MyJewishBooks.com
Your online discount Jewish Bookstore
Books for the People of the Book

Our Shelves

FALL 2017 JEWISH BOOKS
Home

BOOKS BY
Season
Winter 2018
Fall 2017
Summer 2017
Spring 2017
Winter 2017
Fall 2016
Summer 2016
Spring 2016
Winter 2016
Fall 2015
Summer 2015
Spring 2015
Winter 2015
Fall 2014
Summer 2014
Spring 2014
Winter 2014
Fall 2013
Summer 2013
Spring 2013
Winter 2013
Fall 2012
Summer 2012
Spring 2012
Winter 2012
Fall 2011
Summer 2011
Spring 2011
Winter 2011
Fall 2010
Summer 2010
Spring 2010
Winter 2010
Fall 2009
Summer 2009
Spring 2009
Winter 2009
Fall 2008
Summer 2008
Spring 2008
Winter 2008
Fall 2007
Summer 2007
Spring 2007
Winter 2007
More Fall 2006
Fall 2006
Summer 2006
Spring 2006
Winter 2006
Fall 2005
Summer 2005
Spring 2005
Winter 2005
Late Fall 2004
Fall 2004
Summer 2004
Spring 2004
Winter 2004
Late Fall 2003
Fall 2003
Summer 2003
Spring 2003
Winter 2003
FALL 2002
Summer 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
Winter 2002
Dec 2001
Nov 2001
Oct 2001
Sept 2001
Fall 2001
Summer 2001
May 2001 Books
April 2001 Books
March 2001 Books
February 2001 Books
January 2001 Books
December 2000 Books
Hanukkah Books
November 2000 Books
October 2000 Books
September 2000 Books
August 2000 Books
July 2000 Books
June 2000 Books
Spring 2000 Books
April 2000 Books
March 2000 Books
More March 2000
Winter2000 Books

Special Topics
Jewish Audio

Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, 2011


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, 2010


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, ‘09


Winners of the
National Jewish Book
Awards, ‘08


Jewish Book Award Winners

OFRAH's BookClub
Jewish Book of the Week
SEARCH

CHAT About Books
Novels
Cookbooks
Yiddish Culture
THE MAD DANCERS

Jewish Themes in Classical Music
Jewish Mysteries and Science Fiction
Wrabbis Rite Books
Holocaust Studies
Jewish Bio's
Jewish Biz
Jewish Travel
Must Reads
Israel

Israel Travel
Jewish Renewal
Theology
Bibles Torah
Kabbalah

Jewish MUSEUMS

Jewish SEX
Gay & Lesbian
Jewish Weddings
Parenting
Health
Children's Books
Bar Bat Mitzvah
BarBat Mitzvah Gifts
Mourning
Art Books
Jewish Business
More Business
Sociology
Asian Jewry
Miscellaneous Cholent

Jewish Textbooks

Sephardic Jewry
Southern Jewry
South American Jewry
French Jewry
Black-Jewish Relations


More Seasons
Fall99 Books
More Fall99 Books
Summer 99
Spring 99
Jan/Feb 99
Fall98 Books

Holidays
HighHoliday Books
Shavuot Books
Passover Books


More Holidays
Purim Books
Tu B'Shvat Books
Jewish MLKing,Jr Day Books
Sukkah 2000 Project
Haggadahs
HighHolyDay Books
Hanukkah Books
Passover


Special
50% OFF NYT Best Sellers
CHAI-BO (TM)
jewish bedtime stories

Music/CD's

Piano Music

Hollywood and Films

The Jewish Best Sellers

Our partner Amazon.com's Top 100 Books

Amazon.com's Top 100 Music

Top Klezmer CD's
Top Israel Best Selling CD's


Search

Email us at: Admin@myjewishbooks.com



SOME LINKS
Jewish Book Council

JewLicious.com

NYTimes.com

NYTimes in Mandarin

NYT in Chinese

JewishFilm.com

Our NEWS Links Page

Our films page on Facebook

Our books page on Facebook

Sefer Safari and Myjewishbooks.com are online Jewish bookstores. Orders are fulfilled by Amazon.com Net proceeds are donated to tzedakah

Visit our Tzedakah Page

Tzedaka.ORG
penny harvest

Siddur Audio

heeb magazine
bar mitzvah disco
the Hasidic rebel blog about his dislikes in the Hasidic world
Yeshiva Univ Library Blog
Matt Messinger Casting

American Jewish World Service
Lend For Peace – West Bank Microfinance
Dry Bones
Urban Kvetch
Jewish Council on Urban Affairs
Elat Chayim
New Shul Scottsdale
Shalom Center
Tikkun Leil Shabbat
Times Fool
Association of Jewish Librarians Jewish Values site
Avhana.co.il
Avodah
Beach Hillel
Assoc of Jewish Libraries
Bikkurim - Jewish incubator
Cambridge Minyan
Workmen's Circle/Arbiter Ring
Tehillah Riverdale
DC Minyan
Darkhei Noam
Gawker.com
gizmodo
Hazon
IKAR
Isabella Freedman
JCRC Boston
Jdub Records
Jewish Alliance for Law and Social Action
Jewish Community Action
SchmoozeDance 2005
SchmoozeDance 2006
schmoozedance 2007
Jewish Funds for Justice
Selah Cohorts
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish Organizing Initiative
JewLicious
JewSchool
Jews for Racial and Economic Justice
Jewish Social Policy Action Network
Jspot- Jewish Justice spot
Jews United for Justice
Kavana Seattle
Moishe/Kavod House Boston
Hadar
Kol HaKfar
Kol Tzedek West Philly
Kol Zimrah
Mazon
Minyan Tehillah Cambridge
Mitziut Chicago
Nashuva LA
network 2020
PANIM
Panim Hadashot DC
Park Slope Minyan
Progressive Jewish Alliance
Rabbis for Human Rights - North America
Riverway Project Boston
Storahtelling
Synagogue 3000
Tekiah
Tikkun Ha-Ir
wonkette
delete
Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies
JEWISH LITERARY REVIEW
South Jerusalem Blog by Gorenberg and Watzman

JEWISH TWITTER LIST
Jewlicious
Jewlicious
Panim Institute
Volunteers for Israel
Jewish Teen Funders Network
Jewish Heart Africa
Jewschool
Jcrc NY
Lisa Klug Cool Jew
Judios Latino
Israel Films
Israeli Films
Masa Israel
Birthright Israel Next
JTA News
Hazon
Jewish Dly Forward
Jewish Book Council
JB Books
MyJewishBooks
Jewishfilms
Jewishfilm
NY Jewish Week
Jewishfood
WJFF
Jewish Camps Fdtn
Jewishfilm



Welcome to our Fall 2017, Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Winter 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, and oh so many more pages of Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME FALL 2017 BOOK READINGS



August 07, 2017: Tova Mirvis reads from The Book of Separation. Sure to be highly talked about. Scribblers on the Roof. NYC UWS Ansche Chesed rooftop.
August 07, 2017: Lara Vapnyar reads from Still Here. Scribblers on the Roof. NYC UWS Ansche Chesed rooftop.
September 2, 2017: National Book Fair, Washington DC and on C-Span Book-TV
September 12, 2017: Former US Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton signs her book, What Happened, which as of this writing, is said to lay blame on US Senator Bernie Sanders for her loss, Union Square B&N
September 14, 2017: Daniel Mendelsohn reads from An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic. B&N 82nd and Broadway NYC
September 17, 2017: Brooklyn Book Festival and Fair, Brooklyn NY
September 26, 2017: Art Garfunkel reads from What Is It All but Luminous: Notes from an Underground Man. B&N Fifth Avenue NYC
September 27, 2017: Tova Mirvis reads from The Book of Separation. B&N 82nd and Broadway, NYC
September 28, 2017: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar reads from Mycroft Holmes and The Apocalypse Handbook. B&N The Grove Farmers' Market. Los Angeles
October 11, 2017: Zac Posen reads from his cookbook: Cooking with Zac. B&N Union Square NYC
October 18, 2017: Dr. Henry Marsh reads from Admissions: Life as a Brain Surgeon. B&N 82nd and Broadway NYC
October 24, 2017: Deb Perelman reads from Smitten Kitchen Every Day. B&N Union Square NYC
October 25, 2017: Canadian-American cartoonist/artist (The New Yorker) Barry Blitt presents Blitt. B&N 82nd and Broadway NYC
October 28, 2017: Boston Book Fair and Festival, Boston, MA, featuring Tovah Mirvis and Stephen Greenblatt and more
October 2017 – April 2018: Beyond Chicken Soup. Jews and Medicine in America. Exhibit. Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. Beachwood, Ohio.

November 03-06, 2017: Israeli American Conference in Washington DC
November 05-07, 2017: UCLA. American Culture and the Jewish Experience in Music. Jews and the LA Music Industry; Mark Slobin on Jewish American Music; The Afterlife of Fiddler on the Roof; Sacred Song and Music of the Past: Tradition and Innovation; 100 Years of the Jazz Singer; The Language of Yiddish Theatre; and more.
November 12-15, 2017: JFNA General Assembly in Los Angeles, CA
November 18-19, 2017: Miami Book Fair




SOME LATE AUGUST 2017 BOOKS

[book] Feeling Jewish:
(A Book for Just About Anyone)
by Devorah Baum
August 2017

Yale University Press
In this sparkling debut, a young critic offers an original, passionate, and erudite account of what it means to feel Jewish—even when you’re not.

Self-hatred. Guilt. Resentment. Paranoia. Hysteria. Overbearing Mother-Love. In this witty, insightful, and poignant book, Devorah Baum delves into fiction, film, memoir, and psychoanalysis to present a dazzlingly original exploration of a series of feelings famously associated with modern Jews. Reflecting on why Jews have so often been depicted, both by others and by themselves, as prone to “negative” feelings, she queries how negative these feelings really are. And as the pace of globalization leaves countless people feeling more marginalized, uprooted, and existentially threatened, she argues that such “Jewish” feelings are becoming increasingly common to us all.

Ranging from Franz Kafka to Philip Roth, Sarah Bernhardt to Woody Allen, Anne Frank to Nathan Englander, Feeling Jewish bridges the usual fault lines between left and right, insider and outsider, Jew and Gentile, and even Semite and anti-Semite, to offer an indispensable guide for our divisive times.

























[book] The Modern Jewish Table:
100 Kosher Recipes from
around the Globe
by Tracey Fine and Georgie Tarn
August 15, 2017

Skyhorse
The Modern Jewish Table is the new, essential kosher cookbook for every Jewish home, whether you are a reluctant cook or a dedicated balabusta. Bringing their fun, upbeat, and infectious brand of energy to the kitchen, self-proclaimed Jewish Princesses Tracey Fine and Georgie Tarn don their high heels and aprons to revamp the kosher kitchen and raise the culinary bar. It’s no longer just chopped liver, chicken soup, and matzo bread; instead, learn to make Mock Chopped Liver, Sephardi Saffron Chicken Soup, and Princess Pitta Bread!

Writing from the point of view of the average home cook, the Jewish Princesses dish out their witty know-how and inspire amateur cooks to create simple and hip recipes, with all the short cuts included, even as they entice “professional” home cooks to revitalize traditional Jewish fare with uniquely global flavors. Drawing inspirations from Turkish, Iranian, Japanese, Chinese, French, German, American, and Mexican cooking, to name a few, The Modern Jewish Table boasts globe-trotting recipes that include:
• Street Food Gefilte Fish Bites
• Crème Fraiche Vegetable Latkes
• Cohen-Tucky Baked Chicken
• Princess Pad Thai
• Kunafa Middle Eastern Cheese Cake
• Cuban Sweet Corn Soufflé, and more!

Complete with stunning photography, outrageous tips, and a dash of chutzpah, The Modern Jewish Table introduces innovative dishes that will soon become Jewish traditions for the future.




















[book] The Jewlish Cookbook:
175 Pages of Fun, Easy &
Authentic Jewish Recipes
by Dana Attias and Jacob Attias
Summer 2017

The Jewlish Cookbook is for fun, easy & authentic Jewish cooking. Just over a year ago, Dana and Jacob Attias began filming cooking videos in their tiny Tel Aviv apartment. Since then, these Jewish cooking videos have reached over 100 million people worldwide, with viral hits such as Challah In A Bag, Libyan Mafrum, Apple Challah and many more. The goal of Jewlish is to show the world that Jewish food is more diverse than you could ever imagine, with recipes spanning the world and the ages. With Jewlish, it's easy to tap into Jewish history- and you might even find a creative new twist! After selling out it's first batch of cookbooks in less than a day, Jewlish is back, presenting more than 150 pages of Jewish food, including exclusive and never-before-seen recipes.

































[book] Little Book of Jewish Appetizers
by Leah Koenig
August 2017

Chronicle Books
Cookbook
First in a series of elegant little books exploring Jewish culinary traditions, this perfect hostess gift or self-treat takes us through the most social part of the meal: the appetizers.

Organize a Jewish Cheese Plate (between Chapter 1 and 2) and Be The Talk Of The Town.

Whether you call them mezzes, forspeisn, appies, apps, or appetizers, a gefilte fish fritter or chopped liver on a crostini will delight. This is a little book, a tiny treasure of twenty three items in two chapters. In Chapter One (Fresh, Toasted, Pickled) we are introduced to items including Beet-Pickled Turnips; Pickled Cherry Tomatoes; Borscht Crostini; Eggplant Carpaccio; Smoky Sweet Potato Hummus; Vegetarian Chopped Liver; and Morroccan Orange and Black Olive Salad. Koenig reminisces about how chopped liver was so iconic that a vegetarian version was made using beans, peas, Tam Tams crackers, or lentils. But Koenig uses cremini mushrooms, brown sugar, walnuts, kidney beans, ring-shaped shallots, oil and eggs for hers. Her outstanding smoky sweet-potato hummus retains the soul of hummus (unlike pizza and ranch hummus) and - as she writes - its structural integrity, and elevates the flavor profile. She uses a sweet potato, chickpeas, garlic, tahini, sumin, and other ingredients. Bored of baby carrots next to a dip? Koenig advises on "next level dippers," such as endive leaves, purple cauliflower florets, black sesame rice ships, jicama, sliced watermelon radishes, and more. Her Aleppo/Halab-rooted Muhammara stars DIY pomegranate molasses (just 1 tablespoon). The Orange and Olive salad use EVOO instead of argan oil; lime juice; honey; cumin and more. Borscht Crostini? Why serve it in a bowl when you can place it on crunchy toast?

In Chapter 2 (Cooked, Fried, Baked), Koenig shares recipes, photos, and histories for Barley-Stuffed Mushrooms; Fried Gefilte Fish (that some might called fritters since it sounds more app'y); Butternut Bichak; Spinach Nichak; a strudel, a knish, a heart (artichoke heart), and more. The Barley-Stuffed Mushrooms? Think reverse mushroom barley soup sans the soup, and prettier. She recommends them for Sukkot. Her Roman-inspired Fried Artichoke Hearts are crunchy panko fried and a nod to the Carciofi alla Giudia. Her Albondigas are beef and inspired by the lamb ones at Brooklyn's La Vara Pre-Inquisition style Spanish eatery. The Fried Gefilte Fish uses halibut and salmon. onion, panko, and more ad looks like a fish latke (think British Fish & Chips by way of the Iberian Jews who settled in London in the 17th century). Koenig closes with pairing ideas with easy to find page references for your parties and dinners.


















[book] The Lincoln Del Cookbook
by Wendi Zelkin Rosenstein
Kit Naylor
With a Foreword by NYT Columnist Thomas Friedman
Summer 2017

Minnesota Historical Society

NOTE: BUY IT FOR THE NOSTALGIA… the recipes are untested and flawed according to many readers.

For Jewish and non-Jewish customers alike, the Lincoln Del was a Minneapolis version of Cheers—at the Del everybody knew your name. Folks hardly minded waiting in line for the fresh caraway rye, the cabbage borscht, the corned beef sandwiches, or the towering strawberry shortcake because every visit was like a family reunion, complete with warm embraces, recounted stories, boisterous jokes, and—of course—plenty of amazing food.

From modest beginnings as a bakery in 1930s north Minneapolis to a local chain of three bustling restaurants in St. Louis Park and Bloomington, the Lincoln Del was a neighborhood institution for decades. These popular spots drew visitors from all over the metro and across the state, and even years later patrons nostalgically recall the tasty baked goods, the generously portioned sandwiches, and the sense of belonging that beckoned everyone who walked through the door.

The Lincoln Del Cookbook gathers not only coveted recipes—for blintzes and challah, coleslaw and chicken matzo ball soup—but also family lore and patrons' memories, with photographs, menus, and memorabilia that will bring you right back to the Lincoln Del—or make you wish you'd been around to experience its delights in person.




















[book] Our Israeli Diary:
Of That Time,
Of That Place
by Antonia Fraser
Summer 2017

Oneworld Press
In May 1978 Harold Pinter and Antonia Fraser visited Israel at the time of the 30th Anniversary of Independence. It was three years after they first lived together; neither had set foot in Israel before. Based in Jerusalem, they toured many of the country’s historic sites: from Bethlehem to the fortress of Masada, encountering future Prime Minister Shimon Peres, Mayor of Jerusalem Teddy Kollek, Jackie Kennedy and a long-lost cousin of Harold’s on a kibbutz. It was a trip during which Pinter’s feelings about his heritage emerged for the first time. As he said himself: ‘For the first time I feel Jewish’.

This diary was kept daily by Antonia Fraser: the vivid narrative and descriptions (Antonia swimming in the Dead Sea while Harold had a beer) are leavened with humor, occasionally wry where Harold’s quirks were concerned, and always tender. Above all, it is a unique picture of a time and place – and a touching insight into fifteen days in the lives of two writers, one Jewish, one Catholic, one a playwright and one a biographer, who were also a devoted couple.
























[book] Warner Bros:
The Making of an American
Movie Studio
by David Thomson
August 2017

Jewish Live Series
Yale University Press

Behind the scenes at the legendary Warner Brothers film studio, where four immigrant brothers transformed themselves into the moguls and masters of American fantasy

Warner Bros charts the rise of an unpromising film studio from its shaky beginnings in the early twentieth century through its ascent to the pinnacle of Hollywood influence and popularity. The Warner Brothers—Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack—arrived in America as unschooled Jewish immigrants, yet they founded a studio that became the smartest, toughest, and most radical in all of Hollywood.

David Thomson provides fascinating and original interpretations of Warner Brothers pictures from the pioneering talkie The Jazz Singer through black-and-white musicals, gangster movies, and such dramatic romances as Casablanca, East of Eden, and Bonnie and Clyde. He recounts the storied exploits of the studio’s larger-than-life stars, among them Al Jolson, James Cagney, Bette Davis, Errol Flynn, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean, Doris Day, and Bugs Bunny. The Warner brothers’ cultural impact was so profound, Thomson writes, that their studio became “one of the enterprises that helped us see there might be an American dream out there.”

































[book] The Knish War on Rivington Street
by Joanne Oppenheim
Illustrated by Jon Davis
August 2017

Albert Whitman Books
Ages 4 – 8
There really was a knish war – it was reported on in The New York Times on January 27, 1916, at 150 Rivington
This is a fictional account
Benny's family owns a knishery and sells delicious round dumplings. Then the Tisch family opens a store across the street — selling square knishes — and Benny's papa worries. Benny's mother lowers the price to 4 cents to match their neighbor. Mr. Tisch lowers his price to 3 cents. The lines grow. The agglomeration actually increases overall sales and competiton. The mayor gets involved.
Benny helps his papa realize there's room on Rivington Street for more than one knishery.

Includes recipes for both knisheries























[book] Sukkot Is Coming!
by Tracy Newman
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 1 – 4
Kids will learn about the Jewish fall harvest holiday of Sukkot from building the sukkah, to the tradition of shaking the lulav and etrog. Don't know what those things are? Read the book!





























[book] The Best Sukkot Pumpkin Ever
Paperback
by Laya Steinberg
and Colleen Madden (Illustrator)
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
It's almost Sukkot, and Micah and his family are heading to Farmer Jared's pumpkin patch. Micah wants to find the very best pumpkin to decorate his family's sukkah, but Farmer Jared says his pumpkins can also go to a soup kitchen, to feed people who need a good meal. What will Micah decide to do with the best Sukkot pumpkin ever?























[book] The Cholent Brigade
by Michael Herman
and Sharon Harmer (Illustrator)
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
When a big snowstorm hits, Monty Nudelman happily shovels his neighbors' sidewalks, driveways, cars, and steps—until he hurts his back. Now he can barely move! He can't even make his Shabbat lunch. Luckily, his neighbors have all made cholent—a delicious Shabbat stew. The neighborhood kids form a "cholent brigade" to bring Monty Nudelman a tasty feast. Cholent to the rescue!























[book] Drop by Drop:
A Story of Rabbi Akiva
by Jacqueline Hechtkopf
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Akiva is just a poor shepherd living an ordinary life, until he falls in love with Rachel. Rachel thinks her husband could become a great man of learning—but Akiva can't even read! Is he too old to be a scholar or can he follow the example of the water in the nearby brook? Water is soft, yet drop by drop, it can soften the hardest stone.























[book] Engineer Arielle and the
Israel Independence Day Surprise
by Deborah Cohen
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Engineer Arielle drives a train in Jerusalem, just like her great-great-grandfather, Engineer Ari. Except she drives a light rail train, and today is a special day. It's Israel's Independence Day! Arielle works all day taking people to their holiday destinations—but how will Arielle celebrate? Her brother Ezra, a pilot in the Israeli Air Force, has something special in mind.























[book] Koala Challah
by Laura Gehl
Illustrated by Maria Mola
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Lila's older sisters both have jobs to help their family get ready for Shabbat. Lila wants to help too, but she can't figure out the perfect job, and everything she tries just ends in a gigantic mess. Then Lila has an idea. Maybe she can make the most beautiful, most special, most delicious challah ever! At least she can try....























[book] The Missing Letters:
A Dreidel Story
by Renee Londner
Illustrated by Iryna BodnarUK
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
It's almost Hanukkah and the dreidel-maker's shop is busy. But all is not well for the four Hebrew letters that will soon go on the wooden tops. The Heys, the Nuns, and the Shins are jealous of everyone's favorite letter, the Gimel. They decide to hide the Gimels so that the dreidel-maker can't use them. But then the other letters learn that the Hanukkah story wouldn't be complete without the Gimels! Is it too late for the missing letters to be found?























[book] Moti the Mitzvah Mouse
by Vivian Newman
Illustrated by Inga Knipp-Kolpert
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Moti, the busy little mitzvah mouse, works all night, secretly doing good deeds for his human family and his animal friends. Who will do a mitzvah for Moti?Vivian Newman has an M.S. in Early Childhood Education from Bank Street College of Education and a certificate in Jewish Early Childhood Education from Hebrew College. In addition to writing, she is an Educational Consultant for PJ Library, an initiative of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation. Her previous chldren s books include Ella sTrip to Israel and Tikkun Olam Ted.























[book] Rosie Saves the World
by Debbie Herman
Illustrated by Debbie Herman
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Rosie can't wait to start doing good deeds to save the world. But as she helps the people in her neighborhood, she is soon so busy saving the world that she doesn't have time for her own family! It turns out, though, that the greatest acts of tikkun olam—repairing the world—start in her own home.























[book] Way Too Many Latkes:
A Hanukkah in Chelm
by Linda Glaser
Illustrated by Aleksander Zolotic
August 2017

Kar Ben
Ages 4 – 8
Faigel makes the best Hanukkah latkes in Chelm, but somehow, this year she's forgotten how to make them! She sends her husband, Shmuel, to ask the rabbi for help. And in Chelm, the village of fools—oy vey!—this becomes a recipe for disaster!























[book] Big Sam
A Rosh Hashanah Tall Tale
by Eric A. Kimmel and
Jim Starr (Illustrator)
Apples & Honey Press
August 2017

How does Big Sam make a GIANT-sized challah for Rosh Hashanah?

He digs an enormous hole in the ground to use as a mixing bowl. (It's still there today we call it the Grand Canyon.)

He adds mountains of flour, thousands of eggs, and other good things.

He whittles a massive California redwood tree into a mixing spoon. He flattens the hills of West Texas as he kneads the dough. And he bakes it inside Mount Saint Helens.

But when it's time to celebrate the holiday, the eagles call out, "Not so fast, Big Sam!" Rosh Hashanah is about fixing the world, and Big Sam has some MAJOR cleaning up to do.




























[book] Little Red Ruthie:
A Hanukkah Tale
by Gloria Koster
Sue Eastland (Illustrator)
Albert Whitman
August 2017
Ages Pre-K - 5
It was a chilly winter in the northern woods, but Ruthie did not mind. Dressed in her favorite puffy red coat, she was going to spend Hanukkah with her grandmother, who lived on the other side of the forest. Ruthie was bringing sour cream and applesauce to go along with the yummy latkes. She carefully packed her basket and kissed her mother good-bye. Snow began to fall. Soon Ruthie was lost in a thicket, and she was not alone. Someone was hiding behind the tree, and when he jumped out, Ruthie found herself face to face with a wolf. Ruthie will have to convince the wolf that eating latkes will be tastier than eating her!


























[book] Yom Kippur Shortstop
by David A. Adler and
Andre Ceolin (Illustrator)
Apples & Honey Press
August 2017

Bam! It's a speedy drive over second base. I jump and catch it. My whole team shouts, 'Jacob, you saved the game!';
It's Jacob's third year in Little League, and he's never missed a game. The championship game is coming up, and his team is counting on him. But then he finds out the game is scheduled on the holiday of Yom Kippur. The game is important. and Jacob has a decision to make.
Jacob's story was inspired by the Los Angeles Dodgers' star pitcher Sandy Koufax, who sat out a 1965 World Series game on Yom Kippur. He was a hero to people everywhere who have made difficult decisions in order to observe their religious holidays.


























[book] Judah Maccabee Goes to the Doctor
by Ann D. Koffsky
and Talitha Shipman (Illustrator)
Apples & Honey Press
August 2017

More than anything, Judah wants to be a good big brother to his baby sister, Hannah. He even uses his new Maccabee shield to protect her from danger!

On the last day of Hanukkah, during a visit to the doctor, Judah refuses to have his shot. Surely, his shield can protect him from germs, too!


















See also:
[book] [book]





































[book] Offal Good:
Cooking from the Heart, with Guts
by Chris Cosentino and Michael Harlan Turkell
August 29, 2017

Clarkson Potter

Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeei

The off cuts, the odd bits, the variety meats, the fifth quarter—it seems that offal is always hidden, given a soft-pedaled name, and left for someone else to eat. But it wasn't always this way, and it certainly shouldn't be.
Offal—the organs and the under-heralded parts from tongue to trotter—are some of the most delicious, flavorful, nutritious cuts of meat, and this is your guide to mastering how to cook them. Through both traditional and wildly creative recipes, Chris Cosentino takes you from nose-to-tail, describing the basic prep and best cooking methods for every offal cut from beef, lamb, poultry, and more.

Anatomy class was never so delicious.




























[book] Ruth Bader Ginsburg:
The Case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality
by Jonah Winter
Stacy Innerst (Illustrator)
August 2017

Harry Abrams
Ages 6 – 9
To become the first female Jewish Supreme Court Justice, the unsinkable Ruth Bader Ginsburg had to overcome countless injustices. Growing up in Brooklyn in the 1930s and ’40s, Ginsburg was discouraged from working by her father, who thought a woman’s place was in the home. Regardless, she went to Cornell University, where men outnumbered women four to one. There, she met her husband, Martin Ginsburg, and found her calling as a lawyer. Despite discrimination against Jews, females, and working mothers, Ginsburg went on to become Columbia Law School’s first tenured female professor, a judge for the US Court of Appeals, and finally, a Supreme Court Justice.

Structured as a court case in which the reader is presented with evidence of the injustice that Ginsburg faced, Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the true story of how one of America’s most “notorious” women bravely persevered to become the remarkable symbol of justice she is today.























[book] Where the Line Is Drawn:
A Tale of Crossings, Friendships,
and Fifty Years of Occupation
in Israel-Palestine
Summer 2017

THE NEW PRESS
In what has become a classic of Middle Eastern literature, Raja Shehadeh, in Palestinian Walks, wrote of his treks through the hills surrounding Ramallah over a period of three decades under Israel’s occupation.

In Where the Line Is Drawn, Shehadeh explores how he thinks that the occupation has affected him personally, chronicling the various crossings that he undertook into Israel over a period of forty years to visit friends and family, to enjoy the sea, to argue before the Israeli courts, and to negotiate failed peace agreements.

Those forty years also saw him develop a close friendship with Henry, a Canadian Jew who immigrated to Israel at around the same time Shehadeh returned to Palestine from studying in London. While offering an unforgettably poignant exploration of Palestinian-Israeli relationships, Where the Line Is Drawn also provides an anatomy of friendship and an exploration of whether, in the bleakest of circumstances, it is possible for bonds to transcend political divisions.



























[book] The Last Palestinian:
The Rise and Reign of Mahmoud Abbas
by Grant Rumley and
Amir Tibon (Haaretz)
Summer 2017

PROMETHEUS BOOKS
Mahmoud Abbas rose to prominence as a top Palestinian negotiator, became the leader of his nation, and then tragically failed to negotiate a peace agreement. This is the first book in English that focuses on one of the most important fixtures of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Filled with new details and based on interviews with key figures in Ramallah, Jerusalem, and Washington, this book weaves together a fascinating story that will interest both veteran observers of the conflict and readers new to Israeli-Palestinian history.

The authors, one a research fellow at a nonpartisan Washington think tank and the other an award-winning diplomatic correspondent for Israel's largest news website, tell the inside story of Abbas's complicated multi-decade relationship with America, Israel, and his own people. They trace his upbringing in Galilee, his family's escape from the 1948 Israeli-Arab war, and his education abroad. They chart his rise to prominence as a pivotal actor in the Oslo peace process of the 1990s and his unsuccessful attempt to offer a nonviolent alternative to the Second Intifada.

The authors pay special attention to the crucial years of 2005 to 2014, exploring such questions as: How did Abbas lose control of half of his governing territory and the support of more than half of his people? Why was Abbas the most prominent Palestinian leader to denounce terrorism? Why did Abbas twice walk away from peace offers from Israel and the U.S. in 2008 and 2014? And how did he turn himself from the first world leader to receive a phone call from President Obama to a person who ultimately lost the faith of the American president?

Concluding that Abbas will most likely be judged a tragic figure, the authors emphasize that much of his historical importance will depend on the state of the peace process after he is gone. Only the future will determine which of the emerging schools of Palestinian political thought will hold sway and how it will affect the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.





















[book] The Soviet-Israeli War, 1967-1973:
The USSR's Military Intervention
in the Egyptian-Israeli Conflict
by Isabella Ginor (Hebrew U)
and Gideon Remez (Hebrew Univ)
Summer 2017

Oxford Univ Press
Russia's forceful re-entry into the Middle Eastern arena, and the accentuated continuity of Soviet policy and methods of the 1960s and '70s, highlight the topicality of this groundbreaking study, which confirms the USSR's role in shaping Middle Eastern and global history.

This book covers the peak of the USSR's direct military involvement in the Egyptian-Israeli conflict. The head-on clash between US-armed Israeli forces and some 20,000 Soviet servicemen with state-of-the-art weaponry turned the Middle East into the hottest front of the Cold War. The Soviets' success in this war of attrition paved the way for their planning and support of Egypt's cross-canal offensive in the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

Ginor and Remez challenge a series of long-accepted notions as to the scope, timeline and character of the Soviet intervention and overturn the conventional view that détente with the US induced Moscow to restrainthat a US-Moscow détente led to a curtailment of Egyptian ambitions to recapture of the land it lost to Israel in 1967. Between this analytical rethink and the introduction of an entirely new genre of sources-- -memoirs and other publications by Soviet veterans themselves---The Soviet-Israeli War paves the way for scholars to revisit this pivotal moment in world history.




















SEPTEMBER 2017 BOOKS




[book] WHAT HAPPENED.
by Hillary Rodham Clinton
(former U.S. Senator, D-NY)
(Former U.S. Secretary of State)
(Former candidate for POTUS, November 2016)
September 12 2017

Simon & Schuster


“In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.” —Hillary Rodham Clinton, from the introduction of What Happened

For the first time, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what SHE was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.

Now free from the constraints of running, Hillary takes you inside the intense personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. If it is to be believed, this is her most personal memoir yet.

In these pages, Clinton describes what it was like to run against Donald Trump, the mistakes she made, how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, and how she found the strength to pick herself back up afterward.

Surprisingly, she lays a lot of blame on Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. This was quite surprising. But the full book must be read to see if she takes any blame on her self and her own problems as a candidate and issues with connecting with the voters. If you are looking for any sort of smoking gun on how the DNC helped her in the primaries, this will not be in here.

But with humor and calculated candor, she tells readers what it took to get back on her feet—the rituals, relationships, and reading that got her through, and what the experience has taught her about life. She speaks about the challenges of being a strong woman in the public eye, the criticism over her voice, age, and appearance, and the double standard confronting women in politics.

She writes that the 2016 election saw an unprecedented assault on American democracy by a foreign adversary (Russia). By analyzing the evidence and connecting the dots, Hillary shows just how dangerous the forces are that shaped the outcome, and why Americans need to understand them to protect our values and our democracy in the future.

The election of 2016 was unprecedented and historic. What Happened is the story of that campaign from the POV of Hillary Clinton, who received over 70% of America's Jewish vote, and its aftermath—both a deeply intimate account and a cautionary tale for the nation.


See also:

[book]










































[book] What Is It All but Luminous:
Notes from an Underground Man
by Art Garfunkel
Sep. 2017

KNOPF
From the golden-haired, curly-headed half of Simon & Garfunkel--a memoir (of sorts): artful, moving, lyrical; the making of a musician; the evolution of a man, a portrait of a life-long friendship and collaboration that became one of the most successful singing duos of their time.

Art Garfunkel writes about his life before, during, and after Simon & Garfunkel . . . about their folk-rock music in the roiling age that embraced and was defined by their pathbreaking sound. He writes about growing up in the 1940s and '50s (son of a traveling salesman), a middle class Jewish boy, living in a red brick semi-attached house in Kew Gardens, Queens, a kid who was different--from the age of five feeling his vocal cords "vibrating with the love of sound" . . . meeting Paul Simon in school, the funny guy who made Art laugh; their going on to junior high school together, of being twelve at the birth of rock'n'roll, both of them "captured" by it; going to a recording studio in Manhattan to make a demo of their song, "Hey Schoolgirl" (for $7!) and the actual record (with Paul's father on bass) going to #40 on the national charts, selling 150,000 copies . . .

He writes about their becoming Simon & Garfunkel, taking the world by storm, ruling the pop charts from the time he was sixteen, about not being a natural performer, but more a thinker . . . touring; sex-for-thrills on the road, reading or walking to calm down (walking across two continents--the USA and Europe). He writes of being an actor working with directors Nicolas Roeg (Bad Timing) and Mike Nichols ("the greatest of them all") . . . getting his masters in mathematics at Columbia; choosing music over a PhD; his slow unfolding split with Paul and its aftermath; learning to perform on his own, giving a thousand concerts worldwide, his voice going south (a stiffening of one vocal cord) and working to get it back . . . about being a husband, a father and much more.




























[book] Dinner at the Center
of the Earth:
A novel
by Nathan Englander
September 2017

Knopf

The best work yet from the Pulitzer finalist and best-selling author of For the Relief of Unbearable Urges--a political thriller that unfolds in the highly charged territory of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and pivots on the complex relationship between a secret prisoner and his guard.

A prisoner in a secret cell. The guard who has watched over him a dozen years. An American waitress in Paris. A young Palestinian man in Berlin who strikes up an odd friendship with a wealthy Canadian businessman. And The General, Israel's most controversial leader, who lies dying in a hospital, the only man who knows of the prisoner's existence.

From these vastly different lives Nathan Englander has woven a powerful, intensely suspenseful portrait of a nation riven by insoluble conflict, even as the lives of its citizens become fatefully and inextricably entwined--a political thriller of the highest order that interrogates the anguished, violent division between Israelis and Palestinians, and dramatizes the immense moral ambiguities haunting both sides. Who is right, who is wrong--who is the guard, who is truly the prisoner?

A tour de force from one of America's most acclaimed voices in contemporary fiction.


























[book] THE DIVINE AND THE HUMAN
The Great Shift:
Encountering God in Biblical Times
by James L. Kugel, PhD
September 12, 2017

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A world-renowned scholar brings a lifetime of study to reveal how a pivotal transformation in spiritual experience during the Biblical Era made us who we are today

Why does the Bible depict a world in which humans, with surprising regularity, encounter the divine—wrestling an angel, addressing a burning bush, issuing forth prophecy without any choice in the matter? These stories spoke very differently to their original audience than they do to us, and they reflect a radically distinct understanding of reality and the human mind. Yet over the course of the thousand-year Biblical Era, encounters with God changed dramatically. As James L. Kugel argues, this transition allows us to glimpse a massive shift in human experience—the emergence of the modern, Western sense of self.

In this landmark work, Kugel fuses revelatory close readings of ancient texts with modern scholarship from a range of fields, including neuroscience, anthropology, psychology, and archaeology, to explain the origins of belief, worship, and the sense of self, and the changing nature of God through history. In the tradition of books like The Swerve and The Better Angels of Our Nature,The Great Shift tells the story of a revolution in human consciousness and the enchantment of everyday life. This book will make believers and seekers think differently not just about the Bible, but about the entire history of the human imagination.


























