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Welcome to our Fall 2017, Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Winter 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, and oh so many more pages of Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME FALL 2018 BOOK READINGS


August 6, 2018: Scribblers on the Roof at Congregation Ansche Chesed: Authors Cherise Wolas (The Family Tabor) and Dawn Raffel ( The Strange Case of Dr. Couney). NYC UWS W 100th St 8PM.
August 08, 2018: Jason Kander reads from Outside the Wire: Ten Lessons I've Learned in Everyday Courage. Historic Sixth and I Synagogue, Washington DC.
September 01, 2018: National Book Festuval, Library of Congress, Mall, Washington, DC
September 06, 2018: Yuval Noah Harari reads from In 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. Sixth and I Synagogue, Washington, Dc
September 10-17, 2018: Brooklyn Book Festival
September 13, 2018: Jules Feiffer reads from The Ghost Script: A Graphic Novel. Barnes & Noble UWS NYC
October 03, 2018: From the journalist and bestselling author of All the Single Ladies comes Good and Mad, on Female Anger by Rebecca Traister. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 04, 2018: Ken Krimstein reads from The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth. B&N UWS NYC
October 09, 2018: Gary Shteyngart reads from Lake Success. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 21, 2018: Chef Yotam Ottolenghi reads from Ottolenghi Simple. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 29, 2018: NPR Raio host Peter Sagal reads from his book on running. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
November 17-18, 2018: Miami Book Fair (main portion)





[book] Walking Shadows:
A Peter Decker/Rina Lazarus Novel
by Faye Kellerman
August 28, 2018
William Morrow

Detective Peter Decker and his wife, Rina Lazarus, risk life and limb to solve a pair of brutal murders that may be tied to a crime from more than twenty years ago in this intense and addictive mystery from New York Times bestselling author Faye Kellerman.

On a quiet suburban street in upstate Greenbury, New York, the brutally beaten body of a young man is discovered in the woods adjacent to an empty vacation home. Twenty-six-year-old Brady Neil a resident of the neighboring town of Hamilton, had no criminal record, few friends, worked full-time, and attended community college. But as Detective Peter Decker learns, the clean-cut kid is linked to the criminal world. When Brady was a baby, his father, Brandon Gratz, was convicted of robbing and killing the owners of a local jewelry store. While Gratz and his partner, Kyle Masterson, admitted to the robbery, they swore they left the owners, Glen and Lydia Levine, very much alive.

The experienced detective knows there’s more to this homicide case than the records show. As he digs into Gratz’s past, Decker begins to suspect that the son’s murder may be connected to the father’s sins. Before he can put together the pieces, Decker finds out that one of Brady Neil’s friends, Joseph Boch—aka Boxer—has gone missing. Heading to Boch’s house with his temporary new partner, Hamilton PD cop Lenora Baccus, they discover a bloodbath.

Who would savagely kill two innocent men—and why? Finding the answers will require all of Decker’s skill and knowledge, the help of his fellow Greenbury detectives, Tyler McAdams and Kevin Butterfield, and information gleaned from his wife Rina’s behind the scenes investigation to put all the pieces of this deadly puzzle together . . . and see justice done.





















[book] Death in Shangri-La
(A Dotan Naor Thriller)
by Yigal Zur
August 7, 2018
Oceanview
Ex-Israeli operative turned private investigator, Dotan Naor-to settle a bet-agrees to locate the missing son of former acquaintance, now ruthless Israeli arms merchant, Willy Mizrachi. Willy, who does not hesitate to sell killing machines to the most heinous players in the world, is desperate to find his only son, Itiel, who has headed to an ashram in the Himalayas.

The Himalayas are also host to groups of young Israelis who have completed their mandatory military service-a sort of rite of passage. Now, those innocent kids are being hunted down by violent terrorists.

India and the disputed Kashmir region between India and Pakistan is familiar territory to Dotan, as he searches for Itiel and for the source of these heinous attacks on Israeli youth.

Unwilling to leave this quest in the hands of Dotan, Willy also travels to India, where he is murdered in Delhi, triggering international repercussions capable of ripping the world apart at one of its most dangerous flashpoints.

Nothing is as it seems in this region of the world. Betrayal reigns everywhere.

But love, in its purest form, does manage to shine through in this story of brutal international corruption.



















[book] Was Yosef on the Spectrum?:
A Contemporary Reading of the
Joseph Story in the Torah
by Samuel J. Levine
(Tuoro Law Center)
August 1,2018
Urim Publications
Yosef’s behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and personal development are often difficult to understand and seem to defy explanation. This book presents a coherent and cohesive reading of the well known Bible story that offers a plausible account of Yosef’s behaviors, specifically those of an individual on the autism spectrum. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder.





























[book] The Arab of the Future 3:
The Circumcision Years:
A Childhood in the Middle East, 1985-1987
by Riad Sattouf
August 2018
Metropolitan
In the third installment of the acclaimed series, the Sattouf family begins to implode under the pressure of Hafez al-Assad's regime and the suffocation of their rural Syrian village.

The Arab of the Future is the widely acclaimed, internationally bestselling graphic memoir that tells the story of Riad Sattouf’s peripatetic childhood in the Middle East. In the first volume, which covers the years 1978–1984, his family moves between rural France, Libya, and Syria, where they eventually settle in his father’s native village of Ter Maaleh, near Homs. The second volume recounts young Riad’s first year attending school in Syria (1984–1985), where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of Hafez al-Assad. In this third volume, (1985–1987), Riad’s mother, fed up with the grinding reality of daily life in the village, decides she cannot take it any longer. When she resolves to move back to France, young Riad sees his father torn between his wife’s aspirations and the weight of family traditions.

























[book] The Crusader Armies:
1099–1187
by Steve Tibble
(Univ of London)
August 2018
Yale University Press
A major new history of the Crusades that illuminates the strength and sophistication of the Western and Muslim armies

During the Crusades, the Western and Muslim armies developed various highly sophisticated strategies of both attack and defense, which evolved during the course of the battles. In this ambitious new work, Steve Tibble draws on a wide range of Muslim texts and archaeological evidence as well as more commonly cited Western sources to analyze the respective armies’ strategy, adaptation, evolution, and cultural diversity and show just how sophisticated the Crusader armies were even by today’s standards.

In the first comprehensive account of the subject in sixty years, Tibble takes a fresh approach to Templars, Hospitallers, and other key Orders and makes the controversial proposition that the Crusades were driven as much by sedentary versus nomadic tribal concerns as by religious conflict. This fluently written, broad-ranging narrative provides a crucial missing piece in the study of the West’s attempts to colonize the Middle East during the Middle Ages.



























[book] BLOOD PAPA
Rwanda's New Generation
by Jean Hatzfeld
(Liberation)
Joshua David Jordan (Translator)
August 2018
FS&G
The continuation of a groundbreaking study of the Rwandan genocide, and the story of the survivor generation

In Rwanda from April to June 1994, 800,000 Tutsis were slaughtered by their Hutu neighbors in the largest and swiftest genocide since World War II. In his previous books, Jean Hatzfeld has documented the lives of the killers and victims, but after twenty years he has found that the enormity of understanding doesn’t stop with one generation. In Blood Papa, Hatzfeld returns to the hills and marshes of Nyamata to ask what has become of the children-those who never saw the machetes yet have grown up in the shadow of tragedy.

Fabrice, Sandra, Jean-Pierre, and others share the genocide as a common inheritance. Some have known only their parents’ silence and lies, enduring the harassment of classmates or the stigma of a father jailed for unspeakable crimes. Others have enjoyed a loving home and the sympathies offered to survivor children, but do so without parents or an extended family.

The young Rwandans in Blood Papa see each other in the neighborhood-they dance and gossip, frequent the same cafés, and, like teenagers everywhere, love sports, music, and fashion; they surf the Web and dream of marriage. Yet Hutu and Tutsi children rarely speak of the ghosts that haunt their lives. Here their moving first-person accounts combined with Hatzfeld’s arresting chronicles of everyday life form a testament to survival in a country devastated by the terrible crimes and trauma of the past.



























[book] The Disordered Mind:
What Unusual Brains Tell
Us About Ourselves
by Eric R. Kandel
Summer 2018
FS&G
Eric R. Kandel, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts.

In his seminal new book, The Disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. As a result, the brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, resulting in diseases such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities-the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower.

By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, we will deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behavior, memory, and creativity. Only then can we grapple with the big question of how billions of neurons generate consciousness itself. .


























[book] Outside the Wire:
Ten Lessons I've Learned
in Everyday Courage
by Jason Kander
AUGUST 2018
Twelve

Yes, for those wondering... Jason was raised in a Jewish household.
A smart and revealing political memoir from a rising star of the Democratic Party.

"In life and in politics, the most important work is often that which happens outside the wire."

Going "outside the wire" -- military lingo for leaving the safety of a base -- has taught Jason Kander to take risks and make change rather than settling for the easy option. After you've volunteered to put your life on the line with and for your fellow Americans in Afghanistan, cynical politics and empty posturing back home just feel like an insult.

Kander understands that showing political courage really just means doing the right thing no matter what. He won a seat in the Missouri Legislature at age twenty-seven and then, at thirty-one, became the first millennial in the country elected to statewide office. An unapologetic progressive from the heartland, he rejected conventional political wisdom and stood up to the NRA in 2016 with a now-famous Senate campaign ad in which he argued for gun reform while assembling a rifle blindfolded.

That fearless commitment to service has placed him at the forefront of a new generation of American political leaders. In his final interview as President, Barack Obama pointed to Kander as the future of the Democratic Party.

"...do something rather than be something..."

In OUTSIDE THE WIRE, Jason Kander describes his journey from Midwestern suburban kid to soldier to politician and details what he's learned along the way: lessons imparted by his dad on the baseball diamond, wisdom gained outside the wire in Kabul, and cautionary tales witnessed under the Missouri Capitol dome. Kander faced down petty tyrants in Jefferson City -- no big deal after encountering real ones in Afghanistan. He put in 90,000 miles campaigning for statewide office in 2012 -- no sweat compared to the thirty-seven miles between Bagram Air Base and Camp Eggers. When confronted with a choice between what's easy and what's right, he's never hesitated.

OUTSIDE THE WIRE is a candid, practical guide for anyone thinking about public service and everyone wishing to make a difference. It's a call to action, an entertaining meditation on the demands and rewards of civic engagement, and, ultimately, a hopeful vision for America's future -- all seen through the eyes of one of its most dedicated servants.


































[book] The Eyes of Isaac:
Medical and Halachic Perspectives
on Ophthalmologic Conditions
Edited by Norman Saffra, MD FACS
Foreword by Alan Kadish
SEPTEMBER 2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A compilation of essays and studies from leading doctors, professors, and rabbis, The Eyes of Isaac endeavors to connect important medical and psychological issues of ophthalmology with Jewish law. Rabbis and physicians navigate the daily challenges that visual disability presents for themselves as well as for those under their care. Interspersed with personal anecdotes and stories, The Eyes of Isaac offers profound knowledge on the significant organ and diseases related to it, and how those diseases, such as glaucoma, can affect the practice of daily Jewish rituals. Included in this collection are explanations of eye diseases, considerations on how to treat them, along with the detailed process of medical surgeries in ophthalmology.
























[book] LAKE SUCCESS
A novel
by Gary Shteyngart
September 2018
Random House
“Barry Cohen, a man with $2.4 billion of assets under management, staggered into the Port Authorty Bus Terminal.

When his dream of the perfect marriage, the perfect son, and the perfect life implodes, a Wall Street millionaire takes a cross-country bus trip in search of his college sweetheart and ideals of youth in the long-awaited novel, his first in seven years, from the acclaimed, bestselling author of Super Sad True Love Story.

Myopic, narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his 3 year-old-son’s diagnosis of autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart, whom he hasn't seen or spoken to in years. Meanwhile, reeling from the fight that caused Barry's departure, his super-smart wife Seema—a driven first-generation American who craved a picture-perfect life, with all the accoutrements of a huge bank account—has her own demons to face. How these two imperfect characters navigate the Shteyngartian chaos of their own making is the heart of this biting, brilliant, emotionally resonant novel very much of our times.































[book] Living in the Presence:
A Jewish Mindfulness Guide
for Everyday Life
by Rabbi Benjamin Epstein, PsyD
September 2018
URIM
In our frantic, fast paced society, we need constant guidance to remind us that we can only find the peace of mind we sorely lack by looking inward. Judaism, like many other spiritual traditions, offers a unique path to cultivating fulfillment and presence of mind. In cultivating peace of mind, we do not aim to achieve transcendence. Rather, our goal is to enter fully into whatever is occurring in our lives and meet it with full presence. But being a better Jew and a happier person are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they are mutually interdependent. From the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep, biblical commandments provide us with guidelines that encourage us to be aware of the present moment. A Guide to Jewish Mindfulness provides concise and clear instructions on how to cultivate peace of mind in order to attain a life of greater commitment and inspiration for the present moment.


























[book] Zion's Fiction:
A Treasury of Israeli
Speculative Literature
Edited by Sheldon Teitelbaum,
and Emanuel Lottem
Illustrated by Avi Katz
SEPTEMBER 2018
Mandel Villar Press

This anthology showcases the best Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature published since the 1980s. The stories included come from Hebrew, Russian, and English-language sources, and include well-known authors such as
Shimon Adaf, Pesach (Pavel) Amnuel,
Gail Hareven, Savyon Liebrecht,
Nava Semel and Lavie Tidhar,
as well as a hot-list of newly translated Israeli writers.

The book features: an historical and contemporary survey of Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature by the editors; a foreword by revered SF/F writer Robert Silverberg,; an afterword by Dr. Aharon Hauptman, the founding editor of Fantasia 2000, Israel’s seminal SF/F magazine; an author biography for each story included in the volume; and illustrations for each story by award winning American-born Israeli artist, Avi Katz.

“Zion’s Fiction will supply a distinctive bright line to the spectrum of futuristic fiction, which stands in sore need of broadening, in the cause of promoting cross-cultural understanding as well as showcasing exciting new talent.”– Brian Stableford, author of over 70 novels and renowned SF historian

“Zion’s Fiction explores the unlimited dreams of a people who have learned to stand on shifting ground. To face a future filled with danger and hope, forging into territory that can only be surveyed with the lamp of imagination on our brows.”– David Brin, multiple Hugo and Nebula award-author of EARTH and Existence

“When my collection Wandering Stars: An Anthology of Jewish Fantasy and Science Fiction was published in 1974,[It] became a classic. And now…we have the first ever anthology in the entire universe of Israeli fantasy and science fiction: Zion’s Fiction…Go forth and read…and may you find Zion’s Fiction unexpected, delightful, and delirious!” –Jack Dann, award winning author and editor of over 75 books including The Memory Cathedral and The Silent

“The basic joy in science fiction and fantasy is the chance to look inside minds different from your own. Here’s your chance. Some bright minds in the nation of Israel have been exercising their imaginations, sharing their different dreams and nightmares, and the results are ours to enjoy.” – Larry Niven, a multiple Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of the Ringworld Series

Sheldon Teitelbaum, an award-winning Los Angeles-based Canadian/American/Israeli writer, and former member of the Editorial Board of Fantasia 2000, is a longtime commentator on Jewish and Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature who has published widely in the Los Angeles Times, Cinefantastique, The Jerusalem Report, Foundation: The Review of Science Fiction, and The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction

Emanuel Lottem, a central figure in Israeli science fiction and fantasy scene and former member of the Editorial Board of Fantasia 2000, is the translator and editor of some of the best SF/F books published in Hebrew, and a moving force in the creation of the Israeli Society for Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Avi Katz, an award-winning American-born Israeli illustrator, cartoonist, and painter, is the staff illustrator of Jerusalem Report magazine. He has illustrated over 170 books in Israel and the United States.
























