. She guides us through the principles of gases (“Explosions in the kitchen are generally considered a bad idea. But just occasionally a small one can produce something delicious”); gravity (drop some raisins in a bottle of carbonated lemonade and watch the whoosh of bubbles and the dancing raisins at the bottom bumping into each other); size (Czerski explains the action of the water molecules that cause the crime-scene stain left by a puddle of dried coffee); and time (why it takes so long for ketchup to come out of a bottle).
Along the way, she provides answers to vexing questions: How does water travel from the roots of a redwood tree to its crown? How do ducks keep their feet warm when walking on ice? Why does milk, when added to tea, look like billowing storm clouds? In an engaging voice at once warm and witty, Czerski shares her stunning breadth of knowledge to lift the veil of familiarity from the ordinary. You may never look at your toaster the same way.



















[book] American Hookup:
The New Culture of
Sex on Campus
by Lisa Wade
Occidental College
January 2017
Norton
The hookup is now part of college life. Yet the drunken encounter we always hear about tells only a fraction of the story. Rising above misinformation and moralizing, Lisa Wade offers the definitive account of this new sexual culture and demonstrates that the truth is both more heartening and more harrowing than we thought.
What should Jewish students expect at college. How will hookup culture affect their dorm years, psychology, feelings of self esteem, and later lives.
Should be read be all Jewish educators and social leaders working on campuses

Offering invaluable insights for parents, educators, and students, Wade situates hookup culture within the history of sexuality, the evolution of higher education, and the unfinished feminist revolution. Using new research, she maps out a punishing emotional landscape marked by unequal pleasures, competition for status, and sexual violence. She discovers that the most privileged students tend to like hookup culture the most, and she considers its effects on racial and sexual minorities, students who “opt out,” and those who participate ambivalently.

Accessible and open-minded, compassionate and brutally honest, American Hookup explains where we are and how we got here, asking not “How do we go back?” but “Where do we go from here?”
























[book] A World Erased
A Grandson's Search for His
Family's Holocaust Secrets
by Noah Lederman
February 7, 2017
Rowman & Littlefield
This poignant memoir by Noah Lederman, the grandson of Holocaust survivors, transports readers from his grandparents’ kitchen table in Brooklyn to World War II Poland. In the 1950s, Noah’s grandparents raised their children on Holocaust stories. But because tales of rebellion and death camps gave his father and aunt constant nightmares, in Noah’s adolescence Grandma would only recount the PG version. Noah, however, craved the uncensored truth and always felt one right question away from their pasts. But when Poppy died at the end of the millennium, it seemed the Holocaust stories died with him. In the years that followed, without the love of her life by her side, Grandma could do little more than mourn.

After college, Noah, a travel writer, roamed the world for fifteen months with just one rule: avoid Poland. A few missteps in Europe, however, landed him in his grandparents’ country. When he returned home, he cautiously told Grandma about his time in Warsaw, fearing that the past would bring up memories too painful for her to relive. But, instead, remembering the Holocaust unexpectedly rejuvenated her, ending five years of mourning her husband. Together, they explored the memories—of Auschwitz and a half-dozen other camps, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, and the displaced persons camps—that his grandmother had buried for decades. And the woman he had playfully mocked as a child became his hero.

I was left with the stories—the ones that had been hidden, the ones that offered catharsis, the ones that gave me a second hero, the ones that resurrected a family, the ones that survived even death. Their shared journey profoundly illuminates the transformative power of never forgetting.
























[book] [book] Needles and Haystacks:
Smart Thinking in the
Age of New Data

Everybody Lies:
Big Data, New Data, and
What the Internet Reveals
About Who We Really Are

by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz
February 2017
Morrow – Dey Street
Seth is an Op-Ed contributor for The New York Times and former data scientist for Google. He has his PhD from Harvard and another degree from Stanford. This is a story of finding or uncovering insights in big data.

In 2013, as a PhD student in economics at Harvard, he wrote a dissertation claiming that Google searches could improve measurements of racism and child abuse and predict voter turnout. Based on these insights, Google hired him. Dr. Stephens-Davidowitz has used Google searches to measure son preference, self-induced abortion, sexual insecurity, depression, and therapy usage. He has also used Google searches to estimate how many men are gay; explore why we tell jokes; and learn how politicians can successfully calm an angry mob. He used Facebook likes to measure the key ages in child development; scraped Wikipedia to find what cities are best for producing superstars; analyzed the demographics of America's largest hate site; and studied ancestry.com data to learn what it really takes to make the NBA. He also knows how to juggle and has a passion for the Mets and the late Leonard Cohen.

Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didn’t vote for Barack Obama because he’s black? Does where you go to school effect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives and who’s more self-conscious about sex, men or women?
Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potential—revealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions we’re afraid to ask that might be essential to our health—both emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data everyday, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world.























[book] A NARROW BRIDGE
by J.J. Gesher
with Joyce Gittlin and
Janet B. Fattal
February 2017
Prospect Park Books
Shortly after Orthodox Jewish Brooklynite Jacob Fischer puts his young family on a bus to visit relatives, the bus explodes in a stunning act of terrorism. HIs faith shattered, Jacob flees the comforts of his community and disappears. He lands up in a predominantly black town in rural Alabama, where he meets Rosie, the single mother of a young son. Their developing relationship, along with the rekindling of his love of music, precipitate events that will change both their lives. This debut novel is a powerful page-turner that follows a complex man on a journey of salvation after tragedy.

J.J. Gesher is the pen name for co-authors Joyce Gittlin and Janet B. Fattal. Together, Janet and Joyce have won several prestigious screenwriting awards, including the Geller Prize and the Screenwriting Award at the Austin Film Festival. Their first screenwriting collaboration was produced as a Lifetime Television feature.
























[book] High Noon:
The Hollywood Blacklist and
the Making of an American Classic
by Glenn Frankel
February 2017
Bloomsbury USA
Many politicians cite HIGH NOON as their favorite film. It was difficult to produce and was made for a very low budget. It starred Gary Cooper and Grace Kelley. For 1953, it won four Academy Awards. It became a quintessential post-War American film. It celebrated moral fortitude and American moral strength.
What is overlooked and forgotten is that it was written by a blacklisted writer who would NOT name names. He was exiled from Hollywood and America (and co-wrote The Bridge of the River Kwai, 1957 (uncredited)
This is the story of Carl Foreman (the son of Fanny (Rozin) and Isidore Foreman), and the film, and its producers, and how it evolved from idea to draft to final script, and its allegorical weight in light of the McCarthy hunt for Communist influence in Hollywood.






















[book] Traveling with Ghosts:
A Memoir
by Shannon Leone Fowler
February 2017
Simon and Schuster
From grief to reckoning to reflection to solace, a marine biologist shares the solo journey she took—through war-ravaged Eastern Europe, Israel, and beyond—to find peace after her fiancé suffered a fatal attack by a box jellyfish in Thailand.
In the summer of 2002, Shannon Leone Fowler, a twenty-eight-year-old marine biologist, was backpacking with her fiancé and love of her life, Sean. Sean was a tall, blue-eyed, warmhearted Australian, and he and Shannon planned to return to Australia after their excursion to Koh Pha Ngan, Thailand. Their plans, however, were devastatingly derailed when a box jellyfish — the most venomous animal in the world — wrapped around Sean’s leg, stinging and killing him in a matter of minutes as Shannon helplessly watched. The book opens as he sort of can’t stand, feels weird after being stung, and dies within minutes. Two Israeli women sit with the author as she tries to make plans and face Sean’s death, telling off Thai authorities to respect the body.
Rejecting the Thai authorities attempt to label Sean’s death a “drunk drowning,” Shannon ferried his body home to his stunned family—a family to which she suddenly no longer belonged. Shattered and un-tethered, Shannon’s life paused indefinitely so that she could travel around the world to find healing. Travel had forged her relationship with Sean, and she hoped it could also aid in processing his death. Though Sean wasn’t with Shannon, he was everywhere she went—among the places she visited were O?wi?cim, Poland (the site of Auschwitz); war-torn Israel; shelled-out Bosnia; poverty-stricken Romania; and finally to Barcelona, where she first met Sean years before. Ultimately, Shannon had to confront the ocean after her life’s first great love took her second great love away.
Cheryl Strayed’s Wild meets Helen Macdonald’s H Is for Hawk in this beautiful, profoundly moving memorial to those we have lost on our journeys and the unexpected ways their presence echoes in all places—and voyages—big and small.

