[book] EINSTEIN AND THE RABBI: SEARCHING FOR THE SOUL
by Rabbi Naomi Levy
(Nashuva, Los Angeles)
September 2017

Flatiron Books

A bestselling author and rabbi’s profoundly affecting exploration of the meaning and purpose of the soul, inspired by the famous correspondence between Albert Einstein and a grieving rabbi, and not just any rabbi, but one of the greatest of the twentieth century that no one recalls.

“A human being is part of the whole, called by us ‘Universe,’ a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts, and feelings as something separate from the rest - a kind of optical DELUSION of his consciousness...” -Albert Einstein

When Rabbi Naomi Levy came across this poignant letter by Einstein it shook her to her core.

His words perfectly captured what she has come to believe about the human condition: That we are intimately connected, and that we are blind to this truth. Levy wondered what had elicited such spiritual wisdom from a man of science? Thus began a three-year search into the mystery of Einstein’s letter, and into the mystery of the human soul, that took Rabbi Levy around the world to interview people from Rabbi Lau, Elie Wiesel, Caltech's Kip Thorne, the family of the late Rabbi (Dr) Marcus and more.

What emerges is an inspiring, deeply affecting book for people of all faiths filled with universal truths that will help us reclaim our own souls and glimpse the unity that has been evading us. We all long to see more expansively, to live up to our gifts, to understand why we are here. Levy leads us on a breathtaking journey full of wisdom, empathy and humor, challenging us to wake up and heed the voice calling from within-a voice beckoning us to become who we were born be.


Just some more information as background. The universe is a thick cholent soup, where the eat and potatoes melt into each other. As you may know from earlier books, Rabbi Levy knew she wanted to be a rabbi since the age of four, while growing up in Boro Park/Brooklyn and at Yeshiva of Flatbush. AT the age of 15 her father was murdered and she lost interest in religion and much of life. Dragged to a lecture at the 92nd St Y by Elie Wiesel as a teen, she has a slight epiphany and rejoined life. In college, she thought she was going crazy when she started to feel her father's departed soul close to her. A teacher told her to embrace it. Dr. (Rabbi) Marcus was a young Captain and Army Chaplain in Patton's army. He was also an NYU Law grad. He was in Europe on D-Day, and was the first U.S Army rabbi to arrive at Buchenwald. With his wife and three children back in the United States during WWII, he remained at the liberated Buchenwald to save the surviving children, set up Kibbutz Buchenwald, get many of the orphans to France and Israel. Rabbi Marcus was righteous. One survivor was Elie Wiesel, another grew up to be the Chief Rabbi of Israel. On his ship to Haifa, Palestine, one of the passengers is now known as Dr. Ruth Westheimer. After the war, Rabbi Marcus returned to America and his family and worked to set up the World Jewish Congress with Rabbi Stephen Wise. When Rabbi Marcus' beloved son died of polio at a bungalow, Rabbi Marcus did not write to his rebbe, Rabbi Soloveitchik, but to Albert Einstein. And Einstein replied, saying that it is a delusion that we are separate; that the past, present, and future are different; and that souls are around us. A while after the letter, Rabbi Marcus passed away at age 41 from cardiac arrest, and is forgotten to most people until now. SIMPLY... THIS IS THE MUST READ of 2017.












[book] If All the Seas Were Ink:
A Memoir
by Ilana Kurshan
September 2017

St. Martin's Press

Ilana Kurshan grew up on Long Island, NY, the daughter of a rabbi, in a family that had to sit in the front pews, with all eyes on them. She attended a Schecter school through eighth grade; and as a voracious reader, she studied at Harvard and became a translator and literary agent. Marrying, she and her husband, like many young couples, moved to Israel to start their newlywed lives. Sadly, the marriage faltered after the move, and a painful divorce followed. Kurshan, an accomplished literary analyst, began to study the Talmud daily, and compare it to her daily life. Perhaps she chose late night classes so she could avoid being alone at home, a divorced woman not knowing if she would find love again.

Here she was in the promised land of dreams, yet she was feeling lost in the wilderness. But studying a page (Daf) a day (Yomi), and joining the tens of thousand of others around the world who study the same page, one page a day, of the Babylonian Talmud over the seven and a half year it takes to finish all the tractates, was like a daily dose of Xanax -- an anchor on the seas of ink (but not one that drowns you).

Slowly we follow the author as she recovers from divorce and an eating disorder and seeks new love and pregnancy, and as she compares the writings of the Talmud's rabbis to her own adventures, and to the writings of her literary heroes. She lugs a heavy tractate with her everywhere, even on the flights to literary conferences in Europe. Actually, there is a page on her interrogation by an El Al security agent at Heathrow that throws her into a sadness. (Where are you going? Why do you live in Israel if your friends are elsewhere, Why, Why Why, etc.) But fortunately the structure of the daf yomi was there to help. A fascinating, intelligent adventure.

This memoir is a tale of heartache and humor, of love and loss, of marriage and motherhood, and of learning to put one foot in front of the other by turning page after page. Kurshan takes us on a deeply accessible and personal guided tour of the Talmud, shedding new light on its stories and offering insights into its arguments-both for those already familiar with the text and for those who have never encountered it. For people of the book-both Jewish and non-Jewish-If All the Seas Were Ink is a celebration of learning-through literature-how to fall in love once again.

























[book] Modern Jewish Baker:
Challah, Babka,
Bagels & More
by Shannon Sarna
September 2017

Countryman Press
Step-by-step instructions for the seven core doughs of Jewish baking.
Jewish baked goods have brought families together around the table for centuries. In Modern Jewish Baker, Sarna pays homage to those traditions while reinvigorating them with modern flavors and new ideas. One kosher dough at a time, she offers the basics for challah, babka, bagels, hamantaschen, rugelach, pita, and matzah. Never one to shy away from innovation, Sarna sends her readers off on a bake-your-own adventure with twists on these classics. Recipes include:
Chocolate Chip Hamantaschen
Tomato-Basil Challah
Everything-Bagel Rugelach
S’mores Babka

(hey.. her dog is named babka

Detailed instructions, as well as notes on make-ahead strategies, ideas for using leftovers, and other practical tips will have even novice bakers braiding beautiful shiny loaves that will make any bubbe proud.

































[book] The German-Jewish Cookbook:
Recipes and History of a Cuisine
(HBI Series on Jewish Women)
by Gabrielle Rossmer Gropman
and Sonya Gropman
Nach Waxman (Contributor)
September 2017


This cookbook features recipes for German-Jewish cuisine as it existed in Germany prior to World War II, and as refugees later adapted it in the United States and elsewhere. Because these dishes differ from more familiar Jewish food, they will be a discovery for many people. With a focus on fresh, seasonal ingredients, this indispensable collection of recipes includes numerous soups, both chilled and hot; vegetable dishes; meats, poultry, and fish; fruit desserts; cakes; and the German version of challah, Berches. These elegant and mostly easy-to-make recipes range from light summery fare to hearty winter foods. The Gropmans—a mother-daughter author pair—have honored the original recipes Gabrielle learned after arriving as a baby in Washington Heights from Germany in 1939, while updating their format to reflect contemporary standards of recipe writing.

Six recipe chapters offer easy-to-follow instructions for weekday meals, Shabbos and holiday meals, sausage and cold cuts, vegetables, coffee and cake, and core recipes basic to the preparation of German-Jewish cuisine.

Some of these recipes come from friends and family of the authors; others have been culled from interviews conducted by the authors, prewar German-Jewish cookbooks, nineteenth-century American cookbooks, community cookbooks, memoirs, or historical and archival material. The introduction explains the basics of Jewish diet (kosher law). The historical chapter that follows sets the stage by describing Jewish social customs in Germany and then offering a look at life in the vibrant émigré community of Washington Heights in New York City in the 1940s and 1950s.

Vividly illustrated with more than fifty drawings by Megan Piontkowski and photographs by Sonya Gropman that show the cooking process as well as the delicious finished dishes, this cookbook will appeal to readers curious about ethnic cooking and how it has evolved, and to anyone interested in exploring delicious new recipes.

































[book] Modern Israeli Cooking:
100 New Recipes for
Traditional Classics
by Danielle Oron
NOW IN PAPERBACK
November 2017
Page Street reprint
Oron studied at The French Culinary Institute-now the International Culinary Center-and draws cooking inspiration from her Israeli and Moroccan background. Oron is the chef and owner of Moo Milk Bar in Toronto. In Modern Israeli Cooking, Oron offers an incredible collection of Israeli recipes for the modern home cook.

Oron takes inspiration from dishes like Schnitzel platters, potato latkes and falafel and adapts them with a modern eye to create Israeli-inspired recipes like Cornflake-Crusted Schnitzel Sandwiches with Pickled Radishes and Spicy Mayo, Latkes Eggs Benedict with Smoked Salmon and Herby Sour Cream Sauce, and Green Spinach Falafel.

Even the format gets a modern twist with chapters like Weekdays-Everyday Kind of Food; Friday-Special dishes made on Shabbat or holidays; Beach-Just like sitting in Tel Aviv on the beach; Midnight-It's late, and you're hungry aka the carb chapter; and more.

































[book] BACO
Vivid Recipes from the Heart
of Los Angeles
by Josef Centeno and Betty Hallock
Dylan James Ho (Photographer)
Jeni Afuso (Photographer)
September 2017

Chronicle Books
Visually stunning and conceptually fresh, this is the cookbook of the season from Josef Centeno, the chef credited with capturing the myriad tastes of Los Angeles on the plate. Recipes span from simple to show stopping, exploring sauces, soups, mains, salads, and desserts, too. More than 130 vivid photographs convey the beauty and excitement of Chef Centeno's extraordinary cooking.
A decade ago, Josef Centeno, after working at Daniel, impressed Los Angeles with his cooking at Lazy Ox Canteen in Little Tokyo. From there he impressed as the chef and owner of Bäco Mercat, Bacoshop (Culver City takeaway), Bar Amá, Orsa & Winston, Ledlow, and P.Y.T. His main restaurant is known for a mashup of Asian, Latin American, Middle Eastern and Moroccan dishes. In his cookbook, Bäco, he draws on his multicultural heritage, and he layers textures, sauces, and spices, specifically he layers citrus, herbs, vinegar and spices; and allows us to experience his LA food scene without having to travel to Southern California.
In his nine chapters, he says he groups it by flavor and texture. To make a meal, you need to mix and match.

The chapters move from lighter to heavier. The lightest is Chapter 1 (spicy salty pickled preserved); it has 45 recipes of sauces, marinades, pickles, preserves, dressings and condiments. They are heavy on tradition, but he invites you to modify whatever you desire. His great grandmother, for example, modified her Tejano cooking with carrots instead of peppers. This first chapter, alone, makes it the most unique cookbook of 2017. Eight of the unique recipes are (a) Sharp and pungent Mint and rose pickled red onions, inspired by Middle Eastern and Mexican flavors a la San Antonio with serrano and habanero chiles and rosebud; (b) sweet and sour huckleberries with sherry vinegar, pepper and cinnamon stick (or pickled ones; (c) Baharat; (d) Berbere; (e) a Coffee-spice dry rub; (f) Adjika (Abkhazaian and Georgian) vinaigrette; (g) several dukkas; and (h) Kochkocha (Ethiopian hot sauce).

CHAPTER 2 (fresh green snappy light) has 9 recipes that are about juxtaposition and balance. So “Belgian red endive and blood oranges with blue cheese, dukkah, and Banyuls vanaigrette” takes a bitter, sweet, nutty, crunchy chicory leaves with bkue cheese and citrus. And “Tuscan meln and Persian cucumber salad with cacik” takes a sweet creamy melon with a crunchy cuke and earthy toasted walnuts. CHAPTER 3 (bright citrusy, zest, hardy) shares nine recipes for “brassicas” or mustards, cauliflowers, and cabbages. Cauliflower is the best selling dishes in the restaurants. “Caesar” Brussel sprouts is a must try, as are “Sauteed broccolini with Mexican umami-rich sriracha and queso fresco” and “Flowering choy with lime and f.s. Vinaigrette.”

CHAPTER 4 (buttery crispy tangy herbal) has 11 recipes, a secret to achieving crisyness, and the recipe for Baco flatbread; it starts with “Griddled corn cake with aonori mascarpone butter, and includes :Tomato-dill pappardelle with caraway bread crumbs.” CHAPTER 5 (earthy sharp velvety savory) has 11 recipes that are led by the oxymoronic “beets bi tahina with Japanese sesame paste,” and “English pea and dill 'hummus' with Parmigiano-Regiano and dill,” and includes “Bulgur pancakes with grape leaves, raisins and goat cheese (which he also calls inside out grape leaves).”

CHAPTER 6 (creamy nutty crunchy floral) contains over a dozen recipes, including one for barley porridge with ginger and sauteed oranges, and one for creamy grits with blistered tomatoes, pickled serrano chiles and sunflower-miso tahini. CHAPTER 7 (tender juicy peppery rich) focuses on meat and poultry, including Sichuan pepper lamb top round with English pea and parsley salad; coffee-rubbed prime rib with mint and rose pickled red onions; “Whole roasted orange- and soy-glazed duck;” and Lamb and tomato stew with chickpeas and curry lead Meyer lemon pickle.

CHAPTER 8 (flaky fruity caramely tart) has 8 recipes, including “Blueberry sesame cake with cardamom sugar;” two fools; “Salty caramel;” and “Yogurt panna cotta with pickled huckleberries.” CHAPTER 9 (bubbly sweet sour vivid) shares nearly a dozen recipes for shrubs, mashes, and drinks, including ones for Sudachi-cucumber yogurt drink; Ginger syrup; Peach-sumac shrub, and Blackberry-Thai basil fruit mash.
































[book] THE BOOK OF SEPARATION
A MEMOIR
by Tova Mirvis
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
September 2017

OMG... WHO KNEW?
The memoir of a woman who leaves her faith and her marriage and sets out to navigate the terrifying, liberating terrain of a newly map-less world.

Born and raised in a tight-knit Orthodox Jewish family, Tova Mirvis committed herself to observing the rules and rituals prescribed by this way of life. After all, to observe was to be accepted and to be accepted was to be loved. She married a man from within the fold and quickly began a family.
But over the years, her doubts became noisier than her faith, and at age forty she could no longer breathe in what had become a suffocating existence. Even though it would mean the loss of her friends, her community, and possibly even her family, Tova decides to leave her husband and her faith.

After years of trying to silence the voice inside her that said she did not agree, did not fit in, did not believe, she strikes out on her own to discover what she does believe and who she really is. This will mean forging a new way of life not just for herself, but for her children, who are struggling with what the divorce and her new status as “not Orthodox” mean for them.

This is a memoir about what it means to decide to heed your inner compass at long last. To free the part of yourself that has been suppressed, even if it means walking away from the only life you’ve ever known. Honest and courageous, Tova takes us through her first year outside her marriage and community as she learns to silence her fears and seek adventure on her own path to happiness.




























[book] One Long Night
A Global History of Concentration Camps
by Andrea Pitzer
Little, Brown
September 2017

A groundbreaking, haunting, and profoundly moving history of modernity's greatest tragedy: concentration camps

For over 100 years, at least one concentration camp has existed somewhere on Earth. First used as battlefield strategy, camps have evolved with each passing decade, in the scope of their effects and the savage practicality with which governments have employed them. Even in the twenty-first century, as we continue to reckon with the magnitude and horror of the Holocaust, history tells us we have broken our own solemn promise of "never again."
In this harrowing work based on archival records and interviews during travel to four continents, Andrea Pitzer reveals for the first time the chronological and geopolitical history of concentration camps. Beginning with 1890s Cuba, she pinpoints concentration camps around the world and across decades. From the Philippines and Southern Africa in the early twentieth century to the Soviet Gulag and detention camps in China and North Korea during the Cold War, camp systems have been used as tools for civilian relocation and political repression. Often justified as a measure to protect a nation, or even the interned groups themselves, camps have instead served as brutal and dehumanizing sites that have claimed the lives of millions.
Drawing from exclusive testimony, landmark historical scholarship, and stunning research, Andrea Pitzer unearths the roots of this appalling phenomenon, exploring and exposing the staggering toll of the camps: our greatest atrocities, the extraordinary survivors, and even the intimate, quiet moments that have also been part of camp life during the past century




























[book] LEADING TONES
Reflections on Music, Musicians,
and the Music Industry
by Leonard Slatkin
Maestro
Amadeus Press/Montclair
September 2017

Leading Tones is a glimpse into several aspects of the musical world. There are portions devoted to Leonard Slatkin's life as a musician and conductor, portraits of some of the outstanding artists with whom he has worked, as well as anecdotes and stories both personal and professional. Much of the book discusses elements of the industry that are troubling and difficult during this first part of the 21st century. Auditions, critics, fiscal concerns, and labor negotiations are all matters that today's conductors must be aware of, and this book provides helpful suggested solutions. Leading Tones is intended not only for musicians, but also for the music lover who wishes to know more about what goes into being a conductor.

Slatkin also delves into his relationships with Eugenne Ormandy, Isaac Stern, Gilbert Kaplan, John Browning, John Williams, and Nathan Milstein

























[book] Putting Wealth to Work:
Philanthropy for Today or
Investing for Tomorrow?
by Joel L. Fleishman
(Duke University)
PublicAffairs (not Mesorah)
September 2017


During the next twenty years, as part of the largest transfer of wealth in history, more than $500 billion is expected to pour into the philanthropic sector. Some of it will come from retiring baby boomers, but even more will come from newly rich Silicon Valley billionaires. Since 2006, the appeal of "giving while living" has grown, so much so that many philanthropic donors now expect not just to give money during their lifetimes, but to create organizations or ventures-some for profit, others not for profit-whose missions are expected to be completed within the lifetime of the donors. The combination of these two trends has transformed the not-for-profit sector in scale and dynamism, attracting some skeptical scrutiny along the way.

Philanthrocapitalism has acquired some of the trappings of financialization, and has the potential to deliver ever greater impact. But will it? And will the demand that the impact be quickly realized mean that longer-term institution-building missions will be neglected?

Joel L. Fleishman is one of the wisest of wise men in philanthropy whose advice is routinely sought by organizations and individuals across the country. In Putting Wealth to Work, he tells the story of a uniquely American financial sector, all but created by Andrew Carnegie's example, that since 1995 has become more dynamic with every passing year. Staggering personal fortunes are made and given away, from Bill Gates to Mark Zuckerberg, as in no previous era since the golden age of American capitalism. America currently leads the world in this trend-of the 138 signers of the giving-while-living pledge, 110 were American-but the world is following in its footsteps. This movement of socially motivated capital is unprecedented and its consequences are potentially transformative for the American economy and the world at large.

Did I mention that Professor Fleishman has been a leader of Artscroll and Mesorah? He also wrote about Wine for Vanity Fair for nearly a decade, and serves on the Board of Ralph Lauren Inc.


























[book] Hollywood’s Spies:
The Undercover Surveillance
of Nazis in Los Angeles
(Goldstein-Goren Series in
American Jewish History)
by Laura B. Rosenzweig, PhD
NYU Press
September 2017


Tells the remarkable story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who established the first anti-Nazi Jewish resistance organization in the country in the 1930s
In April 1939, Warner Brothers studios released the first Hollywood film to confront the Nazi threat in the United States. Confessions of a Nazi Spy, starring Edward G. Robinson, told the story of German agents in New York City working to overthrow the U.S. Government. The film alerted Americans to the dangers of Nazism at home and encouraged them to defend against it.
Confessions of a Nazi Spy may have been the first cinematic shot fired by Hollywood against Nazis in America, but it by no means marked the political awakening of the film industry’s Jewish executives to the problem. Hollywood’s Spies tells the remarkable story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who paid private investigators to infiltrate Nazi groups operating in Los Angeles, establishing the first anti-Nazi Jewish resistance organization in the country—the Los Angeles Jewish Community Committee (LAJCC).
Drawing on more than 15,000 pages of archival documents, Laura B. Rosenzweig offers a compelling narrative illuminating the role that Jewish Americans played in combating insurgent Nazism in the United States in the 1930s. Forced undercover by the anti-Semitic climate of the decade, the LAJCC partnered with organizations whose Americanism was unimpeachable, such as the American Legion, to channel information regarding seditious Nazi plots to Congress, the Justice Department, the FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department.
. Hollywood’s Spies corrects the decades-long belief that American Jews lacked the political organization and leadership to assert their political interests during this period in our history and reveals that the LAJCC was one of many covert "fact finding" operations funded by Jewish Americans designed to root out Nazism in the United States


























[book] The Rise and Fall of
Adam and Eve
by Stephen Greenblatt, PhD
September 2017

WW Norton
Stephen Greenblatt-Pulitzer Prize– and National Book Award–winning author of The Swerve and Will in the World-investigates the life of one of humankind’s greatest stories.
Bolder, even, than the ambitious books for which Stephen Greenblatt is already renowned, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve explores the enduring story of humanity’s first parents. Comprising only a few ancient verses, the story of Adam and Eve has served as a mirror in which we seem to glimpse the whole, long history of our fears and desires, as both a hymn to human responsibility and a dark fable about human wretchedness.
Tracking the tale into the deep past, Greenblatt uncovers the tremendous theological, artistic, and cultural investment over centuries that made these fictional figures so profoundly resonant in the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim worlds and, finally, so very “real” to millions of people even in the present. With the uncanny brilliance he previously brought to his depictions of William Shakespeare and Poggio Bracciolini (the humanist monk who is the protagonist of The Swerve), Greenblatt explores the intensely personal engagement of Augustine, Dürer, and Milton in this mammoth project of collective creation, while he also limns the diversity of the story’s offspring: rich allegory, vicious misogyny, deep moral insight, and some of the greatest triumphs of art and literature.
The biblical origin story, Greenblatt argues, is a model for what the humanities still have to offer: not the scientific nature of things, but rather a deep encounter with problems that have gripped our species for as long as we can recall and that continue to fascinate and trouble us today.






























[book] Arithmetic
by Paul Lockhart
St Ann's School, Brooklyn
September 2017

Harvard / Belknap
Because evolution endowed humans with a complement of ten fingers, a grouping size of ten seems natural to us, perhaps even ideal. But from the perspective of mathematics, groupings of ten are arbitrary, and can have serious shortcomings. Twelve would be better for divisibility, and eight is smaller and well suited to repeated halving. Grouping by two, as in binary code, has turned out to have its own remarkable advantages.

Paul Lockhart reveals arithmetic not as the rote manipulation of numbers-a practical if mundane branch of knowledge best suited for balancing a checkbook or filling out tax forms-but as a set of ideas that exhibit the fascinating and sometimes surprising behaviors usually reserved for higher branches of mathematics. The essence of arithmetic is the skillful arrangement of numerical information for ease of communication and comparison, an elegant intellectual craft that arises from our desire to count, add to, take away from, divide up, and multiply quantities of important things. Over centuries, humans devised a variety of strategies for representing and using numerical information, from beads and tally marks to adding machines and computers. Lockhart explores the philosophical and aesthetic nature of counting and of different number systems, both Western and non-Western, weighing the pluses and minuses of each.

A passionate, entertaining survey of foundational ideas and methods, Arithmetic invites readers to experience the profound and simple beauty of its subject through the eyes of a modern research mathematician.
































[book] Forest Dark:
A Novel
by Nicole Krauss
September 2017

Harper

"A brilliant novel. I am full of admiration." —Philip Roth

"One of America’s most important novelists" (New York Times), the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of The History of Love, conjures an achingly beautiful and breathtakingly original novel about personal transformation that interweaves the stories of two disparate individuals—an older lawyer and a young novelist—whose transcendental search leads them to the same Israeli desert.

Jules Epstein, a man whose drive, avidity, and outsized personality have, for sixty-eight years, been a force to be reckoned with, is undergoing a metamorphosis. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, his divorce from his wife of more than thirty years, and his retirement from the New York legal firm where he was a partner, he’s felt an irresistible need to give away his possessions, alarming his children and perplexing the executor of his estate. With the last of his wealth, he travels to Israel, with a nebulous plan to do something to honor his parents. In Tel Aviv, he is sidetracked by a charismatic American rabbi planning a reunion for the descendants of King David who insists that Epstein is part of that storied dynastic line. He also meets the rabbi’s beautiful daughter who convinces Epstein to become involved in her own project—a film about the life of David being shot in the desert—with life-changing consequences.

But Epstein isn’t the only seeker embarking on a metaphysical journey that dissolves his sense of self, place, and history. Leaving her family in Brooklyn, a young, well-known novelist arrives at the Tel Aviv Hilton where she has stayed every year since birth. Troubled by writer’s block and a failing marriage, she hopes that the hotel can unlock a dimension of reality—and her own perception of life—that has been closed off to her. But when she meets a retired literature professor who proposes a project she can’t turn down, she’s drawn into a mystery that alters her life in ways she could never have imagined.

Bursting with life and humor, Forest Dark is a profound, mesmerizing novel of metamorphosis and self-realization—of looking beyond all that is visible towards the infinite.

























[book] TO LOOK A NAZI IN THE EYE
A Teen's Account of a War Criminal Trial
by Kathy Kacer and Jordana Lebowitz
September 12, 2017

Second Story Press

The true story of nineteen-year-old Jordana Lebowitz's time at the trial of Oskar Groening, known as the bookkeeper of Auschwitz, a man charged with being complicit in the death of more than 300,000 Jews. A granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, Jordana was still not prepared for what she would see and hear.
Listening to Groening's testimony and to the Holocaust survivors who came to testify against him, Jordana came to understand that by witnessing history she gained the knowledge and legitimacy to be able to stand in the footsteps of the survivors who went before her and pass their history—her history—on to the next generation.
Kathy Kacer – a psychologist - has won many awards for her books about the holocaust for young readers, including Hiding Edith, The Secret of Gabi’s Dresser, Clara’s War and The Underground Reporters.

































[book] My Grandmother Ironed the King's Shirts
by Torill Kove
September 2017

Firefly Books
It is Norwegian, not Jewish, but I like to think of it as a Jewish tale.
You can find the animated film on Youtube from NFB (National Film Board of Canada)

This tall tale of Kove's Norwegian grandmother was nominated for an Academy Award when first produced as an animated short film. Torill Kove's grandmother often told stories to Torill when she was a young girl. One in particular revolved around ironing shirts for the King of Norway.
When Norway gained independence, they needed a king. They placed an ad for royals and interviewed candidates. They hired a royal from Denmark who had a British royal wife. They became the king and queen but did not know how to iron. SO they sent their clothes (Shirts) out. In My Grandmother Ironed the King's Shirts, Kove follows a thread of family history, embroidering it with playful twists along the way, imaginatively rendering her grandmother's life and work in Oslo during World War II.
In Kove's retelling, her grandmother leads a Norwegian resistance to the invading German Army who had forced the King to flee for his safety.
When the task of ironing the King's shirts was replaced by those of the German Army officers, Kove's grandmother and her shirt pressing sisters sabotage the enemy uniforms until morale among the Germans is so low that they lose the war and head home without a thing to wear!
Full of sharp humor and myth making, My Grandmother Ironed the King's Shirts is a great example of how small contributions to the greater good count for a whole lot.
My Grandmother Ironed the King's Shirts was nominated for an Oscar in 2000 and won 17 awards in all. It has also been produced as a book in Norway.
































[book] Holocaust Memory in the Digital Age:
Survivors’ Stories and New
Media Practices
by Jeffrey Shandler
September 2017

Stanford University Press

Smart Family Fellow at the Allen and Joan
Bildner Center for Study of Jewish Life
Holocaust Memory in the Digital Age explores the nexus of new media and memory practices, raising questions about how advances in digital technologies continue to influence the nature of Holocaust memorialization. Through an in-depth study of the largest and most widely available collection of videotaped interviews with survivors and other witnesses to the Holocaust, the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive, Jeffrey Shandler weighs the possibilities and challenges brought about by digital forms of public memory. The Visual History Archive's holdings are extensive-over 100,000 hours of video, including interviews with over 50,000 individuals-and came about at a time of heightened anxiety about the imminent passing of the generation of Holocaust survivors and other eyewitnesses. Now, the Shoah Foundation's investment in new digital media is instrumental to its commitment to remembering the Holocaust both as a subject of historical importance in its own right and as a paradigmatic moral exhortation against intolerance. Shandler not only considers the Archive as a whole, but also looks closely at individual survivors' stories, focusing on narrative, language, and spectacle to understand how Holocaust remembrance is mediated.

























[book] The Ken Commandments:
My Search for God
in Hollywood
by Ken Baker
September 12, 2017

Convergent Books

Do the Kardashians believe in God?
An E! News star mixes memoir and investigative journalism in his own rollicking, poignant, and masterful version of A.J. Jacobs’ A Year of Living Biblically, chronicling his own spiritual journey as he investigates the religious lives of the rich and famous in Hollywood.

Ken Baker, the popular L.A.-based senior correspondent for E! News and E! Online, has worked in Hollywood for over twenty years—hobnobbing with multimillionaires and interviewing movie, music and TV stars such as George Clooney, Britney Spears, Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie and Kim Kardashian, day in and day out. In that time, and in the land of fairy tales and double-dealing, Baker had become one of the materialistic, carnal people he never wanted to be, abandoning his Christian heritage and losing his spiritual center in the process. Finding himself alone and confused one day in Vegas, he has an awakening that puts him on a journey to find God, not only in himself, but in the celebrities whose lives intersect with his both professionally and personally.

In The Ken Commandments, Ken sets off on an experiment that will bring him closer to the spiritual lives of such diverse luminaries as Deepak Chopra, Tom Cruise, Selena Gomez, Justin Bieber, Joel Osteen and Gwen Stefani and in the process help to reveal the light and dark of Hollywood in new ways. From New Age spirituality, to Bible-based Christianity, to Scientology, to Buddhist retreats, to meditation classes, to Atheism studies, to the mega-church of the nation's top TV preacher, to “Jewish POWER TEMPLES,” Baker immerses himself in a range of spiritual practices side by side with the celebrity set, revealing a world that is deeper, more questioning and more God-centered than you'd ever imagine.

























[book] The Exodus
by Richard Elliott Friedman
September 2017

HarperOne

The Exodus has become a core tradition of Western civilization. Millions read it, retell it, and celebrate it. But did it happen?
Biblical scholars, Egyptologists, archaeologists, historians, literary scholars, anthropologists, and filmmakers are drawn to it. Unable to find physical evidence until now, many archaeologists and scholars claim this mass migration is just a story, not history. Others oppose this conclusion, defending the biblical account.
Like a detective on an intricate case no one has yet solved, pioneering Bible scholar and bestselling author of Who Wrote the Bible? Richard Elliott Friedman cuts through the noise — the serious studies and the wild theories — merging new findings with new insight. From a spectrum of disciplines, state-of-the-art archeological breakthroughs, and fresh discoveries within scripture, he brings real evidence of a historical basis for the exodus — the history behind the story. The biblical account of millions fleeing Egypt may be an exaggeration, but the exodus itself is not a myth.
Friedman does not stop there. Known for his ability to make Bible scholarship accessible to readers, Friedman proceeds to reveal how much is at stake when we explore the historicity of the exodus. The implications, he writes, are monumental. We learn that it became the starting-point of the formation of monotheism, the defining concept of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Moreover, we learn that it precipitated the foundational ethic of loving one’s neighbors — including strangers — as oneself. He concludes, the actual exodus was the cradle of global values of compassion and equal rights today.

















[book] Final Stop, Algiers:
A Thriller
by Mishka Ben-David
Translated from Hebrew by Ronnie Hope
September 2017

The Overlook Press

Internationally bestselling author Mishka Ben-David’s new thriller spans continents, as a Mossad operative must choose between duty and love.

By the author of Duet in Beirut and Forbidden Love in St. Petersburg, Final Stop, Algiers is former Israeli intelligence agent Mishka Ben-David's most exhilarating novel yet.

When a terrorist attack in Tel Aviv violently disrupts his life, Mickey Simhoni abandons his plans to become an artist and instead allows himself to be recruited into the Mossad. Slowly, he learns the art of spy craft the and painstaking process of building a cover, becoming someone else whom he resembles, who is presumed dead. His cover story takes him to Toronto where he meets an old flame-Niki, a girl he had been involved with in Tokyo a decade earlier. As Mickey is torn between loyalty to the Mossad and his intense feelings for Niki, the dilemma leads to a harrowing conclusion.


























[book] Philip Roth:
Why Write? Collected Nonfiction
1960-2013
(The Library of America)
by Philip Roth
September 2017
America’s most celebrated writer returns with a definitive edition of his essential statements on literature, his controversial novels, and the writing life, including including six pieces published here for the first time and many others newly revised.

Throughout a unparalleled literary career that includes two National Book Awards (Goodbye, Columbus, 1959 and Sabbath’s Theater, 1995), the Pulitzer Prize in fiction (American Pastoral, 1997), the National Book Critics Circle Award (The Counterlife, 1986), and the National Humanities Medal (awarded by President Obama in 2011), among many other honors, Philip Roth has produced an extraordinary body of nonfiction writing on a wide range of topics: his own work and that of the writers he admires, the creative process, and the state of American culture. This work is collected for the first time in Why Write?, the tenth and final volume in the Library of America’s definitive Philip Roth edition. Here is Roth’s selection of the indispensable core of Reading Myself and Others, the entirety of the 2001 book Shop Talk, and “Explanations,” a collection of fourteen later pieces brought together here for the first time, six never before published. Among the essays gathered are “My Uchronia,” an account of the genesis of The Plot Against America, a novel grounded in the insight that “all the assurances are provisional, even here in a two-hundred-year-old democracy”; “Errata,” the unabridged version of the “Open Letter to Wikipedia” published on The New Yorker’s website in 2012 to counter the online encyclopedia’s egregious errors about his life and work; and “The Ruthless Intimacy of Fiction,” a speech delivered on the occasion of his eightieth birthday that celebrates the “refractory way of living” of Sabbath’s Theater’s Mickey Sabbath. Also included are two lengthy interviews given after Roth’s retirement, which take stock of a lifetime of work.



































[book] Why Judaism Matters:
Letters of a Liberal Rabbi
to his Children and
the Millennial Generation
by Rabbi John Rosove
Temple Israel of Hollywood
Jewish Lights
September 2017
Presented in the form of letters from a rabbi to his sons, Why Judaism Matters is common sense guidance and a road map for a new generation of young men and women who find Jewish orthodoxy, tradition, issues, and beliefs impenetrable in 21st Century society. By intimately illustrating how the tenets of Judaism still apply in our modern world, Rabbi John Rosove gives heartfelt direction to the sons and daughters of reform Jews everywhere






























[book] The Heart of Torah,
Volume 1:
Essays on the Weekly Torah Portion,
Genesis and Exodus
by Rabbi Shai Held (Mechon Hadar)
Foreword by Rabbi Yitz Greenberg
September 2017
In The Heart of Torah, Rabbi Shai Held s Torah essays two for each weekly portion open new horizons in Jewish biblical commentary.

Held probes the portions in bold, original, and provocative ways. He mines Talmud and midrashim, great writers of world literature, and astute commentators of other religious backgrounds to ponder fundamental questions about God, human nature, and what it means to be a religious person in the modern world. Along the way, he illuminates the centrality of empathy in Jewish ethics, the predominance of divine love in Jewish theology, the primacy of gratitude and generosity, and God s summoning of each of us with all our limitations into the dignity of a covenantal relationship.






























[book] The Heart of Torah,
Volume 2 :
Essays on the Weekly Torah Portion,
Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy
by Rabbi Shai Held (Mechon Hadar)
Foreword by Rabbi Yitz Greenberg
September 2017
JPS – Jewish Publication Society
In The Heart of Torah, Rabbi Shai Held s Torah essays two for each weekly portion open new horizons in Jewish biblical commentary.

Held probes the portions in bold, original, and provocative ways. He mines Talmud and midrashim, great writers of world literature, and astute commentators of other religious backgrounds to ponder fundamental questions about God, human nature, and what it means to be a religious person in the modern world. Along the way, he illuminates the centrality of empathy in Jewish ethics, the predominance of divine love in Jewish theology, the primacy of gratitude and generosity, and God s summoning of each of us with all our limitations into the dignity of a covenantal relationship.


























[book] An Odyssey:
A Father, a Son,
and an Epic
by Daniel Mendelsohn
September 2017
Knopf
From award-winning memoirist and critic, and bestselling author of The Lost: a deeply moving tale of a father and son's transformative journey in reading--and reliving--Homer's epic masterpiece.

When eighty-one-year-old Jay Mendelsohn decides to enroll in the undergraduate Odyssey seminar his son teaches at Bard College, the two find themselves on an adventure as profoundly emotional as it is intellectual.

For Jay, a retired research scientist who sees the world through a mathematician's unforgiving eyes, this return to the classroom is his "one last chance" to learn the great literature he'd neglected in his youth--and, even more, a final opportunity to more fully understand his son, a writer and classicist. But through the sometimes uncomfortable months that the two men explore Homer's great work together--first in the classroom, where Jay persistently challenges his son's interpretations, and then during a surprise-filled Mediterranean journey retracing Odysseus's famous voyages--it becomes clear that Daniel has much to learn, too: Jay's responses to both the text and the travels gradually uncover long-buried secrets that allow the son to understand his difficult father at last. As this intricately woven memoir builds to its wrenching climax, Mendelsohn's narrative comes to echo the Odyssey itself, with its timeless themes of deception and recognition, marriage and children, the pleasures of travel and the meaning of home. Rich with literary and emotional insight, An Odyssey is a renowned author-scholar's most triumphant entwining yet of personal narrative and literary exploration.


