[book] NOT FOR THE FAINT
OF HEART
Lessons in Courage,
power and Persistence
by Ambassador Wendy R. Sherman
SEPTEMBER 2018
PublicAFFAIRS
Ambassador Sherman is loved by many and despised by many. She is credited with much of the Obama/Kerry administration's nuclear deal with Iran.

Sherman combines personal storytelling and expert insight to show readers how they can put diplomatic values like courage, persistence, and empathy to work in their own lives.

The art of diplomacy requires courage, persistence, and above all, authenticity. In Not for the Faint of Heart, Ambassador Wendy Sherman argues that we can all learn to put these qualities to work in our lives.

In this book, Sherman shares stories of her time in the State Department negotiating the most sensitive issues of our time (often as the lone woman in the room), along with personal stories that show how our private experiences affect our professional lives. She argues that we negotiate best when we are our authentic selves, not reliant on stratagems or manipulation but on all of the skills we've gained through our experiences.

Not for the Faint of Heart brings readers inside the world of international diplomacy and into the mind of one of our most effective diplomatic negotiators, revealing that success takes courage, the ability to forge common ground, and an understanding of the nature and use of power.





























[book] The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt:
A Tyranny of Truth
by Ken Krimstein
SEPTEMBER 2018
Bloomsbury

One of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century and a hero of political thought, the largely unsung and often misunderstood Hannah Arendt is best known for her landmark 1951 book on openness in political life, The Origins of Totalitarianism, which, with its powerful and timely lessons for today, has become newly relevant.

She led an extraordinary life. This was a woman who endured Nazi persecution firsthand, survived harrowing "escapes" from country to country in Europe, and befriended such luminaries as Walter Benjamin and Mary McCarthy, in a world inhabited by everyone from Marc Chagall and Marlene Dietrich to Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. A woman who finally had to give up her unique genius for philosophy, and her love of a very compromised man--the philosopher and Nazi-sympathizer Martin Heidegger--for what she called "love of the world."

Compassionate and enlightening, playful and page-turning, New Yorker cartoonist Ken Krimstein's The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt is a strikingly illustrated portrait of a complex, controversial, deeply flawed, and irrefutably courageous woman whose intelligence and "virulent truth telling" led her to breathtaking insights into the human condition, and whose experience continues to shine a light on how to live as an individual and a public citizen in troubled times.
























[book] The Collected Plays of Chaim Potok
by the late Chaim Potok
Edited by Rena Potok with
David Bassuk, Carol Rocamora, Aaron Posner
September 2018
Adam Kadmon Books

While Chaim Potok is most famous for his novels, particularly his first book The Chosen (1967), which was listed on The New York Times’ best seller list for 39 weeks and sold more than 3,400,000 copies, he also wrote plays all of which are collected and published here for the first time. In the course of excavating his files and VHS tapes, David Bassuk discovered a video of the post-performance discussion on Out of the Depths featuring Chaim Potok and Prof. David Roskies. The transcript of that talk also appears for the first time in print, in this volume.

Includes:
Out of the Depths (Previously did not exist in written form—the last version was a 1992 video of a staged workshop performance; this play was reconstructed in this collection by Rena Polok and David Bassuk using that version.)

Sins of the Father (The Carnival and The Gallery) (Staged in Philadelphia in 1990. Few copies existed, and the plays would have been lost if not for electronic preservation and updating.)

The Play of Lights (Performed in Philadelphia in 1992. Few, if any, copies of the play were left, and it would have been lost if not for electronic preservation and updating.) The Chosen (Performed in 1999. Adapted from the novel of the same name into a play by Chaim Potok and Aaron Posner.)






















[book] Kafka's Last Trial:
The Case of a Literary Legacy
by Benjamin Balint
September 2018
The story of the international struggle to preserve Kafka’s literary legacy... or that is what the parties said their motivation was

Kafka’s Last Trial tells the extraordinary story of the international struggle to preserve Franz Kafka’s literary legacy. It begins with Kafka’s last instruction to his closest friend, Max Brod: to destroy all his remaining papers upon his death. But when the moment arrived in 1924, Brod could not bring himself to burn the unpublished works of the man he considered a literary genius-even a saint. Instead, Brod devoted his life to championing Kafka’s writing, rescuing his legacy from obscurity and physical destruction.

The story of Kafka’s posthumous life is itself Kafkaesque. By the time of Brod’s own death in Tel Aviv in 1968, Kafka’s major works had been published, transforming the once little-known writer into a pillar of literary modernism. Yet Brod left a wealth of still-unpublished papers to his secretary, who sold some, held on to the rest, and then passed the bulk of them on to her daughters, who in turn refused to release them. An international legal battle erupted to determine which country could claim ownership of Kafka’s work: Israel, where Kafka dreamed of living but never entered, or Germany, where Kafka’s three sisters perished in the Holocaust?

Benjamin Balint offers a gripping account of the controversial trial in Israeli courts-brimming with dilemmas legal, ethical, and political-that determined the fate of Kafka’s manuscripts. Deeply informed, with sharply drawn portraits and a remarkable ability to evoke a time and place, Kafka’s Last Trial is at once a brilliant biographical portrait of a literary genius, and the story of two countries whose national obsessions with overcoming the traumas of the past came to a head in a hotly contested trial for the right to claim the literary legacy of one of our modern masters.


























[book] Our American Israel:
The Story of an
Entangled Alliance
by Amy Kaplan
(Professor, Univ of Pennsylvania)
September 17, 2018
Harvard University Press

An essential account of America’s most controversial alliance that reveals how the United States came to see Israel as an extension of itself, and how that strong and divisive partnership plays out in our own time.

Our American Israel tells the story of how a Jewish state in the Middle East came to resonate profoundly with a broad range of Americans in the twentieth century. Beginning with debates about Zionism after World War II, Israel’s identity has been entangled with America’s belief in its own exceptional nature. Now, in the twenty-first century, Amy Kaplan challenges the associations underlying this special alliance.

Through popular narratives expressed in news media, fiction, and film, a shared sense of identity emerged from the two nations’ histories as settler societies. Americans projected their own origin myths onto Israel: the biblical promised land, the open frontier, the refuge for immigrants, the revolt against colonialism. Israel assumed a mantle of moral authority, based on its image as an “invincible victim,” a nation of intrepid warriors and concentration camp survivors. This paradox persisted long after the Six-Day War, when the United States rallied behind a story of the Israeli David subduing the Arab Goliath. The image of the underdog shattered when Israel invaded Lebanon and Palestinians rose up against the occupation. Israel’s military was strongly censured around the world, including notes of dissent in the United States. Rather than a symbol of justice, Israel became a model of military strength and technological ingenuity.

In America today, Israel’s political realities pose difficult challenges. Turning a critical eye on the turbulent history that bound the two nations together, Kaplan unearths the roots of present controversies that may well divide them in the future.
























[book] Then They Came for Me:
Martin Niemöller, the Pastor
Who Defied the Nazis
by Matthew D Hockenos
September 2018
"First they came for the Communists, and I did not speak out-Because I was not a Communist..."

Few today recognize the name Martin Niemöller, though many know his famous confession. In Then They Came for Me, Matthew Hockenos traces Niemöller's evolution from a Nazi supporter to a determined opponent of Hitler, revealing him to be a more complicated figure than previously understood.

Born into a traditionalist Prussian family, Niemöller welcomed Hitler's rise to power as an opportunity for national rebirth. Yet when the regime attempted to seize control of the Protestant Church, he helped lead the opposition and was soon arrested. After spending the war in concentration camps, Niemöller emerged a controversial figure: to his supporters he was a modern Luther, while his critics, including President Harry Truman, saw him as an unrepentant nationalist.

A nuanced portrait of courage in the face of evil, Then They Came for Me puts the question to us today: What would I have done?

























[book] God Is in the Crowd:
Twenty-First-Century Judaism
by Tal Keinan
September 25, 2018
Spiegel * Grau
Part call to action and part riveting personal story, an original proposal for discovering relevance in Judaism and ensuring its survival from a pioneering social activist and Harvard MBA business leader who served as a pilot in the Israel Air Force.

God Is in the Crowd is an original and provocative blueprint for Judaism in the 21st century, told through the lens of Keinan's unusual personal story. Keinan's analysis of the threat to Jewish continuity is sobering: as Jewry has become concentrated in just two parts of the world, America and Israel, the Jewish people has lost the subtle code of governance that made Judaism relevant in the Diaspora. This "code," as Keinan explains it, is a derivative of Francis Galton's wisdom of crowds (aka swarm intelligence or collective intelligence). Keinan argues forcefully that the science of crowd wisdom has played a key role in Jewish survival over the centuries and must be resurrected now, since the alternative is the extinction of the Jews. Born to a secular Jewish family in Florida, Keinan's interest in Judaism was piqued by a Christian minister at Exeter. That interest took him down an unlikely path to becoming a fighter pilot in the Israel Air Force. Through the prism of his own dramatic personal story and the lessons he learned from his professional life, Keinan embarks on an investigation of the core values of Judaism in the twenty-first century, and looks to the relationship between American and Israeli Jews to enrich world Jewry in a post-Diaspora age. God Is in the Crowd presents an innovative plan in which the wisdom of the Jewish crowd is harnessed to endow Judaism with new purpose and ensure its survival.

























ISRAEL'S NON FICTION BEST SELLER NOW IN ENGLISH
THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE ARE OCCUPIED, BUT THE LAND IS NOT?
[book] CATCH-67:
The Left, the Right, and the
Legacy of the Six-Day War
by Micah Goodman
(Shalom Hartman Inst, Jerusalem )
Eylon Levy (Translator)
September 2018
Yale University Press

Since the Six-Day War, Israelis have been entrenched in a national debate over whether to keep the land they conquered or to return some, if not all, of the territories to Palestinians. In a balanced and insightful analysis, Micah Goodman deftly sheds light on the ideas that have shaped Israelis' thinking on both sides of the debate, and among secular and religious Jews about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Contrary to opinions that dominate the discussion, he shows that the paradox of Israeli political discourse is that both sides are right in what they affirm—and wrong in what they deny. Although he concludes that the conflict cannot be solved, Goodman is far from a pessimist and explores how instead it can be reduced in scope and danger through limited, practical steps. Through philosophical critique and political analysis, Goodman builds a creative, compelling case for pragmatism in a dispute where a comprehensive solution seems impossible.


























[book] The Sisters of the Winter Wood
by Rena Rossner
September 2018
Redhook
Captivating and boldly imaginative, with a tale of sisterhood at its heart, Rena Rossner's debut fantasy invites you to enter a world filled with magic, folklore, and the dangers of the woods.

Raised in a remote village surrounded by vast forests on the border of Moldova and Ukraine, sisters Liba and Laya live a peaceful, sheltered life.

But when a troupe of mysterious men arrives, Laya falls under their spell-despite their mother's warning to be wary of strangers. And this is not the only danger lurking in the woods....

As dark forces close in on their small village, Liba and Laya discover a family secret passed down through generations. Faced with a magical heritage they never knew existed, the sisters realize the old fairy tales are true...and could save them all.


























[book] The Person You Mean to Be:
How Good People
Fight Bias
by Dolly Chugh
Laszlo Bock (Foreword)
September 2018
Harper Business
An inspiring guide from Dolly Chugh, an award-winning social psychologist at the New York University Stern School of Business, on how to confront difficult issues including sexism, racism, inequality, and injustice so that you can make the world (and yourself) better.

Many of us believe in equality, diversity, and inclusion. But how do we stand up for those values in our turbulent world? The Person You Mean to Be is the smart, "semi-bold" person’s guide to fighting for what you believe in.

Dolly reveals the surprising causes of inequality, grounded in the "psychology of good people". Using her research findings in unconscious bias as well as work across psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and other disciplines, she offers practical tools to respectfully and effectively talk politics with family, to be a better colleague to people who don’t look like you, and to avoid being a well-intentioned barrier to equality. Being the person we mean to be starts with a look at ourselves.

She argues that the only way to be on the right side of history is to be a good-ish— rather than good—person. Good-ish people are always growing. Second, she helps you find your "ordinary privilege"—the part of your everyday identity you take for granted, such as race for a white person, sexual orientation for a straight person, gender for a man, or education for a college graduate. This part of your identity may bring blind spots, but it is your best tool for influencing change. Third, Dolly introduces the psychological reasons that make it hard for us to see the bias in and around us. She leads you from willful ignorance to willful awareness. Finally, she guides you on how, when, and whom, to engage (and not engage) in your workplaces, homes, and communities. Her science-based approach is a method any of us can put to use in all parts of our life.

Whether you are a long-time activist or new to the fight, you can start from where you are. Through the compelling stories Dolly shares and the surprising science she reports, Dolly guides each of us closer to being the person we mean to be.

























[book] Button Man
a novel
by Andrew Gross
September 2018
Minotaur Books
Following up The One Man and The Saboteur, Gross's next historical thriller brings to life the drama of the birth of organized crime in 1930s New York City from the tale of one family.

After a string of New York Times bestselling suburban thrillers, Andrew Gross has reinvented himself as a writer of historical thrillers. In his latest novel, Button Man, he delivers a stirring story of a Jewish family brought together in the dawn of the women's garment business and torn apart by the birth of organized crime in New York City in the 1930s.

Morris, Sol, and Harry Rabishevsky grew up poor and rough in a tiny flat on the Lower East Side, until the death of their father thrust them into having to fend for themselves and support their large family. Morris, the youngest, dropped out of school at twelve years old and apprenticed himself to a garment cutter in a clothing factory; Sol headed to accounting school; but Harry, scarred by a family tragedy, fell in with a gang of thugs as a teenager. Morris steadily climbs through the ranks at the factory until at twenty-one he finally goes out on his own, convincing Sol to come work with him. But Harry can't be lured away from the glamour, the power, and the money that come from his association with Louis Buchalter, whom Morris has battled with since his youth and who has risen to become the most ruthless mobster in New York. And when Buchalter sets his sights on the unions that staff the garment makers' factories, a fatal showdown is inevitable, pitting brother against brother.

This new novel is equal parts historical thriller, rich with the detail of a vibrant New York City in the 1920s and 1930s, and family saga, based on Andrew Gross's own family story and on the history of the era, complete with appearances by real-life characters like mobsters Louis Lepke and Dutch Schultz and special prosecutor Thomas Dewey, and cements Gross's reputation as today's most atmospheric and original historical thriller writer.

























[book] THE PARTING GIFT
a novel
By Evan Fallenberg
(Bar Ilan University)
September 2018
Other Press
“An unabashed tale that does not pull punches and looks at love’s underside…This breathless story should only be read in one sitting. It hits hard and never lets up. Terse, brusque, etched on one’s inner thigh with an old serrated knife.” —André Aciman, author of Call Me by Your Name

This erotic tale of jealousy, obsession, and revenge is suffused with the rich flavors and intoxicating scents of Israel’s Mediterranean coast.

An unnamed narrator writes a letter to an old college friend, Adam, with whom he has been staying since his abrupt return to the States from Israel. Now that the narrator is moving on to a new location, he finally reveals the events that led him to Adam’s door, set in motion by a chance encounter with Uzi, a spice merchant whose wares had developed a cult following.

From his first meeting with Uzi, the narrator is overwhelmed by an animal attraction that will lead him to derail his life, withdraw from friends and extend his stay in a small town north of Tel Aviv. As he becomes increasingly entangled in Uzi’s life—and by extension the lives of Uzi’s ex-wife and children—his passion turns sinister, ultimately threatening all around him.

Written in a circuitous style that keeps you guessing until the end, The Parting Gift is a page-turner and a shrewd exploration of the roles men assume, or are forced to assume, as lovers, as fathers, as Israelis, as Palestinians.

























[book] The Real Lolita:
The Kidnapping of Sally Horner
and the Novel That Scandalized the World
by Sarah Weinman
September 11, 2018
“The Real Lolita is a tour de force of literary detective work. Not only does it shed new light on the terrifying true saga that influenced Nabokov’s masterpiece, it restores the forgotten victim to our consciousness.” —David Grann, author of Killers of the Flower Moon

Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita is one of the most beloved and notorious novels of all time. And yet, very few of its readers know that the subject of the novel was inspired by a real-life case: the 1948 abduction of eleven-year-old Sally Horner.