[book] The Islamic Jesus:
How the King of the Jews
Became a Prophet of the Muslims
by Mustafa Akyol
February 2017
St. Martin’s Press
When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.”

Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesus is that book.

The Islamic Jesus reveals startling new truths about Islam in the context of the first Muslims and the early origins of Christianity. Muslims and the first Christians?the Jewish followers of Jesus?saw Jesus as not divine but rather as a prophet and human Messiah and that salvation comes from faith and good works, not merely as faith, as Christians would later emphasize. What Akyol seeks to reveal are how these core beliefs of Jewish Christianity, which got lost in history as a heresy, emerged in a new religion born in 7th Arabia: Islam.

Akyol exposes this extraordinary historical connection between Judaism, Jewish Christianity and Islam?a major mystery unexplored by academia. From Jesus’ Jewish followers to the Nazarenes and Ebionites to the Qu’ran’s stories of Mary and Jesus, The Islamic Jesus will reveal links between religions that seem so contrary today. It will also call on Muslims to discover their own Jesus, at a time when they are troubled by their own Pharisees and Zealots.
























[book] MATZO
35 RECIPES FOR PASSOVER
AND ALL YEAR LONG
By Michele STREIT Heilbrun
March 2017
Clarkson Potter
The preeminent fine Kosher food company with a 90-year history, Streit's, presents 35 recipes for enjoying matzo during the eight days of Passover and all year long.

Matzo and the story of its creation are the centerpiece of both the meals and the observance of Passover; it is eaten in place of bread and other leavened products for the holiday's eight day duration. Michele (Mikie) Heilbrun is the co-owner of Streit's, one of the top two matzo companies in the world. Now, she is sharing 35 recipes-- both from her family and fresh favorites-- for ways to cook with matzo that are so good, readers will want to make them all year round. Dishes like Matzo Granola, Caesar Salad with Matzo Croutons, and Matzo Spanikopita show readers just how delicious and versatile this ingredient can be. With its bright photography and fun package, this book is sure to become an instant seder (and anytime) must-have.






























[book] THE PALOmAR COOKBOOK
MODERN ISRAELI CUISINE
By Layo Paskin and Tomer Amedi
(Palomar restaurant, Soho, London)
March 2017
Clarkson Potter
Rule One; If you have an Israeli restaurant in London, you get to write a cookbook and it will be a bestseller
Modern Israeli recipes influenced by flavors from Southern Spain, North Africa, and the Levant

The Michelin Bib Gourmand-winning London restaurant The Palomar has won fans the world over for its elevated Middle Eastern cooking inspired by the colorful, flavorful cuisines of the region. From Beet Carpaccio with Burnt Goat Cheese and Date Syrup to Pork Belly Tajine with Ras el Hanout and Israeli couscous, these innovative dishes explore delicious ingredients like za’atar, labneh, pomegranate syrup, and tahini in everything from sharable mezze to dessert. Tucked in the middle of the book is a special cocktail section with a selection of stand-out concoctions such as Lion’s Milk and the Drunken Botanist. Brimming over with lively photographs, The Palomar Cookbook shares a new way to explore this acclaimed restaurant and its unique take on the vibrant foods of the Middle East.






























[book] Boss Bitch:
A Simple 12-Step Plan to Take
Charge of Your Career
by Nicole Lapin
March 2017
Crown Business
You don’t need dozens or hundreds of employees to be a boss, says financial expert and serial entrepreneur Nicole Lapin. Hell, you don’t even need one. You just need to find your inner Boss Bitch — your most confident, savvy, ambitious self — and own it.
A Boss Bitch is the she-ro of her own story. She is someone who takes charge of her future and embraces being a “boss” in all aspects of the word: whether as the boss of her own life, family and career, the literal boss at work, or, as the boss of her own company. Whichever she chooses (or all three), a Boss Bitch is someone who gets out there and makes her success happen — and so can you.
Lapin draws on raw and often hilariously real stories from her own career — the good, the bad, and the ugly — to show what it means to be a "boss" in twelve easy steps. In her refreshingly accessible and relatable style, she first shows how to embrace the “boss of you" mentality by seizing the power that comes from believing in yourself and expanding your skillset. Then she offers candid no-nonsense advice for how to kill it at as the “boss at work” whether you have a high-up role or not. And finally, for those who want to take the plunge as an entrepreneur, she lays out the nuts and bolts of how to be the “boss of your own business” from raising money and getting it off the ground to hiring a kickass staff and dealing office drama to turning a profit.
Being a badass in your career is something that should be worn as a badge of honor, says Lapin. Here, she inspires us to rise to the occasion and celebrate our successes — and then keep killing it like the Boss Bitches we are!






