[book] My Jerusalem:
The Eternal City
by Ilan Greenfield
September 2017
Gefen
Ten measures of beauty descended to the world; nine were taken by Jerusalem. Talmud, Kiddushin 49b
Ever since King Solomon built the Holy Temple on Jerusalem's Temple Mount, Jews around the world have seen the holy city as the core of their lives. Jews from every continent on the globe have always prayed three times a day facing Jerusalem. Jews from Yemen, Ethiopia, and Lithuania; Jews from Morocco, Spain, India, Poland, and Russia. No matter where they are born, no matter where they die, all Jews have Jerusalem in common.

Jerusalem Day 2017 marks fifty years since the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967, allowing worshipers of all religions to freely worship and pray in their holy places for the first time in hundreds of years. In honor of this great anniversary, this unique photo essay brings together the thoughts and reminiscences of those who love the holy city.

MY JERUSALEM features a unique collection of photos by one of Israel's most recognized photographers, Ziv Koren. Here are the people of Jerusalem: the real, everyday people who live in Jerusalem; those who work in Jerusalem; those who worship in Jerusalem; and those who exercise their freedom to demonstrate in Jerusalem. This stunning book is a must-have for everyone whose heart beats to the rhythm of the world's holiest city.

Features personal essays on Jerusalem by 36 personalities, among them: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, President Reuven Rivlin, Education Minister Naftali Bennett, Mayor of Jerusalem Nir Barkat, Mike Huckabee, Professor Deborah Lipstadt, Dr. Ruth R. Wisse, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks Pastor John Hagee and many more.


























[book] BEWILDERMENTS
Reflections on The Book of Numbers
NOW IN PAPERBACK
By Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg
September 2017
Schocken
Through the magnificent literary, scholarly, and psychological analysis of the text that is her trademark, Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg tackles the enduring puzzlement of the book of Numbers. What should have been for the Israelites a brief journey from Mount Sinai to the Holy Land becomes a forty-year death march. Both before and after the devastating report of the Spies, the narrative centers on the people's desire to return to slavery in Egypt. At its heart are speeches of complaint and lament. But in the narrative of the book of Numbers that is found in mystical and Hasidic sources, the generation of the wilderness emerges as one of extraordinary spiritual experience, fed on miracles and nurtured directly by God: a generation of ecstatic faith, human partners in an unprecedented conversation with the Deity. Drawing on kabbalistic sources, the Hasidic commentators depict a people who transcend prudent considerations in order to follow God into the wilderness, where their spiritual yearning comes to full expression.

Is there a way to integrate this narrative of dark murmurings, of obsessive fantasies of a return to Egypt, with the celebration of a love-intoxicated wilderness discourse? What effect does the cumulative trauma of slavery, the miracles of Exodus, and the revelation at Sinai have on a nation that is beginning to speak? In Bewilderments, one of our most admired biblical commentators suggests fascinating answers to these questions.






























[book] What Would Freud Do?
How the Greatest Psychotherapists
Would Solve Your Everyday Problems
by Sarah Tomley
September 2017
Firefly Books

The stars of psychology give advice on what troubles us. This book gives readers a free session with some of history's great psychotherapists, like Sigmund Freud and the men and women that have developed and applied the theories that underpin the "study of the mind". The book asks these luminaries for their help with the personal problems that threaten our happiness while also providing a comprehensive and fascinating overview of the various disciplines.
The book has five sections that use common questions which, whether mundane or disturbing, do cause psychological distress to some degree. Some examples are:

1. What am I like?
Why do I keep leaving things to the last minute
Am I a caring person or am I a "doormat"
I was only joking
If I was more selfish, would I have more fun

2. Why am I acting like this?
I keep looking at my phone every few minutes
Why can't I concentrate
I'm usually so well-behaved. . . what's with the road rage
Why do I lie when she says "Does my butt look big in this?"

3. Other people
Why can't I find Mr/Mrs Right
How do I stop my teenage daughter getting a tattoo
My partner is great - so why am I thinking of having an affair
How can I stop people unfriending me on social media

4. What's happening?
Why do I keep saying embarrassing things
Should I work for love or money
Why do I always buy the more expensive option
What's the point

5. How can I improve myself?
Why can't I lose weight
I'm scared of moving on in my career - how can I change this
How can I think more creatively
How can I cope better with the tough times.

Readers will discover their personality type, their default behaviors, and consider how the various theories play out in their life and what they may want to change. They can learn what specialists say about a specific behavior or unrecognized motivation, among the many other emotional drivers in life. There are Venn diagrams, mind maps and other illustrations to add clarity. Side notes list the theories that address a particular problem, such as positive psychology and existentialist psychotherapy in response to "Why does it always happen to me?"
Life is not simple and it is certainly not without identity confusion, paralyzing fear and other deeply felt emotions and problems. Now a reader need only to turn to the question troubling them and Freud along with his psychoanalyst colleagues will lend a helping hand.







#PARSHAH
WEEKLY INSIGHTS
FROM A LEADING
ISRAELI JOURNALIST
By Sivan Rahav Meir
Koren/Menorah
Translated from Hebrew September 2017










[book] The Itsy Bitsy Dreidel
Board book
by Jeffrey Burton and Chani Turnow
and Illustrated by Sanja Rescek
September 19, 2017

Little Simon
Ages 2 – 4
A fun and playful Chanukah twist on the popular nursery rhyme “The Itsy Bitsy Spider”

The itsy bitsy dreidel went for a little spin.
Down came the snow so the party could begin.
Dad was in the kitchen heating up the oil.
For some doughnuts and some latkes, he brought it to a boil.

The itsy bitsy dreidel gets ready to celebrate the Festival of Lights with the lighting of the menorah.



























[book] Queen of the Hanukkah Dosas
by Pamela Ehrenberg
Illustrated by Anjan Sarkar
Fall 2017

FS&G
Ages 4-7
This sweet book reminded me of the Indian Jewish community and the late Attorney Owen Kupferschmid, who led an great Indian Nepalese Jewish Hanukkah party in Manhattan for the Young Associates of the New Israel Fund in the late 1980s

In this sweet and humorous picture book, a multi-cultural family (Mom's Indian; Dad's Jewish) celebrate Hanukkah while incorporating traditional Indian food.

Instead of latkes, this family celebrates Hanukkah with tasty Indian dosas. To her brother's chagrin, little Sadie won't stop climbing on everything both at home and at the Indian grocery store, even while preparing the dosas. As the family puts the finishing touches on their holiday preparations, they accidentally get locked out of the house. Sadie and her climbing skills just may be exactly what is needed to save the day.

























[book] Almost a Minyan
by Lori S. Kline
Susan Simon (Illustrator)
2017

Sociosights Press
Ages 4-7
Almost a Minyan was just awarded the 2017 Literary Classics Seal of Approval. In their citation, Literary Classics called the book, ''a cultural gem that will connect with readers of all ages.''
How can our sacred institutions preserve tradition while retaining the flexibility to accommodate modern life? And how do you fold that theme into a lively kids' book?
Almost a Minyan, the latest offering from Austin's Sociosights Press, brings children into the world of a loving daughter and granddaughter whose family stays connected to each other and to the past through sacred ritual. The book is a multi-generational love story for Jewish traditions.
In a story that will appeal equally to people familiar with its Yiddish phrases and Jewish traditions and those interested in increasing their cultural understanding, Almost a Minyan subtly handles some of the practices and controversies of modern Judaism. Can women and girls be part of the sacred minyan for public worship?
This spirited story, brought to life with touching and reverent illustrations by Susan Simon, is a sure bet for young readers.























[book] The Language of Angels
A Story About the Reinvention of Hebrew
by Richard Michelson
Karla Gudeon (Illustrator)
2017

Charlesbridge Press
Ages 5-9
In 1885, few Jews in Israel used the holy language of their ancestors, and Hebrew was in danger of being lost—until Ben Zion and his father got involved. Through the help of his father and a community of children, Ben modernized the ancient language, creating a lexicon of new, modern words to bring Hebrew back into common usage. Historically influenced dialogue, engaging characters, and colorful art offer a linguistic journey about how language develops and how one person's perseverance can make a real difference.
Influenced by illuminated manuscripts, Karla Gudeon’s illustrations bring Ben Zion—and the rebirth of Hebrew—to life.























[book] After the Fall
(How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again)
by Dan Santat
Fall 2017

Roaring Brook Press
From the New York Times–bestselling and award-winning author and illustrator of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend comes the inspiring epilogue to the beloved classic nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty.

Everyone knows that when Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. But what happened after?

Caldecott Medalist Dan Santat's poignant tale follows Humpty Dumpty, an avid bird watcher whose favorite place to be is high up on the city wall-that is, until after his famous fall. Now terrified of heights, Humpty can longer do many of the things he loves most.

Will he summon the courage to face his fear?

After the Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again) is a masterful picture book that will remind readers of all ages that Life begins when you get back up.



























[book] Lessons for Non-Profit
and Start-Up Leaders:
Tales from a Reluctant CEO
by Maxine Harris Ph.D (Community COnnections)
and Michael B. O'Leary, Ph.D (Georgetown B School)
Fall 2017

Rowman & Littlefield
Lessons for Non-Profit and Start-Up Leaders: Tales from a Reluctant CEOuses the experiences of a real company, Community Connections, to bring to life the practical dilemmas that an organization founded on a mission and guided by a set of ideals must confront and solve if it is to thrive. With no business or financial background, Maxine Harris and her partner Helen Bergman grew a tiny startup into a $35 million business. Through trial and error, they learned how to manage finances, hire staff, overcome barriers, and adapt to changing business models. In Lessons for Non-Profit and Start-Up Leaders, Harris shares her insights, struggles, and mistakes with the goal of helping others who may be starting and running non-profit organizations. She spells out the ways in which creativity, tenacity, and the power of relationships helped her and her partner overcome barriers that often cause start-ups to flounder in their first years of operation. In a humorous and novel twist, the book engages the reader with a series of original fables, each tailored to introduce a business dilemma in the language of “make-believe.” Michael O’Leary provides commentary that places the stories and case studies from Community Connections into a broader context, making the lessons accessible to anyone working in the non-profit or startup sector.



























[book] The Happiness Prayer:
Ancient Jewish Wisdom
for the Best Way to Live Today
by Rabbi Evan Moffic (Chicago)
September 2017

What makes us happy?
It's not what you think.
Stress is everywhere.
Clever marketing has led us to believe in chasing happiness down a path that doesn't lead anywhere. There is an answer.
It's not a secret.
An ancient formula can help.
2000 years ago there was a prayer.
A prayer for happiness.
You can follow these ten practices in it. The prayer has helped thousands of people. No matter where you are in life, finding purpose is easier than you think. Rabbi Evan Moffic knows the power of prayer. He was called to lead a synagogue at thirty. The prayer became his guidepost. It provided him with the wisdom to lead beyond his years. It made him happy. It's not a typical prayer. It's an active prayer. You will live it. The magic is not in the words. It's in the way the words will change your life.
You will discover those words in this book and the ten life-changing practices it reveals.




























[book] When Basketball Was Jewish:
Voices of Those Who Played the Game
by Douglas Stark
September 2017

Univ of Nebraska Press

In the 2015–16 NBA season, the Jewish presence in the league was largely confined to Adam Silver, the commissioner; David Blatt, the coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers; and Omri Casspi, a player for the Sacramento Kings. Basketball, however, was once referred to as a Jewish sport. Shortly after the game was invented at the end of the nineteenth century, it spread throughout the country and became particularly popular among Jewish immigrant children in northeastern cities because it could easily be played in an urban setting. Many of basketball’s early stars were Jewish, including Shikey Gotthoffer, Sonny Hertzberg, Nat Holman, Red Klotz, Dolph Schayes, Moe Spahn, and Max Zaslofsky.

In this oral history collection, Douglas Stark chronicles Jewish basketball throughout the twentieth century, focusing on 1900 to 1960. As told by the prominent voices of twenty people who played, coached, and refereed it, these conversations shed light on what it means to be a Jew and on how the game evolved from its humble origins to the sport enjoyed worldwide by billions of fans today. The game’s development, changes in style, rise in popularity, and national emergence after World War II are narrated by men reliving their youth, when basketball was a game they played for the love of it.

When Basketball Was Jewish reveals, as no previous book has, the evolving role of Jews in basketball and illuminates their contributions to American Jewish history as well as basketball history.





















[book] Stolen Secrets
by L.B. Schulman
September 2017
Boyd Mills Press
Ages 12-17
After an abrupt move across the country to San Francisco, sixteen-year-old Livvy is shocked to find that her mother has lied to her. Instead of looking for work at a bakery, her mom is taking care of Adelle, Livvy’s grandmother, who Livvy thought was long dead. Suffering from Alzheimer’s, Adelle shouts out startling details, mistakes her own name, and seems to relive moments that may have taken place in a concentration camp. When Livvy and her new friend Franklin D. find journal entries from the Holocaust in Adelle’s home, Livvy begins to suspect that her grandmother may have a shocking link to a notable figure -- Anne Frank.



























[book] Design Thinking for the Greater Good:
Innovation in the Social Sector
by Jeanne Liedtka and
Randy Salzman and Daisy Azer
September 2017
Columbia University Press
Facing especially wicked problems, social sector organizations are searching for powerful new methods to understand and address them. Design Thinking for the Greater Good goes in depth on both the how of using new tools and the why. As a way to reframe problems, ideate solutions, and iterate toward better answers, design thinking is already well established in the commercial world. Through ten stories of struggles and successes in fields such as health care, education, agriculture, transportation, social services, and security, the authors show how collaborative creativity can shake up even the most entrenched bureaucracies-and provide a practical roadmap for readers to implement these tools.

The design thinkers Jeanne Liedtka, Randy Salzman, and Daisy Azer explore how major agencies like the Department of Health and Human Services and the Transportation and Security Administration in the United States, as well as organizations in Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, have instituted principles of design thinking. In each case, these groups have used the tools of design thinking to reduce risk, manage change, use resources more effectively, bridge the communication gap between parties, and manage the competing demands of diverse stakeholders. Along the way, they have improved the quality of their products and enhanced the experiences of those they serve. These strategies are accessible to analytical and creative types alike, and their benefits extend throughout an organization. This book will help today's leaders and thinkers implement these practices in their own pursuit of creative solutions that are both innovative and achievable.























[book] When the State Winks:
The Performance of Jewish
Conversion in Israel
by Michal Kravel-Tovi
(Tel Aviv University)
September 2017
Columbia University Press
Religious conversion is often associated with ideals of religious sincerity. But in a society in which religious belonging is entangled with ethnonational citizenship and confers political privilege, a convert might well have other motives. Over the last two decades, mass non-Jewish immigration to Israel, especially from the former Soviet Union, has sparked heated debates over the Jewish state's conversion policy and intensified suspicion of converts' sincerity. When the State Winks carefully traces the performance of state-endorsed Orthodox conversion to highlight the collaborative labor that goes into the making of the Israeli state and its Jewish citizens.

In a rich ethnographic narrative based on fieldwork in conversion schools, rabbinic courts, and ritual bathhouses, Michal Kravel-Tovi follows conversion candidates-mostly secular young women from a former Soviet background-and state conversion agents caught between the contradictory demands of their nationalist and religious commitments.

She complicates the popular perception that conversion is a "wink-wink" relationship in which both sides agree to treat the converts' pretenses of faith as real. Instead, she demonstrates how their interdependent performances blur any clear boundary between sincere and fraudulent conversions. Alongside detailed ethnography, Kravel-Tovi develops new ways to think about the complex connection between religious conversion and the nation-state. Kravel-Tovi emphasizes how state power is created and managed through "winking"-the subtle exchanges and performances that animate everyday encounters between state and citizen. In a country marked by tension between official religiosity and a predominantly secular Jewish population, winking permits the state to save its Jewish face.













[book] From Head Shops to Whole Foods:
The Rise and Fall of
Activist Entrepreneurs
by Joshua Clark Davis
2017
Columbia University Press
.
Celestial Seasonings; Ben & Jerrys... now owned by a conglomerates
Whole Foods... bought by Amazon
In the 1960s and ’70s, a diverse range of storefronts-including head shops, African American bookstores, feminist businesses, and organic grocers-brought the work of the New Left, Black Power, feminism, environmentalism, and other movements into the marketplace. Through shared ownership, limited growth, and democratic workplaces, these activist entrepreneurs offered alternatives to conventional profit-driven corporate business models. By the middle of the 1970s, thousands of these enterprises operated across the United States-but only a handful survive today. Some, such as Whole Foods Market, have abandoned their quest for collective political change in favor of maximizing profits.
Vividly portraying the struggles, successes, and sacrifices of these unlikely entrepreneurs,From Head Shops to Whole Foodswrites a new history of social movements and capitalism by showing how activists embraced small businesses in a way few historians have considered. The book challenges the widespread but mistaken idea that activism and political dissent are inherently antithetical to participation in the marketplace. Joshua Clark Davis uncovers the historical roots of contemporary interest in ethical consumption, social enterprise, buying local, and mission-driven business, while also showing how today’s companies have adopted the language-but not often the mission-of liberation and social change.




















[book] Who Made Early Christianity?:
The Jewish Lives of the
Apostle Paul
by John Gager Jr.
Professor Emeritus, Princeton
2017
Columbia University Press
In this historical and theological study, John G. Gager undermines the myth of the Apostle Paul's rejection of Judaism, conversion to Christianity, and founding of Christian anti-Judaism. He finds that the rise of Christianity occurred well after Paul's death and attributes the distortion of the Apostle's views to early and later Christians.

Though Christian clerical elites ascribed a rejection-replacement theology to Paul's legend, Gager shows that the Apostle was considered a loyal Jew by many of his Jesus-believing contemporaries and that later Jewish and Muslim thinkers held the same view. He holds that one of the earliest misinterpretations of Paul was to name him the founder of Christianity, and in recent times numerous Jewish and Christian readers of Paul have moved beyond this understanding.

Gager also finds that Judaism did not fade away after Paul's death but continued to appeal to both Christians and pagans for centuries. Jewish synagogues remained important religious and social institutions throughout the Mediterranean world. Making use of all possible literary and archaeological sources, including Muslim texts, Gager helps recover the long pre-history of a Jewish Paul, obscured by recent, negative portrayals of the Apostle, and recognizes the enduring bond between Jews and Christians that has influenced all aspects of Christianity.
























[book] The "Spectral Turn":
Jewish Ghosts in the Polish
Post-Holocaust Imaginaire
by Zuzanna Dziuban
2017
Columbia University Press
Over the last decades, studies on cultural memory have taken a `spectral turn'. They have explored the potential of haunting metaphors for addressing past instances of violence that affect present cultural realities. Zuzanna Dziuban contributes to understandings of the figure of the ghost by inquiring into its culturally and historically located modality: the emergence of Jewish ghosts in contemporary Polish popular culture, literature, and critical art. Locating this new interest in Jewish ghosts on the map of other Polish (and Jewish) ghostologies, this study seeks to explore the cultural and political functions of the post-Holocaust haunted imaginaire.
























[book] The Chilbury Ladies' Choir:
A Novel Paperback
by Jennifer Ryan
September 2017
Broadway Books – now in paperback
For readers of Lilac Girls and The Nightingale, The Chilbury Ladies' Choir unfolds the struggles, affairs, deceptions, and triumphs of a village choir during World War II.

As England becomes enmeshed in the early days of World War II and the men are away fighting, the women of Chilbury village forge an uncommon bond. They defy the Vicar’s stuffy edict to close the choir and instead “carry on singing,” resurrecting themselves as the Chilbury Ladies’ Choir. We come to know the home-front struggles of five unforgettable choir members: a timid widow devastated when her only son goes to fight; the older daughter of a local scion drawn to a mysterious artist; her younger sister pining over an impossible crush; a Jewish refugee from Czechoslovakia hiding a family secret; and a conniving midwife plotting to outrun her seedy past.

An enchanting ensemble story that shuttles from village intrigue to romance to the heartbreaking matters of life and death, Jennifer Ryan’s debut novel thrillingly illuminates the true strength of the women on the home front in a village of indomitable spirit.
























[book] Survivor Café:
The Legacy of Trauma
and the Labyrinth of Memory
by Elizabeth Rosner
September 2017
Counterpoint
Rosner demonstrates a rare blend of scholarly assessment and personal revelation, tempering her singular passion with an encompassing mercy. In this important and vital contribution to the conversation about legacy and responsibility, Rosner distills the magnitude of such burdens and defines the scope of memorialization with an elegance and eloquence that reverberates with both depth and nuance." -Booklist (starred review)

As firsthand survivors of many of the twentieth century's most monumental events-the Holocaust, Hiroshima, the Killing Fields-begin to pass away, Survivor Café addresses urgent questions: How do we carry those stories forward? How do we collectively ensure that the horrors of the past are not forgotten?

Elizabeth Rosner organizes her book around three trips with her father to Buchenwald concentration camp-in 1983, in 1995, and in 2015-each journey an experience in which personal history confronts both commemoration and memorialization. She explores the echoes of similar legacies among descendants of African American slaves, descendants of Cambodian survivors of the Killing Fields, descendants of survivors of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the effects of 9/11 on the general population. Examining current brain research, Rosner depicts the efforts to understand the intergenerational inheritance of trauma, as well as the intricacies of remembrance in the aftermath of atrocity. Survivor Café becomes a lens for numerous constructs of memory-from museums and commemorative sites to national reconciliation projects to small-group cross-cultural encounters.

Beyond preserving the firsthand testimonies of participants and witnesses, individuals and societies must continually take responsibility for learning the painful lessons of the past in order to offer hope for the future. Survivor Café offers a clear-eyed sense of the enormity of our twenty-first-century human inheritance-not only among direct descendants of the Holocaust but also in the shape of our collective responsibility to learn from tragedy, and to keep the ever-changing conversations alive between the past and the present.




















[book] No Room for Small Dreams:
Courage, Imagination, a
nd the Making of Modern Israel
by Shimon Peres
September 2017
Custom House
In 1934, eleven-year-old Shimon Peres emigrated to the land of Israel from his native Poland, leaving behind an extended family who would later be murdered in the Holocaust. Few back then would have predicted that this young man would eventually become one of the towering figures of the twentieth century. Peres would indeed go on to serve the new state as prime minister, president, foreign minister, and the head of several other ministries. He was central to the establishment of the Israeli Defense Forces and the defense industry that would provide the young state with a robust deterrent power. He was crucial to launching Israel’s nuclear energy program and to the creation of its high-tech “Start-up Nation” revolution. His refusal to surrender to conventional wisdom and political norms helped save the Israeli economy and prompted some of the most daring military operations in history, among them the legendary Operation Entebbe. And yet, as important as his role in creating and deploying Israel’s armed forces was, his stunning transition from hawk to dove—with its accompanying unwavering commitment to peace—made him one of the globe’s most recognized, honored, and admired statesmen.

In this, his final work, finished only weeks before his passing, Peres offers a long-awaited examination of the crucial turning points in Israeli history through the prism of having been a decision maker and eyewitness. Told with the frankness of someone aware this would likely be his final statement, No Room for Small Dreams spans decades and events, but as much as it is about what happened, it is about why it happened. Examining pivotal moments in Israel’s rise, Peres explores what makes for a great leader, how to make hard choices in a climate of uncertainty and distress, the challenges of balancing principles with policies, and the liberating nature of imagination and unpredicted innovation. In doing so, he not only charts a better path forward for his beloved country but provides deep and universal wisdom for younger generations who seek to lead—be it in politics, business, or the broader service of making our planet a safer, more peaceful, and just place.



















[book] Unbelievable:
My Front-Row Seat
to the Craziest Campaign
in American History
by Katy Tur
September 2017
DEY STREET BOOKS
AN INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER
“Compelling… this book couldn’t be more timely.” – Jill Abramson, New York Times Book Review
From the Recipient of the 2017 Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism

Called "disgraceful," "third-rate," and "not nice" by Donald Trump, NBC News correspondent Katy Tur reported on—and took flak from—the most captivating and volatile presidential candidate in American history.

Katy Tur lived out of a suitcase for a year and a half, following Trump around the country, powered by packets of peanut butter and kept clean with dry shampoo. She visited forty states with the candidate, made more than 3,800 live television reports, and tried to endure a gazillion loops of Elton John’s "Tiny Dancer"—a Trump rally playlist staple.

From day 1 to day 500, Tur documented Trump’s inconsistencies, fact-checked his falsities, and called him out on his lies. In return, Trump repeatedly singled Tur out. He tried to charm her, intimidate her, and shame her. At one point, he got a crowd so riled up against Tur, Secret Service agents had to walk her to her car.

None of it worked. Facts are stubborn. So was Tur. She was part of the first women-led politics team in the history of network news. The Boys on the Bus became the Girls on the Plane. But the circus remained. Through all the long nights, wild scoops, naked chauvinism, dodgy staffers, and fevered debates, no one had a better view than Tur.

Unbelievable is her darkly comic, fascinatingly bizarre, and often scary story of how America sent a former reality show host to the White House. It’s also the story of what it was like for Tur to be there as it happened, inside a no-rules world where reporters were spat on, demeaned, and discredited. Tur was a foreign correspondent who came home to her most foreign story of all. Unbelievable is a must-read for anyone who still wakes up and wonders, Is this real life?

Katherine (Katy) Baer Tur is the daughter of two award winning journalists. Her father, now trans, is famous for the helicopter based footage of OJ Simpson's White bronco drive, and the :A Riots at Normandie. As Zoe Tur said, we were a culturally if not religiously Jewish family.





















[book] Sons and Soldiers:
The Untold Story of the Jews
Who Escaped the Nazis and
Returned with the U.S. Army
to Fight Hitler
by Bruce Henderson
2017
William Morrow
Joining the ranks of Unbroken, Band of Brothers, and Boys in the Boat, the little-known saga of young German Jews, dubbed The Ritchie Boys, who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s, came of age in America, and returned to Europe at enormous personal risk as members of the U.S. Army to play a key role in the Allied victory.

In 1942, the U.S. Army unleashed one of its greatest secret weapons in the battle to defeat Adolf Hitler: training nearly 2,000 German-born Jews in special interrogation techniques and making use of their mastery of the German language, history, and customs. Known as the Ritchie Boys, they were sent in small, elite teams to join every major combat unit in Europe, where they interrogated German POWs and gathered crucial intelligence that saved American lives and helped win the war.

Though they knew what the Nazis would do to them if they were captured, the Ritchie Boys eagerly joined the fight to defeat Hitler. As they did, many of them did not know the fates of their own families left behind in occupied Europe. Taking part in every major campaign in Europe, they collected key tactical intelligence on enemy strength, troop and armored movements, and defensive positions. A postwar Army report found that more than sixty percent of the credible intelligence gathered in Europe came from the Ritchie Boys.

Bruce Henderson draws on personal interviews with many surviving veterans and extensive archival research to bring this never-before-told chapter of the Second World War to light. Sons and Soldiers traces their stories from childhood and their escapes from Nazi Germany, through their feats and sacrifices during the war, to their desperate attempts to find their missing loved ones in war-torn Europe. Sons and Soldiers is an epic story of heroism, courage, and patriotism that will not soon be forgotten.





























[book] The Choice:
Embrace the Possible
by Dr. Edith Eva Eger
September 2017
Scribner
A powerful, moving memoir—and a practical guide to healing—written by Dr. Edith Eva Eger, an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor help her treat patients and allow them to escape the prisons of their own minds.

Edith Eger was sixteen years old when the Nazis came to her hometown in Hungary and took her Jewish family to an interment center and then to Auschwitz. Her parents were sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Mengele soon after they arrived at the camp. Hours later Mengele demanded that Edie dance a waltz to “The Blue Danube” and rewarded her with a loaf of bread that she shared with her fellow prisoners. These women later helped save Edie’s life. Edie and her sister survived Auschwitz, were transferred to the Mauthausen and Gunskirchen camps in Austria, and managed to live until the American troops liberated the camps in 1945 and found Edie in a pile of dying bodies.

One of the few living Holocaust survivors to remember the horrors of the camps, Edie has chosen to forgive her captors and find joy in her life every day. Years after she was liberated from the concentration camps Edie went back to college to study psychology. She combines her clinical knowledge and her own experiences with trauma to help others who have experienced painful events large and small. Dr. Eger has counselled veterans suffering from PTSD, women who were abused, and many others who learned that they too, can choose to forgive, find resilience, and move forward. She lectures frequently on the power of love and healing.

The Choice weaves Eger’s personal story with case studies from her work as a psychologist. Her patients and their stories illustrate different phases of healing and show how people can choose to escape the prisons they construct in their minds and find freedom, regardless of circumstance. Eger’s story is an inspiration for everyone. And her message is powerful and important: “Your pain matters and is worth healing: you can choose to be joyful and free.” She is eighty-nine years old and still dancing.






























[book] A Boy in Winter:
A Novel
by Rachel Seiffert
Summer 2017
Pantheon
Early on a grey November morning in 1941, only weeks after the German invasion, a small Ukrainian town is overrun by the SS. This new novel from the award-winning author of the Booker Prize short-listed The Dark Room tells of the three days that follow and the lives that are overturned in the process.

Penned in with his fellow Jews, under threat of deportation, Ephraim anxiously awaits word of his two sons, missing since daybreak.

Come in search of her lover, to fetch him home again, away from the invaders, Yasia must confront new and harsh truths about those closest to her. Here to avoid a war he considers criminal, German engineer Otto Pohl is faced with an even greater crime unfolding behind the lines, and no one but himself to turn to.

And in the midst of it all is Yankel, a boy determined to survive this. But to do so, he must throw in his lot with strangers.

As their stories mesh, each of Rachel Seiffert’s characters comes to know the compromises demanded by survival, the oppressive power of fear, and the possibility of courage in the face of terror.

Rich with a rare compassion and emotional depth, A Boy in Winter is a story of hope when all is lost and of mercy when the times have none.




























[book] We Were Strangers Once
A Novel
by Betsy Carter
Summer 2017
Grand Central
On the eve of World War II Egon Schneider--a gallant and successful Jewish doctor, son of two world-famous naturalists--escapes Germany to an uncertain future across the sea. Settling into the unfamiliar rhythms of upper Manhattan, he finds solace among a tight-knit group of fellow immigrants, tenacious men and women drawn together as much by their differences as by their memories of the world they left behind.

They each suffer degradations and triumphs large and small: Egon's terminally acerbic lifelong friend, bestselling author Meyer Leavitt, now wears a sandwich board on a New York street corner; Catrina Harty, the headstrong daughter of a dirt-poor Irish trolley driver, survives heartbreak and loss to forge an unlikely alliance; and Egon himself is forced to abandon his thriving medical practice to become the "Cheese Man" at a Washington Heights grocery. But their spirits remain unbroken, and when their little community is faced with an existential threat, these strangers rise up together in hopes of creating a permanent home. With her uncanny ability to create indelible characters in unforgettable circumstances, bestselling author Betsy Carter has crafted a gorgeous novel that will resonate with anyone who has ever felt adrift and longed for home.





















[book] The Shadow in the Garden:
A Biographer's Tale
by James Atlas
Summer 2017
Pantheon
The biographer—so often in the shadows, kibitzing, casting doubt, proving facts—comes to the stage in this funny, poignant, endearing tale of how writers’ lives get documented. James Atlas, the celebrated chronicler of Saul Bellow and Delmore Schwartz, takes us back to his own childhood in suburban Chicago, where he fell in love with literature and, early on, found in himself the impulse to study writers’ lives. We meet Richard Ellmann, the great biographer of James Joyce and Atlas’s professor during a transformative year at Oxford. We get to know Atlas’s first subject, the “self-doomed” poet Delmore Schwartz. And we are introduced to a bygone cast of intellectuals such as Edmund Wilson and Dwight Macdonald (the “tall pines,” as Mary McCarthy once called them, cut down now, according to Atlas, by the “merciless pruning of mortality”) and, of course, the elusive Bellow, “a metaphysician of the ordinary.”

Atlas revisits the lives and works of the classical biographers, the Renaissance writers of what were then called “lives,” Samuel Johnson and the obsessive Boswell, and the Victorian masters Mrs. Gaskell and Thomas Carlyle. And in what amounts to a pocket history of his own literary generation, Atlas celebrates the biographers who hoped to glimpse an image of them—“as fleeting as a familiar face swallowed up in a crowd.”

























[book] Something Beautiful Happened:
A Story of Survival
and Courage in the Face of Evil
by Yvette Manessis Corporon
Summer 2017
Howard Books
Seventy years after her grandmother helped hide a Jewish family on a Greek island during World War II, a woman sets out to track down their descendants—and discovers a new way to understand tragedy, forgiveness, and the power of kindness.

Yvette Manessis Corporon grew up listening to her grandmother’s stories about how the people of the small Greek island Erikousa hid a Jewish family—a tailor named Savvas and his daughters—from the Nazis during World War II. Nearly 2,000 Jews from that area died in the concentration camps, but even though everyone on Erikousa knew Savvas and his family were hiding on the island, no one ever gave them up, and the family survived the war.

Years later, Yvette couldn’t get the story of the Jewish tailor out of her head. She decided to track down the man’s descendants—and eventually found them in Israel. Their tearful reunion was proof to her that evil doesn’t always win. But just days after she made the connection, her cousin’s child was gunned down in a parking lot in Kansas, a victim of a Neo-Nazi out to inflict as much harm as he could. Despite her best hopes, she was forced to confront the fact that seventy years after the Nazis were defeated, it was still happening today.

As Yvette and her family wrestled with the tragedy in their own lives, the lessons she learned from the survivors of the Holocaust helped her confront and make sense of the present.

In beautifully told interweaving storylines, the past and present come together in a nuanced, heartfelt story about the power of faith, the importance of kindness, and the courage to stand up for what’s right in the face of great evil.




















[book] The Trick
A Novel
by Emanuel Bergmann
September 2017
Atria Books
A deeply moving, humorous story of a boy who believes in everything and an old man who believes in nothing.

In 1934, a rabbi’s son in Prague joins a traveling circus, becomes a magician, and rises to fame under the stage name the Great Zabbatini just as Europe descends into World War II. When Zabbatini is discovered to be a Jew, his battered trunk full of magic tricks becomes his only hope of surviving the concentration camp where he is sent.

Seven decades later in Los Angeles, ten-year-old Max finds a scratched-up LP that captured Zabbatini performing his greatest tricks. But the track in which Zabbatini performs his love spell—the spell Max believes will keep his disintegrating family together—is damaged beyond repair. Desperate for a solution, Max seeks out the now elderly, cynical magician and begs him to perform his magic on his parents. As the two develop an unlikely friendship, Moshe discovers that Max and his family have a surprising connection to the dark, dark days the Great Zabbatini experienced during the war.

Recalling the melancholy humor of Isaac Bashevis Singer and the heartbreaking pathos of the film Life is Beautiful—this outstanding first novel is at once an irreverent yet deeply moving story about a young boy who believes in magic and a disillusioned old man who believes in nothing, as well as a gripping and heartfelt tale about the circle of life.





















[book] GONE TO DUST
A Mystery Novel
by Matt Goldman
Summer 2017
Forge Books
Set in Minnesota, Gone to Dust is the debut private eye murder mystery from Emmy Award-winning Seinfeld writer Matt Goldman.
“Sharp wit, complex characters, and masterful plotting makes Goldman a writer to watch. Irreverent and insightful, private detective Nils Shapiro is sure to become a fan favorite.”-Harlan Coben, New York Times bestselling author
A brutal crime. The ultimate cover-up. How do you solve a murder with no useable evidence?
Private detective Nils Shapiro is focused on forgetting his ex-wife and keeping warm during another Minneapolis winter when a former colleague, neighboring Edina Police Detective Anders Ellegaard, calls with the impossible.
Suburban divorcee Maggie Somerville was found murdered in her bedroom, her body covered with the dust from hundreds of emptied vacuum cleaner bags, all potential DNA evidence obscured by the calculating killer.
Digging into Maggie’s cell phone records, Nils finds that the most frequently called number belongs to a mysterious young woman whose true identity could shatter the Somerville family--but could she be guilty of murder?
After the FBI demands that Nils drop the case, Nils and Ellegaard are forced to take their investigation underground, where the case grows as murky as the contents of the vacuum cleaner bags. Is this a strange case of domestic violence or something with far reaching, sinister implications?
“A perfect blend of light touch and dark story-I want more of Nils Shapiro.” -Lee Child, New York Times bestselling author

























[book] The Education of Eva Moskowitz:
A Memoir
by Eva Moskowitz
September 2017

Some people love her. Others hate her. As an elected member of the NYC City Council from Manhattan Upper East Side, people said she had sharp elbos and antagonized many. Pubic school teachers and leaders called her EVIL Moskowitz. Some give her awards for having great statistics and student achievement successes. Critics say that her schools kick out discipline problems and underperforming children so that they do not hurt the schools' statistics. Many cite her support for Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos. Other say that she distanced herself from Trump after Charlottesville. Here is her side of the story:

From the Publisher: From Eva Moskowitz, the outspoken founder and CEO of the charter school Success Academy, comes a frank, feisty memoir about the rough-and-tumble battles to reform America’s education system.

Eva Moskowitz is a fighter with a reputation for having "sharp elbows"— if that’s a synonym for getting the job done, she’ll take it. A born and bred New Yorker, former City Councilmember, and "charter czarina," Moskowitz has taken on powerful unions and politicians to establish and grow her astonishingly effective and popular charter school program in four of the city’s five boroughs.