Weaving together suspenseful crime narrative, cultural and social history, and literary investigation, The Real Lolita tells (Florence) Sally Horner’s full story for the very first time. Drawing upon extensive investigations, legal documents, public records, and interviews with remaining relatives, Sarah Weinman uncovers how much Nabokov knew of the Sally Horner case and the efforts he took to disguise that knowledge during the process of writing and publishing Lolita.

Sally Horner’s story echoes the stories of countless girls and women who never had the chance to speak for themselves. By diving deeper in the publication history of Lolita and restoring Sally to her rightful place in the lore of the novel’s creation, The Real Lolita casts a new light on the dark inspiration for a modern classic.






























[book] Words Are Weapons:
Inside ISIS’s Rhetoric of Terror
by Philippe-Joseph Salazar
Dorna Khazeni (Translator)
September 12, 2018
Yale University Press

The first book to offer a rigorous, sophisticated analysis of ISIS’s rhetoric and why it is so persuasive

ISIS wages war not only on the battlefield but also online and in the media. Through a close examination of the words and images ISIS uses, with particular attention to the “digital caliphate” on the web, Philippe-Joseph Salazar theorizes an aesthetic of ISIS and its self-presentation. As a philosopher and historian of ideas, well versed in both the Western and the Islamic traditions, Salazar posits an interpretation of Islam that places speech—the profession of faith—at the center of devotion and argues that evocation of the simple yet profound utterance of faith is what gives power to the rhetoric that ISIS and others employ. At the same time, Salazar contends that Western discourse has undergone a “rhetorical disarmament.” To win the fight against ISIS and Islamic extremism, Western democracies, their media, politicians, and counterterrorism agencies must consider radically changing their approach to Islamic extremism.



























[book] Ninth Street Women:
Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning,
Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell,
and Helen Frankenthaler:
Five Painters and the Movement
That Changed Modern Art
by Mary Gabriel
September 25, 2018
Little, Brown
The rich, revealing, and thrilling story of five women whose lives and painting propelled a revolution in modern art

Set amid the most turbulent social and political period of modern times, Ninth Street Women is the impassioned, wild, sometimes tragic, always exhilarating chronicle of five women who dared to enter the male-dominated world of twentieth-century abstract painting--not as muses but as artists. From their cold-water lofts, where they worked, drank, fought, and loved, these pioneers burst open the door to the art world for themselves and countless others to come.

Gutsy and indomitable, Lee Krasner was a hell-raising leader among artists long before she became part of the modern art world's first celebrity couple by marrying Jackson Pollock. Elaine de Kooning, whose brilliant mind and peerless charm made her the emotional center of the New York School, used her work and words to build a bridge between the avant-garde and a public that scorned abstract art as a hoax. Grace Hartigan fearlessly abandoned life as a New Jersey housewife and mother to achieve stardom as one of the boldest painters of her generation. Joan Mitchell, whose notoriously tough exterior shielded a vulnerable artist within, escaped a privileged but emotionally damaging Chicago childhood to translate her fierce vision into magnificent canvases. And Helen Frankenthaler, the beautiful daughter of a prominent New York family, chose the difficult path of the creative life. Her gamble paid off: At twenty-three she created a work so original it launched a new school of painting.

These women changed American art and society, tearing up the prevailing social code and replacing it with a doctrine of liberation. In Ninth Street Women, acclaimed author Mary Gabriel tells a remarkable and inspiring story of the power of art and artists in shaping not just postwar America but the future.



























[book] Making History / Making Blintzes:
How Two Red Diaper Babies
Found Each Other and
Discovered America
by Mickey Flacks and
Dick Flacks
Rutgers University Press
September 2018
Making History/Making Blintzes is a chronicle of the political and personal lives of progressive activists Richard (Dick) and Miriam (Mickey) Flacks, two of the founders of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). As active members of the Civil Rights movement and the anti-Vietnam War movement in the 1960s, and leaders in today’s social movements, their stories are a first-hand account of progressive American activism from the 1960s to the present.

Throughout this memoir, the couple demonstrates that their lifelong commitment to making history through social activism cannot be understood without returning to the deeply personal context of their family history—of growing up “Red Diaper babies” in 1950s New York City, using folk music as self-expression as adolescents in the 1960s, and of making blintzes for their own family through the 1970s and 1980s. As the children of immigrants and first generation Jews, Dick and Mickey crafted their own religious identity as secular Jews, created a critical space for American progressive activism through SDS, and ultimately, found themselves raising an “American” family.

























[book] The Astronaut's Son
a novel
by Tom Seigel
Woodhall Press
September 2018
On the eve of the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing comes a novel in which a Jewish astronaut must reassess his moral compass when forced to confront NASA's early collaboration with Nazis and the role it may have played in his father's death.

Jonathan Stein thinks only a bad heart can stop him from reaching the moon. But when he discovers his father may have been murdered to protect an appalling NASA secret, he must decide whether his moral compass still points towards the stars. Days before the Apollo 18 launch in 1974, Jonathan's father, an Israeli astronaut at NASA, died of an apparent heart attack. A year before his own launch, in 2005, Jonathan, a typically devout skeptic, becomes captivated by the tale of a mysterious online conspiracy theorist who claims that his father had been killed. Unable to keep long-buried suspicions from resurfacing, he reopens the case, digging into a past that becomes stranger and more compelling the deeper he goes.

To get to the truth he must confront Dale Lunden, his father's best friend and the last man on the moon, and his elusive childhood hero Neil Armstrong. When his relentless pursuit of the truth leads to disturbing revelations about the Nazis who worked for NASA, the hardest questions to answer are the ones he must ask himself.

The Astronaut's Son was inspired by the true story of Nazi scientists and engineers at NASA.



























[book] Not Our Kind:
A Novel
by Kitty Zeldis
Jarper
September 4, 2018
With echoes of Rules of Civility and The Boston Girl, a compelling and thought-provoking novel set in postwar New York City, about two women—one Jewish, one a WASP—and the wholly unexpected consequences of their meeting.

One rainy morning in June, two years after the end of World War II, a minor traffic accident brings together Eleanor Moskowitz and Patricia Bellamy. Their encounter seems fated: Eleanor, a teacher and recent Vassar graduate, needs a job. Patricia’s difficult thirteen-year-old daughter Margaux, recovering from polio, needs a private tutor.

Though she feels out of place in the Bellamys’ rarefied and elegant Park Avenue milieu, Eleanor forms an instant bond with Margaux. Soon the idealistic young woman is filling the bright young girl’s mind with Shakespeare and Latin. Though her mother, a hat maker with a little shop on Second Avenue, disapproves, Eleanor takes pride in her work, even if she must use the name "Moss" to enter the Bellamys’ restricted doorman building each morning, and feels that Patricia’s husband, Wynn, may have a problem with her being Jewish.

Invited to keep Margaux company at the Bellamys’ country home in a small town in Connecticut, Eleanor meets Patricia’s unreliable, bohemian brother, Tom, recently returned from Europe. The spark between Eleanor and Tom is instant and intense. Flushed with new romance and increasingly attached to her young pupil, Eleanor begins to feel more comfortable with Patricia and much of the world she inhabits. As the summer wears on, the two women’s friendship grows—until one hot summer evening, a line is crossed, and both Eleanor and Patricia will have to make important decisions—choices that will reverberate through their lives.

Gripping and vividly told, Not Our Kind illuminates the lives of two women on the cusp of change—and asks how much our pasts can and should define our futures.

























[book] The Great Delusion:
Liberal Dreams and
International Realities
by John J. Mearsheimer
Yale University Press
September 2018
Mearsheimer is famous in the American Jewish community for co-authoring a book a decade ago accusing the “Israel Lobby” of excessive influence in America, and writing that the “lobby” would attempt to injure him for what he wrote.

Yale Press writes that this is a major theoretical statement on why a policy of liberal hegemony is doomed to fail. He asserts that Washington should adopt a more restrained foreign policy based on an understanding of the power of nationalism. The USA should not try to spread liberal democracy across the world. The author also asserts that the United States has ended up as a highly militarized state fighting wars that undermine peace, harm human rights, and threaten liberal values at home.





























[book] Flame in the Night:
A Novel of World War II France
by Heather Munn
Kregel
September 2018
In occupied France, a teen is torn between hate and love Julien Losier has just turned eighteen. But this is Vichy France in 1942, and his coming of age is marred by the Nazi occupation of his homeland. His father has always taught him that evil is resisted by the power of God, not by the gun. But when the roundups of Jews begin and both his best friend and the girl he's falling for become targets, Julien must question where real power lies. Can he be a man who protects the people he loves if he follows his father's ways of peace?

His hometown is a fragile fortress where hundreds of Jewish youth hide in plain sight, protected only by the goodwill of their neighbors. Julien takes part in the intricate system of sentries and alert codes that keep them safe, doing what he can to resist the Nazis. As the Germans close in, he can see the moment coming when all the town's careful defenses will fail. He's torn between the faith of his father and his increasing surety that fighting violence with violence is the only way to win. How can the meek inherit the earth when the strong hold all the cards?

Now the young Jewish woman who has captured his heart comes under deadly threat, and there are no good choices. But for Elise, there's nothing Julien won't risk.

Based on actual events in Vichy France, Flame in the Night is a powerful examination of the strength of faith and peaceful resistance in the face of overwhelming odds.

































[book] Open to God:
Open to the World
by Pope Francis
and Antonio Spadaro
Bloomsbury
September 2018

Pope Francis here presents his hopes and aspirations for the Church in the future. Over the course of 16 conversations with Father Antonio Spadaro from 2013 to 2017, Pope Francis engages in a valuable dialogue. His impact on the modern world is extraordinary. He has turned the Catholic Church upside-down, flung open the windows of the Vatican and purged the Augean stables of corruption, simony, nepotism and financial skulduggery. But above all he is engaged with the poor, the starving and the marginalized.

Unlike his predecessor, he does not sit down in a room in the Vatican and write learned books. He is in constant dialogue with the outside world and with the universal Catholic Church. He likes being asked questions and finds it easy to respond. In this new book are some of his most valuable engagements in dialogue form with people of all sorts and kinds. Several of the interviews in this volume were originally meant to remain as private conversations. Father Spadaro recorded these free, spontaneous conversations for his own use, but upon listening again, he was struck by “a vision of church and a vision of the world” and worked with Pope Francis to make “rich vision” available to a wider audience.

The Franciscan revolution is under way and in spite of his vehement critics the revolution will roll on and new horizons will be opened for the one and a half billion Catholics in the world today. Including a preface by Pope Francis himself, as well as thoughts on his recent trips to Colombia, Myanmar, Chile, and Peru, Open to God: Open to the World reveals a leader's vision for progress.

































[book] The Battle for Bonhoeffer
by Stephen R. Haynes
Eerdmans
September 2018
The figure of Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) has become a clay puppet in modern American politics. Secular, radical, liberal, and evangelical interpreters variously shape and mold the martyr’s legacy to suit their own pet agendas.

Stephen Haynes offers an incisive and clarifying perspective. A recognized Bonhoeffer expert, Haynes examines “populist” readings of Bonhoeffer, including the acclaimed biography by Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. In his analysis Haynes treats, among other things, the November 2016 election of Donald Trump and the “Bonhoeffer moment” announced by evangelicals in response to the US Supreme Court’s 2015 decision to legalize same-sex marriage.

The Battle for Bonhoeffer includes an open letter from Haynes pointedly addressing Christians who still support Trump. Bonhoeffer’s legacy matters. Haynes redeems the life and the man.




































[book] The Last Palace:
Europe's Turbulent Century in Five
Lives and One Legendary House
by Norman Eisen
Crown
September 2018
A sweeping yet intimate narrative about the last hundred years of turbulent European history, as seen through one of Mitteleuropa’s greatest houses—and the lives of its occupants

When Norman Eisen moved into the US ambassador’s residence in Prague, returning to the land his mother had fled after the Holocaust, he was startled to discover swastikas hidden beneath the furniture in his new home. These symbols of Nazi Germany were remnants of the residence’s forgotten history, and evidence that we never live far from the past.

From that discovery unspooled the twisting, captivating tale of four of the remarkable people who had called this palace home. Their story is Europe’s, and The Last Palace chronicles the upheavals that transformed the continent over the past century. There was the optimistic Jewish financial baron, Otto Petschek, who built the palace after World War I as a statement of his faith in democracy, only to have that faith shattered; Rudolf Toussaint, the cultured, compromised German general who occupied the palace during World War II, ultimately putting his life at risk to save the house and Prague itself from destruction; Laurence Steinhardt, the first postwar US ambassador whose quixotic struggle to keep the palace out of Communist hands was paired with his pitched efforts to rescue the country from Soviet domination; and Shirley Temple Black, an eyewitness to the crushing of the 1968 Prague Spring by Soviet tanks, who determined to return to Prague and help end totalitarianism—and did just that as US ambassador in 1989.

Weaving in the life of Eisen’s own mother to demonstrate how those without power and privilege moved through history, The Last Palace tells the dramatic and surprisingly cyclical tale of the triumph of liberal democracy.

























[book] AI Superpowers:
China, Silicon Valley, and
the New World Order
by Kai-Fu Lee
HMH
September 25, 2018
Here are two well-known facts:
Artificial Intelligence is reshaping the world as we know it.
The United States has long been, and remains, the global leader in AI.

That first fact is correct. But in his provocative new book, Dr. Kai-Fu Lee—one of the world’s most respected experts on AI—reveals that China has suddenly caught up to the US at an astonishingly rapid pace. As the US-Sino competition begins to heat up, Lee envisions China and the US forming a powerful duopoly in AI, but one that is based on each nation’s unique and traditional cultural inclinations.

Building upon his longstanding US-Sino technology career (working at Apple, Microsoft and Google) and his much-heralded New York Times Op-Ed from June 2017, Dr. Lee predicts that Chinese and American AI will have a stunning impact on not just traditional blue-collar industries but will also have a devastating effect on white-collar professions. Is the concept of universal basic income the solution? In Dr. Lee’s opinion, probably not.

In AI Superpowers, he outlines how millions of suddenly displaced workers must find new ways to make their lives meaningful, and how government policies will have to deal with the unprecedented inequality between the "haves" and the "have-nots." Even worse, Lee says the transformation to AI is already happening all around us, whether we are aware of it or not.

Dr. Lee—a native of China but educated in America —argues powerfully that these unprecedented developments will happen much sooner than we think. He cautions us about the truly dramatic upheaval that AI will unleash and how we need to start thinking now on how to address these profound changes that are coming to our world.

























[book] The Challenge Culture:
Why the Most Successful
Organizations Run on Pushback
by Nigel Travis
CEO, Dunkin' Brands; Chairman
PublicAffairs
September 2018

What is on the cover? A donut? A Baskin Robbins ice cream cone? No. A coffee.

William Rosenberg started Dunkin Donuts franchise system in 1950.

Now, the charismatic CEO of Dunkin' Brands (Dunkin' Donuts, Baskin-Robbins) shows how positive pushback--the discipline of "questioning everything without trashing anyone"--provides a unique results-oriented way to lead an organization to prosperity.

We live in a world where the move from success to failure can happen in a flash. Customers, competition, changing societal mores, and technology can bring on existential crisis. But as Dunkin' Brands Chairman and CEO Nigel Travis shows in The Challenge Culture, businesses can cope with change and go on to thrive by instituting a culture that supports positive pushback: questioning everything without trashing anything or anyone.

The ability to get colleagues to break out of conformity--especially when it means upending a culture of fear and authoritarianism--is a rare skill, one Nigel (everyone calls him Nigel) has been developing for decades. In a distinct, authentic, and authoritative voice, Nigel draws from a wide range of personal experiences--including the way Blockbuster dawdled in the face of the Netflix challenge, his early days at Dunkin' Donuts, and his recent foray into owning a UK soccer team--to show how a challenge culture is necessary to provide a human-oriented, results-driven blueprint for building a prosperous future.