[book] The Doorposts of Your
House and on Your Gates:
A Novel
by Jacob Bacharach
March 2017
Liveright/Norton
The biblical story of Abraham and Isaac is transposed into a modern world even madder than the ancient Middle East in Jacob Bacharach’s hilarious novel.
Does any family better fit the Anna Karenina principle? that happy families are alike but every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way?better than the patriarchs of the Book of Genesis? Is there any worse (or crazier) father than Abraham? These are some of the questions The Doorposts of Your House and on Your Gates asks, replacing the biblical Ur with New York and the land of Canaan with the rugged hills and rusted river valleys of western Pennsylvania. Fleeing a failed relationship, Isabel Giordani leaves New York and moves across the Appalachians to Pittsburgh, where she soon begins to insinuate herself into the lives of Isaac Mayer and his father, Abbie, an architect turned crooked real estate developer. As Isabel learns this family’s weird, often sordid, and occasionally violent history, her own motives for entering their lives are called into question, in Jacob Bacharach’s new novel that considers love, family, God, and, of course, real estate.


























[book] DINNER
CHANGING THE GAME
BY MELISSA CLARK
March 2017
Clarkson Potter
From Melissa Clark, the New York Times bestselling author and one of the most beloved food and recipe writers of our generation, comes a comprehensive and practical cookbook. With more than 250 all new recipes and abundant four-color photography, these inherently simple recipes make for the kind of easy cooking that can turn anyone into a better and more confident cook.
Dinner is all about options: inventive, unfussy food with unexpected flavor (and plenty of make ahead ideas, too): a sheetpan chicken laced with spicy harissa; burgers amped with chorizo; curried lentils with poached eggs, to name a few. Here, too, are easy flourishes that make dinner exceptional: stirring charred lemon into pasta, tossing a Caesar-like dressing on a grain bowl, adding fresh ricotta and demerara sugar to stovetop mac and cheese; lavishing a dollop of chili paste just about anywhere.
Clark’s mission is to help anyone—whether a novice with just a single pan or the experienced (and, perhaps jaded) home cook, figure out what to make any night of the week, without settling on fallbacks. Each recipe in this book is meant to be dinner—one fantastic dish that is so satisfying and flavor-forward it can stand alone or sit with just a little something else, such as green beans with caper vinaigrette, a citrus salad with olives, coconut rice, or skillet brown butter cornbread. Or maybe all you need is some baguette and the simplest green salad.
Dinner has the range and authority—and the author’s trademark warmth—of an instant classic.






























[book] Candy is Magic:
Real Ingredients, Modern Recipes
by Jami Curl
Owner of Quin, Portland OR
March 14, 2017
Ten Speed
This game-changing candy cookbook from the owner of Quin, a popular Portland-based candy company, offers more than 200 achievable recipes using real, natural ingredients for everything from flavor-packed fruit lollipops to light-as-air marshmallows.

Jami Curl, candy-maker extraordinaire and owner of the candy company Quin has been called the "new Willy Wonka" by Bon Appetit. Her debut book, This is Candy, includes the recipes that have made Quin a favorite with local and national media, foodies, chefs, and bloggers. But This is Candy is not just a candy book. Instead, Jami's approach to candy forms the foundation for a world of other confections--from bacon glazed with maple and black pepper caramel to a clever Chocolate Magic Dust that can be turned into chocolate pudding, chocolate sauce, and even a chocolate lollipop. Packed with more than 200 recipes for totally original confections like Whole Roasted Strawberry Lollipops, Bergamot Caramels, Fig & Coffee Gumdrops, and Pinot Noir cotton candy, as well as serious tips and advice for making amazing candy at home.

