In this unabashedly candid memoir, Moskowitz tells of how she became a forward-thinking education entrepreneur and her fight to establish nearly three dozen schools—activism that has made her into one of the most polarizing figures in New York City and beyond. Now, having established a remarkable, even unprecedented, track record for guiding the city’s most disadvantaged children to high academic performance, Moskowitz addresses the battles she has won and lost, writing candidly about the people who seek to undermine her work—most notably New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio—and celebrating the powerful allies who have aided her cause, including former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Moskowitz’s insightful memoir is a deeply felt personal story and an impassioned call to action that bluntly identifies failing policies and the alarmingly powerful forces arrayed against improving an education system that is both deeply dysfunctional and prejudiced. The Education of Eva Moskowitz is sure to galvanize supporters, enrage her opponents, generate headlines, and urgently impact the national conversation on education.



















[book] AT THE STRANGERS' GATE Arrivals in New York
by Adam Gopnik
(The New Yorker)
September 2017
A MEMOIR
From The New York Times best-selling author of Paris to the Moon and beloved New Yorker writer, a memoir that captures the romance of New York City in the 1980s.

When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers' Gate builds a portrait of this particular moment in New York through the story of this couple's journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side, and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. He takes us through his professional meanderings, from graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the corridors of Condé Nast and the galleries of MoMA.

Between tender and humorous reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others, Gopnik discusses the ethics of ambition, the economy of creative capital, and the peculiar anthropology of art and aspiration in New York, then and now.






















[book] Thanks, Obama:
My Hopey, Changey White House Years
by David Litt
September 2017
A MEMOIR of The White House
Remember when presidents spoke in complete sentences instead of in unhinged tweets? Former Obama speechwriter David Litt does. In his comic, coming-of-age memoir, he takes us back to the Obama years – and charts a path forward in the age of Trump.

More than any other presidency, Barack Obama’s eight years in the White House were defined by young people – twenty-somethings who didn’t have much experience in politics (or anything else, for that matter), yet suddenly found themselves in the most high-stakes office building on earth. David Litt was one of those twenty-somethings. After graduating from college in 2008, he went straight to the Obama campaign. In 2011, he became one of the youngest White House speechwriters in history. Until leaving the White House in 2016, he wrote on topics from healthcare to climate change to criminal justice reform. As President Obama’s go-to comedy writer, he also took the lead on the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, the so-called “State of the Union of jokes.”

Now, in this refreshingly honest memoir, Litt brings us inside Obamaworld. With a humorists’ eye for detail, he describes what it’s like to accidentally trigger an international incident or nearly set a president’s hair aflame. He answers questions you never knew you had: Which White House men’s room is the classiest? What do you do when the commander in chief gets your name wrong? Where should you never, under any circumstances, change clothes on Air Force One? With nearly a decade of stories to tell, Litt makes clear that politics is completely, hopelessly absurd.

But it’s also important. For all the moments of chaos, frustration, and yes, disillusionment, Litt remains a believer in the words that first drew him to the Obama campaign: “People who love this country can change it.” In telling his own story, Litt sheds fresh light on his former boss’s legacy. And he argues that, despite the current political climate, the politics championed by Barack Obama will outlive the presidency of Donald Trump.

Full of hilarious stories and told in a truly original voice, Thanks, Obama is an exciting debut about what it means – personally, professionally, and politically – to grow up.





















[book] One Nation After Trump:
A Guide for the Perplexed,
the Disillusioned, the Desperate,
and the Not-Yet Deported
by E.J. Dionne Jr.
Norman J. Ornstein and Thomas E. Mann
September 2017
ST. Martin's Press
A call to action from three of Washington's premier political scholar-journalists, One Nation After Trump offers the definitive work on the threat posed by the Trump presidency and how to counter it.

American democracy was never supposed to give the nation a president like Donald Trump. We have never had a president who gave rise to such widespread alarm about his lack of commitment to the institutions of self-government, to the norms democracy requires, and to the need for basic knowledge about how government works. We have never had a president who raises profound questions about his basic competence and his psychological capacity to take on the most challenging political office in the world.

Yet if Trump is both a threat to our democracy and a product of its weaknesses, the citizen activism he has inspired is the antidote. The reaction to the crisis created by Trump’s presidency can provide the foundation for an era of democratic renewal and vindicate our long experiment in self-rule.

The award-winning authors of One Nation After Trump explain Trump’s rise and the danger his administration poses to our free institutions. They also offer encouragement to the millions of Americans now experiencing a new sense of citizenship and engagement and argue that our nation needs a unifying alternative to Trump’s dark and divisive brand of politics-an alternative rooted in a New Economy, a New Patriotism, a New Civil Society, and a New Democracy. One Nation After Trump is the essential book for our era, an unsparing assessment of the perils facing the United States and an inspiring roadmap for how we can reclaim the future.


























[book] Young Jane Young:
A Novel
by Gabrielle Zevin
2017
Algonquin
From the author of the international bestseller The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry comes another novel that will have everyone talking.

Aviva Grossman, an ambitious congressional intern in Florida, makes the mistake of having an affair with her (married) boss. When the affair comes to light, the popular congressman doesn’t take the fall. But Aviva does, and her life is over before it hardly begins: slut-shamed, she becomes a late-night talk show punch line, anathema to politics. She sees no way out but to change her name and move to a remote town in Maine. This time, she tries to be smarter about her life and strives to raise her daughter, Ruby, to be strong and confident. But when, at the urging of others, Aviva decides to run for public office, that long-ago mistake trails her via the Internet and catches up—an inescapable scarlet A. In the digital age, the past is never, ever, truly past. And it’s only a matter of time until Ruby finds out who her mother was and is forced to reconcile that person with the one she knows.

Young Jane Young is a smart, funny, serious, and moving novel about the myriad ways in which roles are still circumscribed for women, whether they are young and ambitious interns; mothers attempting to steer their daughters through a male-dominated world; political wives facing an age-old knowledge that fidelity isn’t always honored; or young girls feeling bold about their many choices before they realize the gender restrictions all around them. Gabrielle Zevin captures not only the double standards alive and well in every aspect of life for women but also the mood of our recent highly charged political season.




























[book] Dare to Sketch:
A Guide to Drawing on the Go
by Felix Scheinberger
September 2017
Watson-Guptill
An inspirational, instructional, and visually stimulating guide to sketching and drawing. Dare to Sketch is filled with practical tips about which materials to use, a variety of subject matter ranging from easy to more challenging, and wisdom about overcoming creative blocks and fear of making mistakes.
A whimsical beginner's guide to sketching, covering all of the important basics: what kind of notebook to buy, what drawing materials to use, ideas for subject matter, and daily exercises. Includes inviting, inspirational, and idiosyncratic tips (don't start on the first page of your sketchbook!), Dare to Sketch is gorgeously illustrated with the author's unique and contemporary art style.



He likes to sketch Jews wearing tefillin for some reason
























[book] A Concise Code of
Jewish Law for Converts
by Michael J. Broyde, Rabbi and Dayan
2017

Urim Publications
While the topic of conversion in Judaism has been extensively covered, no one has explored the particular laws related to after conversion. In A Concise Code of Jewish Law for Converts, Michael J. Broyde explores many topics and questions that revolve around the life of a Jewish convert. Such topics include the place of a convert in a Jewish community according to Jewish law, the treatment of a convert in respect to acceptance and discrimination, and providing affirmative incentives to converts. Containing a detailed review of every aspect of Jewish law from the convert’s perspective and in relation to them, as well as supplemental essays, A Concise Code of Jewish Law for Converts provides knowledge and guidance on life after conversion.

Michael J. Broyde is Professor of Law at Emory University School of Law and a Senior Fellow at Emory University’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion. He served for many years as the Yoshev Rosh (chair) and a dayan (judge) in the SouthEast Rabbinical Court for Conversion which was part of the GPS Conversion network. He also served as a dayan in the Beth Din of America and as its director. He was the Founding Rabbi of the Young Israel in Atlanta as well





















[book] The Jewish Annotated New Testament
2nd Edition
Edited by
Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Zvi Brettler
Now in the Second Edition

Oxford University Press
First published in 2011, The Jewish Annotated New Testament was a groundbreaking work, bringing the New Testament's Jewish background to the attention of students, clergy, and general readers. In this new edition, eighty Jewish scholars bring together unparalleled scholarship to shed new light on the text. This thoroughly revised and greatly expanded second edition brings even more helpful information and new insights to the study of the New Testament.

· Introductions to each New Testament book, containing guidance for reading and specific information about how the book relates to the Judaism of the period, have been revised and augmented, and in some cases newly written.

· Annotations on the text--some revised, some new to this edition--provide verse-by-verse commentary.

· The thirty essays from the first edition are thoroughly updated, and there are twenty-four new essays, on topics such as "Mary in Jewish Tradition," "Christology," and "Messianic Judaism."

· For Christian readers The Jewish Annotated New Testament offers a window into the first-century world of Judaism from which the New Testament springs. There are explanations of Jewish concepts such as food laws and rabbinic argumentation. It also provides a much-needed corrective to many centuries of Christian misunderstandings of the Jewish religion.

· For Jewish readers, this volume provides the chance to encounter the New Testament--a text of vast importance in Western European and American culture--with no religious agenda and with guidance from Jewish experts in theology, history, and Jewish and Christian thought. It also explains Christian practices, such as the Eucharist.















[book] Holiness and Transgression:
Mothers of the Messiah
in the Jewish Myth
(Psychoanalysis and Jewish Life)
by Ruth Kara-Ivanov Kanieland
? Eugene D. Matanky (as Translator)
(YIVO)
2017
Stanford University Press
This volume deals with the female dynasty of the House of David and its influence on the Jewish Messianic Myth. It provides a missing link in the chain of research on the topic of messianism and contributes to the understanding of the connection between female transgression and redemption, from the Bible through Rabbinic literature until the Zohar. The discussion of the centrality of the mother image in Judeo-Christian culture and the parallels between the appearance of Mary in the Gospels and the Davidic Mothers in the Hebrew Bible, stresses mutual representations of "the mother of the messiah" in Christian and Jewish imaginaire.

Through the prism of gender studies and by stressing questions of femininity, motherhood and sexuality, the subject appears in a new light. This research highlights the importance of intertwining Jewish literary study with comparative religion and gender theories, enabling the process of filling in the ‘mythic gaps’ in classical Jewish sources. The book won the Pines, Lakritz and Warburg awards.













`







[book] The House of Government:
A Saga of the Russian Revolution
by Yuri Slezkine
Oxford University Press
2017
Princeton Univ Press

On the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, the epic story of an enormous apartment building where Communist true believers lived before their destruction The House of Government is unlike any other book about the Russian Revolution and the Soviet experiment. Written in the tradition of Tolstoy's War and Peace, Grossman’s Life and Fate, and Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago, Yuri Slezkine’s gripping narrative tells the true story of the residents of an enormous Moscow apartment building where top Communist officials and their families lived before they were destroyed in Stalin’s purges. A vivid account of the personal and public lives of Bolshevik true believers, the book begins with their conversion to Communism and ends with their children’s loss of faith and the fall of the Soviet Union. Completed in 1931, the House of Government, later known as the House on the Embankment, was located across the Moscow River from the Kremlin. The largest residential building in Europe, it combined 505 furnished apartments with public spaces that included everything from a movie theater and a library to a tennis court and a shooting range. Slezkine tells the chilling story of how the building’s residents lived in their apartments and ruled the Soviet state until some eight hundred of them were evicted from the House and led, one by one, to prison or their deaths.
Drawing on letters, diaries, and interviews, and featuring hundreds of rare photographs, The House of Government weaves together biography, literary criticism, architectural history, and fascinating new theories of revolutions, millennial prophecies, and reigns of terror. The result is an unforgettable human saga of a building that, like the Soviet Union itself, became a haunted house, forever disturbed by the ghosts of the disappeared.





































OCTOBER 2017 BOOKS


An award winning film from Sony Picture Classics based on this novel is now in theaters in December 2017:
[book] Call Me by Your Name:
A Novel
by André Aciman
Paperback film tie-in edition, October 2017
Originally published in 2007
Picador
The novel upon which the film, directed by Luca Guadagnino, starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, and adapted by James Ivory, is based. Andre Aciman's “Call Me by Your Name” is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between a brilliant, sensitive adolescent Jewish boy (Elio) and a Jewish grad student guest (Oliver), 24, at his parents’ cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each Summer, Elio's father invites an accomplished PhD student in Classics to spend the Summer in Italy at their house. Oliver and Elio are each unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer, unrelenting currents of obsession, fascination, competition, and desire intensify their passion and test the charged volcanic ground between them. Elio reads and plays music, dates, and spends languid summer days and nights. Oliver works on his dissertation on Heraclitus. (As you will recall from high school Greek, Heraclitus wrote that no man steps in the same river twice, that life is fleeting, and that 'the path up and down are one and the same' so that opposites attract). Recklessly, the two verge toward the one thing both fear they may never truly find again: total intimacy. Oliver likes to say “later”, it is like a ping pong game between the two of them, never knowing one's true thoughts and desires. Elio hides his discreet Jewishness, at times, and it can be considered a metaphor for his hiding of his desires. It is an instant classic. Set in 1983, it is a winner of a Lambda Literary Award for Fiction, and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, as well as a Publishers Weekly and The Washington Post Best Book of the Year

André Aciman is the noted CUNY professor, expert in Marcel Proust, and am award winning novelist as well as the author of Out of Egypt, about his Egyptian Jewish family's life in and flight from Gamal Abdul Nasser's Egypt.

NOTE: For readers who already saw the film... note that the novel ends 20 years after where the film does. So buy and read the book to find out what happens.

NOTE: The idea for the novel came in 2005, when André Aciman’s plans to take his wife and three sons to a Mediterranean villa collapsed. Angry, Aciman, now 66, decided to instead, write a love story set on the Italian Riviera in the mid-1980s. Three months later he had “Call Me By Your Name” ready for editing.

NOTE: Does the Hanukkah scene in the novel relate on a deeper level to Oliver's study on a Greek philosopher from 500 BCE? We will need to ask Professor Aciman if we meet him

NOTE: A paragraph from the novel: “He had, it took me a while to realize, four personalities depending on what bathing suit he was wearing. Knowing which to expect gave me the illusion of a slight advantage. Red: bold, set in his ways, very grown-up, almost gruff and ill-tempered — stay away. Yellow: sprightly, buoyant, funny, not without barbs — don't give in too easily; might turn to red in no time. Green, which he seldom wore: acquiescent, eager to learn, eager to speak, sunny — why wasn't he always like this? Blue: the afternoon he stepped into my room from the balcony, the day he massaged my shoulder, or when he picked up my glass and placed it right next to mine.”














[book] Bad Rabbi:
And Other Strange but
True Stories from the Yiddish Press
by Eddy Portnoy
(YIVO)
October 2017
Stanford University Press
Stories abound of immigrant Jews on the outside looking in, clambering up the ladder of social mobility, successfully assimilating and integrating into their new worlds. But this book is not about the success stories. It's a paean to the bunglers, the blockheads, and the just plain weird—Jews who were flung from small, impoverished eastern European towns into the urban shtetls of New York and Warsaw, where, as they say in Yiddish, their bread landed butter side down in the dirt. These marginal Jews may have found their way into the history books far less frequently than their more socially upstanding neighbors, but there's one place you can find them in force: in the Yiddish newspapers that had their heyday from the 1880s to the 1930s. Disaster, misery, and misfortune: you will find no better chronicle of the daily ignominies of urban Jewish life than in the pages of the Yiddish press. An underground history of downwardly mobile Jews, Bad Rabbi exposes the seamy underbelly of pre-WWII New York and Warsaw, the two major centers of Yiddish culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With true stories plucked from the pages of the Yiddish papers, Eddy Portnoy introduces us to the drunks, thieves, murderers, wrestlers, poets, and beauty queens whose misadventures were immortalized in print. There's the Polish rabbi blackmailed by an American widow, mass brawls at weddings and funerals, a psychic who specialized in locating missing husbands, and violent gangs of Jewish mothers on the prowl—in short, not quite the Jews you'd expect. One part Isaac Bashevis Singer, one part Jerry Springer, this irreverent, unvarnished, and frequently hilarious compendium of stories provides a window into an unknown Yiddish world that was.





















[book] The Story of the Jews
Volume Two:
Belonging: 1492-1900
by Simon Schama
October 2017
Ecco Books
In the second of three volumes of this magnificently illustrated cultural history, the tie-in to the PBS and BBC series The Story of the Jews, Simon Schama details the story of the Jewish people from 1492 through the end of nineteenth century

Simon Schama’s great project continues and the Jewish story is woven into the fabric of humanity. Their search for a home where a distinctive religion and culture could be nourished without being marginalized suddenly takes on startling resonance in our own epoch of homelessness, wanderings, persecutions, and anxious arrivals.

Volume 2 of The Story of the Jews epic tells the stories of many who seldom figure in Jewish histories: not just the rabbis and the philosophers but a poetess in the ghetto of Venice; a general in Ming China; a boxer in Georgian England, a Bible showman in Amsterdam; a teacher of the deaf in eighteenth-century France, an opera composer in nineteenth-century Germany. The story unfolds in Kerala and Mantua, the starlit hills of Galilee, the rivers of Colombia, the kitchens of Istanbul, the taverns of Ukraine and the mining camps of California. It sails in caravels, rides the stagecoaches and the railways, trudges the dawn streets of London with a pack load of old clothes, hobbles along with the remnant of Napoleon’s ruined army.

Through Schama’s passionate and intelligent telling, a story emerges of the Jewish people that feels as if it is the story of everyone, of humanity packed with detail, this second chronicle in an epic tale will shed new light on a crucial period of history.






























[book] Jewish Comedy:
A Serious History
by Jeremy Dauber
October 31, 2017
WW Norton
A celebrated scholar’s rich account of Jewish humor: its nature, its development, and its vital role throughout Jewish history.

In a major work of scholarship both erudite and very funny, Jeremy Dauber traces the origins of Jewish comedy and its development from biblical times to the age of Twitter. Organizing his book thematically into what he calls the seven strands of Jewish comedy (including the Satirical, the Witty, and the Vulgar), Dauber explores the ways Jewish comedy has dealt with persecution, assimilation, and diaspora through the ages. He explains the rise and fall of popular comic archetypes such as the Jewish mother, the JAP, and the schlemiel and schlimazel. He also explores an enormous range of comic masterpieces, from the Book of Esther, Talmudic rabbi jokes, Yiddish satires, Borscht Belt skits, Seinfeld, and Curb Your Enthusiasm to the work of such masters as Sholem Aleichem, Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, Woody Allen, Joan Rivers, Philip Roth, Sarah Silverman, and Jon Stewart.


































[book] Zingerman's Bakehouse
by Amy Emberling and
Frank Carollo
and Photos by Antonis Achilleos
Chronicle Books
October 2017
This is the must-have baking book for bakers of all skill levels. Since 1992, Michigan's renowned artisanal bakery, Zingerman's Bakehouse in Ann Arbor, has fed a fan base across the United States and beyond with their chewy-sweet brownies and gingersnaps, famous sour cream coffee cake, and fragrant loaves of Jewish rye, challah, and sourdough. It's no wonder Zingerman's is a cultural and culinary institution. Now, for the first time, to celebrate their 25th anniversary, the Zingerman's bakers share 65 meticulously tested, carefully detailed recipes in a beautiful hardcover book featuring more than 50 color photographs and bountiful illustrations. Behind-the-scenes stories of the business enrich this collection of best-of-kind, delicious recipes for every "I can't believe I get to make this at home!" treat.































[book] FEED THE RESISTANCE
RECIPES AND IDEAS
FOR GETTING INVOLVED
By Julia Turshen
Chronicle Books
October 3, 2017
From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table to talk and plan.

Turshen, though growing up secular Jewish, enjoys Friday evening Shabbat meals with her partner and friends. The dishes she includes in this cute sized book foster community and provide sustenance for the mind and soul, including a dozen of the healthy, affordable recipes Turshen is known for, plus over 15 more recipes from a diverse range of celebrated chefs. With stimulating lists, extensive resources, and essays from activists in the worlds of food, politics, and social causes, Feed the Resistance is a must have handbook for anyone hoping to make a difference.

Her first piece of practical advice is that you can do something, but not everything. Chapter One is for Easy Meals For Folks Who Are Too Busy Resisting to Cook. There are 8 recipes for items including Greek Chickpeas Salad; Thai Yellow Curry Vegetable Pot; and Manoomin Elk Meatballs. In Chapter Two “Feeding The Masses: Food For Crowds,” she writes the food is like sex, it is the provocation. Recipes include ones for Adobo sa Gata; Brazilian Fish Potpie; People's Grits; Tikka Masala Macaroni & Cheese; Pizza Frittata for a Crowd; Easy Posole; and Baked Japanese Sweet Potatoes, Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce and Baked Polenta. Chapter Three is Baked Goods + Portable Snacks, with Persistence Biscuits; Baked Oatmeal and Apple Squares; Sweet Potato Tzimmes Muffins; Spiced Brown Sugar Pound Cake with Rum Molasses Glaze, and Chocolate Espresso Pie Bars




























[book] LIONESS
Golda Meir and the
Nation of Israel
by Francine Klagsbrun
October 2017

Schocken

Klagsbrun has been working on this for three decades. A biography of Meir is hard, she left no diaries, and did not write letters much. She swore those closest to her to keep her secrets and closest opinions. Klagsbrun has interviewed them all, and most have now passed away. This is THE definitive biography of Golda Meir. Meir was the the iron-willed leader, chain-smoking political operative in Israel, and tea-and-cake-serving grandmother who became the fourth prime minister of Israel and one of the most notable women of our time. As Ben Gurion quipped, she had the most balls of anyone on his cabinet

Golda Meir was a world figure unlike any other. Born in czarist Russia in 1898, she immigrated to America in 1906 and grew up in Milwaukee, where from her earliest years she displayed the political consciousness and organizational skills that would eventually catapult her into the inner circles of Israel's founding generation. She left home as a teen to escape her overbearing parents and moved in with her married sister. There she fell in love with the man she would marry. Together they moved to British Mandate Palestine in 1921. The passionate socialist joined a kibbutz but soon left for Tel Aviv with her husband and two children, and was hired at a public works office by the man who would become the great love of her life: David Remez who was Secretary of the Histadrut trade unions organization and Israel’s first minister of transportation. (Meir was also romantically involved with Zalman Shazar, who would become Israel’s third president; and linked to other powerful lovers in the United States and Israel.)

A series of public service jobs brought her to the attention of David Ben-Gurion, and her political career took off. Fund-raising in America in 1948, secretly meeting in Amman with King Abdullah right before Israel's declaration of independence, mobbed by thousands of Jews in a Moscow synagogue in 1948 as Israel's first representative to the USSR, serving as minister of labor and foreign minister in the 1950s and 1960s, Golda brought fiery oratory, plainspoken appeals, and shrewd deal-making to the cause to which she had dedicated her life—the welfare and security of the State of Israel and its inhabitants.

As prime minister Golda negotiated arms agreements with Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, agonized over the mixed signals being sent by newly installed Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, and had dozens of clandestine meetings with Jordan's King Hussein in the unsuccessful pursuit of a land-for-peace agreement with Israel's neighbors. But her time in office ended in tragedy, when Israel was caught off guard by Egypt and Syria's surprise attack on Yom Kippur in 1973. Resigning in the war's aftermath (critics were calling her an old lady, and a murderer), Golda spent her final years keeping a hand in national affairs and bemusedly enjoying international acclaim. Francine Klagsbrun's superbly researched and masterly recounted story of Israel's founding mother gives us a Golda for the ages.


Note: For those of you expecting some unique intimate details from Lou Kadar, Meir's confidante and secretary for over 30 years, you will have to look elsewhere.




(In 2018, we will have to check out Pnina Lahav's Gender Based biography of Meir)




























[book] Stormtroopers:
A New History of
Hitler's Brownshirts
by Daniel Siemens
October 2017

Yale University Press

The first full history of the Nazi Stormtroopers whose muscle brought Hitler to power, with revelations concerning their longevity and their contributions to the Holocaust

Germany’s Stormtroopers engaged in a vicious siege of violence that propelled the National Socialists to power in the 1930s. Known also as the SA or Brownshirts, these “ordinary” men waged a loosely structured campaign of intimidation and savagery across the nation from the 1920s to the “Night of the Long Knives” in 1934, when Chief of Staff Ernst Röhm and many other SA leaders were assassinated on Hitler’s orders.

In this deeply researched history, Daniel Siemens explores not only the roots of the SA and its swift decapitation but also its previously unrecognized transformation into a million-member Nazi organization, its activities in German-occupied territories during World War II, and its particular contributions to the Holocaust. The author provides portraits of individual members and their victims and examines their milieu, culture, and ideology. His book tells the long-overdue story of the SA and its devastating impact on German citizens and the fate of their country.

























[book] Three Floors Up
by Eshkol Nevo
Translated by Sondra Silverston
October 2017

Other Press

Set in an upper-middle-class Tel Aviv apartment building, this best-selling and warmly acclaimed Israeli novel examines the interconnected lives of its residents, whose turmoils, secrets, unreliable confessions, and problematic decisions reveal a society in the midst of an identity crisis.

On the first floor, Arnon, a tormented retired officer who fought in the First Intifada, confesses to an army friend with a troubled military past how his obsession about his young daughter's safety led him to lose control and put his marriage in peril. Above Arnon lives Hani, known as "the widow," whose husband travels the world for his lucrative job while she stays at home with their two children, increasingly isolated and unstable. When her brother-in-law suddenly appears at their door begging her to hide him from loan sharks and the police, she agrees in spite of the risk to her family, if only to bring some emotional excitement into her life. On the top floor lives a former judge, Devora. Eager to start a new life in her retirement, Devora joins a social movement, desperately tries to reconnect with her estranged son, and falls in love with a man who isn't what he seems.

A brilliant novelist, Eshkol Nevo vividly depicts how the grinding effects of social and political ills play out in the psyche of his flawed yet compelling characters, in often unexpected and explosive ways.

























[book] Yiddish for Pirates
a novel
by Gary Barwin
October 2017

Vintage Canada
Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize
Nominated for the Governor-General's Award for Literature
From the author of 20 books including “I, Dr Greenblatt, Orthodontist, 251-1457,” a hilarious, swashbuckling yet powerful tale of pirates, buried treasure and a search for the Fountain of Youth, told in the ribald, philosophical voice of a 500-year-old Jewish parrot. Set in the years around 1492, Yiddish for Pirates recounts the compelling story of Moishe, a Bar Mitzvah boy who leaves home to join a ship's crew, where he meets Aaron, the polyglot parrot who becomes his near-constant companion.

From a present-day Florida nursing home, this wisecracking yet poetic bird guides us through a world of pirate ships, Yiddish jokes and treasure maps. But Inquisition Spain is a dangerous time to be Jewish and Moishe joins a band of hidden Jews trying to preserve some forbidden books. He falls in love with a young woman, Sarah; though they are separated by circumstance, Moishe's wanderings are motivated as much by their connection as by his quest for loot and freedom. When all Jews are expelled from Spain, Moishe travels to the Caribbean with the ambitious Christopher Columbus, a self-made man who loves his creator. Moishe eventually becomes a pirate and seeks revenge on the Spanish while seeking the ultimate booty: the Fountain of Youth. This outstanding New Face of Fiction is filled with Jewish takes on classic pirate tales--fights, prison escapes, and exploits on the high seas--but it's also a tender love story, between Moishe and Sarah, and between Aaron and his "shoulder," Moishe. Rich with puns, colourful language, post-colonial satire and Kabbalistic hijinks, Yiddish for Pirates is also a compelling examination of mortality, memory, identity and persecution from one of this country's most talented writers.






















[book] Personal Midrash
Fresh Insights into the Torah
by Daniel Shulman, Esq.
(Chicago, IL)
2017

Urim Publishing
A personal exploration of one Jew's journey to find meaning in the Torah, Personal Midrash is a unique collection of commentary and insights on the Torah. The search for meaning as religious and spiritual beings is anchored to a common written document: the Torah. But, if the Torah were inaccessible, or inscrutable, or beyond the grasp of the ordinary person, we would lose our way. This book is a personal journey through Torah by a curious Jew without rabbinic training. While a scholar may learn something new from this book, the hope is that any Jew may be inspired to likewise seek his or her own voice in interpreting Torah.






















[book] GRANT
By Ron Chernow
October 2017
a short 1,074 pages
Penguin Press


Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency.

Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing. His business ventures had ended dismally, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness. But in war, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign, and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Along the way, Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort. Grant’s military fame translated into a two-term presidency, but one plagued by corruption scandals involving his closest staff members.

More important, he sought freedom and justice for black Americans, working to crush the Ku Klux Klan and earning the admiration of Frederick Douglass, who called him “the vigilant, firm, impartial, and wise protector of my race.” After his presidency, he was again brought low by a dashing young swindler on Wall Street, only to resuscitate his image by working with Mark Twain to publish his memoirs, which are recognized as a masterpiece of the genre.

With lucidity, breadth, and meticulousness, Chernow finds the threads that bind these disparate stories together, shedding new light on the man whom Walt Whitman described as “nothing heroic... and yet the greatest hero.” Chernow’s probing portrait of Grant's lifelong struggle with alcoholism transforms our understanding of the man at the deepest level. This is America's greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of our finest but most underappreciated presidents. The definitive biography, Grant is a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant's life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary.

As for General Grant's order against the Jewish merchants of Memphis TN during the Civil War... Chernow thinks it was more Oedipal rage against his father, who once went to Mississippi with three Jewish cotton traders who.





























[book] Hitler in Los Angeles:
How Jews Foiled Nazi
Plots Against Hollywood
and America
by Steven J. Ross
October 24, 2017
Bloomsbury USA
The chilling, little-known story of the rise of Nazism in Los Angeles, and the Jewish leaders and spies they recruited who stopped it.

No American city was more important to the Nazis than Los Angeles, home to Hollywood, the greatest propaganda machine in the world. The Nazis plotted to kill the city's Jews and to sabotage the nation's military installations: plans existed for hanging twenty prominent Hollywood figures such as Al Jolson, Charlie Chaplin, and Samuel Goldwyn; for driving through Boyle Heights and machine-gunning as many Jews as possible; and for blowing up defense installations and seizing munitions from National Guard armories along the Pacific Coast.

U.S. law enforcement agencies were not paying close attention--preferring to monitor Reds rather than Nazis--and only Leon Lewis and his daring ring of spies stood in the way. From 1933 until the end of World War II, attorney Leon Lewis, the man Nazis would come to call "the most dangerous Jew in Los Angeles," ran a spy operation comprised of military veterans and their wives who infiltrated every Nazi and fascist group in Los Angeles. Often rising to leadership positions, this daring ring of spies uncovered and foiled the Nazi's disturbing plans for death and destruction.

Featuring a large cast of Nazis, undercover agents, and colorful supporting players, Hitler in Los Angeles, by acclaimed historian Steven J. Ross, tells the story of Lewis's daring spy network in a time when hate groups had moved from the margins to the mainstream.

























[book] JULIUS ROSENWALD
REPAIRING THE WORLD
By Hasia Diner, PhD
October 2017

Jewish Live Series
Yale University Press

Everyone remembers Sears & Roebuck, and even James Cash (JC) Penney
Rarely does anyone mention Julius Rosenwald

The portrait of a humble retail magnate whose visionary ideas about charitable giving transformed the practice of philanthropy in America and beyond

Julius Rosenwald (1862–1932) rose from modest means as the son of a peddler to meteoric wealth at the helm of Sears, Roebuck. Yet his most important legacy stands not upon his business acumen but on the pioneering changes he introduced to the practice of philanthropy. While few now recall Rosenwald’s name—he refused to have it attached to the buildings, projects, or endowments he supported—his passionate support of Jewish and African American causes continues to influence lives to this day.

This biography of Julius Rosenwald explores his attitudes toward his own wealth and his distinct ideas about philanthropy, positing an intimate connection between his Jewish consciousness and his involvement with African Americans. The book shines light on his belief in the importance of giving in the present to make an impact on the future, and on his encouragement of beneficiaries to become partners in community institutions and projects. Rosenwald emerges from the pages as a compassionate man whose generosity and wisdom transformed the practice of philanthropy itself.













































[book] PERLA
by Frédéric Brun
Translated by Sarah Gendron
and Jennifer Vanderheyden
October 2017
University of Nebraska Press
Perla is the story of a woman who lived through the horrors of the Holocaust and would ultimately die unable to extricate herself from its corrosive memory. It is told from the point of view of her son, who, not long after losing her, learns that he is about to become a father. These two events become the impetus for reconstructing Perla’s past and for understanding gestation, as he’s equally in the dark about what happened in his mother’s life and what is taking place in his wife’s womb. Strangely, at this time he finds himself drawn to the poets Novalis, Hölderlin, and Schlegel, and the painter Caspar David Friedrich—founders of German romanticism who strove to capture the spiritual essence of the world. With and through them, he seeks peace and grapples with the question: How could Germany produce both the purest poetry and the most complete barbarity?
Winner of France’s Goncourt Prize for a first novel, Frédéric Brun’s semiautobiographical novel considers the seemingly irreconcilable multiplicities of life—past and present, personal and collective, self and other, life and death.






























[book] The Third Reich:
A History of
Nazi Germany
by Thomas Childers
(University of Pennsylvania)
October 2017
Simon & Schuster
The dramatic story of the Third Reich—how Adolf Hitler and a core group of Nazis rose to power and plunged the world into a horrific war, perpetrating the genocidal Holocaust while sacrificing the lives of millions of ordinary Germans.

In The Third Reich, Thomas Childers shows how the young Hitler became passionately political and anti-Semitic as he lived on the margins of society. Fueled by outrage at the punitive terms of the Versailles Treaty that ended the Great War, he found his voice and drew a following.

As his views developed, Hitler attracted like-minded colleagues who formed the nucleus of the nascent Nazi party. The failed Munich putsch of 1923 and subsequent trial gave Hitler a platform for his views, which he skillfully exploited. Between 1924 and 1929 Hitler and his party languished in obscurity on the radical fringes of German politics, but the onset of the Great Depression provided Hitler the issues he needed to move into the mainstream of German political life. He seized the opportunity to blame Germany’s misery on the victorious allies, the Marxists, the Jews, and big business—and the political parties that represented them. By 1932 the Nazis had become the largest political party in Germany. Although Hitler became chancellor in 1933, his party had never achieved a majority in free elections. Within six months the Nazis transformed a dysfunctional democracy into a totalitarian state and began the inexorable march to World War II and the Holocaust.

It is these fraught times that Childers brings to life: the Nazis’ rise to power and their use and abuse of power once they achieved it. Based in part on German documents seldom used by previous historians, The Third Reich charts the dramatic, improbable rise of the Nazis; the suffering of ordinary Germans under Nazi rule; and the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust. This is the most comprehensive and readable one-volume history of Nazi Germany since the classic Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.






























Haha... Sous chef... and the Jew... the Siouz Chef...
[book] The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen
by Sean Sherman
and Beth Dooley
October 2017
University of Minnesota Press
Here is real food—our indigenous American fruits and vegetables, the wild and foraged ingredients, game and fish. Locally sourced, seasonal, “clean” ingredients and nose-to-tail cooking are nothing new to Sean Sherman, the Oglala Lakota chef and founder of The Sioux Chef. In his breakout book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman shares his approach to creating boldly seasoned foods that are vibrant, healthful, at once elegant and easy.

Sherman dispels outdated notions of Native American fare—no fry bread or Indian tacos here—and no European staples such as wheat flour, dairy products, sugar, and domestic pork and beef. The Sioux Chef’s healthful plates embrace venison and rabbit, river and lake trout, duck and quail, wild turkey, blueberries, sage, sumac, timpsula or wild turnip, plums, purslane, and abundant wildflowers. Contemporary and authentic, his dishes feature cedar braised bison, griddled wild rice cakes, amaranth crackers with smoked white bean paste, three sisters salad, deviled duck eggs, smoked turkey soup, dried meats, roasted corn sorbet, and hazelnut–maple bites.

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen is a rich education and a delectable introduction to modern indigenous cuisine of the Dakota and Minnesota territories, with a vision and approach to food that travels well beyond those borders.






























[book] The Power of Moments:
Why Certain Experiences Have
Extraordinary Impact
by Chip Heath and Dan Heath
Stanford and Duke
October 2017
Simon & Schuster
The New York Times bestselling authors of Switch and Made to Stick explore why certain brief experiences can jolt us and elevate us and change us—and how we can learn to create such extraordinary moments in our life and work.
While human lives are endlessly variable, our most memorable positive moments are dominated by four elements: elevation, insight, pride, and connection. If we embrace these elements, we can conjure more moments that matter. What if a teacher could design a lesson that he knew his students would remember twenty years later? What if a manager knew how to create an experience that would delight customers? What if you had a better sense of how to create memories that matter for your children?
This book delves into some fascinating mysteries of experience: Why we tend to remember the best or worst moment of an experience, as well as the last moment, and forget the rest. Why “we feel most comfortable when things are certain, but we feel most alive when they’re not.” And why our most cherished memories are clustered into a brief period during our youth.
Readers discover how brief experiences can change lives, such as the experiment in which two strangers meet in a room, and forty-five minutes later, they leave as best friends. (What happens in that time?) Or the tale of the world’s youngest female billionaire, who credits her resilience to something her father asked the family at the dinner table. (What was that simple question?)
Many of the defining moments in our lives are the result of accident or luck—but why would we leave our most meaningful, memorable moments to chance when we can create them? The Power of Moments shows us how to be the author of richer experiences.






