To keep up with the times and grow, people need to be allowed to speak up and question the status quo, talk in a civil way about difficult issues, debate across disciplines, disagree about strategies and tactics in order to successfully move forward together.

























[book] To Obama:
With Love, Joy,
Anger, and Hope
by Jeanne Marie Laskas
(Univ of Pbg)
Random House
September 2018
Every day, President Obama received ten thousand letters from constituents. Every night, he read ten of them before going to bed. This is the story of the profound ways in which they shaped his presidency.

Every evening for eight years, at his request, President Obama received ten handpicked letters written by ordinary American citizens—the unfiltered voice of a nation—from his Office of Presidential Correspondence. He was the first president to interact daily with constituent mail and to archive it in its entirety. The letters affected not only the president and his policies but also the deeply committed people who were tasked with opening and reading the millions of pleas, rants, thank-yous, and apologies that landed in the White House mailroom.

In To Obama, Jeanne Marie Laskas interviews President Obama, the letter writers themselves, and the White House staff who sifted through the powerful, moving, and incredibly intimate narrative of America during the Obama years: There is Kelli, who saw her grandfathers finally marry—legally—after thirty-five years together; Bill, a lifelong Republican whose attitude toward immigration reform was transformed when he met a boy escaping MS-13 gang leaders in El Salvador; Heba, a Syrian refugee who wants to forget the day the tanks rolled into her village; Marjorie, who grappled with disturbing feelings of racial bias lurking within her during the George Zimmerman trial; and Vicki, whose family was torn apart by those who voted for Trump and those who did not.

They wrote to Obama out of gratitude and desperation, in their darkest times of need, in search of connection. They wrote with anger, fear, and respect. And together, this chorus of voices achieves a kind of beautiful harmony. To Obama is an intimate look at one man’s relationship to the American people, and at a time when empathy intersected with politics in the White House.

























[book] RIVER
by Esther Kinsky
Translated by Iain Galbraith
Transit Books
September 4, 2018
A woman moves to a London suburb near the River Lea, without knowing quite why or for how long. Over a series of long, solitary walks she reminisces about the rivers she has encountered during her life, from the Rhine, her childhood river, to the Saint Lawrence, and a stream in Tel Aviv. Filled with poignancy and poetic observation, River cements Esther Kinsky as a leading European prose stylist.































[book] NOT BAD FOR DELANCEY STREET
The Rise of Billy Rose
America's Great Jewish Impresario
(Brandeis Series in American
Jewish History, Culture, and Life)
by Mark Cohen
Brandeis University Press
September 4, 2018
He was amazing. “A little man with a Napoleonic penchant for the colossal and magnificent, Billy Rose is the country’s No. 1 purveyor of mass entertainment,” Life magazine announced in 1936. The Times reported that with 1,400 people on his payroll, Rose ran a larger organization than any other producer in America. “He's clever, clever, clever,” said Rose's first wife, the legendary Fanny Brice. “He's a smart little goose.” Not Bad for Delancey Street: The Rise of Billy Rose is the first biography in fifty years of the producer, World’s Fair impresario, songwriter, nightclub and theater owner, syndicated columnist, art collector, tough guy, and philanthropist, and the first to tell the whole story of Rose’s life. He combined a love for his thrilling and lucrative American moment with sometimes grandiose plans to aid his fellow Jews. He was an exaggerated exemplar of the American Jewish experience that predominated after World War II: secular, intermarried, bent on financial success, in love with Israel, and wedded to America.

The life of Billy Rose was set against the great events of the twentieth century, including the Depression, when Rose became rich entertaining millions; the Nazi war on the Jews, which Rose combated through theatrical pageants that urged the American government to act; the postwar American boom, which Rose harnessed to attain extraordinary wealth; and the birth of Israel, where Rose staked his claim to immortality. Mark Cohen tells the unlikely but true story, based on exhaustive research, of Rose’s single-handed rescue in 1939 of an Austrian Jewish refugee stranded in Fascist Italy, an event about which Rose never spoke but which surfaced fifty years later as the nucleus of Saul Bellow’s short novel The Bellarosa Connection.































[book] The Autobiography of Solomon Maimon:
The Complete Translation
by Solomon Maimon
but Edited and Translated by
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Abraham Socher,
and Paul Reitter
Foreword by Gideon Freudenthal
September 2018
Princeton University Press
The first complete and annotated English translation of Maimon’s influential and delightfully entertaining memoir

Solomon Maimon's autobiography has delighted readers for more than two hundred years, from Goethe, Schiller, and George Eliot to Walter Benjamin and Hannah Arendt. The American poet and critic Adam Kirsch has named it one of the most crucial Jewish books of modern times. Here is the first complete and annotated English edition of this enduring and lively work.

Born into a down-on-its-luck provincial Jewish family in 1753, Maimon quickly distinguished himself as a prodigy in learning. Even as a young child, he chafed at the constraints of his Talmudic education and rabbinical training. He recounts how he sought stimulation in the Hasidic community and among students of the Kabbalah--and offers rare and often wickedly funny accounts of both. After a series of picaresque misadventures, Maimon reached Berlin, where he became part of the city's famed Jewish Enlightenment and achieved the philosophical education he so desperately wanted, winning acclaim for being the "sharpest" of Kant's critics, as Kant himself described him.

This new edition restores text cut from the abridged 1888 translation by J. Clark Murray, which has long been the only available English edition. Paul Reitter's translation is brilliantly sensitive to the subtleties of Maimon's prose while providing a fluid rendering that contemporary readers will enjoy, and is accompanied by an introduction and notes by Yitzhak Melamed and Abraham Socher that give invaluable insights into Maimon and his extraordinary life. The book also features an afterword by Gideon Freudenthal that provides an authoritative overview of Maimon's contribution to modern philosophy.































[book] UNDER MY WINDOW
by Ms. Michal Safdie
(with an Intro by Ari Shavit)
September 2018
powerHOUSE Books
Jews, Muslims, Christians, believers, nonbelievers, residents, tourists, and so many others have flocked for millenia to the cultural richness that has always been Jerusalem. It is one of the world's greatest crossroads showcasing the variety that is humanity. From her stunning viewpoint Michal Safdie invites you to see what she sees every day.

Perched up on a hill in the old city of Jerusalem, along the fragile border between the Jewish and Muslim Quarters, is the home of Michal Ronnen Safdie. Facing east, it overlooks the Western Wall precinct, the Dome of the Rock, and the Al-Aqsa mosque. To the north unfolds the Muslim Quarter with Mount Scopus in the skyline; to the west, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the Christian Quarter.

Directly under her window, is a narrow alley, through which thousands of people pass every day. The alley is a crossroads. It is the path of Jews residing in the Jewish Quarter and in the western part of the city, to the Western Wall. It is a passage for those entering the old city through Dung Gate on the south side, mostly Palestinians making their way to their workplaces, schools, markets, and holy mosques in the Old City. It is the route of Christians to the Holy Sepulcher.

The view from the window offers two contrasting perspectives.

Across toward the Western Wall precinct: vast ceremonial spaces, and the silhouette of the Old City quarters. Directly below, in the alley and terraces: a great variety of people seeking the sacred as well as the morning and evening cycles of life's routines.

The photographs capture private and personal moments, as well as ritual events side-by-side with seeming normality, hinting at the social and political forces that shape life in Jerusalem.





























[book] Cultural Journeys into
the Arab World:
A Literary Anthology
Dalya Cohen-Mor, PhD
September 2018
SUNY PRESS
A diverse collection of fiction and nonfiction literature from across the Arabic-speaking world.
Cultural Journeys into the Arab World provides a fascinating window into Arab culture and society through the voices of its own writers and poets. Organized thematically, the anthology features more than fifty texts, including poems, essays, stories, novels, memoirs, eyewitness accounts, and life histories, by leading male and female authors from across the Arabic-speaking world. Each theme is explored in several genres, both fiction and nonfiction, and framed by a wealth of contextual information that places the literary texts within the historical, political, cultural, and social background of the region. Spanning a century of Arab creative writing—from the “dean of Arabic letters” Taha Hussein to the Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz and the celebrated poet Adonis—the anthology offers unforgettable journeys into the rich and dynamic realm of Arab culture. Representing a wide range of settings, viewpoints, and socioeconomic backgrounds, the characters speak of their conditions, aspirations, struggles, and achievements living in complex societies marked by tensions arising from the persistence of older traditions and the impact of modernity. Their myriad voices paint a vivid and intimate portrait of contemporary Arab life in the Middle East, revealing the common humanity of a region of vital significance in world affairs.

Includes works by Ahmad Amin (Egypt); Layla al-Uthman (Kuwait); Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt); Taha Hussein (Egypt); Nayra Atiya (Egypt); Alifa Rifaat (Egypt); Abd al-Aziz al-Maqalih (Yemen); Hijab Yahya Musa al-Hazimi (Saudi Arabia); Hassan Daoud (Lebanon); Zakaria Tamer (Syria); Ramziya Abbas al-Iryani (Yemen); Mu’nis al-Razzaz (Jordan); Hamza Bogary (Saudi Arabia); and many more

























[book] UNDER MY WINDOW
by Ms. Michal Safdie
(with an Intro by Ari Shavit)
July 2018
powerHOUSE Books
Jews, Muslims, Christians, believers, nonbelievers, residents, tourists, and so many others have flocked for millenia to the cultural richness that has always been Jerusalem. It is one of the world's greatest crossroads showcasing the variety that is humanity. From her stunning viewpoint Michal Safdie invites you to see what she sees every day.

Perched up on a hill in the old city of Jerusalem, along the fragile border between the Jewish and Muslim Quarters, is the home of Michal Ronnen Safdie. Facing east, it overlooks the Western Wall precinct, the Dome of the Rock, and the Al-Aqsa mosque. To the north unfolds the Muslim Quarter with Mount Scopus in the skyline; to the west, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the Christian Quarter.

Directly under her window, is a narrow alley, through which thousands of people pass every day. The alley is a crossroads. It is the path of Jews residing in the Jewish Quarter and in the western part of the city, to the Western Wall. It is a passage for those entering the old city through Dung Gate on the south side, mostly Palestinians making their way to their workplaces, schools, markets, and holy mosques in the Old City. It is the route of Christians to the Holy Sepulcher.

The view from the window offers two contrasting perspectives.

Across toward the Western Wall precinct: vast ceremonial spaces, and the silhouette of the Old City quarters. Directly below, in the alley and terraces: a great variety of people seeking the sacred as well as the morning and evening cycles of life's routines.

The photographs capture private and personal moments, as well as ritual events side-by-side with seeming normality, hinting at the social and political forces that shape life in Jerusalem.





























[book] The Coddling of the American Mind:
How Good Intentions and Bad
Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure
by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt
September 2018
Penguin Random House
Something has been going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and are afraid to speak honestly. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising—on campus as well as nationally. How did this happen?

First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: What doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths contradict basic psychological principles about well-being and ancient wisdom from many cultures. Embracing these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—interferes with young people’s social, emotional, and intellectual development. It makes it harder for them to become autonomous adults who are able to navigate the bumpy road of life.

Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to promote the spread of these untruths. They explore changes in childhood such as the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised, child-directed play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. They examine changes on campus, including the corporatization of universities and the emergence of new ideas about identity and justice. They situate the conflicts on campus within the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization and dysfunction.

This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.

























[book] HALAKHAH
The Rabbinic Idea of Law
(Library of Jewish Ideas)
by Chaim N. Saiman
September 2018
Princeton University Press
How the rabbis of the Talmud transformed everything into a legal question-and Jewish law into a way of thinking and talking about everything

Though typically translated as “Jewish law,” the term halakhah is not an easy match for what is usually thought of as law. This is because the rabbinic legal system has rarely wielded the political power to enforce its many detailed rules, nor has it ever been the law of any state. Even more idiosyncratically, the talmudic rabbis claim that the study of halakhah is a holy endeavor that brings a person closer to God-a claim no country makes of its law.

In this panoramic book, Chaim Saiman traces how generations of rabbis have used concepts forged in talmudic disputation to do the work that other societies assign not only to philosophy, political theory, theology, and ethics but also to art, drama, and literature. In the multifaceted world of halakhah where everything is law, law is also everything, and even laws that serve no practical purpose can, when properly studied, provide surprising insights into timeless questions about the very nature of human existence.

What does it mean for legal analysis to connect humans to God? Can spiritual teachings remain meaningful and at the same time rigidly codified? Can a modern state be governed by such law? Guiding readers across two millennia of richly illuminating perspectives, this book shows how halakhah is not just “law” but an entire way of thinking, being, and knowing.

























[book] In the Land of Happy Tears:
Yiddish Tales for Modern Times:
collected and edited
by David Stromberg
September 2018
Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Ages 10 and up

You don't need to be Jewish to love Levy's rye bread, nor do you need to read Yiddish to appreciate these wise tales. This engaging collection offers access to modern works--translated for the first time into English--for anyone who appreciates a well-told story rich with timeless wisdom. A year-round book for families. Includes a comprehensive introduction on Yiddish culture.

These eighteen stories for a changing world, never before translated into English, by writers from Eastern European countries including Russia and Poland, focus on excellent storytelling, strong characters, and creative ideas. The stories express solid principles and open-minded attitudes, and a sense of both familiarity and adventure in the face of difficult times.

As the old Eastern European Yiddish-speaking world began to clash with modernity, Yiddish authors created new stories to capture the imaginations of children growing up in times of social and historical upheaval. These stories have largely been overlooked or forgotten, until now. These hidden treasures from the early- and mid-20th-century rich Yiddish literary tradition each provide a satisfying read, while the entire collection runs the gamut of storytelling modes used to bridge new and old worlds. Authors include some of the most respected Yiddish writers of their time, who were known in their homelands and then in America, such as Moyshe Nadir, Jacob Reisfeder, Sonya Kantor, and many others. The ethos binding the stories focuses on messages that continue to ring true today while reinvigorating the idea of values largely usurped from contemporary society.





























[book] THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ
A NOVEL
BY HEATHER MORRIS
September 2018
Harper trade paperback

The #1 International Bestseller

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov—an unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity.

“The Tattooist of Auschwitz is an extraordinary document, a story about the extremes of human behavior existing side by side: calculated brutality alongside impulsive and selfless acts of love. I find it hard to imagine anyone who would not be drawn in, confronted and moved. I would recommend it unreservedly to anyone, whether they’d read a hundred Holocaust stories or none.”—Graeme Simsion, internationally-bestselling author of The Rosie Project

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism—but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov's experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.




SEE ALSO:
[book] THE LIBRARIAN OF AUSCHWITZ
A NOVEL
BY ANTONIIO ITURBE
































[book] Twisting Fate:
My Journey with BRCA-from
Breast Cancer Doctor to Patient and Back
by Pamela Munster M.D.
September 2018
The Experiment

A practical yet personal guide to the medical and emotional facets of breast cancer, from a woman who’s made her living researching the disease—and lived through it herself

A leading oncologist at the University of California San Francisco, Dr. Pamela Munster has advised thousands of women on how to deal with the life-altering diagnosis of breast cancer. But when she got a call saying that her own mammogram showed “irregularities,” she found herself experiencing a whole new side of the disease she thought she was an expert in.

Weaving together her personal story with her team’s groundbreaking research on the BRCA gene—responsible for not only breast cancer but also for many other inherited cancers affecting both women and men—Twisting Fate is an inspiring guide to living with BRCA mutations. With authority, insight, and compassion, Dr. Munster uses her voice to create a safe space for genuine healing and honesty in a world otherwise dominated by fear.






