[book] The Islamic Enlightenment:
The Struggle Between Faith
and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times
by Christopher de Bellaigue
April 2017
Liveright/Norton
A revelatory and game-changing narrative that rewrites everything we thought we knew about the modern history of the Islamic world.
With majestic prose, Christopher de Bellaigue presents an absorbing account of the political and social reformations that transformed the lands of Islam in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Structuring his groundbreaking history around Istanbul, Cairo, and Tehran, the three main loci of Islamic culture, The Islamic Enlightenment challenges the ossified perceptions in Western culture that self-righteously condemn the Muslim world as hopelessly benighted. This false perception belies the fact that Islamic civilization has been undergoing its own anguished transformation over the last two hundred years and that the violence of an infinitesimally small minority is the blowback from this process. In reclaiming the stories of the nineteenth-century philosophers, anti-clerics, journalists, and feminists who opened up their societies to political and intellectual emancipation, The Islamic Enlightenment shows the folly of Westerners demanding modernity from people whose lives are already drenched in it. 8 pages of color and 8 pages of black-and-white illustrations


























[book] Mexican Ice Cream:
Beloved Recipes and Stories
by Fany Gerson
April 2017
Ten Speed
A collection of 60+ flavor-packed recipes for ice creams and frozen treats rooted in Mexico's rich and revered ice cream traditions. Fany Gerson—the Mexican-Jewish dessert genius behind Dough and La Newyorkina. She is the mother of the Doughka... the Mexican Jewish Babka Donut

This new offering from the incredibly popular baker and sweets maker Fany Gerson, the powerhouse behind Brooklyn's La Newyorkina and Dough, showcases the incredibly diverse flavors of Mexican ice cream while exploring the cultural aspects of preparing and consuming ice cream in Mexico. Gerson uses unique ingredients to create exciting and fresh flavors like Red Prickly Pear Ice Cream, Oaxacan-style Lime Sorbet, Avocado-Chocolate Ice Cream, and Rice-Almond Ice Cream with Cinnamon. All recipes are created with the home cook in mind, and written in Fany's knowledgeable but accessible voice. Mexican Ice Cream features vibrant location photography and captures the authentic Mexican heladerias that Gerson has been visiting for decades. For anyone looking to up their summer ice cream game, this is the book.

























[book] LEADING LADY
SHERRY LANSING AND THE
MAKING OF A HOLLYWOOD GROUNDBREAKER
By Stephen Galloway
April 2017
Crown Archetype
The definitive biography of movie executive and philanthropist Sherry Lansing traces her groundbreaking journey to become the first female head of a major motion picture studio, shares behind-the-scenes tales from movie sets and Hollywood boardrooms, and explains what inspired her to walk away from it all to start the Sherry Lansing Foundation.

























[book] California Dreamin':
Cass Elliot Before the
Mamas & the Papas
by Pénélope Bagieu
March 2017
First Second
Before she became the legendary Mama Cass?one quarter of the mega-huge folk group The Mamas and the Papas?Cass Eliot was a girl from Baltimore trying to make it in the big city. After losing parts to stars like Barbra Streisand on the Broadway circuit, Cass found her place in the music world with an unlikely group of cohorts.

The Mamas and the Papas released five studio albums in their three years of existence. It was at once one of the most productive (and profitable) three years any band has ever had, and also one of the most bizarre and dysfunctional groups of people to ever come together to make music. Through it all, Cass struggled to keep sight of her dreams?and her very identity.






























[book] The Gatekeepers:
How the White House Chiefs
of Staff Define Every Presidency
by Chris Whipple
April 2017
Crown
The first in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at how the American presidency has hinged on the effectiveness of the White House chiefs of staff, and how their decisions have dictated the course of our country

What do Dick Cheney and Rahm Emanuel have in common? Aside from polarizing personalities, both served as chief of staff to the president of the United States—as did Donald Rumsfeld, Leon Panetta, and a relative handful of others. The chiefs of staff, often referred to as "the gatekeepers," wield tremendous power in Washington and beyond; they decide who is allowed to see the president, negotiate with Congress to push POTUS's agenda, and—most crucially—are the first in line to the leader of the free world's ear. Award-winning producer and journalist Chris Whipple demonstrates how those appointed to this lofty position have often served as de facto prime ministers, and the surprising extent to which their tenures have set the tone for our political climate. Through extensive, intimate interviews with all 20 living chiefs of staff and two former presidents, The Gatekeepers pulls back the curtain to expose how the nation's levers of power are operated by these right-hand advisors, and what each appointment reveals about its respective president.






