[book] The Vél d'Hiv Raid:
The French Police at the
Service of the Gestapo
by Maurice Rajsfus
Translated by Levi Laub
Foreword by Michel Warschawski
(Le Monde)
October 2017
Beginning in the early morning hours of July 16, 1942, and lasting for two days, the French police went beyond Nazi ordinances and took it upon themselves to arrest and imprison more than 13,000 Jews at a Paris sporting arena, the Vélodrome d'Hiver. For most of the Jews, this detention without water, food, or sleep was the first horrific step toward death in the concentration camps. This uniquely detailed study of the roundup offers the only contemporary analysis of both the precursors and the aftermath of the events of those two days.

Using recently opened police files, Maurice Rajsfus details the internal organization of the police, showing the mechanisms of this raid in particular and of raids in general, making the book an indispensable micro-history of the Holocaust. A companion piece to Rajsfus's Operation Yellow Star / Black Thursday (DoppelHouse Press, 2017), The Vél d'Hiv Raid includes witness and police reports, shocking excerpts from the collaborationist press, and speeches by contemporary French politicians whose official apology is still not complete and terribly overdue.

With a foreword by Israeli activist and author Michel Warschawski.

Maurice Rajsfus (b. 1928), a former investigative journalist for Le Monde, survived the Vél d'Hiv roundup. He has written thirty books, including many examining the Vichy regime and its legacy in French police culture. Several of his books about his World War II experiences are the basis of a YA comic published by Tartamudo editions, as well as a theatrical production and a film. He lives in Paris with his family.






























[book] Smitten Kitchen Every Day:
Triumphant and Unfussy
New Favorites
by Deb Perelman
October 2017
Knopf
Deb Perelman, award-winning blogger and New York Times best-selling author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, understands that a happy discovery in the kitchen has the ability to completely change the course of your day. Whether we’re cooking for ourselves, for a date night in, for a Sunday supper with friends, or for family on a busy weeknight, we all want recipes that are unfussy to make with triumphant results.
Deb thinks that cooking should be an escape from drudgery. Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites presents more than one hundred impossible-to-resist recipes—almost all of them brand-new, plus a few favorites from her website—that will make you want to stop what you’re doing right now and cook. These are real recipes for real people—people with busy lives who don’t want to sacrifice flavor or quality to eat meals they’re really excited about.
You’ll want to put these recipes in your Forever Files: Sticky Toffee Waffles (sticky toffee pudding you can eat for breakfast), Everything Drop Biscuits with Cream Cheese, and Magical Two-Ingredient Oat Brittle (a happy accident). There’s a (hopelessly, unapologetically inauthentic) Kale Caesar with Broken Eggs and Crushed Croutons, a Mango Apple Ceviche with Sunflower Seeds, and a Grandma-Style Chicken Noodle Soup that fixes everything. You can make Leek, Feta, and Greens Spiral Pie, crunchy Brussels and Three Cheese Pasta Bake that tastes better with brussels sprouts than without, Beefsteak Skirt Steak Salad, and Bacony Baked Pintos with the Works (as in, giant bowls of beans that you can dip into like nachos).
And, of course, no meal is complete without cake (and cookies and pies and puddings): Chocolate Peanut Butter Icebox Cake (the icebox cake to end all icebox cakes), Pretzel Linzers with Salted Caramel, Strawberry Cloud Cookies, Bake Sale Winning-est Gooey Oat Bars, as well as the ultimate Party Cake Builder—four one-bowl cakes for all occasions with mix-and-match frostings (bonus: less time spent doing dishes means everybody wins).
Written with Deb’s trademark humor and gorgeously illustrated with her own photographs, Smitten Kitchen Every Day is filled with what are sure to be your new favorite things to cook.






























[book] Hazana:
Jewish Vegetarian Cooking
by Paola Gavin
Illus by Liz Catchpole
Photos by Mowie Kay
October 2017
Quadrille
Food and cooking are at the heart of Jewish life. During their 2,000 years of exile, Jews migrated across the world taking their culinary heritage and traditions with them. Wherever they settled, they adapted the dishes of their country of residence to fit their own dietary customs and laws, and as a result, Jewish food today embraces a vast variety of cuisines and cooking styles. Acclaimed food writer Paola Gavin takes the reader on a culinary journey through more than twenty countries from Poland to Morocco uncovering a myriad traditional vegetarian dishes that play such an important part in Jewish cooking. When Jews arrived in the Promised Land they became farmers and agriculturists, growing wheat, barley, rye and millet. Their diet was mainly vegetarian – based on bread, pulses, goat's and sheep's cheese, olives and nuts, vegetables and herbs, fresh and dried fruit. For the poor, food was made more palatable by sweetening with honey or syrup made from dates, pomegranates, or carob beans. These are some of the unique tastes and ingredients that are still associated with modern Jewish cooking today. Through 150 recipes Paola leads us from North Africa to Italy, Lithuania, Turkey and beyond, examining the subtle differences and genesis of the dishes of these regions. With lavish, colorful food photography and a meticulously researched narrative, Hazana is a classic in cookbook writing.






























[book] Hot Mess Kitchen:
Recipes for Your Delicious
Disastrous Life
by Gabi Moskowitz
Miranda Berman and
Mindy Kaling (Foreword)
2017
Grand Central
"I came for the recipes and stayed for the funny, personal writing. How could you not love a book with recipes like "Fuck It, Let's Just Get Stoned Nachos" and "All My Friends Are Married Mud Pie"? Surely there is not one among you who has not felt both sentiments. You could buy this book and enjoy it without ever taking out your oven mitts." --Mindy Kaling, from the foreword

Decades ago, every young woman left home knowing how to cook, but now, well, not so much. And while they're happy times have changed, authors Gabi Moskowitz and Miranda Berman want to save millennials from the perils of takeout and take back the kitchen with their new book, HOT MESS KITCHEN.

These ladies aren't serving caviar and champagne; they're making Quarter-Life Crisis Queso. They're not giving you a plan for the perfect dinner party, but suggesting How to Throw a Fabulous Dinner Party Without Having an Anxiety Attack. And they're going to be there each step of the way with easy, delicious recipes and personal stories that make it feel like they're right there in your kitchen with you, showing you which knife to use and wiping the mascara from your face as you cry from onion chopping. They're going to be your friends. Your kitchen friends, your HOT MESS KITCHEN friends. Your best friends? No, no, this isn't like a Her type of scenario. Have real friends.

Read this book and all their stories, and let Gabi and Miranda show you how cooking has helped, or how it could have helped them, in their messiest moments!


























[book] Jewish Fairy Tale Feasts:
A Literary Cookbook
Paperback edition
by Jane Yolen, Heidi E. Y. Stemple
Sima Elizabeth Shefrin (Illustrator)
October 2017
Ages 7-10
Master storyteller Jane Yolen and her daughter Heidi Stemple have teamed up to bring the magic of their acclaimed Fairy Tale Feasts to the time-honored and delicious traditions of Jewish storytelling and cuisine. Here youll find Yolens dynamic, enchanting retellings of Jewish tales from around the world paired with Stemples recipesfor everything from challah to matzo brei to pomegranate couscous, tzimmes chicken, and rugelah, in creative versions of classic dishes that any family will delight in cooking together. And Jewish Fairy Tale Feasts is more than a collection of stories and recipes: Yolen and Stemple imagine their readers as co-conspirators. Throughout they share fun facts and anecdotes about the creation of the stories and the history of the dishes, designed to encourage future cooks and storytellers to make up their own versions. Readers of all ages will learn about Jewish folktales, culture, and cooking, all the while captivated by the humor and wisdom of these enduring stories (and ready to eat!).






























[book] Myers+Chang at Home:
Recipes from the Beloved Boston Eatery
by Joanne Chang AND Karen Akunowicz
Fall 2017
HMH Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
From beloved chef and author Joanne Chang, the first cookbook from her acclaimed Boston restaurant, Myers+Chang

A fave of jewishboston dot com's muse and schmooze

Award-winning and beloved chef Joanne Chang of Boston’s Flour bakery may be best known for her sticky buns, but that’s far from the limit of her talents. When Chang married acclaimed restaurateur Christopher Myers, she would make him Taiwanese food for dinner at home every night. The couple soon realized no one was serving food like this in Boston, in a cool but comfortable restaurant environment. Myers+Chang was born and has turned into one of Boston’s most popular restaurants, and will be celebrating its tenth anniversary in 2017, just in time for publication of this long-awaited cookbook. These recipes, all bursting with flavor, are meant to be shared, and anyone can make them at home—try Dan Dan Noodle Salad, Triple Pork Mushu Stir-fry, or Grilled Corn with Spicy Sriracha Butter. This is food people crave and will want to make again and again. Paired with the couple's favorite recipes, the photography perfectly captures the spirit of the restaurant, making this book a keepsake for devoted fans.






























[book] Bollywood Kitchen:
Home-Cooked Indian Meals
Paired with Unforgettable Bollywood Films
by Sri Rao
Fall 2017

You’re invited to a party where the food and entertainment are both in Technicolor. It’s “dinner and a movie” in this vibrant, beautifully photographed tour of Indian food and films. Indian cuisine and Indian cinema (known as Bollywood) share much in common – bold colors and flavors with plenty of drama. But to the uninitiated, they can seem dizzying. Let Sri Rao be your guide. As one of the only Americans working in Bollywood, Sri is an expert on Indian musical films, and as an avid cook, he’s taken his mom’s authentic, home-cooked recipes and adapted them for the modern, American kitchen. Sri, a Penn/Wharton graduate (with honors) and native of the Harrisburg, PA area, wrote the film "Baar Baar Dekho" ("Look Again & Again"), featuring 2016's #1 dance song, "Kala Chashma" (with over 250 million views on YouTube). He also produced the films "New York" and "Badmaash Company" for India's leading movie studio, Yash Raj Films. He writes like Herskovitz and Zwick.

The popularity of Indian food has grown immensely in recent years – and for good reason. It's perfectly suited for people who love bold flavors, as well as those looking for vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free meals that don’t skimp on taste. But as Sri points out in Bollywood Kitchen – you’ve probably never tasted real Indian food. Home-cooked Indian-American food is surprisingly simple to make, using ingredients readily available in your local grocery store.

In this book you’ll find dinner menus and brunch menus, menus for kids and menus for cocktail parties. Along with each healthy and easy-to-prepare meal, Sri has paired one of his favorite Bollywood movies. Every one of these films is a musical, packed with dazzling song-and-dance numbers that are the hallmark of Bollywood, beloved by millions of fans all over the world. Sri will introduce each film to you, explaining why you’ll love it, and letting you in on some juicy morsels from behind the scenes.

Bollywood Kitchen is as much a beautiful coffee table book as it is a cookbook, filled with gorgeous film photographs and colorful tablescapes. It’s a unique treasure for Indian food lovers, as well as fans of world cinema.


























[book] Jewish New York:
The Remarkable Story of a
City and a People
by Deborah Dash Moore
Jeffrey S. Gurock, Annie Polland,
Howard B. Rock, Daniel Soyer, and Diana L. Linden
October 2017

NYU PRESS

The definitive history of Jews in New York and how they transformed the city

Based on the acclaimed multi-volume series, City of Promises: A History of the Jews of New York, Jewish New York reveals the multifaceted world of one of the city’s most important ethnic and religious groups. Spanning three centuries, Jewish New York traces the earliest arrival of Jews in New Amsterdam to the recent immigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union.

Jewish immigrants transformed New York. They built its clothing industry and constructed huge swaths of apartment buildings. New York Jews helped to make the city the center of the nation’s publishing industry and shaped popular culture in music, theater, and the arts. With a strong sense of social justice, a dedication to civil rights and civil liberties, and a belief in the duty of government to provide social welfare for all its citizens, New York Jews influenced the city, state, and nation with a new wave of social activism.

In turn, New York transformed Judaism and stimulated religious pluralism, Jewish denominationalism, and contemporary feminism. The city’s neighborhoods hosted unbelievably diverse types of Jews, from Communists to Hasidim.

Jewish New York not only describes Jews’ many positive influences on New York, but also exposes the group’s struggles with poverty and anti-Semitism. These injustices reinforced an exemplary commitment to remaking New York into a model multiethnic, multiracial, and multireligious world city.





















[book] The Jewish Bible:
A Material History
(Samuel and Althea Stroum
Lectures in Jewish Studies)
by David Stern
(Harvard Univ Professor of Hebrew Studies)
October 5, 2017

University of Washington Press

In The Jewish Bible: A Material History, David Stern explores the Jewish Bible as a material object-the Bibles that Jews have actually held in their hands-from its beginnings in the Ancient Near Eastern world through to the Middle Ages to the present moment.

Drawing on the most recent scholarship on the history of the book, Stern shows how the Bible has been not only a medium for transmitting its text-the word of God-but a physical object with a meaning of its own. That meaning has changed, as the material shape of the Bible has changed, from scroll to codex, and from manuscript to printed book. By tracing the material form of the Torah, Stern demonstrates how the process of these transformations echo the cultural, political, intellectual, religious, and geographic changes of the Jewish community. With tremendous historical range and breadth, this book offers a fresh approach to understanding the Bible's place and significance in Jewish culture.





















[book] Betaball:
How Silicon Valley and Science
Built One of the Greatest
Basketball Teams in History
by Erik Malinowski
October 2017
Atria Books
THE INSIDE STORY OF THE NBA CHAMPION GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS. One of Publishers Weekly's Sports Books to Watch for 2017

Moneyball meets The City Game in this compelling look at how the world champion Golden State Warriors embraced savvy business practices, next-generation science, and Silicon Valley's technocentric culture to not only produce the most talented basketball team ever assembled but revolutionize the modern NBA.

Betaball is the definitive, inside account of how the Warriors -- under the leadership of venture capitalist Joe Lacob and Hollywood producer Peter Guber -- quickly became one of the most remarkable success stories ever witnessed in sports or business. In just five years, the duo turned a declining franchise with no immediate hope into the NBA's dominant force, facilitated the rise of All-Star point guard Stephen Curry, produced the best single-season record in league history, and won two championships over a three-year span.

Lacob and Guber (along with their executives, coaches, and players) did so by urging employees to speak out; encouraging cross-collaboration; investing in bold, new technologies; and never resisting the urge to innovate, no matter how successful they became. In the tech industry, the term for this development stage -- when your product isn't quite fully baked, so you're always in flux and open to change yet focused on the end-goal -- is "beta."

By operating in "beta," the Warriors morphed into a model organization for American professional sports, instituting the best workplace principles found inside the world's most successful corporations and instilling a top-down organizational ethos that allowed all of their employees to thrive, from the front office to the free-throw line.

With in-depth access and meticulous reporting on and off the court, acclaimed journalist Erik Malinowski recounts a gripping tale of worlds colliding, a team's reinvention, ordinary people being pushed to extraordinary heights, and the Golden State Warriors' unending quest to remain the best.






























[book] Retail's Seismic Shift:
How to Shift Faster,
Respond Better, and Win
Customer Loyalty
by Michael Dart
Robin Lewis
October 2017

St. Martin's Press

Compared to 25 years ago, today’s retail experience is a world apart. Almost anything can be ordered, delivered and picked up rapidly, often customized to personal preferences at no extra cost. The smartphone has created a world of limitless consumer expectation and logistical possibility. So how much further can it go? What will the retail experience look like in ten, twenty, or even fifty years–and how should companies, big and small, be preparing?

Amazon may still loom large, say industry experts Robin Lewis and Michael Dart, but now they’ll actually be profitable, as mobile shopping becomes the norm. More importantly, the primacy of access over ownership, and experience over material goods, will force retailers to transform their offerings. Demographic trends, like the glut of seniors and the declining marriage rate, and societal trends, like income polarization and continued urbanization, will have surprising effects on which brands and products take center stage. And the double-edged sword of technology will be fully apparent: no more cards or cash, but pervasive fear of fraud and surveillance from the dark Web and the rise of A.I..

In their previous book, The New Rules of Retail, Lewis and Dart predicted nearly every defining characteristic of today’s marketplace–and the industry snapped it up in two editions. Now, in Retail's Seismic Shift, they do the same for the next era, where retailers will have to be ready for anything.

























[book] Echo After Echo
by Amy Rose Capetta
October 2017

Candlewick

Debuting on the New York stage, Zara is unprepared — for Eli, the girl who makes the world glow; for Leopold, the director who wants perfection; or for death in the theater.

Zara Evans has come to the Aurelia Theater, home to the visionary director Leopold Henneman, to play her dream role in Echo and Ariston, the Greek tragedy that taught her everything she knows about love. When the director asks Zara to promise that she will have no outside commitments, no distractions, it’s easy to say yes. But it’s hard not to be distracted when there’s a death at the theater — and then another — especially when Zara doesn’t know if they’re accidents, or murder, or a curse that always comes in threes. It’s hard not to be distracted when assistant lighting director Eli Vasquez, a girl made of tattoos and abrupt laughs and every form of light, looks at Zara. It’s hard not to fall in love. In heart-achingly beautiful prose, Amy Rose Capetta has spun a mystery and a love story into an impossible, inevitable whole — and cast lantern light on two young women, finding each other on a stage set for tragedy.

























[book] Bible Nation:
The United States of Hobby Lobby
by Candida R. Moss and Joel S. Baden
October 2017
Princeton University Press
How the billionaire owners of Hobby Lobby are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to make America a “Bible nation”

Like many evangelical Christians, the Green family of Oklahoma City believes that America was founded on a “biblical worldview as a Christian nation.” But the Greens are far from typical evangelicals in other ways. The billionaire owners of Hobby Lobby, a huge nationwide chain of craft stores, the Greens came to national attention in 2014 after successfully suing the federal government over their religious objections to provisions of the Affordable Care Act. What is less widely known is that the Greens are now America’s biggest financial supporters of Christian causes-and they are spending hundreds of millions of dollars in an ambitious effort to increase the Bible’s influence on American society. In Bible Nation, Candida Moss and Joel Baden provide the first in-depth investigative account of the Greens’ sweeping Bible projects and the many questions they raise.

Bible Nation tells the story of the Greens’ rapid acquisition of an unparalleled collection of biblical antiquities; their creation of a closely controlled group of scholars to study and promote their collection; their efforts to place a Bible curriculum in public schools; and their construction of a $500 million Museum of the Bible near the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Bible Nation reveals how these seemingly disparate initiatives promote a very particular set of beliefs about the Bible-and raise serious ethical questions about the trade in biblical antiquities, the integrity of academic research, and more.

Bible Nation is an important and timely account of how a vast private fortune is being used to promote personal faith in the public sphere-and why it should matter to everyone



























[book] WTF?
What's the Future and
Why It's Up to Us
by Tim O'Reilly
October 2017

Harper Business Press

Silicon Valley’s leading intellectual and the founder of O’Reilly Media explores the upside and the potential downsides of our future—what he calls the "next economy."

Tim O’Reilly’s genius is to identify and explain emerging technologies with world shaking potential—the World Wide Web, Open Source Software, Web 2.0, Open Government data, the Maker Movement, Big Data. "The man who can really can make a whole industry happen," according to Executive Chairman of Google Eric Schmidt, O’Reilly has most recently focused on the future of work—AI, algorithms, and new approaches to business organization that will shape our lives. He has brought together an unlikely coalition of technologists, business leaders, labor advocates, and policy makers to wrestle with these issues. In WTF he shares the evolution of his intellectual development, applying his approach to a number of challenging issues we will face as citizens, employees, business leaders, and a nation.

What is the future when an increasing number of jobs can be performed by intelligent machines instead of people, or only done by people in partnership with those machines? What happens to our consumer based societies—to workers and to the companies that depend on their purchasing power? Is income inequality and unemployment an inevitable consequence of technological advancement, or are there paths to a better future? What will happen to business when technology-enabled networks and marketplaces are better at deploying talent than traditional companies? What’s the future of education when on-demand learning outperforms traditional institutions? Will the fundamental social safety nets of the developed world survive the transition, and if not, what will replace them?

The digital revolution has transformed the world of media, upending centuries-old companies and business models. Now, it is restructuring every business, every job, and every sector of society. Yet the biggest changes are still ahead. To survive, every industry and organization will have to transform itself in multiple ways. O’Reilly explores what the next economy will mean for the world and every aspect of our lives—and what we can do to shape it.

























[book] A DEADLY LEGACY
German Jews and the Great War (WWI)
By Tim Grady
(University of Chester, reader)
October 2017

Yale University Press

I don't get the point... but you might like it
A groundbreaking reassessment of the crucial but unrecognized roles Germany’s Jews played at home and at the front during World War I
This book is the first to offer a full account of the varied contributions of German Jews to Imperial Germany’s endeavors during the Great War. Historian Tim Grady examines the efforts of the 100,000 Jewish soldiers who served in the German military (12,000 of whom died), as well as the various activities Jewish communities supported at home, such as raising funds for the war effort and securing vital food supplies. However, Grady’s research goes much deeper: he shows that German Jews were never at the periphery of Germany’s warfare, but were in fact heavily involved.
The author finds that many German Jews were committed to the same brutal and destructive war that other Germans endorsed, and he discusses how the conflict was in many ways lived by both groups alike. What none could have foreseen was the dangerous legacy they created together, a legacy that enabled Hitler’s rise to power and planted the seeds of the Holocaust to come.


























[book] FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
TRAVELING THE WORLD IN SEARCH OF A GOOD DEATH
By Caitlin Doughty
October 2017

Norton

The best-selling author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes expands our sense of what it means to treat the dead with “dignity.”

Fascinated by our pervasive terror of dead bodies, mortician Caitlin Doughty set out to discover how other cultures care for their dead. In rural Indonesia, she observes a man clean and dress his grandfather’s mummified body. Grandpa’s mummy has lived in the family home for two years, where the family has maintained a warm and respectful relationship. She meets Bolivian natitas (cigarette- smoking, wish- granting human skulls), and introduces us to a Japanese kotsuage, in which relatives use chopsticks to pluck their loved- ones’ bones from cremation ashes. With curiosity and morbid humor, Doughty encounters vividly decomposed bodies and participates in compelling, powerful death practices almost entirely unknown in America. Featuring Gorey-esque illustrations by artist Landis Blair, From Here to Eternity introduces death-care innovators researching green burial and body composting, explores new spaces for mourning- including a glowing- Buddha columbarium in Japan and America’s only open-air pyre- and reveals unexpected new possibilities for our own death rituals. 45 illustrations




























[book] What You Did Not Tell:
A Russian Past and the Journey Home
by Mark Mazower
October 2017
Other Press

Uncovering their remarkable and moving stories, Mark Mazower recounts the sacrifices and silences that marked a generation and their descendants. It was a family which fate drove into the siege of Stalingrad, the Vilna ghetto, occupied Paris, and even into the ranks of the Wehrmacht. His British father was the lucky one, the son of Russian-Jewish emigrants who settled in London after escaping the Bolsheviks, civil war, and revolution. Max, the grandfather, had started out as a socialist and manned the barricades against Tsarist troops, never speaking a word about it afterwards. His wife Frouma came from a family ravaged by the Terror yet making their way in Soviet society despite it all.

In the centenary of the Russian Revolution, What You Did Not Tell revitalizes the history of a socialism erased from memory--humanistic, impassioned, and broad-ranging in its sympathies. But it is also an exploration of the unexpected happiness that may await history's losers, of the power of friendship and the love of place that made his father at home in an England that no longer exists.



























[book] Everyday Mysticism
A Contemplative Community at Work in the Desert
by Ariel Glucklich
(Georgetown, Prof of Theology)
October 2017
Yale University Press

A scholar’s experiences inside a contemplative working community in Israel’s Negev desert
In this thoughtful and enlightening work, world renowned religion scholar Ariel Glucklich recounts his experiences at Neot Smadar, an ecological and spiritual oasis that has been thriving in the arid Southern Israeli desert for a quarter century. An intentional community originally established by a group of young professionals who abandoned urban life to found a school for the study of the self, Neot Smadar has thrived by putting ancient Buddhist and Hindu ideas into everyday practice as ways of living and working. Glucklich provides a fascinating detailed portrait of a dynamic farming community that runs on principles of spiritual contemplation and mindfulness, thereby creating a working environment that is highly ethical and nurturing. His study serves as a gentle invitation to join the world of mindful work, and to gain a new understanding of a unique form of mystical insight that exists without exoticism.



























[book] SWEET
Desserts from
London's Ottolenghi
by Yotam Ottolenghi and
Helen Goh
Ten Speed Press
October 2017
Cookbook
A collection of over 110 recipes for sweets, baked goods, and confections from superstar chef Yotam Ottolenghi. Yotam Ottolenghi is widely beloved in the food world for his beautiful, inspirational, and award-winning cookbooks, as well as his London delis and fine dining restaurant. And while he's known for his savory and vegetarian dishes, he actually started out his cooking career as a pastry chef. Sweet is entirely filled with delicious baked goods, desserts, and confections starring Ottolenghi's signature flavor profiles and ingredients including fig, rose petal, saffron, orange blossom, star anise, pistachio, almond, cardamom, and cinnamon. A baker's dream, Sweet features simple treats such as Chocolate, Banana, and Pecan cookies and Rosemary Olive Oil Orange Cake, alongside recipes for showstopping confections such as Cinnamon Pavlova with Praline Cream and Fresh Figs and Flourless Chocolate Layer Cake with Coffee, Walnut, and Rosewater.































[book] THE WALL AND THE GATE
ISRAEL, PALESTINE< AND THE
LEGAL BATTLE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
By Michael Sfard
Holt/Metropolitan
October 2017
From renowned human rights lawyer Michael Sfard, an unprecedented exploration of the struggle for human rights in Israel's courts

A farmer from a village in the occupied West Bank, cut off from his olive groves by the construction of Israel’s controversial separation wall, asked Israeli human rights lawyer Michael Sfard to petition the courts to allow a gate to be built in the wall. While the gate would provide immediate relief for the farmer, would it not also confer legitimacy on the wall and on the court that deems it legal? The defense of human rights is often marked by such ethical dilemmas, which are especially acute in Israel, where lawyers have for decades sought redress for the abuse of Palestinian rights in the country’s High Court-that is, in the court of the abuser.

In The Wall and the Gate, Michael Sfard chronicles this struggle-a story that has never before been fully told- and in the process engages the core principles of human rights legal ethics. Sfard recounts the unfolding of key cases and issues, ranging from confiscation of land, deportations, the creation of settlements, punitive home demolitions, torture, and targeted killings-all actions considered violations of international law. In the process, he lays bare the reality of the occupation and the lives of the people who must contend with that reality. He also exposes the surreal legal structures that have been erected to put a stamp of lawfulness on an extensive program of dispossession. Finally, he weighs the success of the legal effort, reaching conclusions that are no less paradoxical than the fight itself.

Writing with emotional force, vivid storytelling, and penetrating analysis, Michael Sfard offers a radically new perspective on a much-covered conflict and a subtle, painful reckoning with the moral ambiguities inherent in the pursuit of justice. The Wall and the Gate is a signal contribution to everyone concerned with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and human rights everywhere.






























[book] By Light of Hidden Candles
a novel
by Daniella Levy
October 2017
Kasva Press

n a mud hut in the Jewish Quarter of 16th-century Fez, a dying woman hands her granddaughter a heavy gold ring-and an even heavier secret.
Five hundred years later, Alma Ben-Ami journeys to Madrid to fulfill her ancestor's dying wish. She has recruited an unlikely research partner: Manuel Aguilar, a young Catholic Spaniard whose beloved priest always warned him about getting too friendly with Jews. As their quest takes them from Greenwich Village to the windswept mountain fortresses of southern Spain, their friendship deepens and threatens to cross boundaries sacred to them both; and what they finally discover in the Spanish archives will force them to confront the truth about who they are and what their faiths mean to them.
At times humorous, at times deeply moving, this beautifully written and meticulously researched book will appeal to anyone interested in the history of Inquisition-era Spain, Sephardic Jews, or falling in love.

























[book] VOICE LESSONS:
A Sisters Story
by Cara Mentzel
October 2017
St. Martin's Press

SISTERS!
Voice Lessons is the story of one younger sister growing up in the shadow of a larger-than-life older sister-looking up to her, wondering how they were alike and how they were different and, ultimately, learning how to live her own life and speak in her own voice on her own terms.

As Cara Mentzel, studied, explored, married, gave birth (twice) and eventually became an elementary school teacher, she watched her sister, Idina Menzel, from the wings and gives readers a front row seat to opening night of Rent and Wicked, a seat at the Tonys, and a place on the red carpet when her sister taught millions more, as the voice of Queen Elsa in the animated musical Frozen, to “Let It Go.” Voice Lessons is the story of sisters-sisters with pig tails, sisters with boyfriends and broken hearts, sisters as mothers and aunts, sisters as teachers and ice-queens, sisters as allies and confidantes.

As Cara puts it, “My big sister is Tony-Award-Winning, Gravity-Defying, Let-It-Go-Singing Idina Menzel who has received top billing on Broadway marquees, who has performed for Barbra Streisand and President Obama, at the Super Bowl and at the Academy Awards. The world knows her as 'Idina Menzel', but I call her 'Dee'.” Voice Lessons is their story.

























[book] Republican Like Me:
How I Left the Liberal Bubble
and Learned to Love the Right
by Ken Stern
October 2017
Harper
The former CEO of NPR set out for conservative America to find out why these people are so wrong about everything. It turns out, they weren’t.

Ken Stern watched the increasing polarization of our country with growing concern. As a longtime partisan Democrat himself, he felt forced to acknowledge that his own views were too parochial, too absent of any exposure to the “other side.” In fact, his urban neighborhood is so liberal, he couldn’t find a single Republican--even by asking around.

His street has an annual fair, and children sing a song inviting everyone and every type of labeled person.. except members of the GOP

So for one year, he crossed the aisle to spend time listening, talking, and praying with Republicans of all stripes. With his mind open and his dial tuned to the right, he went to evangelical churches, shot a hog in Texas, stood in pit row at a NASCAR race, hung out at Tea Party meetings and sat in on Steve Bannon’s radio show. He also read up on conservative wonkery and consulted with the smartest people the right has to offer.

What happens when a liberal sets out to look at issues from a conservative perspective? Some of his dearly cherished assumptions about the right slipped away. Republican Like Me reveals what lead him to change his mind, and his view of an increasingly polarized America.




















[book] The Future Is History:
How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia
by Masha Gessen
October 2017
Riverhead Books
Putin’s bestselling biographer reveals how, in the space of a generation, Russia surrendered to a more virulent and invincible new strain of autocracy.
Hailed for her “fearless indictment of the most powerful man in Russia” (The Wall Street Journal), award-winning journalist Masha Gessen is unparalleled in her understanding of the events and forces that have wracked her native country in recent times. In The Future Is History, she follows the lives of four people born at what promised to be the dawn of democracy. Each of them came of age with unprecedented expectations, some as the children and grandchildren of the very architects of the new Russia, each with newfound aspirations of their own—as entrepreneurs, activists, thinkers, and writers, sexual and social beings.
Gessen charts their paths against the machinations of the regime that would crush them all, and against the war it waged on understanding itself, which ensured the unobstructed reemergence of the old Soviet order in the form of today’s terrifying and seemingly unstoppable mafia state. Powerful and urgent, The Future Is History is a cautionary tale for our time and for all time.



























[book] Sting Ray Afternoons
A Memoir
by Steve Rushin
2017
Little Brown and Co., Inc.
A still have a scar on my leg from my sting ray bike with banana seat and sissy bar... no wait. I never had a sissy bar.. the scar is from me trying someone else's stingray bike.

Steve Rushin writes a memoir of a classic '70s childhood. It's a story of the 1970s. Of a road trip in a wood-paneled station wagon, with the kids in the way-back, singing along to the Steve Miller Band. Brothers waking up early on Saturday mornings for five consecutive hours of cartoons and advertising jingles that they'll be humming all day. A father-one of 3M's greatest and last eight-track-salesman fathers-traveling across the country on the brand-new Boeing 747, providing for his family but wanting nothing more than to get home.
It's Steve Rushin's story: of growing up within a '70s landscape populated with Bic pens, Mr. Clean and Scrubbing Bubbles, lightsabers and those oh-so-coveted Schwinn Sting-Ray bikes. Sting-Ray Afternoons paints an utterly fond, psychedelically vibrant, laugh-out-loud-funny portrait of an exuberant decade. With sidesplitting commentary, Rushin creates a vivid picture of a decade of wild youth, cultural rebirth, and the meaning of parental, brotherly, sisterly, whole lotta love.






















[book] Start Without Me:
A Novel
by Joshua Max Feldman
October 2017
William Morrow
The author of the critically acclaimed The Book of Jonah explores questions of love and choice, disappointment and hope in the lives of two strangers who meet by chance in this mesmerizing tale that unfolds over one Thanksgiving Day.

Adam is a former musician and recovering alcoholic who is home for Thanksgiving for the first time in many years. Surrounded by his parents and siblings, nieces and nephews—all who have seen him at his worst—he can’t shake the feeling that no matter how hard he tries, he’ll always be the one who can’t get it right.

Marissa is a flight attendant whose marriage is strained by simmering tensions over race, class, and ambition. Heading to her in-laws for their picture-perfect holiday family dinner, her anxiety is intensified by the knowledge she is pregnant from an impulsive one-night-stand.

In an airport restaurant on Thanksgiving morning, Adam and Marissa meet. Over the course of this day fraught with emotion and expectation, these two strangers will form an unlikely bond as they reckon with their family ties, their pasts, and the choices that will determine their way forward.

Joshua Max Feldman focuses his knowing eye on one of the last bastions of classical American idealism, the Thanksgiving family gathering, as he explores our struggles to know—and to be—our best selves. Hilarious and heartrending, Start Without Me is a thoughtful and entertaining page-turner that will leave its indelible mark on your heart.






















[book] Periods Gone Public:
Taking a Stand for Menstrual Equity
by Jennifer Weiss-Wolf
October 2017
Arcade
The first book to explore menstruation in the current cultural and political landscape and to investigate the new wave of period activism taking the world by storm.

After centuries of being shrouded in taboo and superstition, periods have gone mainstream. Seemingly overnight, a new, high-profile movement has emerged—one dedicated to bold activism, creative product innovation, and smart policy advocacy—to address the centrality of menstruation in relation to core issues of gender equality and equity.

In Periods Gone Public, Jennifer Weiss-Wolf—the woman Bustle dubbed one of the nation's "badass menstrual activists"—explores why periods have become a prominent political cause. From eliminating the tampon tax, to enacting new laws ensuring access to affordable, safe products, menstruation is no longer something to whisper about. Weiss-Wolf shares her firsthand account in the fight for "period equity" and introduces readers to the leaders, pioneers, and everyday people who are making change happen. From societal attitudes of periods throughout history—in the United States and around the world—to grassroots activism and product innovation, Weiss-Wolf challenges readers to face stigma head-on and elevate an agenda that recognizes both the power—and the absolute normalcy—of menstruation.





















[book] Life Is Like a Musical:
How to Live, Love,
and Lead Like a Star
by Tim Federle
October 2017
Running Press
Tim Federele, a former Broadway dancer and a playwright, might not be Jewish, but he dated Jewish guys, and bought a box of 8 crayons for 8 days of Hanukkah gifts, once, for his Jewish bf.
Is that what a star would do? No, but for advice on that, keep reading...
Before Tim Federle became a bestselling author and a Broadway playwright, he worked as a back-up dancer at the Super Bowl, a polar bear at Radio City, and a card-carrying chorus boy on Broadway. Life is Life a Musical features 50 tips learned backstage, onstage, and in between gigs, with chapters such as "Dance Like Everyone's Watching" and "Save the Drama for the Stage." This charming and clever guide will appeal to all ages and inspire readers to step into the lead role of their own life, even if they're not a recovering theater major.




















[book] The Librarian of Auschwitz
by Antonio Iturbe
Translated by Lilit Thwaites
October 2017
Henry Holt
Based on the experience of real-life Auschwitz prisoner Dita Kraus, this is the incredible story of a girl who risked her life to keep the magic of books alive during the Holocaust.

Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to sneak past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the librarian of Auschwitz.

Out of one of the darkest chapters of human history comes this extraordinary story of courage and hope.





















[book] THE RBG WORKOUT
How She Stays Strong
and You Can Too
By Bryant Johnson,
Certified Personal Trainer
HMH
October 2017
Supremely Good
Chest Presses, Side Planks, Front Planks in full push up position, Bicep Curls, Swiss Balls,...
A fun, fully illustrated exercise book that details Ruth Bader Ginsburg's workout, written by her trainer since 1999. Many members of the Federal Court are his clients: judges, clerks, lawyers, as well as members of the U.S> military. He was in the U.S> Army for three depent a dozen years in Special Forces.

Have you ever wondered what keeps Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the Supreme Court’s favorite octogenarians, so sprightly? She owes it in part to the twice-weekly workouts she does with her personal trainer, Bryant Johnson, a man she's called “the most important person” in her life. Now you too can work out with Justice Ginsburg’s trainer in the comfort of your home with The RBG Workout. From planks to squats to (full) push-ups, this simple but challenging workout—illustrated with four-color illustrations of the justice in workout gear—will have you getting fit in no time. With tips from the bench, and sidebars with Bryant’s folksy wisdom on getting fit and staying healthy, this delightful book is a perfect gift for anyone looking to emulate one of America’s most admired women.


























[book] Memories After My Death:
The Story of My Father,
Joseph "Tommy" Lapid
Mayor of Tel Aviv
by Yair Lapid
October 2017
Thomas Dunne Books
From leading political figure and bestselling Hebrew author Yair Lapid comes a mesmerizing portrait of the author's father, one of modern Israel's leading figures.

Memories After My Death is the astonishing true story of Tommy Lapid, a well-loved and controversial Israeli figure who saw the development of the country from all angles over its first sixty years. From seeing his father taken away to a concentration camp to arriving in Tel Aviv at the birth of Israel, Tommy Lapid lived every major incident of Jewish life since the 1930s first-hand.