OCTOBER 2018 BOOKS




[book] Israeli Soul:
Easy, Essential, Delicious
by Chef Michael Solomonov and
Steven Cook
October 16, 2018
Rux Martin/HMH
For their first major book since the trailblazing ZAHAV, Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook go straight to the food of the people—the great dishes that are the soul of Israeli cuisine. Usually served from tiny eateries, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or market stalls, these specialties have passed from father to son or mother to daughter for generations. To find the best versions, the authors scoured bustling cities like Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and Haifa, and sleepy towns on mountaintops. They visited bakeries, juice carts, beaches, even weddings. And even the Druze eatery on the Northern border where there are no menus.

While his first book focused on a restaurant, this one focuses on Israel and its people and food.

Their finds include meals in the hand like falafel and pita; juicy, grilled and roasted spice-rubbed meats; stuffed vegetables; a wealth of chopped vegetable salads; a five-minute fluffy hummus from a can of chickpeas with more than two dozen toppings; pastries, ice creams, and shakes. Solomonov has perfected and adapted every recipe for the home kitchen.

Each chapter weaves history with contemporary portrayals of the food. Striking photographs capture all its flavor and vitality, while step-by-step how-tos and closeups of finished dishes make everything simple and accessible.

PW WRITES: In the follow-up to their 2016 James Beard Award–winning Zahav, chef Solomonov and his business partner Cook (together they have a string of restaurants in Philadelphia) mine the melting pot of Israel for the 70-year-old country’s classic meals. Dishes are examined with quasi-Talmudic love...[and] temptingly presented. Whether cracking a joke about hummus (“After almost 1,000 years, people are pretty much okay with where hummus is at. It doesn’t need to be deconstructed”) or offering thorough guidance for crafting pita dough, this duo strikes a heartwarming, enthusiastic tone. Expect this offering to be as successful as Zahav."

Also in PW: Solomonov replies, “If you go from the Second Temple period to right now, there’s a lot of content. There are 100 or so cultures and gastronomies that have made their way back to Israel from medieval Spain, North Africa, all over the world. There’s the Ottoman influence, the Persian influence, the Palestinian influence, Druze and Levant, every major holiday celebrated by every monotheistic religion, the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Galilee—not to mention ancient and modern agriculture and winemaking, the convergence of the Silk Road. These have all combined to make Israeli cuisine a living and breathing thing. The influx of Ehiopian and Georgian immigrants is continuing to change it.... People have started to do some great Israeli cuisine. They’re not embarrassed by the food they grew up with. Rather than going to Europe or the States and coming back and opening fancy restaurants, they’re saying, “My safta [grandmother] used to make this.” And Israel is an island from a trade perspective. Nothing comes from more than 100 miles outside the country. The cucumbers have been grown in the desert 10 miles or 20 miles away. Why not celebrate those things?

See also:
[book]

































[book] Torah of the Mind,
Torah of the Heart:
Divrei Torah of the Talner Rebbe
by Rabbi Yitzhak Twersky
Edited by Rabbi David Shapiro
Foreword by Meyer Twersky
October 2018
Torah of the Heart, Torah of the Mind includes various shiurim from the late Rav Yitzhak (Isadore) Twersky on the weekly Torah portions.
Rabbi Twersky’s teachings represent a rare synthesis of three intellectual approaches within the Torah world: the Chassidic tradition on which he was nurtured from childhood at home; the scholarly/academic approach which he mastered in Harvard University and Hebrew University; and the Lithuanian yeshivah approach which he internalized by studying weekly for decades with his father-in-law, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik.

Rabbi Dr Yitzhak (Isadore) Twersky (1930–1997) zt"l was the Talner Rebbe of Boston. He also held the Littauer Chair in Hebrew Literature and Jewish Philosophy at Harvard University. He was a unique person in that his religious sensitivity, Chassidic roots, Maimonidean philosophical temperament, and personal piety were nourished and augmented by his unusual, wide-ranging, inter-disciplinary Torah erudition and creativity.


























[book] OTTOLENGHI SIMPLE
A COOKBOOK
By YOTAM OTTOLENGHI
With Tara Wigley and
Esme Howarth (Esme, not Hannah)
October 2018
TEN SPEED PRESS

A collection of 130 easy, flavor-forward recipes from beloved chef Yotam Ottolenghi.

In Ottolenghi Simple, powerhouse author and chef Yotam Ottolenghi presents 130 streamlined recipes packed with his signature Middle Eastern–inspired flavors. Each dish can be made in 30 minutes or less, with 10 or fewer ingredients, in a single pot, using pantry staples, or prepared ahead of time for brilliantly, deliciously simple meals. Brunch gets a make-over with Braised Eggs with Leeks and Za’atar; Cauliflower, Pomegranate, and Pistachio Salad refreshes the side-dish rotation; Lamb and Feta Meatballs bring ease to the weeknight table; and every sweet tooth is sure to be satisfied by the spectacular Fig and Thyme Clafoutis. With more than 130 photographs, this is elemental Ottolenghi for everyone.
































[book] Matters of Vital Interest:
A Forty-Year Friendship
with Leonard Cohen
by Eric Lerner
Da Capo Press
October 2018

A memoir of the author's decades-long friendship and spiritual journey with the late singer, songwriter, novelist, and poet Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen passed away in late 2016, leaving behind many who cared for and admired him, but perhaps few knew him better than longtime friend Eric Lerner. Lerner, a screenwriter and novelist, first met Cohen at a Zen retreat forty years ago. Their friendship helped guide one another through life's myriad obstacles, a journey told from a new perspective for the first time.

Funny, revealing, self-aware, and deeply moving, Matters of Vital Interest is an insightful memoir about Lerner's relationship with his friend, whose idiosyncratic style and dignified life was deeply informed by his spiritual practices. Lerner invites readers to step into the room with them and listen in on a lifetime's ongoing dialogue, considerations of matters of vital interest, spiritual, mundane, and profane. In telling their story, Lerner depicts Leonard Cohen as a captivating persona the likes of which we may never see again.
























[book] Prius or Pickup?:
How the Answers to Four Simple
Questions Explain America’s Great Divide
by Marc Hetherington and
Jonathan Weiler
(Univ of North Carolina)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
October 2018
Two award-winning political scientists provide the psychological key to America’s deadlocked politics, showing that we are divided not by ideologies but something deeper: personality differences that appear in everything from politics to parenting to the workplace to TV preferences, and which would be innocuous if only we could decouple them from our noxious political debate.

What’s in your garage: a Prius or a pickup?
What’s in your coffee cup: Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts?
What about your pet: cat or dog?
As award-winning political scholars Marc Hetherington and Jonathan Weiler explain, even our smallest choices speak volumes about us—especially when it comes to our personalities and our politics. Liberals and conservatives seem to occupy different worlds because we have fundamentally different worldviews: systems of values that can be quickly diagnosed with a handful of simple parenting questions, but which shape our lives and decisions in the most elemental ways. If we're to overcome our seemingly intractable differences, Hetherington and Weiler show, we must first learn to master the psychological impulses that give rise to them, and to understand how politicians manipulate our mindsets for their own benefit.

Drawing on groundbreaking original research, Prius or Pickup? is an incisive, illuminating study of the fracturing of the American mind.

























[book] THE FORGOTTEN
How the People of One Pennsylvania County
Elected Donald Trump and
Changed America
by Ben Bradlee. JR
Little, Brown & Company
October 2018

Luzerne County in Northeastern Pennsylvania, in the Wyoming Valley with the Susquehanna River, closed coal mines, a casino, some synagogues, a yeshiva for struggling young men, a kosher pizza shop housed in a defunct church, a decentralized centralized unvisited downtown, and a lot of Trump signs on lawns.

This is an up-close look at the voters of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, who decisively swung the state for Donald J. Trump, and an examination of the role of the President's base as the midterm elections loom.

Luzerne County Pennsylvania, as Ben Bradlee describes it, is a microcosm of the nation. While it boasts its own police, firemen, schools and municipal services, Luzerne has few urban centers and is fundamentally rural in character. And like so many of the 3,000 other counties that resemble it across America, Donald J. Trump won Luzerne County in 2016.
But President Obama had carried Luzerne in both elections.
What changed? And what does this mean for America?

The Forgotten tells this story, revealing how Trump voters came to feel like strangers in their own land, marginalized by flat or falling wages, rapid demographic change, and a liberal culture that mocks their faith and patriotism. As they explain it, residents of Luzerne felt like others were 'cutting in line' and that the federal government was taking too much money from the employed and giving it to the idle. They felt a loss of breadwinner status, and more importantly, a loss of dignity.

Drawing an unforgettable portrait of Americans caught in a fraught political moment that doesn't seem to end, The Forgotten not only expresses the growing divide between the two political parties, but also the immense forces that powered the election of Donald Trump. America is changing, and the men and women of The Forgotten are the ones who are changing it.
























[book] ANNE FRANK'S DIARY
THE GRAPHIC ADAPTATION
By Ari Folman and David Polonsky
and Anne Frank
October 2018
Pantheon
A timeless story rediscovered by each new generation, The Diary of a Young Girl stands without peer. For both young readers and adults it continues to capture the remarkable spirit of Anne Frank, who for a time survived the worst horror the modern world has seen—and who remained triumphantly and heartbreakingly human throughout her ordeal.

Adapted by Ari Folman, illustrated by David Polonsky, and authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation in Basel, this is the first graphic edition of The Diary and includes extensive quotation directly from the definitive edition. It remains faithful to the original, while the stunning illustrations interpret and add layers of visual meaning and immediacy to this classic work of Holocaust literature.

































[book] Superman isn't Jewish
by Jimmy Bemon
Emilie Boudet (Artist)
October 2018
Humanoids

Benjamin would always proudly say, "I'm Jewish. Like Superman!" Assuming that Judaism is some kind of super power and Hebrew is akin to the Kryptonian language, Benjamin believes each of his family members is a superhero.

Until, like Krypton, his world is shattered. After learning of the link between being circumcised and his religion, Ben decides to hide his heritage from everyone. Caught between the desire to avoid disappointing his Jewish father and his desire to understand his Catholic mother, Ben has to find a way to abandon his secret identity for a very public one.

Humorous, timeless and universal, this personal and poignant story of acceptance and understanding shows how we all must learn to love the hero within ourselves.
































[book] Hitler's American Friends:
The Third Reich's Supporters
in the United States
by Bradley W. Hart
October 2, 2018

A book examining the strange terrain of Nazi sympathizers, nonintervention campaigners and other voices in America who advocated on behalf of Nazi Germany in the years before World War II.

Americans who remember World War II reminisce about how it brought the country together. The less popular truth behind this warm nostalgia: until the attack on Pearl Harbor, America was deeply, dangerously divided.

Bradley W. Hart's Hitler's American Friends exposes the homegrown antagonists who sought to protect and promote Hitler, leave Europeans (and especially European Jews) to fend for themselves, and elevate the Nazi regime.

Some of these friends were Americans of German heritage who joined the Bund, whose leadership dreamed of installing a stateside Führer. Some were as bizarre and hair-raising as the Silver Shirt Legion, run by an eccentric who claimed that Hitler fulfilled a religious prophesy. Some were Midwestern Catholics like Father Charles Coughlin, an early right-wing radio star who broadcast anti-Semitic tirades. They were even members of Congress who used their franking privilege-sending mail at cost to American taxpayers-to distribute German propaganda. And celebrity pilot Charles Lindbergh ended up speaking for them all at the America First Committee.

We try to tell ourselves it couldn't happen here, but Americans are not immune to the lure of fascism. Hitler's American Friends is a powerful look at how the forces of evil manipulate ordinary people, how we stepped back from the ledge, and the disturbing ease with which we could return to it.


























[book] Appealing for Liberty:
Freedom Suits in
the South
by Loren Schweninger
October 2018
Oxford University Press
Dred Scott and his landmark Supreme Court case are ingrained in the national memory, but he was just one of multitudes who appealed for their freedom in courtrooms across the country. Appealing for Liberty is the most comprehensive study to give voice to these African Americans, drawing from more than 2,000 suits and from the testimony of more than 4,000 plaintiffs from the Revolutionary era to the Civil War. Through the petitions, evidence, and testimony introduced in these court proceedings, the lives of the enslaved come sharply and poignantly into focus, as do many other aspects of southern society such as the efforts to preserve and re-unite black families. This book depicts in graphic terms, the pain, suffering, fears, and trepidations of the plaintiffs while discussing the legal systemlawyers, judges, juries, and testimonythat made judgments on their "causes," as the suits were often called.

Arguments for freedom were diverse: slaves brought suits claiming they had been freed in wills and deeds, were born of free mothers, were descendants of free white women or Indian women; they charged that they were illegally imported to some states or were residents of the free states and territories. Those who testified on their behalf, usually against leaders of their communities, were generally white. So too were the lawyers who took these cases, many of them men of prominence, such as Francis Scott Key. More often than not, these men were slave owners themselves-- complicating our understanding of race relations in the antebellum period.

A majority of the cases examined here were not appealed, nor did they create important judicial precedent. Indeed, most of the cases ended at the county, circuit, or district court level of various southern states. Yet the narratives of both those who gained their freedom and those who failed to do so, and the issues their suits raised, shed a bold and timely light on the history of race and liberty in the "land of the free."

























[book] When Christians Were Jews:
The First Generation
by Paula Fredriksen
October 23, 2018
Yale University Press
How did a group of charismatic, apocalyptic Jewish missionaries, working to prepare their world for the impending realization of God's promises to Israel, end up inaugurating a movement that would grow into the gentile church? Committed to Jesus’s prophecy—“The Kingdom of God is at hand!”—they were, in their own eyes, history's last generation. But in history's eyes, they became the first Christians.

In this electrifying social and intellectual history, Paula Fredriksen answers this question by reconstructing the life of the earliest Jerusalem community. As her account arcs from this group’s hopeful celebration of Passover with Jesus, through their bitter controversies that fragmented the movement’s midcentury missions, to the city’s fiery end in the Roman destruction of Jerusalem, she brings this vibrant apostolic community to life. Fredriksen offers a vivid portrait both of this temple-centered messianic movement and of the bedrock convictions that animated and sustained it.


























[book] Seltzertopia:
The Extraordinary Story
of an Ordinary Drink
by Barry Joseph
October 2018
Behrman House

What makes a person develop a loyalty and passion so intense, so unexpected, that it can turn their lives upside down?

Seltzertopia is the story of the modern pioneers of seltzer, loyal to and passionate about the crisply carbonated, who wrangle centuries-old machines to fill siphons with sparkling water, keeping alive a craft that is centuries old.

Using their stories to consider the social, cultural, and economic impacts of seltzer, Seltzertopia tackles the question: What is it about this simplest of concoctions that has allowed it to make a difference to so many people, in such different ways?

Based on more than fourteen years of original research and interviews, the extraordinary story of this ordinary drink can finally be told.

In Part One, "The World According to Seltzer," readers will learn the untold history of seltzer and about the people across America who have found themselves building a path to Seltzertopia. They will discover where seltzer comes from, the science of seltzer, and how people can become SO passionate about something SO ordinary. More specifically, readers will meet John Seekings, a public relations executive in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and join him on his unexpected journey into the modern world of old-fashioned seltzer bottling.

In Part Two, "Give Me Seltzer (and the People Who Crave It),” readers will learn how, during the blizzard of 2010, John Seekings saw for the first time how much seltzer meant to his new customers. They will discover how that meaning can change over time and place, and how it is most often associated with one of four categories: health, refreshment, identity, and comedy. And it will begin with a visit not too far into the past, to a time when seltzer found itself pitted in a battle against another popular drink: Coca-Cola.

In Part Three, “Seltzertopia,” readers will enter the effervescent age. Widely available in plastic bottles, in supermarkets and corner stores, in a wide range of flavors, readers will discover seltzer’s global appeal, then revisit John Seekings, now a seltzer master in an emerging generation of new seltzer professionals.

Get your own copy of Seltzertopia and feel the fizz!
