[book] Tell Me How This Ends Well:
A Novel
by David Samuel Levinson
April 2017
Crown
An ambitious, gripping, darkly funny family drama about the reckoning of three adult siblings with their profoundly flawed parents, set during Passover in a near-future America rife with anti-Semitism and terror, from an award-winning short-story writer

It is 2022, and Jewish Americans face problems in America. The Jacobson family gathers in Los Angeles for Passover. Mo, Jacob, and Edith are in despair and coming apart at the seams. They each relate how they were abused by their father Julian, and they are gathering for a PASSOVER PLOT… to murder their father, Will God help them put their bickering aside so they can work as a united front…





























[book] Teach Like Finland:
33 Simple Strategies
for Joyful Classrooms
by Timothy D. Walker
April 4, 2017
Norton

Are you listening Solomon Schecter??

Easy-to-implement classroom lessons from the world’s premier educational system.
Finland shocked the world when its fifteen-year-olds scored highest on the first Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a set of tests touted for evaluating critical-thinking skills in math, science, and reading. That was in 2001; but even today, this tiny Nordic nation continues to amaze. How does Finnish education?with short school days, light homework loads, and little standardized testing?produce students who match the PISA scores of high-powered, stressed-out kids in Asia?
When Timothy D. Walker started teaching fifth graders at a Helsinki public school, he began a search for the secrets behind the success of Finland’s schools. Walker has already written about several of those discoveries, and his Atlantic article on this topic received more than 500,000 shares. Here, he gathers all he has learned and reveals how any American teacher can implement these simple practices, which integrate seamlessly with educational standards in the United States.

























[book] ARE YOU ANYBODY
A MEMOIR
BY JEFFREY TAMBOR
May 9, 2017
Crown Archetype
From the Jewish kid with a lisp to a celebrated actor
It's rare that an actor embodies even one memorable character over the arc of a career. Jeffrey Tambor has managed to create three, beginning with Hank "Hey Now!" Kingsley on The Larry Sanders Show, the series created by Garry Shandling, Jeffrey’s first mentor in television. He went on to find two more show creators, Mitch Hurwitz of Arrested Development and Jill Soloway of Transparent, who shared a love of actors and taught him a lot about acting along the way.

Are You Anybody is Tambor's chance to discuss his creative process and immense accomplishments from a life lived onscreen. Drawing from his formative childhood years, in which he describes himself as a fat Hungarian-Jewish kid with a lisp and a depressive father to how he drew inspiration from his life to create these characters, Tambor's memoir is funny, insightful, and uplifting, touching on comedy and the enduring chutzpah required to make it through life.



























[book] Confronting Scandal
How Jews Can Respond When Jews Do Bad Things
Erica Brown
August 2010, Jewish Lights
Jews seem to be in the news today for all of the wrong reasons. Whether it is Bernie Madoff or money laundering by rabbinic leaders, faking appraisals so you can sell assets to friends, smuggling narcotics to benefit yeshivas, the Jewish community has yet to take stock of what these breaches of civil law and Jewish ethical teachings mean for us as a people.
How do we manage collective discomfort and shame?
Should we feel ghetto mentality shame, or be filled with Dershowitz like Chutzpah?
How do we explain rabbis (or cantors) who commit sex offenses (and then ask for ultra kosher food in prison) or other crimes yet stand at the pulpit week after week offering others moral guidance?
And most importantly, how do we restore honor and dignity to our community by raising the ethical bar and adherence to it? This book explores the difficult and thorny issues surrounding scandals: airing dirty laundry in public, coming to terms with criminality among Jews, examining painful stereotypes of Jews and the difficult position of being a minority in society. A call for us to answer to a higher authority, it also addresses practical ways to strengthen ethical behavior and "do good things" to bring pride back, and to engender greater self-respect and the respect of others.
Dr. Erica Brown, a leading voice on subjects of current Jewish interest, consults for Jewish federations and organizations across the country. She is author of Inspired Jewish Leadership: Practical Approaches to Building Strong Communities, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.
Click the book cover to read more.









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