This sweeping narrative will captivate anyone with an interest in how Israel became what it is today. Tommy Lapid's uniquely unorthodox opinions - he belonged to neither left nor right, was Jewish, but vehemently secular - expose the many contradictions inherent in Israeli life today




















[book] The State of Affairs:
Rethinking Infidelity
by Esther Perel
(Columbia Univ)
October 2017
Harper
Iconic couples’ therapist and bestselling author of Mating in Captivity Esther Perel returns with a provocative look at relationships through the lens of infidelity.
Affairs, she argues, have a lot to teach us about the human heart—what we expect, what we think we want, and what we feel entitled to. They offer a unique window into our personal and cultural attitudes about love, lust, and commitment. Through examining illicit love from multiple angles, Perel invites readers into an honest, enlightened, and entertaining exploration of modern marriage in its many variations.
An affair: it can rob a couple of their relationship, their happiness, their very identity. And yet, this extremely common human experience is so poorly understood. Adultery has existed since marriage was invented, and so too the prohibition against it—in fact, it has a tenacity that marriage can only envy. So what are we to make of this time-honored taboo—universally forbidden yet universally practiced? Why do people cheat—even those in happy marriages? Why does an affair hurt so much? When we say infidelity, what exactly do we mean? Do our romantic expectations of marriage set us up for betrayal? Is there such a thing as an affair-proof marriage? Is it possible to love more than one person at once? Can an affair ever help a marriage? Perel weaves real-life case stories with incisive psychological and cultural analysis in this fast-paced and compelling book.
For the past ten years, Perel has traveled the globe and worked with hundreds of couples who have grappled with infidelity. Betrayal hurts, she writes, but it can be healed. An affair can even be the doorway to a new marriage—with the same person. With the right approach, couples can grow and learn from these tumultuous experiences, together or apart.
Fiercely intelligent, The State of Affairs provides a daring framework for understanding the intricacies of love and desire. As Perel observes, “Love is messy; infidelity more so. But it is also a window, like no other, into the crevices of the human heart.”




















[book] Going Into Town:
A Love Letter to New York
by Roz Chast
October 2017
Bloomsbury
From the #1 NYT bestselling author of Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, Roz Chast's new graphic memoir--a hilarious illustrated ode/guide/thank-you note to Manhattan as only she could write it.

For native Brooklynite Roz Chast, adjusting to life in the suburbs (where people own trees!?) was surreal. But she recognized that for her kids, the reverse was true. On trips into town, they would marvel at the strange world of Manhattan: its gum-wad-dotted sidewalks, honey-combed streets, and "those West Side Story-things" (fire escapes). Their wonder inspired Going into Town, part playful guide, part New York stories, and part love letter to the city, told through Chast's laugh-out-loud, touching, and true cartoons.




















[book] A Force So Swift:
Mao, Truman, and the
Birth of Modern China, 1949
by Kevin Peraino
Fall 2017
Crown
In 1948, Truman ignored his advisers and recognized the State of Israel
In 1949, many advisers and Republican Senators, as well as Madame Chang wanted Truman to attack Mao and Communist China.
This is a gripping narrative of the Truman Administration's response to the fall of Nationalist China and the triumph of Mao Zedong's Communist forces in 1949--an extraordinary political revolution that continues to shape East Asian politics to this day.

In the opening months of 1949, U.S. President Harry S. Truman found himself faced with a looming diplomatic catastrophe--"perhaps the greatest that this country has ever suffered," as the journalist Walter Lippmann put it. Throughout the spring and summer, Mao Zedong's Communist armies fanned out across mainland China, annihilating the rival troops of America's one-time ally Chiang Kai-shek and taking control of Beijing, Shanghai, and other major cities. As Truman and his aides--including his shrewd, ruthless secretary of state, Dean Acheson--scrambled to formulate a response, they were forced to contend not only with Mao, but also with unrelenting political enemies at home. Over the course of this tumultuous year, Mao would fashion a new revolutionary government in Beijing, laying the foundation for the creation of modern China, while Chiang Kai-shek would flee to the island sanctuary of Taiwan. These events transformed American foreign policy--leading, ultimately, to decades of friction with Communist China, a long-standing U.S. commitment to Taiwan, and the subsequent wars in Korea and Vietnam.

Drawing on Chinese and Russian sources, as well as recently declassified CIA documents, Kevin Peraino tells the story of this remarkable year through the eyes of the key players, including Mao Zedong, President Truman, Secretary of State Acheson, Minnesota congressman Walter Judd, and Madame Chiang Kai-shek, the influential first lady of the Republic of China. Today, the legacy of 1949 is more relevant than ever to the relationships between China, the United States, and the rest of the world, as Beijing asserts its claims in the South China Sea and tensions endure between Taiwan and the mainland.

























[book] Who Is Ralph Lauren?
by Jane O'Connor
Fall 2017
Penguin
Ages 8 – 12

The polo player with the raised mallet—everyone knows the Ralph Lauren logo. Learn the amazing story of the man who is a true American fashion icon.

Born in the Bronx, even as a teenager Ralph Lauren was known for his distinctive fashion sense, having a taste for both classic preppy clothes and vintage looks like beat-up leather jackets. He got his start in the fashion business by selling ties that he designed. From ties he went on to create a global fashion empire. In this easy-to-read biography, best-selling author and Who Was? creator Jane O'Connor explains exactly how a fashion line is created—from first drawings to models strutting on the runway.























[book] FOR TWO THOUSAND YEARS
By Mihail Sebastian
Translated from Romanian
Fall 2017
Other Press
Available in English for the first time, Mihail Sebastian’s classic 1934 novel delves into the mind of a Jewish student in Romania during the fraught years preceding World War II.

This literary masterpiece revives the ideological debates of the interwar period through the journal of a Romanian Jewish student caught between anti-Semitism and Zionism. Although he endures persistent threats just to attend lectures, he feels disconnected from his Jewish peers and questions whether their activism will be worth the cost. Spending his days walking the streets and his nights drinking and conversing with revolutionaries, zealots, and libertines, he remains isolated, even from the women he loves. From Bucharest to Paris, he strives to make peace with himself in an increasingly hostile world.

For Two Thousand Years echoes Mihail Sebastian’s struggles as the rise of fascism ended his career and turned his friends and colleagues against him. Born of the violence of relentless anti-Semitism, his searching, self-derisive work captures a defining moment in history and lights the way for generations to come—a prescient, heart-wrenching chronicle of resilience and despair, resistance and acceptance.




























[book] The River of Consciousness
by the late Dr. Oliver Sacks
Fall 2017
Knopf
From the best-selling author of Gratitude, On the Move, and Musicophilia, a collection of essays that displays Oliver Sacks's passionate engagement with the most compelling and seminal ideas of human endeavor: evolution, creativity, memory, time, consciousness, and experience.
Oliver Sacks, a scientist and a storyteller, is beloved by readers for the extraordinary neurological case histories (Awakenings, An Anthropologist on Mars) in which he introduced and explored many now familiar disorders--autism, Tourette's syndrome, face blindness, savant syndrome. He was also a memoirist who wrote with honesty and humor about the remarkable and strange encounters and experiences that shaped him (Uncle Tungsten, On the Move, Gratitude). Sacks, an Oxford-educated polymath, had a deep familiarity not only with literature and medicine but with botany, animal anatomy, chemistry, the history of science, philosophy, and psychology. The River of Consciousness is one of two books Sacks was working on up to his death, and it reveals his ability to make unexpected connections, his sheer joy in knowledge, and his unceasing, timeless project to understand what makes us human.




























[book] FINDING MEANING IN AN
IMPERFECT WORLD
By Iddo Landau
(Haifa University)
2017
Oxford

Does life have meaning? Is it possible for life to be meaningful when the world is filled with suffering and when so much depends merely upon chance? Even if there is meaning, is there enough to justify living?

These questions are difficult to resolve. There are times in which we face the mundane, the illogically cruel, and the tragic, which leave us to question the value of our lives. However, Iddo Landau argues, our lives often are, or could be made, meaningfulwe've just been setting the bar too high for evaluating what meaning there is.

When it comes to meaning in life, Landau explains, we have let perfect become the enemy of the good. We have failed to find life perfectly meaningful, and therefore have failed to see any meaning in our lives. We must attune ourselves to enhancing and appreciating the meaning in our lives, and Landau shows us how to do that.

In this warmly written book, rich with examples from the author's life, film, literature, and history, Landau offers new theories and practical advice that awaken us to the meaning already present in our lives and demonstrates how we can enhance it. He confronts prevailing nihilist ideas that undermine our existence, and the questions that dog us no matter what we believe. While exposing the weaknesses of ideas that lead many to despair, he builds a strong case for maintaining more hope. Along the way, he faces provocative questions: Would we choose to live forever if we could? Does death render life meaningless? If we examine it in the context of the immensity of the whole universe, can we consider life meaningful? If we feel empty once we achieve our goals, and the pursuit of these goals is what gives us a sense of meaning, then what can we do? Finding Meaning in an Imperfect World is likely to alter the way you understand your life.























[book] In Pursuit of Memory:
The Fight Against Alzheimer's
by Joseph Jebelli, Neuroscientist
October 31, 2017
Little, Brown and Company
For readers of Atul Gawande, Siddhartha Mukherjee, and Henry Marsh, a riveting, gorgeously written biography of one of history's most fascinating and confounding diseases--Alzheimer's--from its discovery more than 100 years ago to today's race towards a cure.
Named "Science Book of the Month" by Bookseller
Alzheimer's is the great global epidemic of our time, affecting millions worldwide -- there are more than 5 million people diagnosed in the US alone. And as our population ages, scientists are working against the clock to find a cure.
Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli is among them. His beloved grandfather had Alzheimer's and now he's written the book he needed then -- a very human history of this frightening disease. But In Pursuit of Memory is also a thrilling scientific detective story that takes you behind the headlines. Jebelli's quest takes us from nineteenth-century Germany and post-war England, to the jungles of Papua New Guinea and the technological proving grounds of Japan; through America, India, China, Iceland, Sweden, and Colombia. Its heroes are scientists from around the world -- many of whom he's worked with -- and the brave patients and families who have changed the way that researchers think about the disease.
This compelling insider's account shows vividly why Jebelli feels so hopeful about a cure, but also why our best defense in the meantime is to understand the disease. In Pursuit of Memory is a clever, moving, eye-opening guide to the threat one in three of us faces now.

































[book] Maimonides and the Merchants:
Jewish Law and Society
in the Medieval Islamic World
by Mark R. Cohen
Univ of Pennsylvania Press
2017
The advent of Islam in the seventh century brought profound economic changes to the Jews living in the Middle East, and Talmudic law, compiled in and for an agrarian society, was ill equipped to address an increasingly mercantile world. In response, and over the course of the seventh through eleventh centuries, the heads of the Jewish yeshivot of Iraq sought precedence in custom to adapt Jewish law to the new economic and social reality.


In Maimonides and the Merchants, Mark R. Cohen reveals the extent of even further pragmatic revisions to the halakha, or body of Jewish law, introduced by Moses Maimonides in his Mishneh Torah, the comprehensive legal code he compiled in the late twelfth century. While Maimonides insisted that he was merely restating already established legal practice, Cohen uncovers the extensive reformulations that further inscribed commerce into Jewish law. Maimonides revised Talmudic partnership regulations, created a judicial method to enable Jewish courts to enforce forms of commercial agency unknown in the Talmud, and even modified the halakha to accommodate the new use of paper for writing business contracts. Over and again, Cohen demonstrates, the language of Talmudic rulings was altered to provide Jewish merchants arranging commercial collaborations or litigating disputes with alternatives to Islamic law and the Islamic judicial system.


Thanks to the business letters, legal documents, and accounts found in the manuscript stockpile known as the Cairo Geniza, we are able to reconstruct in fine detail Jewish involvement in the marketplace practices that contemporaries called "the custom of the merchants." In Maimonides and the Merchants, Cohen has written a stunning reappraisal of how these same customs inflected Jewish law as it had been passed down through the centuries.




























[book] Birthrate Politics in Zion:
Judaism, Nationalism, and Modernity
under the British Mandate
by Lilach Rosenberg-Friedman
(Bar Ilan University)
Indiana University Press
October 23, 2017
Despite both national and traditional imperatives to have many children, the birthrate of the Jewish community in British Mandate Palestine declined steadily from 1920-1948. During these years Jews were caught in contradictions between political and social objectives, religion, culture, and individual needs. Lilach Rosenberg-Friedman takes a deep and detailed look at these diverse and decisive issues, including births and abortions during this period, the discourse about birthrate, and practical attempts to implement policies to counter the low birthrate. Themes that emerge include the effect of the Holocaust, economics, ethnicity, efforts by public figures to increase birthrate, and the understanding that women in the society were viewed as entirely responsible for procreation. Providing a deep examination of the day-to-day lives of Jewish families in British Mandate Palestine, this book shows how political objectives are not only achieved by political agreements, public debates, and battlefields, but also by the activities of ordinary men, women, and families.




























[book] The Limits of the Land:
How the Struggle for the
West Bank Shaped the
Arab-Israeli Conflict
by Avshalom Rubin
(U.S. Dept of State )
Indiana University Press
Fall 2017
Was Israel’s occupation of the West Bank inevitable? From 1949-1967, the West Bank was the center of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Many Israelis hoped to conquer it and widen their narrow borders, while many Arabs hoped that it would serve as the core of a future Palestinian state. In The Limits of the Land, Avshalom Rubin presents a sophisticated new portrait of the Arab-Israeli struggle that goes beyond partisan narratives of the past. Drawing on new evidence from a wide variety of sources, many of them only recently declassified, Rubin argues that Israel’s leaders indeed wanted to conquer the West Bank, but not at any cost. By 1967, they had abandoned hope of widening their borders and adopted an alternative strategy based on nuclear deterrence. In 1967, however, Israel’s new strategy failed to prevent war, convincing its leaders that they needed to keep the territory they conquered. The result was a diplomatic stalemate that endures today.
























[book] Think Bigger:
And 39 Other Winning
Strategies from Successful Entrepreneurs
by Michael W. Sonnenfeldt
Bloomberg / Wiley
(Tiger 21)
Autumn 2017
What does it take to succeed today both personally and professionally? In looking for answers, one obvious place to start would be to talk to self-made men and women who themselves are successful. That's exactly what Michael W. Sonnenfeldt—an accomplished entrepreneur—has done here in this ground-breaking book.

Drawing on the wisdom, insight and experience of members of TIGER 21 (The Investment Group for Enhanced Results in the 21st Century), and supplementing that with additional research and interviews, Sonnenfeldt offers real-world guidance and often counter-intuitive advice and conclusions.

Among the things you'll learn are:
Why grit and focus trump intelligence just about every time.
Why having—and listening to— a wise mentor will create shortcuts to getting more done.
What you need to do to avoid getting in your own way. And why.
'Shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations' can be avoided by taking some simple, commonsense steps.

Think BIGGER will inspire you, no matter where you are in your business career. It will also show you that the skills you use to grow wealth can be applied to making the world a better place.

Your success can benefit others.

Michael W. Sonnenfeldt is the founder and chairman of TIGER 21, the premier peer-to-peer learning network for high-net-worth first generation wealth creators in North America and London. He is an accomplished serial entrepreneur, philanthropist and most excited that all of his proceeds from this book will support the TIGER 21 Foundation for young entrepreneurs.
























[book] New Children of Israel:
Emerging Jewish Communities
in an Era of Globalization
by Nathan P. Devir
Univ of Utah Press
2017
In the last century, the tragic events of the Holocaust and the subsequent founding of the state of Israel brought about tremendous changes for Jewish communities all over the world. This book explores what may be the next watershed moment for the Jews: the inclusion of millions of people from developing nations who self-define as Jewish but who have no historical ties with established centers of Jewish life. These emerging groups are expanding notions of what it means to be Jewish.

This comparative ethnographic study, the first of its kind, presents in-depth analyses of the backgrounds, motivations, and sociohistorical contexts of emerging Jewish communities in Cameroon, Ghana, India, and other postcolonial locales. It investigates the ramifications of these new movements for the larger Judeo-Christian world, particularly with regard to issues of multiculturalism, immigration, race relations, and messianic expectations concerning the prophecy of Isaiah 11:12, according to which God will "assemble the dispersed of Israel, and gather together the scattered of Judah from the four corners of the earth."



















[book] I Am Not a Spy:
An American Jew Goes Deep
in the Arab World & Israeli Army
by Michael Bassin
WiDo Publishing
October 2017
WiDo Publishing at first rejected Bassin's manuscript. It was poorly structured and edited. They gave him advice when he asked for it, and a better book was created.

Here is a true story of an idealistic young American Jew from Cincinnati, Ohio (the son of Gayna Mandelbaum Bassin, the violinist, and the Bassin's of Milwaukee). Michael’s best friends in high school were a Palestinian Muslim and an Israeli Jew; and he is committed to promoting peace and reconciliation in the Middle East. Michael Bassin, a student at GWU in DC, enrolled for a semester exchange at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2006 (a decade ago). He was told not to mention he is Jewish, but he does. Classmates, students, faculty, and even the secret police respond with shock and suspicion. He visits Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and northern India Back on campus, he nurtures enemies and allies. Just like a Jewish peace corps volunteer, he has to become a reluctant ambassador for the United States, for the Jewish people, and even for the State of Israel as he responds to the conspiracies and threats made against him.

He is the first live Jew many people he meets have ever seen.

After this experience, Michael – remember... he is idealistic.... feels that to promote peace and understanding.... he should move to Israel and join the Army... and so... he moved to Israel and joined the IDF as a combat translator. He must be the voice and the face of his IDF unit during both friendly interactions and hostile engagements with Palestinians in the West Bank.

Here is his story. (Michael is presently the Chief Revenue Officer for FirstImpression.IO in Israel)





















[book] The Abu Dhabi Bar Mitzvah:
Fear and Love in the
Modern Middle East
by Adam Valen Levinson
WW Norton
November 2017
Chronically questioning, funny, and bold, a young American writer explores the majority-Muslim lands that scare him most.

Armed only with college Arabic and restless curiosity, Adam Valen Levinson set out to “learn about the world 9/11 made us fear.” From a base in globalized and sterilized Abu Dhabi, he sets out to lunch in Taliban territory in Afghanistan, travels under the watchful eye of Aleppo’s secret police, risks shipwreck en route to Somalia, investigates Yazidi beliefs in a sacred cave, cliff-dives in Oman, celebrates New Year’s Eve in Tahrir Square, and, at every turn, discovers a place that matches not at all with its reputation.

While politicians and media eagerly stoke the flames of Islamophobia, Valen Levinson crosses borders with abundant humor and humanity. Seeking common ground everywhere, he finds that people who pray differently often laugh the same. And as a young man bar mitzvahed at twenty-one (instead of the usual thirteen), he slowly learns how childish it is to live by decisions and distinctions born of fear.





























NOVEMBER 2017 BOOKS




[book] It's All Relative:
Adventures Up and Down
the World’s Family Tree
by A. J. Jacobs
Simon and Schuster
November 2017
New York Times bestselling author of The Know-It-All and The Year of Living Biblically, A.J. Jacobs undergoes a hilarious, heartfelt quest to understand what constitutes family—where it begins and how far it goes—and attempts to untangle the true meaning of the “Family of Humankind.”

A.J. Jacobs has received some strange emails over the years, but this note was perhaps the strangest: “You don’t know me, but I’m your eighth cousin. And we have over 80,000 relatives of yours in our database.”

That’s enough family members to fill Madison Square Garden four times over. Who are these people, A.J. wondered, and how do I find them? So began Jacobs’s three-year adventure to help build the biggest family tree in history.

Jacobs’s journey would take him to all seven continents. He drank beer with a US president, found himself singing with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir (but not in the Temple), and unearthed genetic links to Hollywood actresses and real-life scoundrels. After all, we can choose our friends, but not our family.

Note: I attended his family reunion two years ago in Queens since, via marriage, I am a seventh cousin and also a genetic cousin

The book is partly a memoir about my eccentric family. It’s also partly about the revolutions in DNA and family trees and the huge effect they’re having on politics, race relations and happiness. And it’s partly an adventure in which I try to put on the biggest family reunion in history, The Global Family Reunion. Because, as the book demonstrates, we’re all related. We are all cousins. Family is the ultimate social network.
“It’s All Relative” features black sheep, celebrity cousins (Daniel Radcliffe! John Legend!), separated-at-birth twins, genealogy obsessives, plenty of Mormons, a family with nine fathers, an African-American daughter of the revolution, the real Adam and Eve, kissing cousins and friendly Neanderthals, among much more.
It’s also a heartfelt argument against tribalism, which I believe is the biggest problem facing the world today. This idea of “us vs. them” is killing us. We need to remember that we share 99.9 percent of our DNA with all other humans. A Harvard study from last year showed that Israelis and Palestinians treated each other with more kindness when they were shown how closely they were related. “Whether he’s posing as a celebrity, outsourcing his chores, or adhering strictly to the Bible, we love reading about the wacky lifestyle experiments of author A.J. Jacobs” (Entertainment Weekly). Now Jacobs upends, in ways both meaningful and hilarious, our understanding of genetics and genealogy, tradition and tribalism, identity and connection. It’s All Relative is a fascinating look at the bonds that connect us all.
























[book] The Patriots:
A Novel
Now in paperback
by Sana Krasikov
Spiegel and Grau
Autumn 2017
A sweeping multigenerational novel about idealism, betrayal, and family secrets set in the U.S. and Russia, from one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists

When the Great Depression hits, Florence Fein leaves Brooklyn College for a job in Moscow—and the promise of love and independence. But once in Russia, she quickly becomes entangled in a country she can’t escape. Many years later, Florence’s son, Julian, immigrates back to the United States, though his work in the oil industry takes him on frequent visits to Moscow. When he learns that Florence’s KGB file has been opened, he arranges a business trip to uncover the truth about his mother, and to convince his son, Lenny—trying to make his fortune in Putin’s cutthroat Russia—to return home. What Julian discovers is both chilling and heartbreaking: an untold story of a generation of Americans abandoned by their country, and the secret history of two rival nations colluding under the cover of enmity.

The Patriots is a riveting evocation of the Cold War years, told with brilliant insight and extraordinary skill. Alternating between Florence’s and Julian’s perspectives, it is at once a mother-son story and a tale of two countries bound in a dialectic dance; a love story and a spy story; both a grand, old-fashioned epic and a contemporary novel of ideas. Through the history of one family moving back and forth between continents over three generations, The Patriots is a poignant tale of the power of love, the rewards and risks of friendship, and the secrets parents and children keep from one another.




























[book] Hippie Food:
How Back-to-the-Landers,
Longhairs, and Revolutionaries
Changed the Way We Eat
by Jonathan Kauffman
William Morrow
November 2017
An enlightening narrative history—an entertaining fusion of Tom Wolfe and Michael Pollan—that traces the colorful origins of once unconventional foods and the diverse fringe movements, charismatic gurus, and counterculture elements that brought them to the mainstream and created a distinctly American cuisine.

Food writer Jonathan Kauffman journeys back more than half a century—to the 1960s and 1970s—to tell the story of how a coterie of unusual men and women embraced an alternative lifestyle that would ultimately change how modern Americans eat. Impeccably researched, Hippie Food chronicles how the longhairs, revolutionaries, and back-to-the-landers rejected the square establishment of President Richard Nixon’s America and turned to a more idealistic and wholesome communal way of life and food.

From the mystical rock-and-roll cult known as the Source Family and its legendary vegetarian restaurant in Hollywood to the Diggers’ brown bread in the Summer of Love to the rise of the co-op and the origins of the organic food craze, Kauffman reveals how today’s quotidian whole-foods staples—including sprouts, tofu, yogurt, brown rice, and whole-grain bread—were introduced and eventually became part of our diets. From coast to coast, through Oregon, Texas, Tennessee, Minnesota, Michigan, Massachusetts, and Vermont, Kauffman tracks hippie food’s journey from niche oddity to a cuisine that hit every corner of this country.

A slick mix of gonzo playfulness, evocative detail, skillful pacing, and elegant writing, Hippie Food is a lively, engaging, and informative read that deepens our understanding of our culture and our lives today.































[book] Let's Eat:
Jewish Food and Faith
by Lori Stein
and Ronald H. Isaacs
Rowman & Littlefield
November 2017
The food that Jewish people eat is part of our connection to our faith, culture, and history. Not only is Jewish food comforting and delicious, it’s also a link to every facet of Judaism. By learning about and cooking traditional Jewish dishes, we can understand fundamentals such as kashrut, community, and diversity. And Jewish history is so connected to food that one comedian said that the story of Judaism can be condensed into nine words: They tried to kill us. We survived. Let’s eat.

Let’s Eat follows the calendar of Jewish holidays to include food from the many different Jewish communities around the world; in doing so, it brings the values that are the foundation of Judaism into focus. It also covers the way these foods have ended up on the Jewish menu and how Jews, as they wandered through the world, have influenced and been influenced by other nations and cuisines. Including over 40 recipes, this delicious review of the role of food in Jewish life offers a lively history alongside the traditions of one of the world’s oldest faiths.






























[book] Promise Me, Dad:
A Year of Hope,
Hardship, and Purpose
by Joe Biden
Flatiron
November 14, 2017
A deeply moving memoir about the year that would forever change both a family and a country.
In November 2014, thirteen members of the Biden family gathered on Nantucket for Thanksgiving, a tradition they had been celebrating for the past forty years; it was the one constant in what had become a hectic, scrutinized, and overscheduled life. The Thanksgiving holiday was a much-needed respite, a time to connect, a time to reflect on what the year had brought, and what the future might hold. But this year felt different from all those that had come before. Joe and Jill Biden's eldest son, Beau, had been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor fifteen months earlier, and his survival was uncertain. "Promise me, Dad," Beau had told his father. "Give me your word that no matter what happens, you’re going to be all right." Joe Biden gave him his word.
Promise Me, Dad chronicles the year that followed, which would be the most momentous and challenging in Joe Biden’s extraordinary life and career. Vice President Biden traveled more than a hundred thousand miles that year, across the world, dealing with crises in Ukraine, Central America, and Iraq. When a call came from New York, or Capitol Hill, or Kyiv, or Baghdad-“Joe, I need your help”-he responded. For twelve months, while Beau fought for and then lost his life, the vice president balanced the twin imperatives of living up to his responsibilities to his country and his responsibilities to his family. And never far away was the insistent and urgent question of whether he should seek the presidency in 2016.
The year brought real triumph and accomplishment, and wrenching pain. But even in the worst times, Biden was able to lean on the strength of his long, deep bonds with his family, on his faith, and on his deepening friendship with the man in the Oval Office, Barack Obama.
Writing with poignancy and immediacy, Joe Biden allows readers to feel the urgency of each moment, to experience the days when he felt unable to move forward as well as the days when he felt like he could not afford to stop.
This is a book written not just by the vice president, but by a father, grandfather, friend, and husband. Promise Me, Dad is a story of how family and friendships sustain us and how hope, purpose, and action can guide us through the pain of personal loss into the light of a new future.

























[book] More Beautiful Than Before:
How Suffering Transforms Us
by Rabbi Steve Leder
(Wilshire Blvd Temple, Los Angeles)
Hay House
November 7, 2017
Every one of us sooner or later walks through hell. The hell of being hurt, the hell of hurting another. The hell of cancer, the hell of a reluctant, thunking shovel full of earth upon the casket of someone we deeply loved, the hell of betrayal, the hell of betraying, the hell of divorce, the hell of a kid in trouble . . . the hell of knowing that this year, like any year, may be our last. We all walk through hell. The point is not to come out empty-handed. . . . There is real and profound power in the suffering we endure if we transform that suffering into a more authentic, meaningful life.

In the spirit of such classics as When Bad Things Happen to Good People, A Grief Observed, and When Things Fall Apart, More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us examines the many ways we can transform physical, psychological, or emotional pain into a more beautiful and meaningful life.

As the leader of Wilshire Boulevard Temple, one of America’s largest and most important congregations, located in the heart of Los Angeles, Rabbi Leder has witnessed a lot of pain: “It’s my phone that rings when people’s bodies or lives fall apart,” he writes. “The couch in my office is often drenched with tears.” After 27 years of listening, comforting, and holding so many who suffered, he thought he understood pain and its challenges—but when it struck hard in his own life and brought him to his knees, a new understanding unfolded before him as he felt pain’s profound effects on his body, spirit, and soul.

In this elegantly concise, beautifully written, and deeply inspiring book, Rabbi Leder guides us through pain’s stages of surviving, healing, and growing to help us all find meaning in our suffering. Drawing on his experience as a spiritual leader, the wisdom of ancient traditions, modern science, and stories from his own life and others’, he shows us that when we must endure, we can, and that there is a path for each of us that leads from pain to wisdom. “Pain cracks us open,” he writes. “It breaks us. But in the breaking, there is a new kind of wholeness.” This powerful book will inspire in us all a life worthy of our suffering; a life gentler, wiser, and more beautiful than before.























[book] A Poet's Siddur:
Friday Evening:
Liturgy Through the Eyes of Poets
by Rick Lupert
AGN Press
November 2017
A Poet's Siddur is Ain't Got No Press' and editor Rick Lupert's follow up to A Poet's Haggadah. This time 36 poets reinterpret the Jewish Friday night Shabbat liturgy with poems for a Shabbat service including work by beloved Canadian poet and singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen, the extraordinary Danny Maseng and many other poets and Rabbi poets.
Complete with humor, personal story, spirituality, and alternative takes on the traditional prayers and liturgy of Friday evening this book serves as an excellent and enjoyable stand-alone read, a companion to the existing evening Shabbat service (think a book full of the left-side of the page content), or as the foundation for a completely new Shabbat evening service composed completely of poetry.
A Poet's Siddur is edited by Los Angeles poet and humorist Rick Lupert, author of God Wrestler: A Poem for Every Torah Portion.

Including poetry from Leonard Cohen, Danny Maseng along with Trisha Arlin, Rachel Berghash, Ben Berman, Janet Bowdan, Rabbi Diane Elliot, Adam D. Fisher, Harris Gardner, Michael Getty, Bracha Goetz, Rabbi James Stone Goodman, Rabbi Andra Greenwald, I.B. Iskov, Raoul Izzard, Joanne Jagoda, J. H. Johns, Jacqueline Jules, Rachel Kann, D.L. Lang, Aurora Levins Morales, Rabbi Ellen Lewis, Cantor Abbe Lyons, John Reinhart, Stacey Zisook Robinson, Ty Rocker, Sy Roth, Rabbi Yael Saidoff, Ellen Sander, Don Schaeffer, Nancy Shiffrin, David Supper, Alan Walowitz, Florence Weinberger, Neal Whitman, and Seree Cohen Zohar.





















[book] Spineless:
The Science of Jellyfish and
the Art of Growing a Backbone
by Juli Berwald
Riverhead
November 2017
A former ocean scientist goes in pursuit of the slippery story of jellyfish, rediscovering her passion for marine science and the sea’s imperiled ecosystems.

Jellyfish are an enigma. They have no centralized brain, but they see and feel and react to their environment in complex ways. They look simple, yet their propulsion systems are so advanced that engineers are just learning how to mimic them. They produce some of the deadliest toxins on the planet and still remain undeniably alluring. Long ignored by science, they may be a key to ecosystem stability.

Juli Berwald’s journey into the world of jellyfish is a personal one. More than a decade ago, she left the sea and her scientific career behind to raise a family in landlocked Austin, Texas. Increasingly dire headlines drew her back to jellies, as unprecedented jellyfish blooms toppled ecosystems and collapsed the world’s most productive fisheries. What was unclear was whether these incidents were symptoms of a changing planet or part of a natural cycle.

Berwald’s desire to understand jellyfish takes her on a scientific odyssey. She travels the globe to meet the scientists who devote their careers to jellies; hitches rides on Japanese fishing boats to see giant jellyfish in the wild; raises jellyfish in her dining room; and throughout it all marvels at the complexity of these fascinating and ominous biological wonders. Gracefully blending personal memoir with crystal-clear distillations of science, Spineless reveals that jellyfish are a bellwether for the damage we’re inflicting on the climate and the oceans and a call to realize our collective responsibility for the planet we share.

























[book] Enemies and Neighbors:
Arabs and Jews in Palestine
and Israel, 1917-2017
by Ian Black
(The Guardian UK)
November 2017

Atlantic Monthly Press

The ECONOMIST recommended it... as did NY JEWISH WEEK.

From a long-time Guardian correspondent and editor, an account of over a century of confrontation, war, and occupation in Palestine and Israel, published on the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration and 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War In Enemies and Neighbors, Ian Black, who has spent over three decades covering events in the Middle East and is currently a fellow at the London School of Economics, offers a major new history of the Arab-Zionist conflict from 1917 to today, published on the centenary of the Balfour Declaration.

Laying the historical groundwork in the final decades of the Ottoman Era, when the first Zionist settlers arrived, Black draws on a wide range of sources-from declassified documents to oral histories to his own vivid on-the-ground reporting-to recreate the major milestones in the most polarizing conflict of the modern age from both sides. In the third year of World War I, the seed was planted for an inevitable clash: Jerusalem Governor Izzat Pasha surrendered to British troops and Foreign Secretary Lord Balfour issued a document sympathizing with the establishment of “a national home for the Jewish people.” The chronicle takes us through the Arab rebellion of the 1930s; the effects of the Nazi Holocaust; the war of 1948-culminating in Israel’s independence and the Palestinian Nakba (catastrophe); the “cursed victory” of the Six-Day War of 1967 and the Palestinian re-awakening; the first and second Intifadas; the Oslo Accords; and other failed peace negotiations and continued violence up to 2017.

Combining his narrative with his analysis and cultural insights, Enemies and Neighbors is an accessible overview and an investigation into the continued attitudes on several sides that dominate Middle Eastern politics and diplomacy; and the disappearance of hopes for a two-state solution

























[book] The Abu Dhabi Bar Mitzvah:
Fear and Love in the
Modern Middle East
by Adam Valen Levinson
WW Norton
November 2017
Chronically questioning, funny, and bold, a young American writer explores the majority-Muslim lands that scare him most.

Armed only with college Arabic and restless curiosity, Adam Valen Levinson set out to “learn about the world 9/11 made us fear.” From a base in globalized and sterilized Abu Dhabi, he sets out to lunch in Taliban territory in Afghanistan, travels under the watchful eye of Aleppo’s secret police, risks shipwreck en route to Somalia, investigates Yazidi beliefs in a sacred cave, cliff-dives in Oman, celebrates New Year’s Eve in Tahrir Square, and, at every turn, discovers a place that matches not at all with its reputation.

While politicians and media eagerly stoke the flames of Islamophobia, Valen Levinson crosses borders with abundant humor and humanity. Seeking common ground everywhere, he finds that people who pray differently often laugh the same. And as a young man bar mitzvahed at twenty-one (instead of the usual thirteen), he slowly learns how childish it is to live by decisions and distinctions born of fear.






























[book] The Doha Experiment:
Arab Kingdom, Catholic College,
Jewish Teacher
by Gary Wasserman
Foreword by U.S. Senator Dick Durbin
Skyhorse Publishing
November 2017
Professor Wasserman is a graduate of Georgetown famed school of Foreign Service (1966). He has taught at John Hopkins SAIS China, George Mason, Columbia SIPA, Gerogetown and other schools. His decision to move to Qatar to teach at Georgetown sounds questionable, at best. “In the beginning,” he writes, “this sounds like a politically incorrect joke. A Jewish guy walks into a fundamentalist Arab country to teach American politics at a Catholic college.”

But he quickly discovers that he has entered a world that gives him a unique perspective on the Middle East and on Muslim youth; that teaches him about the treatment of Arab women and what an education will do for them, both good and bad; shows him the occasionally amusing and often deadly serious consequences his students face simply by living in the Middle East; and finds surprising similarities between his culture and the culture of his students.

Most importantly, after eight years of teaching in Qatar he realizes he has become part of a significant, little understood movement to introduce liberal, Western values into traditional societies. Written with a sharp sense of humor, The Doha Experiment offers a unique perspective on where the region is going and clearly illustrates why Americans need to understand this clash of civilizations.




























[book] Two's Company:
A Fifty-Year Romance
with Lessons Learned in Love,
Life & Business
by Suzanne Somers
Harmony
November 14, 2017
In her most personal and inspiring book yet, New York Times bestselling author Suzanne Somers shows readers how to shape a healthy, lasting relationship through the lens of her fifty-year love affair with her husband, Alan Hamel. For the first time, Suzanne will expose the inner workings of her marriage: a winning combination of love, business, and family.

Starting from the very beginning, when a big-city guy from Toronto met a small-town girl from San Bruno, California, readers will get a behind-the-scenes perspective on Suzanne’s groundbreaking success as a TV star and Las Vegas diva, multiple-bestselling author, and successful entrepreneur and businesswoman, along with her more personal life as a mother, partner, and ultimately self-fulfilled woman.

Sharing stories of leaving home as a teenage mother, nearly dying when her son was five in a car accident, not having 50 cents for the toll to get to her audition in American Graffiti, how a chance meeting in the NBC Commissary with Johnny Carson scored her the Three's COMpany job, how she got a Vegas ig when she was fired, overomcing breast cancer... and more
Through fame, fortune, sickness and blended families, Suzanne and Alan have kept the vitality of their marriage alive— together 24/7 and combining business savvy in their constantly evolving relationship. Now, Suzanne reveals hard-won advice on how to rely on another person without sacrificing individual strengths.

In this mixture of love story, memoir, and practical guide, readers, too, will discover how to forge and maintain a true partnership that’s built to last.






