[book] The Burn (Cook) Book:
An Unofficial, Unauthorized
Mean Girls Guide
by Jonathan Bennett,
Nikki Martin, and Fwd by Lacey Chabert
October 2, 2018
Grand Central L&S
The ultimate, unofficial and unauthorized Mean Girls cookbook. Gretchen's Wieners. Fetch-uccine Alfredo. You Go Glenn (Hot) Cocoa. Ms. Norberry Pie. Just Stab Caesar Salad. Are Buttermilk Pancakes a Carb? Face Smells Like a Foot Peppermint Bark.

With these recipes and more, you too can eat like Regina George and The Plastics. Part hilarious cookbook with real recipes, part ultimate insider guide, THE BURN (COOK)BOOK is the first fanbook to celebrate the film that is required viewing for mean girls everywhere.

Cook your way through recipes for all the important food groups (um carbs, duh), and then feast on the behind-the-scenes stories and trivia from the making of the film, as only Jonathan Bennett--yes Aaron Samuels himself--can tell them. (Does he even go here?) Perfect for happy hour (4:00-6:00 PM), Wednesdays, or when sweatpants are the only thing that fit, THE BURN (COOK)BOOK is the must-own book for the legions of Mean Girls fans still making "fetch" happen today.



















[book] How to Tell Fate from Destiny:
And Other Skillful Word Distinctions
by Charles Harrington Elster
October 23, 2018
HMH
If you have trouble distinguishing the verbs imitate and emulate, the relative pronouns that and which, or the adjectives pliant, pliable, and supple, never fear—How to Tell Fate from Destiny is here to help! With more than 500 headwords, the book is replete with advice on how to differentiate commonly confused words and steer clear of verbal trouble.

Whether you’re a boomer, a Gen-Xer, or a millennial, if you peruse, browse, or even skim these spindrift pages you will (not shall) become versed in the fine art of differentiation. You will learn, for example,

how to tell whether you suffer from pride, vanity, or hubris
how to tell whether you’re contagious or infectious
how to tell if you’re pitiful or pitiable
how to tell if you’re self-centered or self-absorbed
how to live an ethical life in a moral universe






















[book] Professor at Large:
The Cornell Years
by John Cleese
October 2018
Cornell University Press
And now for something completely different. Professor at Large features beloved English comedian and actor John Cleese in the role of ivy league professor at Cornell University. His almost twenty years as professor-at-large has led to many talks, essays, and lectures on campus. This collection of the very best moments from Cleese under his mortarboard provides a unique view of his endless pursuit of intellectual discovery across a range of topics. Since 1999, Cleese has provided Cornell students and local citizens with his ideas on everything from scriptwriting to psychology, religion to hotel management, and wine to medicine.

His incredibly popular events and classes-including talks, workshops, and an analysis of A Fish Called Wanda and The Life of Brian-draw hundreds of people. He has given a sermon at Sage Chapel, narrated Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf with the Cornell Chamber Orchestra, conducted a class on script writing, and lectured on psychology and human development. Each time Cleese has visited the campus in Ithaca, NY, he held a public presentation, attended and or lectured in classes, and met privately with researchers. From the archives of these visits, Professor at Large includes an interview with screenwriter William Goldman, a lecture about creativity entitled, "Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind," talks about Professor at Large and The Life of Brian, a discussion of facial recognition, and Cleese’s musings on group dynamics with business students and faculty.

Professor at Large provides a window into the workings of John Cleese’s scholarly mind, showcasing the wit and intelligence that have driven his career as a comedian, while demonstrating his knack of pinpointing the essence of humans and human problems. His genius on the screen has long been lauded; now his academic chops get their moment in the spotlight, too.

























[book] FAME
THE HIJACKING OF REALITY
by Justine Bateman
October 2018
AkASHIC
"Justine Bateman was famous before selfies replaced autographs, and bags of fan mail gave way to Twitter shitstorms. And here's the good news: she took notes along the way. Justine steps through the looking glass of her own celebrity, shatters it, and pieces together, beyond the shards and splinters, a reflection of her true self. The transformation is breathtaking. Revelatory and raucous, fascinating and frightening, Fame is a hell of a ride." --Michael J. Fox, actor, author of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future



Entertainment shows, magazines, websites, and other channels continuously report the latest sightings, heartbreaks, and triumphs of the famous to a seemingly insatiable public. Millions of people go to enormous lengths to achieve Fame. Fame is woven into our lives in ways that may have been unimaginable in years past.

And yet, is Fame even real? Contrary to tangible realities, Fame is one of those "realities" that we, as a society, have made. Why? What is it about Fame that drives us to spend so much time, money, and focus to create the framework that maintains its health?

Mining decades of experience, writer, director, producer, and actress Justine Bateman writes a visceral, intimate look at the experience of Fame. Combining the internal reality-shift of the famous, theories on the public's behavior at each stage of a famous person's career, and the experiences of other famous performers, Bateman takes the reader inside and outside the emotions of Fame. The book includes twenty-four color photographs to highlight her analysis.
























[book] Minding the Store:
A Big Story about
a Small Business
by Julie Gaines and
Ben Lenovitz (Illustrator)
October 2018
Algonquin
In this charming graphic memoir, the founder of the iconic housewares shop Fishs Eddy recounts the ups and downs—and ups again—of starting a family business, starting a family, and staying true to one’s path while trying to make it in the Big City.

Whether it’s a set of vintage plates from a 1920s steamship, a mug with a New Yorker cartoon on it, a tin of sprinkles designed by Amy Sedaris, or a juice glass from a Jazz Age hotel, Fishs Eddy products are distinctly recognizable. A New York institution, Fishs Eddy also remains a family business whose owners endured the same challenges as many family businesses—and lived to write about it in this tale filled with humorous characterizations of opinionated relatives, nosy neighbors, quirky employees, and above all the eccentric foibles of the founders themselves. Readers come to know author Julie Gaines and her husband, with whom she founded the store, and because this is a family business, the illustrations are all in the family, too: their son Ben Lenovitz’s drawings bring Fishs Eddy to life with a witty style a la Roz Chast and Ben Katchor.

Over the years the store has collaborated with artists and celebrities such as Charley Harper and Todd Oldham, Alan Cumming, and many others to produce original designs that are now found in thousands of stores throughout the country, and Fishs Eddy has garnered a huge amount of media coverage. A great gift for anyone who has ever dreamed of opening a little business—or anyone with any kind of dream—Minding the Store offers wisdom, inspiration, and an exceedingly entertaining story.
























[book] Jerome Robbins
A Life in Dance
(Jewish Lives)
by Wendy Lesser
October 2018
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Jerome Robbins (1918–1998) was born Jerome Wilson Rabinowitz and grew up in Weehawken, New Jersey, where his Russian-Jewish immigrant parents owned the Comfort Corset Company. Robbins, who was drawn to dance at a young age, resisted the idea of joining the family business. In 1936 he began working with Gluck Sandor, who ran a dance group and convinced him to change his name to Jerome Robbins. He went on to become a choreographer and director who worked in ballet, on Broadway, and in film. His stage productions include West Side Story, Peter Pan, and Fiddler on the Roof. In this deft biography, Wendy Lesser presents Jerome Robbins’s life through his major dances, providing a sympathetic, detailed portrait of her subject.


























[book] Reckonings:
Legacies of Nazi Persecution
and the Quest for Justice
by Mary Fulbrook
October 2018
A single word--"Auschwitz"--is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes.

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using "reckoning" in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time, from early brutality through programs to euthanize the sick and infirm in the 1930s to the full functioning of the death camps in the early 1940s, and across the post-war decades of selective confrontation with perpetrators and ever-expanding commemoration of victims, Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past" and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility.

In the successor states to the Third Reich -- East Germany, West Germany, and Austria -- prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

Following the various phases of trials and testimonies, from those immediately after the war to those that stretched into the decades following, Reckonings illuminates shifting public attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, and recalibrates anew the scales of justice.


























[book] THE RABBI'S BRAIN
Mystics, Moderns and the Science
of Jewish Thinking
by Dr. Andrew Newberg
and Dr. David Halpern
(Thomas Jeffferson Univ Hospital)
Turner
October 2018

The topic of “Neurotheology” has garnered increasing attention in the academic, religious, scientific, and popular worlds. However, there have been no attempts at exploring more specifically how Jewish religious thought and experience may intersect with neurotheology. The Rabbi’s Brain engages this groundbreaking area. Topics included relate to a neurotheological approach to the foundational beliefs that arise from the Torah and associated scriptures, Jewish learning, an exploration of the different elements of Judaism (i.e. reform, conservative, and orthodox), an exploration of specifically Jewish practices (i.e. Davening, Sabbath, Kosher), and a review of Jewish mysticism. The Rabbi’s Brain engages these topics in an easy to read style and integrates the scientific, religious, philosophical, and theological aspects of the emerging field of neurotheology. By reviewing the concepts in a stepwise, simple, yet thorough discussion, readers regardless of their background, will be able to understand the complexities and breadth of neurotheology from the Jewish perspective. More broadly, issues will include a review of the neurosciences and neuroscientific techniques; religious and spiritual experiences; theological development and analysis; liturgy and ritual; epistemology, philosophy, and ethics; and social implications, all from the Jewish perspective.


























[book] One Million Followers:
How I Built a Massive
Social Following in 30 Days
by Brendan Kane
BenBella
October 2018
You and your organization have the ability, talent, and desire to change the world as we know it. The first crucial step is getting your brand’s message in front of the right people.

But that’s not an easy feat. More than 60 billion online messages are sent into the world every day, and only a select few companies can succeed in the mad scramble for customer attention.

This means that the question for anyone who wants to gain mass exposure for their transformative content, business, or brand or connect with audiences around the globe is no longer if they should use social media but how to best take advantage of the numerous different platforms.

How can you make a significant impact in the digital world and stand out among all the noise?

Digital strategist and “growth hacker” Brendan Kane has the answer and will show you how—in 30 days or less. A wizard of the social media sphere, Kane has built online platforms for A-listers including Taylor Swift and Rihanna. He’s advised brands such as MTV, Skechers, Vice and IKEA on how to establish and grow their digital audience and engagement. Kane has spent his career discovering the best tools to turn any no-name into a top influencer simply by speaking into a camera or publishing a popular blog—and now he’ll share his secrets with you.

In One Million Followers, Kane gives readers a gimmick-free step-by-step checklist that will teach you how to:

Gain an authentic, dedicated, and diverse online following from scratch Create personal, unique, and valuable content that will engage your core audience Build a multi-media brand through platforms like Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, and LinkedIn

Featuring in-depth interviews with celebrities, influencers, and marketing experts, One Million Followers is the ultimate guide to building your worldwide brand and unlocking all the benefits social media has to offer. It’s time to stop being a follower and start being a leader.


























[book] Greenhorns:
stories
by Richard Slotkin
October 2018
Leapfrog Press
The people of Greenhorns reflect the different ways Jewish immigrants took to America in the early 20th century, and how America affected them. A kosher butcher with a gambling problem. A Jewish Pygmalion. A woman whose elegant persona conceals the memory of an unspeakable horror. A boy who struggles to maintain his father’s old-world code of honor on the mean streets of Brooklyn. The “little man who wasn’t there,” whose absence reflects his family’s inability to deal with its painful memories. An immigrant’s son who “discovers America” — its promise and its dark side — as a soldier on leave in WW2. These tales recover the violent circumstances, the emotional and psychological costs of uprooting, which left the immigrant uncertain of his place in America, and show how that uncertainty shaped the lives of their American descendants.


























[book] RECKONINGS
Legacies of Nazi Persecution
and the Quest for Justice
by Mary Fulbrook
October 2018
Oxford University Press

A single word--"Auschwitz"--is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes.

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using "reckoning" in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time, from early brutality through programs to euthanize the sick and infirm in the 1930s to the full functioning of the death camps in the early 1940s, and across the post-war decades of selective confrontation with perpetrators and ever-expanding commemoration of victims, Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past" and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility. In the successor states to the Third Reich -- East Germany, West Germany, and Austria -- prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

Following the various phases of trials and testimonies, from those immediately after the war to those that stretched into the decades following, Reckonings illuminates shifting public attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, and recalibrates anew the scales of justice.

























[book] Cold War Monks:
Buddhism and America's
Secret Strategy in Southeast Asia
by Eugene Ford
October 24, 2018
Yale University Press

A groundbreaking account of U.S. clandestine efforts to use Southeast Asian Buddhism to advance Washington’s anticommunist goals during the Cold War

How did the U.S. government make use of a “Buddhist policy” in Southeast Asia during the Cold War despite the American principle that the state should not meddle with religion? To answer this question, Eugene Ford delved deep into an unprecedented range of U.S. and Thai sources and conducted numerous oral history interviews with key informants. Ford uncovers a riveting story filled with U.S. national security officials, diplomats, and scholars seeking to understand and build relationships within the Buddhist monasteries of Southeast Asia.

This fascinating narrative provides a new look at how the Buddhist leaderships of Thailand and its neighbors became enmeshed in Cold War politics and in the U.S. government’s clandestine efforts to use a predominant religion of Southeast Asia as an instrument of national stability to counter communist revolution.




























[book] Beastie Boys Book
By Michael Diamond, and Adam Horovitz
October 2018
Spiegel & Grau
592 PAGES
The story of the Beastie Boys written by two of the surviving band members, a book as unique as the band itself — by band members ADROCK and Mike D, with contributions from Amy Poehler, Colson Whitehead, Spike Jonze, Wes Anderson, Luc Sante, and more.

Formed as a New York City hardcore band in 1981, Beastie Boys struck an unlikely path to global hip hop superstardom. Here is their story, told for the first time in the words of the band. Adam “ADROCK” Horovitz and Michael “Mike D” Diamond offer revealing and very funny accounts of their transition from teenage punks to budding rappers;
the dropout of one of their members;
the move from the Chinatown apartment;
their early collaboration with Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin;
the debut album that became the first hip hop record ever to hit #1, Licensed to Ill — and the album’s messy fallout as the band broke with Def Jam;
their move to Los Angeles and rebirth with the genre-defying masterpiece Paul’s Boutique;
their evolution as musicians and social activists over the course of the classic albums Check Your Head, Ill Communication, and Hello Nasty and the Tibetan Freedom Concert benefits conceived by the late Adam “MCA” Yauch (1964-2012); and more.

For more than thirty years, this band has had an inescapable and indelible influence on popular culture. With a style as distinctive and eclectic as a Beastie Boys album, Beastie Boys Book upends the typical music memoir. Alongside the band narrative you will find rare photos, original illustrations, a cookbook by chef Roy Choi, a graphic cartoon novelization of scenes, a map of Beastie Boys’ New York, mixtape playlists, pieces by guest contributors, and many more surprises.


























[book] A MIND UNRAVELED
A Memoir
by Kurt Eichenwald
Ballantine Books
October 16, 2018
The compelling story of an acclaimed journalist and New York Times bestselling author’s ongoing struggle with epilepsy — his torturous decision to keep his condition a SECRET to avoid discrimination, and his ensuing decades-long battle to not only survive, but to thrive.

As a college freshman at Swarthmore, Kurt Eichenwald awoke one night on the floor of his dorm room, confused and in pain. In the aftermath of that critical moment, his once-carefree life would be consumed by confrontations with medical incompetence, discrimination that almost cost him his education and employment, physical abuse, and dark moments when he contemplated suicide.

This is the story of one man’s battle to pursue his dreams despite an often incapacitating brain disorder. From his early experiences of fear and denial to his exasperating search for treatment, Eichenwald provides a deeply candid account of his years facing this misunderstood and often stigmatized condition. He details his encounters with the doctors whose negligence could have killed him, but for the heroic actions of a brilliant neurologist and the family and friends who fought for him.

Many of Eichenwald’s recollections are drawn from his diaries, vivid and painstakingly kept records that helped sharpen his skills as a journalist. Some are taken from actual cassette tape recordings he took at the time after he was expelled. I admit that at one point, when he was raging against Swarthmore's dean after he was forced to leave campus, I questioned whether he was telling the truth or even deranged. Even his parents sat him down and asked if he was imagining conversations. But when he secretly recorded his dean on a phone call, showing that she was lying and contradicting herself... it restored his credibility. Decades later, the former dean replies to Eichenwald's inquiry and explains what happened from her perspective. I also enjoyed the scene where a Swarthmore student calls Eichenwald for a donation, and he explains, at her request, why he won't donate. This leads to a call from the head of Alumni Giving and a meeting with the school's current President who is.. (surprise)...