[book] Counting Backwards:
A Doctor's Notes on Anesthesia
by Henry Jay Przybylo, MD
(Feinberg School of Medicine)
WW Norton
November 2017
A moving exploration of the most common but most mysterious procedure in medicine.
For many of the 40 million Americans who undergo anesthesia each year, it is the source of great fear and fascination. From the famous first demonstration of anesthesia in the Ether Dome at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1846 to today’s routine procedure that controls anxiety, memory formation, pain relief, and more, anesthesia has come a long way. But it remains one of the most extraordinary, unexplored corners of the medical world.

In Counting Backwards, Dr. Henry Jay Przybylo-a pediatric anesthesiologist with more than thirty years of experience-pulls back the curtain and delivers an unforgettable account of the procedure’s daily dramas and fundamental mysteries. Przybylo has administered anesthesia more than 30,000 times in his career-erasing consciousness, denying memory, and immobilizing the body, and then reversing all of these effects-on newborn babies, screaming toddlers, sullen teenagers, even a gorilla. With compassion and candor, he weaves his experiences into intimate stories that explore the nature of consciousness, the politics of pain relief, and the wonder of modern medicine.

Filled with intense and humane tales of near-disasters, life-saving successes, and moments of grace, Counting Backwards is for anyone curious about what happens after we lose consciousness.































[book] You Don't Own Me:
How Mattel V. MGA Entertainment
Exposed Barbie's Dark Side
by Orly Lobel (Univ of San Diego)
Norton
November 2017
The battle between Mattel, the makers of the iconic Barbie doll, and MGA, the company that created the Bratz dolls, was not just a war over best-selling toys, but a war over who owns ideas.

When Carter Bryant began designing what would become the billion-dollar line of Bratz dolls, he was taking time off from his job at Mattel, where he designed outfits for Barbie. Later, back at Mattel, he sold his concept for Bratz to rival company MGA. Law professor Orly Lobel reveals the colorful story behind the ensuing decade-long court battle.

This entertaining and provocative work pits audacious MGA against behemoth Mattel, shows how an idea turns into a product, and explores the two different versions of womanhood, represented by traditional all-American Barbie and her defiant, anti-establishment rival-the only doll to come close to outselling her. In an era when workers may be asked to sign contracts granting their employers the rights to and income resulting from their ideas-whether conceived during work hours or on their own time-Lobel’s deeply researched story is a riveting and thought-provoking contribution to the contentious debate over creativity and intellectual property.
























[book] ALLEY-OOP TO ALIYAH
AFRICAN AMERICAN HOOPSTERS
IN THE HOLY LAND
BY DAVID A. GOLDSTEIN
Skyhorse Publishing
November 2017
Every season, dozens of African American basketball players pack up their sneakers to play and live in Israel. They eat Israeli food, navigate Israeli hustle and bustle, experience cultural and religious customs in the world’s only Jewish country, and voluntarily expose themselves to the omnipresent threat of violence in the volatile Middle East. Some players are both Black and Jewish by birth. Others choose to convert to Judaism while residing in Israel. Some go so far as to obtain Israeli citizenship, enlist in the Israeli Army, marry Israeli women, and stay long after their playing careers end. Alley-Oop to Aliyah: African American Hoopsters in the Holy Land, is the first book to provide an in-depth exploration and analysis of the experiences of African American basketball players in Israel from the 1970s till today.

Author David A. Goldstein examines how they end up in the country in the first place, the multitude of distinctive aspects of their lives there, the challenges and difficulties they face, and the reasons some choose to return to Israel year after year. In some cases they even decide to stay in Israel permanently. Alley-Oop to Aliyah not only deals with basketball and its impact on Israel, but it delves into emotion-laden issues of race, religion, identity, and politics, primarily through the eyes of the players themselves, based on more than forty extensive first-person interviews Goldstein, a sports journalist of half-Israeli descent, conducted. Their stories and their impact on Israel are at the very heart of this revealing book that is about more than just a game.






















[book] The Abu Dhabi Bar Mitzvah:
Fear and Love in the
Modern Middle East
by Adam Valen Levinson
WW Norton
November 14, 2017
Chronically questioning, funny, and bold, a young American explores the majority-Muslim lands that scare him most.

Armed only with college Arabic and restless curiosity, Adam Valen Levinson sets out to “learn about the world 9/11 made us fear.” From a base in globalized and sterilized Abu Dhabi, he sets out to lunch in Taliban territory in Afghanistan, travels under the watchful eye of Syria’s secret police, risks shipwreck en route to Somalia, investigates Yazidi beliefs in a sacred cave, cliff dives in Oman, celebrates New Year’s Eve in Tahrir Square, and, at every turn, discovers a place that matches not at all with its reputation.

Valen Levinson crosses borders with wisecracking humor, erudition, and humanity, seeking common ground with “bros” everywhere, and finding that people who pray differently often laugh the same. And as a young man bar mitzvahed eight years late, he slowly learns how childish it is to live by decisions and distinctions born of fear.























[book] Forged in Crisis:
The Power of Courageous
Leadership in Turbulent Times
by Nancy Koehn (Harvard B School)
Scribner
Fall 2017
An enthralling historical narrative filled with critical leadership insights that will be of interest to a wide range of readers—including those in government, business, education, and the arts—Forged in Crisis, by celebrated Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn, spotlights five masters of crisis: polar explorer Ernest Shackleton; President Abraham Lincoln; legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson.

What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? In delivering the answers to those questions, Nancy Koehn offers a remarkable template by which to judge those in our own time to whom the public has given its trust.

She begins each of the book’s five sections by showing her protagonist on the precipice of a great crisis: Shackleton marooned on an Antarctic ice floe; Lincoln on the verge of seeing the Union collapse; escaped slave Douglass facing possible capture; Bonhoeffer agonizing over how to counter absolute evil with faith; Carson racing against the cancer ravaging her in a bid to save the planet. The narrative then reaches back to each person’s childhood and shows the individual growing—step by step—into the person he or she will ultimately become. Significantly, as we follow each leader’s against-all-odds journey, we begin to glean an essential truth: leaders are not born but made. In a book dense with epiphanies, the most galvanizing one may be that the power to lead courageously resides in each of us.

Both a repository of great insight and an exceptionally rendered human drama, Forged in Crisis stands as a towering achievement.


























[book] DESIGNING REALITY
How to Survive and Thrive
in the Third Digital Revolution
by Neil Gershenfeld
Alan Gershenfeld
and Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld
Basic Books
November 2017


What if anyone could make (almost) anything? That's the promise, and peril, of the third digital revolution.
Two digital revolutions-in computing and communication- have radically transformed our economy and lives. A third digital revolution is upon us, in fabrication. Beyond the hype around 3D printers, digital fabrication technologies are exponentially accelerating in capability-community fab labs will be followed by digital personal fabrication and, ultimately, universal replicators straight out of Star Trek. While advances in digital fabrication promise self-sufficient cities and the ability of anyone to make (almost) anything, the technology could exacerbate current inequalities and environmental stress. The first two digital revolutions caught most of the world flat-footed; thanks to Designing Reality that won't be true this time.




























[book] The Quantum Spy:
A Thriller
by David Ignatius
WW NORTON
November 2017


From the best-selling author of The Director and Body of Lies comes a thrilling tale of global espionage, state-of-the-art technology, and unthinkable betrayal.

A hyper-fast quantum computer is the digital equivalent of a nuclear bomb; whoever possesses one will be able to shred any encryption and break any code in existence. The winner of the race to build the world’s first quantum machine will attain global dominance for generations to come. The question is, who will cross the finish line first: the U.S. or China?

In this gripping cyber thriller, the United States’ top-secret quantum research labs are compromised by a suspected Chinese informant, inciting a mole hunt of history-altering proportions. CIA officer Harris Chang leads the charge, pursuing his target from the towering cityscape of Singapore to the lush hills of the Pacific Northwest, the mountains of Mexico, and beyond. The investigation is obsessive, destructive, and-above all-uncertain. Do the leaks expose real secrets, or are they false trails meant to deceive the Chinese? The answer forces Chang to question everything he thought he knew about loyalty, morality, and the primacy of truth.

Grounded in the real-world technological arms race, The Quantum Spy presents a sophisticated game of cat and mouse cloaked in an exhilarating and visionary thriller.




























[book] Kachka:
A Return to Russian Cooking
by Bonnie Frumkin Morales and
Deena Prichep
Flatiron Press
October 2017
Cookbook
Russian is the third-most-spoken language in Oregon. It’s no secret that large numbers of Russian and Eastern European families are sprinkled all throughout the metropolitan area. This no doubt proved to be an appealing fact for Bonnie Morales, owner of Kachka, a Russian restaurant in Southeast Portland. Kachka is actually a Belarusian word for “duck.” The story behind the name is both sobering and compelling. Morales’ family is Jewish and during World War II her father’s mother escaped a doomed ghetto in Germany and headed towards Russia. Along the way she was stopped by a German village warden who was convinced she was Jewish. After she told him that she was a Ukrainian peasant on a trip to visit family in Russia, he asked her how to say ‘duck’ in Ukrainian. Although she was Belarusian, Morales’ grandmother knew there was some overlap in the language and prayed as she said: “kachka.” Coincidentally, it was the same word for both languages. Not long after providing the correct answer, Morales’ grandmother was let go and she continued on her journey east, later meeting her husband and eventually giving birth to Bonnie’s father.

Bonnie Morales herself is a first-generation American with Russian parents. Her parents immigrated to the United States from Russia when it was still the Soviet Union. She grew up in Chicago and decided to pursue a career in food, eventually attending the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Upon finishing her stint in Culinary School, Bonnie returned to Chicago where she worked in several back- and front-of-house jobs. Though she viewed the food culture of her Russian heritage fondly, she had come to find it to be somewhat bland. She wanted to open a restaurant paying tribute to her heritage, but would potential customers find the food of her heritage to be as underwhelming as she did? Originally born Bonnie Frumkin, it wasn’t until she met her soon-to-be husband Israel Morales that her eyes were opened to the possibilities of her native cuisine. Israel was not familiar with food from former Soviet countries and it was in his delight that Bonnie saw the potential come alive.

In this book, Bonnie Frumkin Morales brings her acclaimed Portland restaurant Kachka into your home kitchen with a debut cookbook enlivening Russian cuisine with an emphasis on vibrant, locally sourced ingredients. From bright pickles to pillowy dumplings, ingenious vodka infusions to traditional homestyle dishes, and varied zakuski to satisfying sweets, Kachka the cookbook covers the vivid world of Russian cuisine. More than 100 recipes show how easy it is to eat, drink, and open your heart in Soviet-inspired style, from the celebrated restaurant that is changing how America thinks about Russian food.

The recipes in this book set a communal table with nostalgic Eastern European dishes like Caucasus-inspired meatballs, Porcini Barley Soup, and Cauliflower Schnitzel, and give new and exciting twists to current food trends like pickling, fermentation, and bone broths.

Kachka’s recipes and narratives show how Russia’s storied tradition of smoked fish, cultured dairy, and a shot of vodka can be celebratory, elegant, and as easy as meat and potatoes. The food is clear and inviting, rooted in the past yet not at all afraid to play around and wear its punk rock heart on its sleeve.



















[book] COOKING WITH ZAC:
Recipes From Rustic to Refined
by Zac Posen
Rodale
October 2017
Cookbook
Zac Posen takes you on a culinary journey through his life with 100 recipes every bit as decadent and inspiring as his designs.

Posen was raised in SoHo/Manhattan. As a child, he took kippot from his grandparents' synagogue and made them into dressed for dolls. As a teen, he would cook with his father, an artist. Over the course of ten years, he thinks he may have cooked every recipe on one of Martha Stewart's earlier cookbooks. He was a young fashion savant, and to de-stress from the fashion world and his work on Project Runway and his designs and ZAC Zac Posen lines and Brooks Brothers work... he cooks. His earliest inspirations were Martha Stewart, Discovery's “Great Chefs” series, and the French bible: La Varenne Pratique, as well as recipes from fashion and chef friends. As an adult, it did not hurt that his partner is French, and Christopher Niquet loves to prepare pâte à choux.

For Zac, cooking and fashion are both sensory experiences. Whether you’re planning a meal or a fashion line, the goal is to create a masterpiece. In Cooking with Zac, Posen shares a curated collection of the favorite recipes, gathered throughout his extraordinary life--from longstanding family favorites to flavors he's discovered while traveling the globe.

When it comes to creating meals, Zac believes in a balance between healthy, fresh, local ingredients and exotic international dishes. In the same way that he breaks down barriers on the runway, he’s not afraid of taking risks in the kitchen: recipes range from delicate summer corn salads to beer can chicken to savory dashi-glazed lotus root.
His recipe for Herb-roasted chicken over vegetables with browned butter gravy. Uses a secret. He massages it with butter and lets it sit out at room temperature before cooking. He says of his Miso-roasted Squash: "If your knowledge of winter squash is confined to butternut and acorn, then you have the wonderful world of winter squash to explore —-like sweet and dense kabocha, savory Calabaza, and mild delicata" Posen writes in the book. "I like to cut the squash, seed it, and then slice it into wedges for roasting." For Lena Dunham, he served his Hot chocolate Bundt Cake with Ganache Glaze. It is inspired by the chocolat chaud that he gets at Angelina's, a popular hot chocolate spot in Paris, France.



















[book] The Healthy Jewish Kitchen:
Fresh, Contemporary Recipes
for Every Occasion
by Paula Shoyer
Sterling Epicure
November 2017
Jewish soul food . . . finally made healthy! Too often, Jewish cookbooks still feature many recipes that lack whole grains and include too much salt, fat, sugar, and processed foods. But Paula Shoyer’s delicious take on Jewish cooking is different: she uses only natural ingredients and offers a fresh, nutrient-dense spin on every dish. Here you’ll find very little frying, and no margarine, frozen puff pastry, soup stocks and powders, and most jarred sauces. More than 60 recipes recipes include both Sephardic and Ashkenazy Jewish classics (Israeli Herb and Almond Salad, Sourdough Challah, Tzimmes Puree, Potato and Scallion Latkes, Schnitzel with Nut Crust) as well as American and international dishes that extend beyond the Jewish culinary world. In Shoyer’s words: “This book has food you’ll recognize, because you still want to feel connected to your ancestors’ kitchens, but I’ve made it more nutritious and often easier to make.”

The array of delicious international dishes includes: Arroz con Pollo with Brown Rice and Salsa Verde * Korean Bibimbap with Tofu * Bouillabaisse * Cambodian Spring Rolls with Lime Chili and Peanut Dipping Sauce * Feijoada (Brazilian Cholent with Collard Greens and Farofa) * Fish Tacos with Cilantro Lime Rice * Indian Barbecue Chicken * Japanese Lamb Chops * Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup * and much more!

















[book] L'Appart:
The Delights and Disasters
of Making My Paris Home
by David Lebovitz
Crown
November 2017
Bestselling author and world-renowned chef David Lebovitz continues to mine the rich subject of his evolving ex-Pat life in Paris, using his perplexing experiences in apartment renovation as a launching point for stories about French culture, food, and what it means to revamp one's life. Includes dozens of new recipes.

When David Lebovitz began the project of updating his apartment in his adopted home city, he never imagined he would encounter so much inexplicable red tape while contending with the famously inconsistent European work ethic and hours. Lebovitz maintains his distinctive sense of humor with the help of his partner Romain, peppering this renovation story with recipes from his Paris kitchen. In the midst of it all, he reveals the adventure that accompanies carving out a place for yourself in a foreign country—under baffling conditions—while never losing sight of the magic that inspired him to move to the City of Light many years ago, and to truly make his home there.



































[book] CONCERTO Al-Quds
By Adonis, the Syrian poet
November 2017

Yale University Press

A cri de cœur or fully imagined poem on the myth and history of Jerusalem/Al-Quds from the author revered as the greatest living Arabic poet
At the age of 86, Adonis, a Syrian poet, critic, essayist, and devoted secularist, has come out of retirement to pen an extended, innovative poem on Jerusalem/Al-Quds. It is a hymn to a troubled city embattled by the conflicting demands of Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
Adonis’s city, as a coveted land, ought to suggest the universal love of humanity; as a land of tragedy, a place of contending history and beliefs, and a locus of bitterness, conflict, hatred, rivalry, and blood. Wrapping multiple voices, historical references, and political viewpoints within his ecstatic lyricism, Adonis has created a provocative work of unique beauty and profound wisdom, beautifully rendered in English by award-winning poet Khaled Mattawa.

























[book] Dollars and Sense:
How We Misthink Money and How
to Spend Smarter
by Dan Ariely and
Jeff Kreisler
November 2017

Harper

Blending humor and behavioral economics, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational delves into the truly illogical world of personal finance to help people better understand why they make bad financial decisions, and gives them the knowledge they need to make better ones.

Why does paying for things often feel like it causes physical pain?
Why does it cost you money to act as your own real estate agent?
Why are we comfortable overpaying for something now just because we’ve overpaid for it before?

In Dollars and Sense, world renowned economist Dan Ariely answers these intriguing questions and many more as he explains how our irrational behavior often interferes with our best intentions when it comes to managing our finances. Partnering with financial comedian and writer Jeff Kreisler, Ariely takes us deep inside our minds to expose the hidden motivations that are secretly driving our choices about money.

Exploring a wide range of everyday topics—from credit card debt and household budgeting to holiday sales—Ariely and Kreisler demonstrate how our ideas about dollars and cents are often wrong and cost us more than we know. Mixing case studies and anecdotes with tangible advice and lessons, they cut through the unconscious fears and desires driving our worst financial instincts and teach us how to improve our money habits.

Fascinating, engaging, funny, and essential, Dollars and Sense is a sound investment, providing us with the practical tools we need to understand and improve our financial choices, save and spend smarter, and ultimately live better.

























[book] Regulating Sex in the Roman Empire:
Ideology, the Bible, and
the Early Christians (Synkrisis)
by David Wheeler-Reed
November 2017

Yale University Press

A New Testament scholar challenges the belief that American family values are based on “Judeo-Christian” norms by drawing unexpected comparisons between ancient Christian theories and modern discourses

Challenging the long-held assumption that American values—be they Christian or secular—are based on “Judeo-Christian” norms, this provocative study compares ancient Christian discourses on marriage and sexuality with contemporary ones, maintaining that modern family values owe more to Roman Imperial beliefs than to the bible.

Engaging with Foucault’s ideas, Wheeler-Reed examines how conservative organizations and the Supreme Court have misunderstood Christian beliefs on marriage and the family. Taking on modern cultural debates on marriage and sexuality, with implications for historians, political thinkers, and jurists, this book undermines the conservative ideology of the family, starting from the position that early Christianity, in its emphasis on celibacy and denunciation of marriage, was in opposition to procreation, the ideological norm in the Greco-Roman world.

























[book] Dear Evan Hansen:
Through the Window
by Steven Levenson
Benj Pasek,
and Justin Paul
November 21, 2017

Grand Central Publishing

Winner of 6 Tony Awards!

The official behind-the-scenes book of the new hit musical.

A letter that was never meant to be seen, a lie that was never meant to be told, a life he never dreamed he could have. Evan Hansen is about to get the one thing he's always wanted: a chance to finally fit in. Both deeply personal and profoundly contemporary, DEAR EVAN HANSEN is a new American musical about life and the way we live it.

The book-produced by Melcher Media, the team behind Hamilton, Wicked, Rent, and many more-tells the story of the musical from its conception nearly a decade ago to the Broadway stage. From developing the idea to writing the show, composing, casting, and rehearsals, DEAR EVAN HANSEN appeals to fans far and wide offering them the opportunity to continuously revisit the show, and for those who haven't seen the musical, reading the book will make them feel like they have.

Filled with interviews with the cast (and Camp Ramah alums) and crew, original behind-the-scenes photography, a deeper look into Evan's fictional world and the visual world of the show, unreleased lyrics, and of course the libretto, as well as reflections on the creators own formative memories from their adolescence as it relates to the show's themes, and important examinations of how we present ourselves online and mental health, DEAR EVAN HANSEN is a beautifully produced, thoughtful, and uplifting book.

























[book] HARPOON
Inside the Covert War
Against Terrorism's Money Masters
by Nitsana Darshan-Leitner
and Samuel M. Katz
Hachette Books
November 2017

Can you guess what the cover photo is of?
Note: This book was cleared by Israeli censors before publication.

They instruct that you should FOLLOW THE MONEY... and the Mossad did

In late March 2016, the U.S. Army Night Stalkers – the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) flew silently in MH-60 and MH-47 silent rotor, night vision helicopters to the ISIS caliphate in order to capture or kill a high value target: Abd al-Rahman Mustafa al-Qaduli, the ISIS financier who was once a prisoner of America but released. The operation had its roots in Financial Warfare.

Financial Warfare. Deep within Israel's intelligence services is a small financial unit that innovated a way to fight terrorism. It is called HARPOON (referred to as Gilgal in 2008, but really Tziltzal). Even the name of the unit was secret for two decades. It was the vision of Meir Dagan, a legendary spymaster. They tracked the flow of money that helps terrorists finance their operations and kill.

A revelatory account of the cloak-and-dagger Israeli campaign to target the finances fueling terror organizations--an effort that became the blueprint for U.S. efforts to combat threats like ISIS and drug cartels.

ISIS boasted $2.4 billion of revenue in 2015, yet for too long the global war on terror overlooked financial warfare as an offensive strategy. "Harpoon," the creation of Mossad legend Meir Dagan, directed spies, soldiers, and attorneys to disrupt and destroy money pipelines and financial institutions that paid for the bloodshed perpetrated by Hamas, Hezbollah, and other groups. Written by an attorney who worked with Harpoon and a bestselling journalist, Harpoon offers a gripping story of the Israeli-led effort, now joined by the Americans, to choke off the terrorists' oxygen supply, money, via unconventional warfare.

Nitsana Darshan-Leitner is an Israeli attorney and the founder and director of the Israel Law Center, Shurat Ha'Din, based outside Tel Aviv. She has represented hundreds of terror victims in lawsuits. Samuel M. Katz is an author based in NY.

















[book] Bethlehem:
Biography of a Town
by Nicholas Blincoe
Nation Books
November 7, 2017

Gee.. it is from Nation Books... I wonder what attitude it will take toward Israel...

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter says that the book “brings within reach 11,000 years of history, centering on the beloved town's unique place in the world. Blincoe's love of Bethlehem is compelling, even as he does not shy away from the complexities of its chronicle."

From the Book Cover: Bethlehem is so suffused with history and myth that it feels like an unreal city even to those who call it home. For many, Bethlehem remains the little town at the edge of the desert described in Biblical accounts. Today, the city is hemmed in by a wall and surrounded by forty-one Israeli settlements and hostile settlers and soldiers. Nicholas Blincoe tells the town's history through the visceral experience of living there, taking readers through its stone streets and desert wadis, its monasteries, aqueducts, and orchards to show the city from every angle and era. His portrait of Bethlehem sheds light on one of the world's most intractable political problems, and he maintains that if the long thread winding back to the city's ancient past is severed, the chances of an end to the Palestine-Israel conflict will be lost with it.






























[book] The People of Godlbozhits
by Leyb Rashkin
Translated by Jordan Finkin
Syracuse University Press
November 2017
First published in 1936, The People of Godlbozhits depicts the ordinary yet deeply complex life of a Jewish community, following the fortunes of one family and its many descendants. Set in a shtetl in Poland between the world wars, Rashkin’s satiric novel offers a vivid cross-section not only of the residents’ triumphs and struggles but also of their dense and complicated web of humanity.
With biting humor and acerbic wit, Rashkin portrays the stratified society-the petty bourgeoisie, artisans, and proletariat-observing the crookedness at every level. The novel’s brisk and oftentimes lively Yiddish prose and its colorful and irascible cast of characters give readers a Yiddish Yoknapatawpha in all its tragic absurdity.































[book] The Know-It-Alls:
The Rise of Silicon Valley
as a Political Powerhouse and
Social Wrecking Ball
by Noam Cohen
The New Press
November 7, 2017
In The Know-It-Alls former New York Times technology columnist Noam Cohen chronicles the rise of Silicon Valley as a political and intellectual force in American life. Beginning nearly a century ago and showcasing the role of Stanford University as the incubator of this new class of super geeks, Cohen shows how smart guys like Jeff Bezos, Peter Thiel, Sergey Brin, Larry Page, and Mark Zuckerberg fell in love with a radically individualistic ideal and then mainstreamed it. With these very rich men leading the way, unions, libraries, public schools, common courtesy, and even government itself have been pushed aside to make way for supposedly efficient market-based encounters via the Internet.

Donald Trump’s election victory was an inadvertent triumph of the "disruption" that Silicon Valley has been pushing: Facebook and Twitter, eager to entertain their users, turned a blind eye to the fake news and the hateful ideas proliferating there. The Rust Belt states that shifted to Trump are the ones being left behind by a "meritocratic" Silicon Valley ideology that promotes an economy where, in the words of LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, each of us is our own start-up. A society that belittles civility, empathy, and collaboration can easily be led astray. The Know-It-Alls explains how these self-proclaimed geniuses failed this most important test of democracy.






























[book] Engaging Torah:
A Jewish Guide to Biblical Study
Edited by Rabbi Walter Homolka
and Rabbi Aaron Panken
Hebrew Union College Press
November 28, 2017
In this volume of essays, eminent Jewish scholars from around the world present introductions to the different parts of the Bible for the wider public.

The essays encompass a general introduction to the Torah in Jewish life, and include specific essays on each of the Five Books of Moses, as well as on the Haftarot, Neviim, and Ketuvim. The contributions provide an overview of the core content of each book as well as highlight central themes and the reception and relevance of these themes in Jewish life and culture past and present. These essays, informed by and based on the profound academic research of their authors, together provide an invaluable bridge between high-level academic insight and the study of the Bible both in synagogues and in homes.





























DECEMBER 2017 BOOKS

[book] Hasidism:
A New History
by David Biale
David Assaf, Benjamin Brown,
Uriel Gellman, Samuel Heilman,
Moshe Rosman, Gadi Sagiv,
Marcin Wodzi?ski, with Afterword by Rabbi Arthur Green
December 2017
Princeton University Press
The first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism

This is the first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism. The book’s unique blend of intellectual, religious, and social history offers perspectives on the movement’s leaders as well as its followers, and demonstrates that, far from being a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world.

Hasidism originated in southeastern Poland, in mystical circles centered on the figure of Israel Ba'al Shem Tov, but it was only after his death in 1760 that a movement began to spread. Challenging the notion that Hasidism ceased to be a creative movement after the eighteenth century, this book argues that its first golden age was in the nineteenth century, when it conquered new territory, won a mass following, and became a mainstay of Jewish Orthodoxy. World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the Holocaust decimated eastern European Hasidism. But following World War II, the movement enjoyed a second golden age, growing exponentially. Today, it is witnessing a remarkable renaissance in Israel, the United States, and other countries around the world.

Written by an international team of scholars, Hasidism is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand this vibrant and influential modern Jewish movement.





























[book] Somewhere Else:
A Picture Book
by Gus Gordon
December 2017
Roaring Brook Press
George has absolutely no interest in exploring the world. None at all.
He's far too busy enjoying his home life and baking delicious pastries. Or so he tells all his friends when they invite him along on their wonderful adventures.
But when George's friend Pascal digs a little deeper, the real reason George refuses to travel away from home is finally revealed



























[book] In Pursuit of Peace
in Israel and Palestine
by Gershon Baskin
December 2017

Vanderbilt Press

A Book recommended by both Peter Beinert and the King of Jordan

Gershon Baskin's memoir of 38 years of his pursuit of peace begins with his childhood on Long Island, New York and a bar mitzvah trip to Israel with his family. Baskin joined Young Judaea back in the States, then later lived on a kibbutz in Israel, where he announced to his parents that he had decided to make aliya, and emigrate to Israel. They persuaded him to return to study at NYU, after which he finally emigrated under the auspices of Interns for Peace. In Israel he spent a pivotal two years living with Arabs in the village of Kufr Qara.

Despite the atmosphere of fear, Baskin found he could talk with both Jews and Palestinians, and that very few others were engaged in efforts at mutual understanding. At his initiative, the Ministry of Education and the office of right-wing prime minister Menachem Begin created the Institute for Education for Jewish-Arab Coexistence with Baskin himself as director. Eight years later he founded and codirected the only joint Israeli-Palestinian public policy think-and-do tank in the world, the Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information. For decades he continued to cross borders, often with a kaffiyeh (Arab headdress) on his dashboard to protect his car in Palestinian neighborhoods. Airport passport control became Kafkaesque as Israeli agents routinely identified him as a security threat.

During the many cycles of peace negotiations, Baskin has served both as an outside agitator for peace and as an advisor on the inside of secret talks—for example, during the prime ministership of Yitzhak Rabin and during the initiative led by Secretary of State John Kerry. Baskin ends the book with his own proposal, which includes establishing a peace education program and cabinet-level Ministries of Peace in both countries, in order to foster a culture of peace.














[book] King without a Crown:
A Memoir
by Matisyahu with Paul Zollo
December 2017
De Capo Press
There has never been a musician like Matisyahu. Known for breaking onto the hip-hop/reggae scene as "that Hassidic rapper," he went on to top the charts with his number one singles "King without a Crown" and "One Day." He's released six albums (all reaching the Billboard charts) and his breakout smash Youth was a Top Five album for 38 weeks upon its release. Through all of this success, Matisyahu never lost his faith. He's seen by the young community as a spiritual advisor and guide and, more than anything, he is applauded for his confidence and bravery to wear his religion on his sleeve.

In King without a Crown, readers will learn about Matisyahu's hippie at-risk early days traveling to Phish shows and getting involved in drugs, they'll see his spiritual awakening when he was sent away to a camp in the backwoods of Oregon, they'll watch his evolution from Matt Miller to Matisyahu (complete with Hassidic garb and beliefs), as well as his recent decision to leave Orthodox Judaism behind--and they'll chart his ascension through the music industry as the creator of some of the biggest and most positive songs in the last thirty years.

























[book] The Saboteur:
The Aristocrat Who Became
France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando
by Paul Kix
Harper
December 2017
In the tradition of Agent Zigzag comes this breathtaking biography, as fast-paced and emotionally intuitive as the very best spy thrillers, which illuminates an unsung hero of the French Resistance during World War II—Robert de La Rochefoucald, an aristocrat turned anti-Nazi saboteur—and his daring exploits as a résistant trained by Britain’s Special Operations Executive.

A scion of one of the most storied families in France, Robert de La Rochefoucald was raised in magnificent chateaux and educated in Europe's finest schools. When the Nazis invaded and imprisoned his father, La Rochefoucald escaped to England and learned the dark arts of anarchy and combat—cracking safes and planting bombs and killing with his bare hands—from the officers of Special Operations Executive, the collection of British spies, beloved by Winston Churchill, who altered the war in Europe with tactics that earned it notoriety as the “Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.” With his newfound skills, La Rochefoucauld returned to France and organized Resistance cells, blew up fortified compounds and munitions factories, interfered with Germans’ war-time missions, and executed Nazi officers. Caught by the Germans, La Rochefoucald withstood months of torture without cracking, and escaped his own death, not once but twice.

The Saboteur recounts La Rochefoucauld’s enthralling adventures, from jumping from a moving truck on his way to his execution to stealing Nazi limos to dressing up in a nun’s habit—one of his many disguises and impersonations. Whatever the mission, whatever the dire circumstance, La Rochefoucauld acquitted himself nobly, with the straight-back aplomb of a man of aristocratic breeding: James Bond before Ian Fleming conjured him.

More than just a fast-paced, true thriller, The Saboteur is also a deep dive into an endlessly fascinating historical moment, telling the untold story of a network of commandos that battled evil, bravely worked to change the course of history, and inspired the creation of America’s own Central Intelligence Agency.




























JANUARY 2018 BOOKS




[book] Beyond the Baby Blues:
Anxiety and Depression
During and After Pregnancy
by Rebecca Fox Starr
Amy Wenzel (Contributor)
January 2018

Rowman & Littlefield
Most people have heard of post-partum depression.
What many people do not know is that anxiety and depression can be experienced during pregnancy, as well, and the impact can be both debilitating and devastating.
This book is a unique combination of one woman’s story of her struggle with perinatal distress and actionable advice from a professional in the field. Rebecca Fox Starr shares her personal story of marriage, motherhood, prenatal anxiety and depression, severe postpartum anxiety and depression, recovery process and hope for the future. Woven throughout the narrative, Dr. Amy Wenzel, a specialist in the field of Perinatal Mood Disorders, provides readers with clinical information and advice, addressing risk factors, warning signs, definitions and recovery options.
Stories from other women who experienced prenatal anxiety or depression are included as well. No longer do women have to suffer in silence, question their mental symptoms, or try to hide their feelings. Here, readers will see themselves in the narrative and understand that the devastating effects of prenatal and post-partum depression can be confirmed, treated, and managed, giving them hope for a brighter future.


Read a New York Times chat with the author on a related topic HERE















[book] The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary
(JPS Study Bible)
by Dr. Sarah Levy, PhD and
Mr. Steven Levy, Esq
January 2018

Jewish Publication Society
Rashi, the medieval French RAbbi SHlomo Yitzchaki (1040–1105), authored monumental commentaries on the Hebrew Bible and the Babylonian Talmud. With The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary, his commentary on the Torah—regarded as the most authoritative of all Torah commentaries—is finally accessible to the entire Jewish community.

Steven and Sarah Levy quote from the biblical text in both Hebrew and English, highlight Rashi’s comments relating to the parashah, and delve into his perceptive moral messages in the context of twenty-first-century dilemmas. Each portion features three essays with analysis and discussion questions that draw on universal human experiences, enabling families and Shabbat study groups to deepen their understanding of Rashi and the portion over the three Sabbath meals.

Readers with little or no knowledge of Hebrew, the Torah, or Jewish practice will feel comfortable diving into this discussion commentary. All Hebrew terms are defined, quoted verses contextualized, and less familiar Jewish concepts explained.














[book] From Forbidden Fruit
to Milk and Honey:
A Commentary on Food
in the Torah
by Diana Lipton, PhD
(January 18, 2018

Urim Publications
Food is at the heart of Jewish life and culture. It's the subject of many studies, popular and academic, and countless Jewish jokes. From Forbidden Fruit to Milk and Honey spotlights food in the Torah itself, where, as still today, it's used to explore themes including love and desire, compassion and commitment, social justice, memory, belonging and exclusion, control, deception, and life and death. Originally an online project to support the food rescue charity, Leket Israel, From Forbidden Fruit to Milk and Honey comprises short essays on food in the parasha by 52 internationally acclaimed scholars and Jewish educators, and a verse by verse commentary by Diana Lipton on food and eating in the Torah.



























[book] Modern Loss:
Candid Conversation About
Grief. Beginners Welcome.
by Rebecca Soffer
and Gabrielle Birkner
January 23, 2018

Harper Wave
Each week, we read MODERN LOVE in The New York Times. But what about MODERN LOSS?
Rebecca's mother died suddenly in a car accident. Soon after, her father passed away from a heart attack. Gabi's father and his wife were murdered. Together Gabi and Rebecca started to keep a website about mourning. The New York Times hailed it as "redefining mourning." This book is a fresh and irreverent examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices, accompanied by gorgeous two-color illustrations and wry infographics.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Let’s face it: most of us have always had a difficult time talking about death and sharing our grief. We’re awkward and uncertain; we avoid, ignore, or even deny feelings of sadness; we offer platitudes; we send sympathy bouquets whittled out of fruit.

In this wise and often funny book, they offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and—above all—empathize.

Soffer and Birkner, along with forty guest contributors including Lucy Kalanithi, singer Amanda Palmer, stylist Stacy London, Amanda Palmer, “Girl” writer Yassir Lester, WNBA all-star Chamique Holdsclaw, Kim Goldman (sister of murdered Ron Goldman), and CNN’s Brian Stelter, reveal their own stories on a wide range of topics including triggers, sex, secrets, and inheritance.

Accompanied by beautiful hand-drawn illustrations and witty "how to" cartoons, each contribution provides a unique perspective on loss as well as a remarkable life-affirming message.

Topics includes Loss & The Workplace; How to be an effective AND empathetic manager of someone who is grieving; how to manage grief when you dont have personal days and can't miss work; Loss & Your Kids; How to make dead parents and siblings “real” to your kids; Living with the fear of dying before your kids mature; How much to share with kids when a loved one dies; Cleaning through you personal effects of a loved one; finding love in the wake of loss; the trigger of yahrzeits, yizkors, anniversaries, birthdays, the holidays, and deathdays; when good things happens because a bad thing happened; the un-dead digital world, when you find a loved one's facebook page or google listing; and an open letter to the dudes the authors' dated who could not deal with their grief.

Brutally honest and inspiring, Modern Loss invites us to talk intimately and humorously about grief, helping us confront the humanity (and mortality) we all share. Beginners welcome.














[book] Eternal Life:
A Novel
by DARA HORN (Dara Horn, PhD)
January 2018

Norton
Horn is a two time recipient of the National Jewish Book Award

What would it really mean to live forever?

Rachel is a woman with a problem: she can’t die. Her recent troubles-widowhood, a failing business, an unemployed middle-aged son-are only the latest in a litany spanning dozens of countries, scores of marriages, and hundreds of children. In the 2,000 years since she made a spiritual bargain to save the life of her first son back in Roman-occupied Jerusalem, she’s tried everything to free herself, and only one other person in the world understands: a man she once loved passionately, who has been stalking her through the centuries, convinced they belong together forever.

But as the twenty-first century begins and her children and grandchildren-consumed with immortality in their own ways, from the frontiers of digital currency to genetic engineering-develop new technologies that could change her fate and theirs, Rachel knows she must find a way out.

Gripping, hilarious, and profoundly moving, Eternal Life celebrates the bonds between generations, the power of faith, the purpose of death, and the reasons for being alive.





















[book] In Days to Come:
A New Hope for Israel
by Avraham Burg
Translated by Joel Greenberg from Hebrew
January 9, 2018

Nation Books
Born in 1955, Avraham Burg witnessed firsthand many of the most dramatic and critical junctions in Israeli history. Here he chronicles the highs and lows of his country during the last five decades, beginning with the 1967 war, when, as a young boy, his mother brought him back Uzi cartridges from the Kotel, which he incorporated into the Chanukah menorah he made for his home economics class. Burg narrates the misplaced hopes of religious Zionism (informed by his conservative upbringing), Israel's obsession with military might (informed by his own experiences as a paratrooper), the country's democratic aspirations (informed by his tenure in the Knesset) and more. What he delivers, ultimately, is an analysis of the ambitions and failures of Israel and Judaism, from the unique standpoint of his generation--the children of the mythical "founders" who established the state.

In Days to Come is Burg's philosophical inquiry into what Jewish-Israeli identity means today if you are personally, ethically, and politically opposed to what your country stands for. With bravery and candor, he urges his countrymen to dare to ask the difficult questions and accept the truth of difficult answers, have the courage to move on from trauma to trust, understand that Jews do not have monopoly over suffering but a responsibility to prevent crimes against humanity, have the will to solve the conflict between Israel and Palestine by adopting new paradigms, be ready to relinquish the privileges given to the Jews and create a shared space with equal rights for every human being, lay the groundwork for a constitutional reality in which every individual--under Israeli sovereignty or responsibility--has equal rights, and build a wall of separation between synagogue and state.

In this book, Burg lays bare the seismic intellectual shifts that drove the country's political and religious journeys, offering a vision for a new comprehensive paradigm for Israel and the Middle East.






















[book] 1947:
Where Now Begins
by Elisabeth Åsbrink
Fiona Graham (Translator)
January 2018

OTHER PRESS
An award-winning writer captures a year that defined the modern world, intertwining historical events around the globe with key moments from her personal history.
The year 1947 marks a turning point in the twentieth century. Peace with Germany becomes a tool to fortify the West against the threats of the Cold War. The CIA is created, Israel is about to be born, Simone de Beauvoir experiences the love of her life, an ill George Orwell is writing his last book, and Christian Dior creates the hyper-feminine New Look as women are forced out of jobs and back into the home.
In the midst of it all, a ten-year-old Hungarian-Jewish boy resides in a refugee camp for children of parents murdered by the Nazis. This year he has to make the decision of a lifetime, one that will determine his own fate and that of his daughter yet to be born, Elisabeth.






















[book] Advice Not Given:
A Guide to Getting
Over Yourself
by Mark Epstein MD
January 2018

Penguin Press
Renowned psychiatrist and author Dr. Mark Epstein presents a how-to guide rooted in two traditions, Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, devoted to maximizing the human potential for living a better life

Our ego, and its accompanying sense of nagging self-doubt as we work to be bigger, better, smarter, and more in control, is one affliction we all share. And, while our ego claims to have our best interests at heart, in its never-ending pursuit of attention and power, it sabotages the very goals it sets to achieve. In Advice Not Given, Dr. Mark Epstein reveals how Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, two traditions that developed in entirely different times and places and, until recently, had nothing to do with each other, both identify the ego as the limiting factor in our well-being, and both come to the same conclusion: When we give the ego free reign, we suffer; but when it learns to let go, we are free.

With great insight, and in a deeply personal style, Epstein offers readers a how-to guide that refuses a quick fix, grounded in two traditions devoted to maximizing the human potential for living a better life. Using the Eightfold Path, eight areas of self-reflection that Buddhists believe necessary for enlightenment, as his scaffolding, Epstein looks back productively on his own experience and that of his patients. While the ideas of the Eightfold Path are as old as Buddhism itself, when informed by the sensibility of Western psychotherapy, they become something more: a road map for spiritual and psychological growth, a way of dealing with the intractable problem of the ego. Breaking down the wall between East and West, Epstein brings a Buddhist sensibility to therapy and a therapist's practicality to Buddhism. Speaking clearly and directly, he offers a rethinking of mindfulness that encourages people to be more watchful of their ego, an idea with a strong foothold in Buddhism but now for the first time applied in the context of psychotherapy.

Our ego is at once our biggest obstacle and our greatest hope. We can be at its mercy or we can learn to mold it. Completely unique and practical, Epstein's advice can be used by all--each in his or her own way--and will provide wise counsel in a confusing world. After all, as he says, "Our egos can use all the help they can get."






















[book] This Narrow Space:
A Pediatric Oncologist, His
Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients,
and a Hospital in Jerusalem
by Elisha Waldman, MD
(Columbia Univ Medical Center)
January 2018

Schocken Books

I hope Hadassah has a book launch party / fundraiser (albeit the book deals with their financings)

A memoir both bittersweet and inspiring by an American pediatric oncologist who spent seven years in Jerusalem taking care of Israeli and Palestinian children with one tragic thing in common—a diagnosis of pediatric cancer

In 2007, Elisha Waldman, a New York–based pediatric oncologist and palliative-care specialist in his mid-thirties, was offered his dream job: attending physician at Jerusalem’s Hadassah Medical Center.

He had gone to medical school in Israel and spent time there as a teenager; now he was going to give something back to the land he loved. But in the wake of a financial crisis at the hospital that left him feeling unsure about his future, Waldman, with considerable regret, left Hadassah in 2014 and returned to America.

This Narrow Space is his deeply affecting and poignant memoir of the seven years he spent taking care of children—Israeli Jews, Muslims, and Christians; Palestinian Arabs from the West Bank and Gaza—with one devastating thing in common: they had all been diagnosed with some form of pediatric cancer. Waldman’s years at Hadassah were filled in equal measure with a deep sense of accomplishment, with FRUSTRATION when regional politics sometimes got in the way of his patients’ care, and with tension over the fine line he would have to walk when the religious traditions of some of his patients’ families made it difficult for him to give these children the care he felt they deserved.

Navigating the baffling Israeli bureaucracy, the ever-present threat of war, and the cultural clashes that sometimes spilled over into his clinic, Waldman learned to be content with small victories: a young patient whose disease went into remission, brokenhearted parents whose final hours with their child were made meaningful and comforting.

As he sought to create both a personal and a professional life in his new home, Waldman struggled with his own questions of identity and belief, and with the intractable conflict between Israelis and Palestinians that had become a fact of his daily life. What he learned about himself, about the complex country that he was now a part of, and about the heartbreakingly brave and endearing children he cared for—whether they were from Me’ah She’arim, Ramallah, or Gaza City—will move and challenge readers everywhere.

















[book] The Stakes of History
On The Use and
Abuse of Jewish History for Life
by David N. Myers, PhD
(UCLA)
January 2018

Yale University Press

A leading scholar of Jewish history’s bracing and challenging case for the role of the historian today

Why do we study history? What is the role of the historian in the contemporary world? These questions prompted David N. Myers’s illuminating and poignant call for the relevance of historical research and writing. His inquiry identifies a number of key themes around which modern Jewish historians have wrapped their labors: liberation, consolation, and witnessing. Through these portraits, Myers revisits the chasm between history and memory, revealing the middle space occupied by modern Jewish historians as they work between the poles of empathic storytelling and the critical sifting of sources.

History, properly applied, can both destroy ideologically rooted myths that breed group hatred and create new memories that are sustaining of life. Alive in these investigations is Myers’s belief that the historian today can and should attend to questions of political and moral urgency. Historical knowledge is not a luxury to society but an essential requirement for informed civic engagement, as well as a vital tool in policy making, conflict resolution, and restorative justice.

























[book] The Culture Code:
The Secrets of Highly
Successful Groups
by Daniel Coyle
January 30, 2018

Random House
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Talent Code comes a book that unlocks the secrets of highly successful groups and provides tomorrow’s leaders with the tools to build a cohesive, motivated culture.

Where does great culture come from?
How do you build and sustain it in your group, or strengthen a culture that needs fixing?

In The Culture Code, Daniel Coyle goes inside some of the world’s most successful organizations—including Pixar, the San Antonio Spurs, and U.S. Navy’s SEAL Team Six—and reveals what makes them tick. He demystifies the culture-building process by identifying three key skills that generate cohesion and cooperation, and explains how diverse groups learn to function with a single mind. Drawing on examples that range from Internet retailer Zappos to the comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade to a daring gang of jewel thieves, Coyle offers specific strategies that trigger learning, spark collaboration, build trust, and drive positive change.

Coyle unearths helpful stories of failure that illustrate what not to do, troubleshoots common pitfalls, and shares advice about reforming a toxic culture. Combining leading-edge science, on-the-ground insights from world-class leaders, and practical ideas for action, The Culture Code offers a roadmap for creating an environment where innovation flourishes, problems get solved, and expectations are exceeded.

Coyle writes the successful groups relentlessly generate three key messages that enable success and excellence (excelling): 1) SAFETY – we are connected; 2) SHARED RISK – we are vulnerable toegther, and 3) PURPOSE – we are part of the same story.

Culture is not something you are—it’s something you do. The Culture Code puts the power in your hands. No matter the size of the group or the goal, this book can teach you the principles of cultural chemistry that transform individuals into teams that can accomplish amazing things together.

A deeper look.
SAFETY: Embrace the messenger and bad news; Preview future connection, between now and the vision of a successful future; Overdo thank-yous to reinforce connections and affirm the relationship; Eliminate bad apples and name the bad behaviors; create safe, collision RICH spaces for interaction and cohesion; make sure everyone has a voice; use the first day of the group as a defining moment so brains connect at the outset; avoid giving sandwich feedback (good, bad, good) so negative feedback is separate, and positive feedback is not tied to a negative; and embrace fun.

SHARED RISK: The leader is vulnerable and should be able to say “I screwed that up;” over over over communicate expectations; deliver negative in person; listen like a trampoline.. be attentive, add insights.. be attentive; resist the temptation to respond and add value, be silent sometimes; generate candor (Braintrust, AAR); be candor but NOT brutally honest; embrace discomfort even if you dredge up a past error; keep the performance review separate from professional development; flash mentor- pick someone to shadow and learn from for three hours.

PURPOSE: name and rank your priorities and targets; be ten times as clear about your priorities as you think you need to be; embrace and use catchphrases; measure what matters; use artifacts to reinforce what matters (trophies); focus on bar setting behaviors.


















[book] Rise and Kill First:
The Secret History of
Israel's Targeted Assassinations
by Ronen Bergman
January 2018

Random House

The page-turning, news-breaking, inside account of Israel’s state-sponsored assassination programs, from the man hailed by David Remnick as “arguably [Israel’s] best investigative reporter.”



































[book] A Torah Giant:
The Intellectual Legacy of Rabbi
Dr. Irving (Yitz) Greenberg
Edited By Shmuly Yanklowitz
Introduction by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin
Foreword by Rabbi Avi Weiss
January 2018

Urim Publishings
Discover the breadth of wisdom provided by this generation’s giant of Torah: Rabbi Irving “Yitz" Greenberg. Rabbi Yitz is one of the most renowned leaders in contemporary Jewish communal life. His dedication to foster a more interconnected and vibrant Judaism has been felt across the academic and broader world. In this new work, the legacy of Rabbi Yitz is discussed at length by those who have been affected by his inclusive model of contemporary Judaism, his approachable erudition, commitment to fostering meaningful interfaith dialogue, and constant striving to make the world a more just place. These intellectual progenies divulge the lasting impact Rabbi Yitz has had on their lives and the lives of people around the globe.

























[book] Modern Loss:
Candid Conversation About Grief.
Beginners Welcome.
by Rebecca Soffer and
Gabrielle Birkner
January 2018
Harper Wave

Inspired by the website that the New York Times hailed as "redefining mourning," this book is a fresh and irreverent examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices, accompanied by gorgeous two-color illustrations and wry infographics.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Let’s face it: most of us have always had a difficult time talking about death and sharing our grief. We’re awkward and uncertain; we avoid, ignore, or even deny feelings of sadness; we offer platitudes; we send sympathy bouquets whittled out of fruit.

Enter Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner, who can help us do better. Each having lost parents as young adults, they co-founded Modern Loss, responding to a need to change the dialogue around the messy experience of grief. Now, in this wise and often funny book, they offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and—above all—empathize.

Soffer and Birkner, along with forty guest contributors including Lucy Kalanithi, singer Amanda Palmer, and CNN’s Brian Stelter, reveal their own stories on a wide range of topics including triggers, sex, secrets, and inheritance. Accompanied by beautiful hand-drawn illustrations and witty "how to" cartoons, each contribution provides a unique perspective on loss as well as a remarkable life-affirming message.

Brutally honest and inspiring, Modern Loss invites us to talk intimately and humorously about grief, helping us confront the humanity (and mortality) we all share. Beginners welcome.
































[book] Heal Us O Lord:
A Chaplain's Interface with Pain
by Rabbi Sidney Goldstein, PhD
Chaplain, Philadelphia
January 2018

Urim Publishing
Heal Us O Lord: A Chaplain's Interface With Pain is the memoir of Rabbi Sidney Goldstein, a chaplain who encounters the traumas of life as he visits with those who are in the throes of experiencing them.

The book expresses the challenges faced by chaplains in providing support during some of the most crucial and painful times of life without being enveloped by them personally. Rabbi Goldstein offers a source of encouragement and council for those whose lives might crave spirituality but do not know where to turn.

Rabbi Goldstein, Ph.D was the Director of Chaplaincy at the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA where he was instrumental in founding the National Association of Jewish Chaplains of which he is a former President. Rabbi Goldstein is the author of Suicide in Rabbinical Literature and has written articles for Hadorom published by the Rabbinical Council of America























[book] Ogilvy on Advertising
IN THE DIGITAL AGE
by Miles Young
January 2018
Bloomsbury

Ogilvy is no longer on the planet to udate his bible on advertising. So he replacement has.

From Miles Young, worldwide non-executive chairman of Ogilvy & Mather, comes a sequel to David Ogilvy's bestselling advertising handbook featuring essential strategies for the digital age.

In this must-have sequel to the bestselling Ogilvy On Advertising, Ogilvy chairman Miles Young provides top insider secrets and strategies for successful advertising in the Digital Revolution. As comprehensive as its predecessor was for print and TV, this indispensable handbook dives deep into the digital ecosystem, discusses how to best collect and utilize data-the currency of the digital age-to convert sales specifically on screen (phone, tablet, smart watch, computer, etc.), breaks down when and how to market to millennials, highlights the top five current industry giants, suggests best practices from brand response to social media, and offers 13 trend predictions for the future.

This essential guide is for any professional in advertising, public relations, or marketing seeking to remain innovative and competitive in today's ever-expanding technological marketplace.


















[book] GAZA:
An Inquest into Its Martyrdom
by Norman G. Finkelstein (Author)
January 9 2018
University of California Press

Alice Walker likes it. Professor Zayas likes it. People who blame Israel for all the world's problems like this book, also.
The Gaza Strip is among the most densely populated places in the world. More than two-thirds of its inhabitants consider themselves as refugees. Half the area's population is aged under 18, and are cildren or grandchildren of people who consider themselves as refugees. Finkelstein writes that since 2004, the State of Israel has attacked the mostly defenseless population of Gaza eight times, leaving thousands homeless or dead. Finkelstein considers Gaza for martyrdom. Although attacks by Israel were provoked by assaults by Hamas and others, Finkelstein indicts Israel for violating international law. He also writes that Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and the United Nations fail Gaza's citizens.
























[book] The Eyes of Isaac:
Medical and Halachic Perspectives
on Ophthalmologic Conditions
Edited by Norman Saffra, MD FACS
Foreword by Alan Kadish
February 2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A compilation of essays and studies from leading doctors, professors, and rabbis, The Eyes of Isaac endeavors to connect important medical and psychological issues of ophthalmology with Jewish law. Rabbis and physicians navigate the daily challenges that visual disability presents for themselves as well as for those under their care. Interspersed with personal anecdotes and stories, The Eyes of Isaac offers profound knowledge on the significant organ and diseases related to it, and how those diseases, such as glaucoma, can affect the practice of daily Jewish rituals. Included in this collection are explanations of eye diseases, considerations on how to treat them, along with the detailed process of medical surgeries in ophthalmology.
























[book] Living in the Presence:
A Jewish Mindfulness
Guide for Everyday Life
by Benjamin Epstein, PhD
March 2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

In our frantic, fast paced society, we need constant guidance to remind us that we can only find the peace of mind we sorely lack by looking inward. Judaism, like many other spiritual traditions, offers a unique path to cultivating fulfillment and presence of mind. In cultivating peace of mind, we do not aim to achieve transcendence. Rather, our goal is to enter fully into whatever is occurring in our lives and meet it with full presence. But being a better Jew and a happier person are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they are mutually interdependent. From the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep, biblical commandments provide us with guidelines that encourage us to be aware of the present moment. A Guide to Jewish Mindfulness provides concise and clear instructions on how to cultivate peace of mind in order to attain a life of greater commitment and inspiration for the present moment.

































[book] Roller Coaster Grandma
Paperback
by Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer
and Pierre Lehu
Edited by Ann D. Koffsky
Illustrated by Mark Simmons
February 2018

Ages 8 – 12
Apples & Honey Press

This graphic novel for ages 8-12 depicts the ups and downs of Dr. Ruth's life from her escape from the Nazis at age 10 aboard a Kindertransport, to her training as a sniper with the Hagganah in Israel, through her immigration to the US where she started as a maid, became a college professor, and eventually a television star. Using a trip to an amusement park with her grandchildren as its framework, the story subtly demonstrates lessons of grit, resilience, and strength that readers can apply to their own lives.































[book] BUILT
The Hidden Stories
Behind our Structures
by Roma Agrawal
February 2018

Bloomsbury
Imagine you woke up one morning, and everything created by engineers had disappeared.What would you see?
No cars, no houses; no phones, bridges or roads. No tunnelsunder tidal rivers, no soaring skyscrapers. The impact that engineering has hadon the human experience is undeniable, but it is also often invisible.
In BUILT, structural engineer Roma Agrawal takes a unique look at how construction has evolved from the mud huts of our ancestors to skyscrapers of steel that reach hundreds of metres into the sky. She unearths how engineers have tunnelled through kilometres of solid mountains; how they've bridged across the widest and deepest of rivers, and tamed Nature's precious - and elusive -water resources. She tells vivid tales of the visionaries who created the groundbreaking materials used in the Pantheon's record-holding concrete dome, and the frame of the record-breaking Eiffel Tower. Through the lens of an engineer, Roma examines tragedies like the collapse of the Quebec Bridge, highlighting the precarious task of ensuring people's safety they hold at every step.
With colourful stories of her life-long fascination with buildings- and her own hand-drawn illustrations - Roma reveals the extraordinary secret livesof structures.






























[book] DIY Rules for a WTF World
How to Speak Up,
Get Creative,
and Change the World
By Krista Suh
Pussyhat Project
(w/ her friend Jayna Zweiman
January 2018
From the creator of the Pussyhat Project, which represents the Women's March and is the symbol of the Resistance, comes a manifesto for every woman to create her own distinct and original path to joy and success at impact.



























[book] Rise and Kill First:
The Secret History of
Israel's Targeted Assassinations
by Ronen Bergman
(Yediot)
Random House January 23, 2018
The page-turning, news-breaking, inside account of Israel’s state-sponsored assassination programs, from the man hailed by David Remnick as “arguably [Israel’s] best investigative reporter.”



























[book] Social Startup Success:
How the Best Nonprofits
Launch, Scale Up, and
Make a Difference
by Kathleen Kelly Janus
January 2018

De Capo

Kathleen Kelly Janus, a lecturer at the Stanford University Program on Social Entrepreneurship and the founder of the successful social enterprise Spark, set out to investigate what makes a startup succeed or fail. She surveyed more than 200 high-performing social entrepreneurs and interviewed dozens of founders. Social Startup Success shares her findings for the legions of entrepreneurs working for social good, revealing how the best organizations get over the revenue hump. How do social ventures scale to over $2 million, Janus's clear benchmark for a social enterprise's sustainability? Janus, tapping into strong connections to the Silicon Valley world where many of these ventures are started or and/or funded, reveals insights from key figures such as DonorsChoose founder Charles Best, charity:water's Scott Harrison, Reshma Saujani of Girls Who Code and many others. Social Startup Success will be social entrepreneurship's essential playbook; the first definitive guide to solving the problem of scale.

























[book] Firestarters:
How Innovators, Instigators,
and Initiators Can Inspire
You to Ignite Your Own Life
by Raoul Davis Jr
Kathy Palokoff (Joe Squared Pizza of Baltimore)
and Paul Eder
January 2018

ProMetheus

Firestarters makes a convincing case that there is a science to the success of the many innovators, instigators, and initiators that shape our world
Based on interviews with entrepreneurs and leaders in many walks of life, this self-help book gives readers the tools for finding success in their careers, businesses, organizations, and private lives. What is the difference between those bold enough to pursue their dreams and others who never get comfortable enough to ignite their lives? The doers are "Firestarters" and, because of them, the world is a much different, and often, better place.
This motivational how-to book provides insights into the crucial difference between people who make things happen and those who only think about making an impact. Based on research from many disciplines and interviews with professionals at the top of their fields, Firestarters creates a complete roadmap to achieve personal success and make an impact in the world.
The authors provide pragmatic advice on how individual readers can ignite the qualities that will lead them toward pursuing and realizing their dreams. Self-assessment exercises, checklists, and other tools will help readers apply Firestarter insights to their own lives. Also included are group exercises and discussion guides so the book can be used in business and nonprofit settings to develop the skills that help companies grow. Whether you're an individual seeking ways to realize personal ambitions or a leader trying to motivate your team, you'll benefit from the Firestarter methods featured in this inspirational book.

























[book] That's What She Said:
What Men Need to Know
(and Women Need to Tell Them)
About Working Together
by Joanne Lipman
February 2018

William Morrow


First things first: There will be no man shaming in That’s What She Said. A recent Harvard study found that corporate “diversity training” has actually made the gender gap worse—in part because it makes men feel demonized. Women, meanwhile, have been told closing the gender gap is up to them: they need to speak up, to be more confident, to demand to be paid what they’re worth. They discuss these issues amongst themselves all the time. What they don’t do is talk to men about it.

It’s time to end that disconnect. More people in leadership roles are genuinely trying to transform the way we work together, because there's abundant evidence that companies with more women in senior leadership perform better by virtually every measure. Yet despite good intentions, men often lack the tools they need, leading to fumbles, missteps, frustration and misunderstanding that continue to inflict real and lasting damage on women's careers.
That's What She Said solves for that dilemma. Filled with illuminating anecdotes, data from the most recent studies, and stories from Joanne Lipman’s own journey to the top of a male-dominated industry, it shows how we can win by reaching across the gender divide. What can the Enron scandal teach us about the way men and women communicate professionally? How does brain chemistry help explain men’s fear of women’s emotions at work? Why did Kimberly Clark have an all-male team of executives in charge of their Kotex tampon line? What can we learn from Iceland’s campaign to “feminize” an entire nation? That’s What She Said shows why empowering women as true equals is an essential goal for women and men—and offers a roadmap for getting there.

That’s What She Said solves for: The respect gap; Unconscious bias; Interruptions; The pay and promotion gap; Being heard; The motherhood penalty; “Bropropriation” and “mansplaining”; and more.

























[book] The Château:
The CHATEAU
A Novel
by Paul Goldberg
February 2018

Picador USA

We have proverb in Florida...You know why it's good to be on the beach?"
Bill smiles, but says nothing. He wants the guy to keep talking.
"Because on beach you are surrounded by idiots on only three sides."
"And on the remaining side you have what?" asks Bill.
"Sharks..."


Paul Goldberg, the acclaimed author of The Yid, takes us behind the scenes of a Florida condo board election, delivering a wild spin on Miami Beach, petty crime, Jewish identity, and life in Trump's America.

It is January 2017 and Bill has hit rock bottom. Yesterday, he was William M. Katzenelenbogen, successful science reporter at The Washington Post. But things have taken a turn. Fired from his job, aimless, with exactly $1,219.37 in his checking account, he learns that his college roommate, a plastic surgeon known far and wide as the “Butt God of Miami Beach,” has fallen to his death under salacious circumstances. With nothing to lose, Bill boards a flight for Florida’s Gold Coast, ready to begin his own investigation-a last ditch attempt to revive his career.

There’s just one catch: Bill’s father, Melsor.

Melsor Yakovlevich Katzenelenbogen-poet, literary scholar, political dissident, small-time-crook-is angling for control of the condo board at the Château Sedan Neuve, a crumbling high-rise in Hollywood, Florida, populated mostly by Russian Jewish immigrants. The current board is filled with fraudsters levying “special assessments” on residents, and Melsor will use any means necessary to win the board election. And who better to help him than his estranged son?

As he did in The Yid, Paul Goldberg has taken something we think we know and turned it on its ear. Featuring a colorful cast of characters, The Château guarantees that you will never look at condo boards, crime, kleptocracy, vodka, Fascism, or Florida the same way again.

























[book] The Rock, the Road,
and the Rabbi:
My Journey into the Heart
of the Scriptural Faith
and the Land Where It All Began
by Kathie Lee Gifford
with contribution by Rabbi Jason Sobel
March 2018

Thomas Nelson Christian Publications

Kathie Lee Gifford writes about her faith with a leader in the Messianic faith

As a lifetime student of scripture, Kathie Lee Gifford has been traveling to Israel since she was 17 years old. She even missed her high school graduation so she could attend the first Jerusalem Conference on Biblical Prophecy in 1971.

In a continuation of that love for this astounding land of faith, The Rock, the Road, and the Rabbi is an examination of a decades-long desire to know more and understand more than the typical “Sunday School” teaching so prevalent in our churches today.

With a father who was Jewish, Kathie Lee has always felt what she calls, “a deep resonance in my very being for the Jewish people and Land of the Covenant—Israel.”

But it wasn’t until she started studying the original texts in Hebrew and Greek and actually hiking the land herself with teachers who taught the messianic rabbinical way, that she finally began to find what her soul had been longing for.

Something profound happens when one follows along the ancient paths in the actual places that Jesus taught, healed, lived, died, was resurrected and ascended into Heaven. He is indeed the Rock, the Rabbi whom we follow on the Road, and when we are introduced to the mysteries of the Word by teachers who are actually trained in the ancient rabbinical way, radical transformation begins to renew our hearts and minds.

As Kathie Lee shares her transformative experience, readers will also be introduced to her teachers on the journey, Ray Vander Laan, Rod Van Solkema, and Rabbi Jason Sobel, a Messianic Jewish Rabbi who has been opening hearts and minds around the world with his historical analysis and eye-opening revelations. The book will include pictures of the actual sites, and stories both old and new of what happened there.

At the end of each chapter Rabbi Sobel takes the reader even deeper into understanding Hebrew culture, language, and the means of connection that opens up an understanding of faith and heritage like never before.

























MOVE OF ZAHAV… (Just kidding)

[book] SHAYA
An Odyssey of Food,
My Journey Back to Israel
by (Chef) Alon Shaya
March 2018

KNOPF

An exciting debut cookbook that confirms the arrival of a new guru chef . . . A moving, deeply personal journey of survival and discovery that tells of the evolution of a cuisine and of the transformative power and magic of food and cooking. From the two-time James Beard Award-winning chef whose celebrated New Orleans restaurants have been hailed as the country's most innovative and best by Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Saveur, GQ, and Esquire.

"Alon's journey is as gripping and as seductive as his cooking . . . Lovely stories, terrific food." --Yotam Ottolenghi, author of Jerusalem: A Cookbook

Alon Shaya's is no ordinary cookbook. It is a memoir of a culinary sensibility that begins in Israel and wends its way from the U.S.A. (Philadelphia) to Italy (Milan and Bergamo), back to Israel (Jerusalem) and comes together in the American South, in the heart of New Orleans. It's a book that tells of how food saved the author's life and how, through a circuitous path of (cooking) twists and (life-affirming) turns the author's celebrated cuisine--food of his native Israel with a creole New Orleans kick came to be, along with his award-winning New Orleans restaurants: Shaya, Domenica, and Pizza Domenica, ranked by Esquire, Bon Appétit, and others as the best new restaurants in the United States.

These are stories of place, of people, and of the food that connects them, a memoir of one man's culinary sensibility, with food as the continuum throughout his journey--guiding his personal and professional decisions, punctuating every memory, choice, every turning point in his life. Interspersed with glorious full-color photographs and illustrations that follow the course of all the flavors Shaya has tried, places he's traveled, things he's experienced, lessons he's learned--more than one hundred recipes--from Roasted Chicken with Harissa to Speckled Trout with Tahini and Pine Nuts; Crab Cakes with Preserved Lemon Aioli; Roasted Cast-Iron Ribeye; Marinated Soft Cheese with Herbs and Spices; Buttermilk Biscuits; and Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Feta.

























[book] DISARMED
Unconventional Lessons from
the World's Only One-Armed
Special Forces Sharpshooter
by Izzy Ezagui
March 2018

PROMETHEUS BOOKS
The inspiring story of a young American who volunteered to fight in the Israel Defense Forces, lost his arm in combat, and then returned to the battlefield.
On January 8, 2009, Izzy Ezagui--a 19-year-old American who had enlisted in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF)--lost his arm in a mortar attack on the border of the Gaza Strip. In this stirring memoir, full of chutzpah and dark humor, Izzy recounts his tortuous trek through rehabilitation to re-enlistment as a squad commander in the IDF. He became the only one-armed Special Forces sharpshooter.
This isn't a typical war chronicle. Izzy eschews macho bluster, steering clear of the usual hero tropes of most war memoirists. He wrote this book for his fellow millennials. Not necessarily those with military ambitions, but for everyone facing life's daily battles. His message is simple: if a self-described "nerd" and "one-armed basket case" like him can accomplish what he set his mind to, then anyone can become a hero in his or her own life.
Growing up in a religious household in Miami, his early life, plagued by self-doubt, family drama, and girl troubles, culminated in a life-changing terrorist attack he and his family barely escaped when he was thirteen. His search for direction eventually led him to that explosion on the Gaza border, changing his life forever.
In the midst of disaster, he discovered a deep well at his core, from which he could draw strength. Through his motivational speeches across the world, he encourages people to seek their own power, and to face whatever adversity life throws at them.
Combining refreshing candor with self-deprecating wit, Izzy's story will provoke readers to live up to their aspirations despite seemingly impossible odds.


























[book] Lonely But Not Alone:
A Spiritual Autobiography
by Nathan Lopes Cardozo
March 2018

Urim Publications
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.



























[book] The Post-Widget Society:
Economic Possibilities for
Our Children
by Lawrence H. Summers
April 2018

FS&G Books
From Professors Anita and Bob Summers son, former U.S. Sec of Treasury Lawrence H. Summers, a presentation of a new paradigm for thinking about the current economic and technological revolution

We are buffeted by the sense that everything is accelerating: Digital technology is changing the way we work, shop, and socialize. And yet for all the talk about disruptive innovations, economic growth is largely stagnant. We are told that with new technologies average citizens are empowered as never before, and yet wide swaths of the population feel powerless and can no longer count on stable careers and a better life for their children. As Lawrence H. Summers shows in The Post-Widget Society, these are the paradoxes that define the economic revolution that is transforming our world.

At the heart of this revolution are two dramatic developments in Western economies: the declining significance of widgets (mass-produced goods) and the rise of design goods (products that cost a lot to design but little to produce); and the controversial prospect of secular stagnation, the long-term phenomenon of negligible economic growth and depressed employment in a dynamic market economy. Summers’s trenchant analysis of these trends reveals that they have profound implications not only for the future of jobs and widening income inequality but also for the nature of the state and the very stability of society.

A bold, pathbreaking book by one of our most important economists, The Post-Widget Society is necessary reading for every American concerned about our economic and political future.


















[book] This is the Year I
Put My Financial Life in Order
by John Schwartz
April 2018

Avery
A New York Times columnist shares his financial successes and mishaps, offering an everyman’s guide to straightening out your money once and for all.

Money management is one of our most practical survival skills—and also one we’ve convinced ourselves we’re either born with or not. In reality, financial planning can be learned, like anything else. Part financial memoir and part research-based guide to attaining lifelong security, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order is the book that everyone who has never wanted to read a preachy financial guide has been waiting for.

John Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, are pre-retirement workers of an economic class well above the poverty line—but well below the one percent. Sharing his own alternately harrowing and hilarious stories—from his brush with financial ruin and bankruptcy in his thirties to his short-lived budgeted diet of cafeteria french fries and gravy—John will walk you through his own journey to financial literacy, which he admittedly started a bit late. He covers everything from investments to retirement and insurance to wills (at fifty-eight, he didn’t have one!), medical directives, and more. Whether you’re a college grad wanting to start out on the right foot or you’re approaching retirement age and still wondering what a pension is, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order will help you become your own best financial adviser.


























[book] Was Yosef on the Spectrum?:
A Contemporary Reading of the
Joseph Story in the Torah
by Samuel J. Levine
(Tuoro Law Center)
April 2018

Urim Publications
Yosef’s behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and personal development are often difficult to understand and seem to defy explanation. This book presents a coherent and cohesive reading of the well known Bible story that offers a plausible account of Yosef’s behaviors, specifically those of an individual on the autism spectrum. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder.



























SADNESS IS A WHITE BIRD
A Novel by Moriel Rothman-Zecher
Spring 2018
Atria Books
Spring 2018 is the expected date on an English translation of this debut novel by Moriel Rothman-Zecher, a MacDowell fellow. The novel concerns “a young Israeli man trying to reconcile his connection to two Palestinian siblings with his deeply ingrained loyalties to family and country as his military draft date approaches.” In 2015, the author published an op-ed in the New York Times about Israelis who refuse to serve in the nation’s military.


















[book] Gershom Scholem:
Master of the Kabbalah
(Jewish Lives series)
by David Biale
UC Davis
June 2018

Yale University Press
A new biography of the seminal twentieth-century historian and thinker who pioneered the study of Jewish mysticism and profoundly influenced the Zionist movement

Gershom Scholem (1897–1982) was perhaps the foremost Jewish intellectual of the twentieth century. Pioneering the study of Jewish mysticism as a legitimate academic discipline, he overturned the rationalist bias of his predecessors and revealed an extraordinary world of myth and messianism. In his youth, he rebelled against the assimilationist culture of his parents and embraced Zionism as the vehicle for the renewal of Judaism in a secular age. He moved to Palestine in 1923 and took part in the creation of the Hebrew University, where he was a towering figure for nearly seventy years.

David Biale traces Scholem’s tumultuous life of political activism and cultural criticism, including his falling-out with Hannah Arendt over the Eichmann trial. Mining a rich trove of diaries, letters, and other writings, Biale shows that his subject’s inner life illuminates his most important writings. Scholem emerges as a passionately engaged man of his times—a period that encompassed the extremely significant events of the two world wars, the rise of Nazism, and the Holocaust.

























[book] The Autobiography of Solomon Maimon:
The Complete Translation
by Solomon Maimon
but Edited and Translated by
Yitzhak Y. Melamed,? Abraham Socher,
?and Paul Reitter
Foreword by Gideon Freudenthal
July 2018

Princeton University Press
The first complete and annotated English translation of Maimon’s influential and delightfully entertaining memoir

Solomon Maimon's autobiography has delighted readers for more than two hundred years, from Goethe, Schiller, and George Eliot to Walter Benjamin and Hannah Arendt. The American poet and critic Adam Kirsch has named it one of the most crucial Jewish books of modern times. Here is the first complete and annotated English edition of this enduring and lively work.

Born into a down-on-its-luck provincial Jewish family in 1753, Maimon quickly distinguished himself as a prodigy in learning. Even as a young child, he chafed at the constraints of his Talmudic education and rabbinical training. He recounts how he sought stimulation in the Hasidic community and among students of the Kabbalah--and offers rare and often wickedly funny accounts of both. After a series of picaresque misadventures, Maimon reached Berlin, where he became part of the city's famed Jewish Enlightenment and achieved the philosophical education he so desperately wanted, winning acclaim for being the "sharpest" of Kant's critics, as Kant himself described him.

This new edition restores text cut from the abridged 1888 translation by J. Clark Murray, which has long been the only available English edition. Paul Reitter's translation is brilliantly sensitive to the subtleties of Maimon's prose while providing a fluid rendering that contemporary readers will enjoy, and is accompanied by an introduction and notes by Yitzhak Melamed and Abraham Socher that give invaluable insights into Maimon and his extraordinary life. The book also features an afterword by Gideon Freudenthal that provides an authoritative overview of Maimon's contribution to modern philosophy.





























[book]



PLEASE CLICK HERE
TO TRANSFER TO OUR HOME PAGE:










USE THE "SEARCH" FUNCTION BELOW to find any other books that interest you, or click the top frame to see the other books that Sefer Safari can offer.

Books Music Enter keywords...


Amazon.com
                     logo





6


http://www.myJewishBooks.com – Revised:7//4/2017, 2/1/2016, 5/14/2012, 3/19/2013, 1/29/2015, 07/22/2016
Copyright © 1996-2017 MyJewishBooks.com

Admin@MyJewishBooks.com


LE FastCounter

Disclaimer: We provide this data as a service to readers. We are not responsible for the results of the use or misuse of the data and/or the review of the works above. Amazon.com fulfills book orders