Eichenwad raises important questions about the nature of memory, the revelations of brain science, and the profound mysteries of human perception.

Ultimately, A Mind Unraveled is an inspirational story, one that chronicles how Eichenwald, faced often with his own mortality, transformed trauma into a guide for reaching the future he desired. Defying relentless threats to his emotional and physical well-being, he affirmed his decision to never give up, and in the process learned how to rise from the depths of despair to the heights of unimagined success.



























[book] Levi-Strauss:
A Biography
by Emmanuelle Loyer
POLITY
October 2018
Academic, writer, figure of melancholy, aesthete – Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) not only transformed his academic discipline, he also profoundly changed the way that we view ourselves and the world around us.

In this award-winning biography, historian Emmanuelle Loyer recounts Lévi-Strauss’s childhood in an assimilated Jewish household, his promising student years as well as his first forays into political and intellectual movements. As a young professor in 1935 Lévi-Strauss left Paris for São Paulo to teach sociology. His rugged expeditions into the Brazilian hinterland, where he discovered the Amerindian Other, made him into an anthropologist. The racial laws of the Vichy regime would force him to leave France yet again, this time for the US in 1941, where he became Professor Claude L. Strauss, to avoid confusion with the jeans manufacturer.

His return to France, after the war, ushered in the period during which he produced his greatest works: several decades of intense labour in which Lévi-Strauss reinvented anthropology, establishing it as a discipline that offered a new view on the world. In 1955, Tristes Tropiques offered indisputable proof of this the world over. During those years, Lévi-Strauss became something of a national monument, a celebrity intellectual in France. But he always claimed his perspective was a “view from afar,” enabling him to deliver incisive and subversive diagnoses of our waning modernity.

Loyer’s outstanding biography tells the story of a true intellectual adventurer whose unforgettable voice invites us to rethink questions of the human and the meaning of progress. Lévi-Strauss was less of a modern than he was our own great and disquieted contemporary.


























[book] GENDER
Your Guide:
A Gender-Friendly Primer
on What to Know, What to Say,
and What to Do in the
New Gender Culture
by Lee Airton PhD
Adams Media
October 16, 2018

An authentic and accessible guide to understanding—and engaging in—today’s gender conversation. The days of two genders—male, female; boy, girl; blue, pink—are over, if they ever existed at all. Gender is now a global conversation, and one that is constantly evolving. More people than ever before are openly living their lives as transgender men or women, and many transgender people are coming out as neither men or women, instead living outside of the binary. Gender is changing, and this change is gaining momentum.

We all want to do and say the right things in relation to gender diversity—whether at a job interview, at parent/teacher night, and around the table at family dinners. But where do we begin?

From the differences among gender identity, gender expression, and sex, to the use of gender-neutral pronouns like singular they/them, to thinking about your own participation in gender, Gender: Your Guide serves as a complete primer to all things gender. Guided by professor and gender diversity advocate Lee Airton, PhD, you will learn how gender works in everyday life, how to use accurate terminology to refer to transgender, non-binary, and/or gender non-conforming individuals, and how to ask when you aren’t sure what to do or say. It provides you with the information you need to talk confidently and compassionately about gender diversity, whether simply having a conversation or going to bat as an advocate.

Just like gender itself, being gender-friendly is a process for all of us. As revolutionary a resource as Our Bodies, Ourselves, Gender: Your Guide invites everyone on board to make gender more flexible and less constricting: a source of more joy, and less harm, for everyone. Let’s get started.


























[book] The Lake on Fire
A Novel
by Rosellen Brown
Sarabande
October 16, 2018
The Lake on Fire is an epic narrative that begins among 19th century Jewish immigrants on a failing Wisconsin farm. Dazzled by lore of the American dream, Chaya and her strange, brilliant, young brother Asher stow away to Chicago; what they discover there, however, is a Gilded Age as empty a façade as the beautiful Columbian Exposition luring thousands to Lake Michigan’s shore. The pair scrapes together a meager living-Chaya in a cigar factory; Asher, roaming the city and stealing books and jewelry to share with the poor, until they find different paths of escape. An examination of family, love, and revolution, this profound tale resonates eerily with today’s current events and tumultuous social landscape. The Lake on Fire is robust, gleaming, and grimy all at once, proving that celebrated author Rosellen Brown is back with a story as luminous as ever.



























[book] BESTIA
Italian Recipes Created
in the Heart of L.A.
by Ori Menashe,
Genevieve Gergis, Lesley Suter
10 Speed Press
October 2018
This debut cookbook from LA's phenomenally popular Bestia restaurant features 140 recipes for rustic Italian food with Middle Eastern influences that are driven by intense flavors, including house-made charcuterie, pizza and pasta from scratch, and innovative desserts inspired by home-baked classics.

This accessible and far-reaching debut cookbook showcases all of the satisfying and flavor-forward food that has made Bestia one of the most talked-about restaurants in the country. Bestia is known for direct and bold flavors, typified by dishes like meatballs with tomato... and preserved lemon; spinach gnocchi; and tomato and burrata salad; capped off with homey and whimsical desserts like rainbow sherbet, apple cider donuts, and butterscotch coconut tart.

Worth the price of the book.... how to make your pizza at home with a stone... YOU USE THE BROILER FOR THE FINAL PORTION

Chef Ori Menashe marries his training in Italian restaurants with the Israeli and Middle Eastern food that he grew up eating, to create a delicious hybrid of two of the most popular cuisines.



























[book] Beyond the Nation-State:
The Zionist Political Imagination
from Pinsker to Ben-Gurion
by Dmitry Shumsky
Yale
October 2018
A revisionist account of Zionist history, challenging the inevitability of a one-state solution, from a bold, path-breaking young scholar

The Jewish nation-state has often been thought of as Zionism’s end goal. In this bracing history of the idea of the Jewish state in modern Zionism, from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of the state of Israel, Dmitry Shumsky challenges this deeply rooted assumption. In doing so, he complicates the narrative of the Zionist quest for full sovereignty, provocatively showing how and why the leaders of the pre-state Zionist movement imagined, articulated and promoted theories of self-determination in Palestine either as part of a multinational Ottoman state (1882-1917), or in the framework of multinational democracy.

In particular, Shumsky focuses on the writings and policies of five key Zionist leaders from the Habsburg and Russian empires in central and eastern Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: Leon Pinsker, Theodor Herzl, Ahad Ha’am, Ze’ev Jabotinsky, and David Ben-Gurion to offer a very pointed critique of Zionist historiography.


























[book] Bedouin Culture in the Bible
by Clinton Bailey
Yale
October 2018
The first contemporary analysis of Bedouin and biblical cultures sheds new light on biblical laws, practices, and Bedouin history

Written by one of the world’s leading scholars of Bedouin culture, this groundbreaking book sheds new light on significant points of convergence between Bedouin and early Israelite cultures, as manifested in the Hebrew Bible. Bailey compares Bedouin and biblical sources, identifying overlaps in economic activity, material culture, social values, social organization, laws, religious practices, and oral traditions. He examines the question of whether some early Israelites were indeed nomads as the Bible presents them, offering a new angle on the controversy over the identity of the early Israelites and a new cultural perspective to scholars of the Bible and the Bedouin alike.


























[book] The Post-Truth Business:
How to Rebuild Brand Authenticity
in a Distrusting World
by Sean Pillot de Chenecey
October 2018
Kogan Oage
Brands are built on trust but, in a post-truth world, they're faced with a serious challenge when so much of modern life is defined by mistrust. A shattering of the vital connection between brands and consumers, combined with the evaporation of authenticity as a core brand pillar, is causing enormous problems for businesses on a global scale. If a brand isn't seen as trustworthy, then when choice is available, it will be rejected in favour of one that is.

The Post-Truth Business provides a way forward for any organization (WHETHER IT BE COMPANY, OR A PHILANTHROPY, OR DEFENSE ORGANIZATION) wishing to rebuild brand authenticity in a distrusting world. Written by a consumer insights and brand strategy expert, the book explains why numerous interconnected issues are causing problems for businesses. From the safeguarding of privacy and the impact of fake news in media and society, via ways to create communication with meaning, what we can learn about authenticity from artisans and innovators and guidelines on cultural marketing activity through to one of the most successful advertising campaigns of all time, Sean Pillot de Chenecey explores how business can prevent their brand being eroded by distrust and restore their reputation capital.

The Post-Truth Business shows brands and business how to strengthen their consumer engagement and gain future loyalty. It's packed with case studies and example of inspiring people and dynamic brands including Patagonia, Harley Davidson, Lego, Vans, Telsa, Beauty Pie, Truth.Org, Sezane, BrewDog and TOMS. These actionable stories will ensure that any company can become a successful post-truth business.

































[book] Fast Asleep in a Little
Village in Israel
by Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod
and Tiphanie Beeke (Illustrator)
October 2018

Ages 2-5
Apples and Honey
Kukurikuuu!
squawks the rooster.
Meowwwww!
yowls the cat.
ZZZZZZzzzzzzz
buzzes the mosquito...
It is the end of a hot, dry summer, and Mrs. Strauss just can't fall asleep.
"SHEKET! QUIET!"
But when at last she falls asleep, something wakes her up again...something her little village in Israel has been waiting for all summer long.
'A lovely peak into life in Israel' One noise after another wakes Mrs. Strauss from a sound sleep in her small Israeli village. The rooster's loud crow wakes her, and then the cat's meow disturbs her as she tries to fall back to sleep. A mosquito buzzes, while the rooster and cat keep up their calls. "Sheket," she yells out her window, "Quiet." Music from the grocer's radio, the toot-toot of the train whistle, even the swish of the street sweeper all add to the cacophony. Mrs. Strauss pulls her pillow over her head, creating a cool spot to block the harsh sunlight. She falls asleep and dreams of coolness and shade. A different sound awakens her, and this one is heartily welcome; it is the geshem, the heavy rain that will reawaken the parched land. It's a much longed-for wet day. Readers might wonder why the title is so specific in naming the setting of the tale. But Israel's climate is really the main character, with long scorching dry spells and that first heavy rain everyone hopes and prays for, and MacLeod weaves hints about the theme in the distress of the animals and the hot, strong sunlight that shines in the window. Beeke's very bright paintings show the village in the sun's glare and the rain's softer light and Mrs. Strauss' every reaction (and her immovable blue hair, which sits atop her tan face). A lovely peek into life in Israel. -Kirkus Reviews
























[book] Hannah's Hanukkah Hiccups
by Shanna Silva
and Bob McMahon (Illustrator)
October 2018
Ages 2-5
Apples and Honey
It s Hanukkah, and Hannah Hartman can't stop Hiccuping!

Her neighbors try to help by sharing their sometimes silly, always fun, remedies: "Drink pickle juice backwards," says Mr. Brown, while Señora River gives Hannah a wet, red string to place on her forehead. Hannah tries ginger ale, breathing into a paper bag, and even slathering peanut butter on her latkes! But nothing works.

How will she be able to perform her solo at the Hebrew school play if her hiccups don't go away?
































[book] The Book of Beautiful Questions:
The Powerful Questions That
Will Help You Decide, Create,
Connect, and Lead
by Warren Berger
October 2018
From the bestselling author of A More Beautiful Question, hundreds of big and small questions that harness the magic of inquiry to tackle challenges we all face--at work, in our relationships, and beyond.

When confronted with almost any demanding situation, the act of questioning can help guide us to smart decisions. By asking questions, we can analyze, learn, and move forward in the face of uncertainty. But "questionologist" Warren Berger says that the questions must be the right ones; the ones that cut to the heart of complexity or enable us to see an old problem in a fresh way.

In The Book of Beautiful Questions, Berger shares illuminating stories and compelling research on the power of inquiry. Drawn from the insights and expertise of psychologists, innovators, effective leaders, and some of the world’s foremost creative thinkers, he presents the essential questions readers need to make the best choices when it truly counts, with a particular focus in four key areas: decision-making, creativity, leadership, and relationships.

The powerful questions in this book can help you:

- Identify opportunities in your career or industry
- Generate fresh ideas in business or in your own creative pursuits
- Check your biases so you can make better judgments and decisions
- Do a better job of communicating and connecting with the people around you

Thoughtful, provocative, and actionable, these beautiful questions can be applied immediately to bring about change in your work or your everyday life.























[book] The Talmud of Relationships,
Volume 1:
God, Self, and Family
by Rabbi Amy Scheinerman
The Jewish Publication Society
October 2018
How can I tame my ego?
How might I control my anger?
How might I experience the spirituality of sexual intimacy?
How can I bestow appropriate honor on a difficult parent?
How might I accept my own suffering and the suffering
of those whom I love?

Enter the Talmudic study house with innovative teacher Rabbi Amy Scheinerman and continue the Jewish values–based conversations that began two thousand years ago. The Talmud of Relationships, Volume 1 shows how the ancient Jewish texts of Talmud can facilitate modern relationship-building—with parents, children, spouses, family members, friends, and ourselves.

Scheinerman devotes each chapter to a different Talmud text exploring relationships—and many of the selections are fresh, largely unknown passages. Overcoming the roadblocks of language and style that can keep even the curious from diving into Talmud, she walks readers through the logic of each passage, offering full textual translations and expanding on these richly complex conversations so that each of us can weigh multiple perspectives and draw our own conclusions. Scheinerman provides grounding in why the selected passage matters, its historical background, a gripping narrative of the rabbis’ evolving commentary, insightful anecdotes and questions for thought and discussion, and a cogent synopsis.

Through this firsthand encounter with the core text of Judaism, readers of all levels—Jews and non-Jews, newcomers and veterans, students and teachers, individuals and chevruta partners and families alike—will discover the treasure of the oral Torah.


Amy Scheinerman is a teacher, writer, and hospice rabbi. She is a former trustee on the Board of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), former president of the Baltimore Board of Rabbis, and a current member of the CCAR Responsa Committee (not to be confused with the CCAR RAPID RESPONSA Committee.

































[book] The Flame:
Poems Notebooks
Lyrics Drawings
by Leonard Cohen
October 2018
The final collection of the seminal musician and poet, which he was determined to complete before his death

Just weeks before his death in late 2016, Leonard Cohen told The New Yorker that he was ready for the end to come. He just wanted enough time to put his last book in order. Fortunately, that time was granted. The Flame is Cohen’s eloquent farewell, a valedictory collection of lyrics, poems, notebook sketches, and self-portraits that maps his singular creative journey. As noted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s citation, “For six decades, Leonard Cohen revealed his soul to the world through poetry and song-his deep and timeless humanity touching our very core.”

In addition to new poems about war, desire, regrets, lamb chops, and hummingbirds, and lyrics from his last three albums, including the chart-topping “You Want It Darker,” The Flame includes carefully selected excerpts from Cohen’s voluminous notebooks, which he kept faithfully over the years. Readers will find in these pages the subjects that have always preoccupied Cohen: the dimensions of love, the secret code of existence, and the hope for transcendence in a broken world.

In the words of Cohen’s longtime manager and friend, Robert Kory, The Flame “reveals to all the intensity of his inner fire” to the end.

































[book] On Desperate Ground:
The Marines at The Reservoir,
the Korean War's Greatest Battle
by Hampton Sides
October 2018
From the New York Times bestselling author of Ghost Soldiers and In the Kingdom of Ice, a chronicle of the extraordinary feats of heroism by Marines called on to do the impossible during the greatest battle of the Korean War

On October 15, 1950, General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of UN troops in Korea, convinced President Harry Truman that the Communist forces of Kim Il-sung would be utterly defeated by Thanksgiving. The Chinese, he said with near certainty, would not intervene in the war. As he was speaking, 300,000 Red Chinese soldiers began secretly crossing the Manchurian border. Led by some 20,000 men of the First Marine Division, the Americans moved deep into the snowy mountains of North Korea, toward the trap Mao had set for the vainglorious MacArthur along the frozen shores of the Chosin Reservoir. What followed was one of the most heroic--and harrowing--operations in American military history, and one of the classic battles of all time. Faced with probable annihilation, and temperatures plunging to 20 degrees below zero, the surrounded, and hugely outnumbered, Marines fought through the enemy forces with ferocity, ingenuity, and nearly unimaginable courage as they marched their way to the sea.

Hampton Sides' superb account of this epic clash relies on years of archival research, unpublished letters, declassified documents, and interviews with scores of Marines and Koreans who survived the siege. While expertly detailing the follies of the American leaders, On Desperate Ground is an immediate, grunt's-eye view of history, enthralling in its narrative pace and powerful in its portrayal of what ordinary men are capable of in the most extreme circumstances. Hampton Sides has been hailed by critics as one of the best nonfiction writers of his generation. As the Miami Herald wrote, "Sides has a novelist's eye for the propulsive elements that lend momentum and dramatic pace to the best nonfiction narratives."



































NOVEMBER 2018 BOOKS



[book] Behind the Scenes of the Old Testament:
Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts
Edited by
Jon S. Greer,
John W. Hilber, and
John H. Walton
(Penn State, Cambridge, Hebrew Union Coll.)
November 2018
Baker Academic Press
This authoritative volume brings together a team of world-class scholars to cover the full range of Old Testament backgrounds studies in a concise, up-to-date, and comprehensive manner. With expertise in various subdisciplines of Old Testament backgrounds, the authors illuminate the cultural, social, and historical contexts of the world behind the Old Testament. They introduce readers to a wide range of background materials, covering history, geography, archaeology, and ancient Near Eastern textual and iconographic studies.

Meant to be used alongside traditional literature-based canonical surveys, this one-stop introduction to Old Testament backgrounds fills a gap in typical introduction to the Bible courses. It contains over 100 illustrations, including photographs, line drawings, maps, charts, and tables, which will facilitate its use in the classroom.


























[book] Those Who Knew
by Idra Novey
November 2018
Vintage
On an unnamed island country ten years after the collapse of a brutal regime, Lena suspects the powerful senator she was involved with back in her student activist days may be guilty of murder. She says nothing, assuming no one will believe her, given her family's shameful support of the former regime and her lack of evidence. They are the same reasons she told no one, a decade earlier, what happened with the senator while they were dating.

But now a college student is dead. And Lena is haunted.

Those Who Knew is a propulsive, suspenseful novel about what powerful men think they can get away with and the emotional cost of resigning oneself to silence. Moving between the island and New York City, this novel confirms Novey's place as one of the most inventive and prescient writers at work today.



























[book] WITNESS
Lessons from Elie Wiesel’s Classroom
by Ariel Burger
(Rabbi Ariel Burger)
November 13, 2018
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HMH
I recall when a childhood neighbor went off to Boston University and how she got to take a class with Eli Wiesel and it influenced her life. So I was excited to read this new book.

Rabbi Burger, a devoted protégé and friend of the late Elie Wiesel shows us the Nobel Peace Prize recipientas a master teacher.

Ariel Burger first met Elie Wiesel at age fifteen. They studied together and taught together. Witness chronicles the intimate conversations between these two men over decades, as Burger sought counsel on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while navigating his own personal journey from boyhood to manhood, from student and assistant to rabbi and, in time, teacher.

In this profoundly hopeful, thought-provoking, and inspiring book, Burger takes us into Elie Wiesel’s classroom, where the art of listening and storytelling conspire to keep memory alive. As Wiesel’s teaching assistant, Burger gives us a front-row seat witnessing these remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom. The act of listening, of sharing these stories, makes of us, the readers, witnesses.





























[book] The Museum of Modern Love
a novel
by Heather Rose
Algonquin Books BR> November 2018
Our hero, Arky Levin, has reached a creative dead end. An unexpected separation from his wife was meant to leave him with the space he needs to work composing film scores, but it has provided none of the peace of mind he needs to create. Guilty and restless, almost by chance he stumbles upon an art exhibit that will change his life.

Based on a real piece of performance art that took place in 2010, the installation that the fictional Arky Levin discovers is inexplicably powerful. Visitors to the Museum of Modern Art sit across a table from the performance artist Marina Abramovi?, for as short or long a period of time as they choose. Although some go in skeptical, almost all leave moved. And the participants are not the only ones to find themselves changed by this unusual experience: Arky finds himself returning daily to watch others with Abramovi?. As the performance unfolds over the course of 75 days, so too does Arky. As he bonds with other people drawn to the exhibit, he slowly starts to understand what might be missing in his life and what he must do.

This is a book about art, but it is also about success and failure, illness and happiness. It’s about what it means to find connection in a modern world. And most of all, it is about love, with its limitations and its transcendence.


























[book] Becoming
by Michelle Obama
Crown Books BR> November 2018
An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.




























[book] Under a Darkening Sky:
The American Experience in
Nazi Europe: 1939-1941
by Robert Lyman
November 6, 2018
Pegasus
A vivid social history of the American expatriate experience in Europe between 1939 and 1941, as the Nazi menace brings a shadow over the continent, heralding the storms of war.

A poignant and powerful portrait of Europe in the years between 1939 and 1941-as the Nazi menace marches toward the greatest man-made catastrophe the world has ever experienced-Under A Darkening Sky focuses on a diverse group of expatriate Americans. Told through the eyes and observations of these characters caught up in these seismic events, the story unfolds alongside a war that slowly drags a reluctant United States into its violent embrace.

This vibrant narrative takes these dramatic personalities and evokes the engagement between Europe and a reluctant America from the September 3rd, 1939-when Britain declares war-through the tragedy of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. In a distinctively energetic storyline, Robert Lyman brings together a wide range of encounters, conversations, and memories. It includes individuals from across the social spectrum, from Josephine Baker to the young Americans who volunteered to fight in the RAF, as part of the famous “Eagle Squadrons.”

Hundreds of young Americans-like the aces James Goodison, Art Donahue, and the wealthy playboy Billy Fiske, who was the first American volunteer in the RAF to die in action during the Battle of Britain-smuggled themselves into Canada so that they could volunteer for the cockpits of Spitfires and Hurricanes, as they flew against the deadly Luftwaffe over ever-darkening skies in London.



























[book] Emergent Hasidism:
Spontaneity and Institutionalization
by Ada Rapoport-Albert
November 2018
Littman
Ada Rapoport-Albert is Professor of Jewish Studies and former Head of the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London. She is the author of a number of studies on the history of hasidism.

Actual synopsis forthcoming... Ada Rapoport-Albert has been a key player in the profound transformation of the history of hasidism that has taken shape since the 1970s. She has never lacked the courage to question conventional wisdom, but neither has she overturned it lightly. The essays in this volume show the erudition and creativity of her contribution to rewriting the master-narrative of hasidic history. Thanks to her we now know that eighteenth-century hasidism evolved in a context of intense spirituality rather than political, social, economic, or religious crisis. It did not represent the movement’s ‘classic period’ and was not a project of democratization, ameliorating the hierarchical structuring of religion and spirituality. Eighteenth-century hasidism is more accurately described as the formative and creative prelude to the mature movement of the nineteenth century: initially neither institutionalized nor centralized, it developed through a process of differentiation from traditional ascetic-mystical hasidism. Its elite leaders only became conscious of a distinctive group identity after the Ba’al Shem Tov’s death, and they subsequently spent the period from the late eighteenth to the early nineteenth century experimenting with various forms of doctrine, literature, organization, leadership, and transfer of authority. Somewhat surprisingly there was no attempt to introduce any revision of women’s status and role; in the examination of this area of hasidism Rapoport-Albert’s contribution has been singularly revealing. Her work has emphasized that, contrary to hasidism’s thrust towards spiritualization of the physical, the movement persisted in identifying women with an irredeemable materiality: women could never escape their inherent sexuality and attain the spiritual heights. Gender hierarchy therefore persisted and, formally speaking, for the first 150 years or so of hasidism’s existence women were not counted as members of the group. Twentieth-century Habad hasidim responded to modernist feminism by re-evaluating the role of women, but just as Habad appropriated modern rhetorical strategies to defend tradition, so it adopted certain feminist postulates in order to create a counter-feminism that would empower women without destabilizing traditional gender roles. T





























[book] Ezekiel 38-48:
A New Translation with
Introduction and Commentary
by Stephen L. Cook
Yale / ANCHOR
November 2018
A new interpretation of the final major sections of the Hebrew book of Ezekiel, chapters 38-48

Stephen L. Cook offers an accessible translation and interpretation of the final sections of Ezekiel. These chapters, the most challenging texts of scripture, describe the end-time assault of Gog of Magog on Israel and provide an incredible visionary tour of God’s utopian temple. Following the approach of Moshe Greenberg, the author of the preceding Anchor Yale Bible commentaries on Ezekiel, this volume grounds interpretation of the book in an intimate acquaintance with Ezekiel’s source materials, its particular patterns of composition and rhetoric, and the general learned, priestly workings of the Ezekiel school. The commentary honors Greenberg’s legacy by including insights from traditional Jewish commentators, such as Rashi, Kimhi, and Eliezer of Beaugency. In contrast to preceding commentaries, the book devotes special attention to the Zadokite idea of an indwelling, anthropomorphic “body” of God, and the enlivening effect on people and land of that indwelling.


























[book] How Old Is the Hebrew Bible?:
A Linguistic, Textual, and
Historical Study
by Ronald Hendel and Jan Joosten
Yale / ANCHOR
November 2018
From two expert scholars comes a comprehensive study of the dating of the Hebrew Bible

The age of the Hebrew Bible is a topic that has sparked controversy and debate in recent years. The scarcity of clear evidence allows for the possibility of many views, though these are often clouded by theological and political biases. This impressive, broad-ranging book synthesizes recent linguistic, textual, and historical research to clarify the history of biblical literature, from its oldest texts and literary layers to its youngest. In clear, concise language, the authors provide a comprehensive overview that cuts across scholarly specialties to create a new standard for the historical study of the Bible. This much-needed work paves the path forward to dating the Hebrew Bible and understanding crucial aspects of its historical and contemporary significance.


























[book] Discovering Second Temple Literature:
The Scriptures and Stories
That Shaped Early Judaism
by Malka Z. Simkovich
The Jewish Publication Society JPS
November 2018
Exploring the world of the Second Temple period (539 BCE–70 CE), in particular the vastly diverse stories, commentaries, and other documents written by Jews during the last three centuries of this period, Malka Z. Simkovich takes us to Jerusalem, Alexandria, and Antioch, to the Jewish sectarians and the Roman-Jewish historian Josephus, to the Cairo genizah, and to the ancient caves that kept the secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls. As she recounts Jewish history during this vibrant, formative era, Simkovich analyzes some of the period’s most important works for both familiar and possible meanings.

This volume interweaves past and present in four parts. Part 1 tells modern stories of discovery of Second Temple literature. Part 2 describes the Jewish communities that flourished both in the land of Israel and in the Diaspora. Part 3 explores the lives, worldviews, and significant writings of Second Temple authors. Part 4 examines how authors of the time introduced novel, rewritten, and/or expanded versions of Bible stories in hopes of imparting messages to the people.

Simkovich’s popular style will engage readers in understanding the sometimes surprisingly creative ways Jews at this time chose to practice their religion and interpret its scriptures in light of a cultural setting so unlike that of their Israelite forefathers. Like many modern Jews today, they made an ancient religion meaningful in an ever-changing world.


























[book] I Love Kosher:
Beautiful Recipes from My Kitchen
by Kim Kushner
Weldon Owen
November 27, 2018
Kosher Salt & Black Pepper: Essential Recipes for Your Kosher Kitchen

Kosher food made cool, calm, and sexy—the essentials for cooking and entertaining with style. Author Kim Kushner shares 100+ essential recipes, techniques, tools, and tricks for preparing delicious kosher meals with ease.

This inspiring cookbook offers simple, straightforward, go-to kosher recipes—ranging from quick dinners to slow-simmered main dishes, party fare, and freezer-to-table specialities—for every meal and any occasion, with busy families in mind. Whether preparing a simple dinner for two, a full-family feast, or party menu for ten, Kim’s strategy is to draw on this essential collection of recipes, tips, and tricks to guarantee stellar results, please any crowd, and have fun along the way.

The author’s fantastic sensibility with flavor—and flair for entertaining—comes through the well-curated selection of dishes, which are organized by course and cooking time. Kim also includes her tried-and-true culinary essentials like fridge, freezer, and pantry staples, must-have tools and equipment, and signature homemade dressings and marinades for mix-and-match cooking ease. A special chapter on boards features step-by-step directions and images for how to compose a variety of visually compelling and bountiful boards for easy, elegant serving such as a crudité board with dips, a wine and cheese board, and a breakfast smorgasboard.

Sample Chapters
Board Entertaining
Appetizers & Drinks
Ready-to-go Dishes
Brunch
Quick Stovetop Mains (under 1 hour)
One Pot/Sheet Pan (1–2 hours)
Hot, Slow & Simmered (4–6 hours)
Freezer-to-Table Mains
Dishes for a Crowd
Sides
Desserts



















[book] Baladi Palestine
A Celebration of Food from Land and Sea
by Joudie Kalla amd Jamie Orlando Smith
IPG
Fall 2018
Joudie Kalla, author of the bestselling Palestine on a Plate, introduces readers to more of the Middle Easts' best kept secret Palestinian cuisine.




































[book] MUCK
a Novel
by Dror Burstein
Gabriel Levin (Translator from Hebrew)
FS&G
November 2018
“Those who lament that the novel has lost its prophecy should pay heed and cover-price: Muck is the future, both of Jerusalem and of literature. God is showing some rare good taste, by choosing to speak to us through Dror Burstein.” -Joshua Cohen, author of Moving Kings and Book of Numbers

In a Jerusalem both ancient and modern, where the First Temple squats over the populace like a Trump casino, where the streets are literally crawling with prophets and heathen helicopters buzz over Old Testament sovereigns, two young poets are about to have their lives turned upside down.

Struggling Jeremiah is worried that he might be wasting his time trying to be a writer; the great critic Broch just beat him over the head with his own computer keyboard. Mattaniah, on the other hand, is a real up-and-comer-but he has a secret he wouldn’t want anyone in the literary world to know: his late father was king of Judah.

Jeremiah begins to despair, and in that despair has a vision: that Jerusalem is doomed, and that Mattaniah will not only be forced to ascend to the throne but will thereafter witness his people slaughtered and exiled. But what does it mean to tell a friend and rival that his future is bleak? What sort of grudges and biases turn true vision into false prophecy? Can the very act of speaking a prediction aloud make it come true? And, if so, does that make you a seer, or just a schmuck?

Dramatizing the eternal dispute between poetry and power, between faith and practicality, between haves and have-nots, Dror Burstein’s Muck is a brilliant and subversive modern-dress retelling of the book of Jeremiah: a comedy with apocalyptic stakes by a star of Israeli fiction.


































DECEMBER 2018





[book] The Hebrew Bible:
A Translation with Commentary (Vol. 3)
by Robert Alter
Norton
December 2018
landmark event: the complete Hebrew Bible in the award-winning translation that delivers the stunning literary power of the original.

A masterpiece of deep learning and fine sensibility, Robert Alter’s translation of the Hebrew Bible, now complete, reanimates one of the formative works of our culture. Capturing its brilliantly compact poetry and finely wrought, purposeful prose, Alter renews the Old Testament as a source of literary power and spiritual inspiration. From the family frictions of Genesis and King David’s flawed humanity to the serene wisdom of Psalms and Job’s incendiary questioning of God’s ways, these magnificent works of world literature resonate with a startling immediacy. Featuring Alter’s generous commentary, which quietly alerts readers to the literary and historical dimensions of the text, this is the definitive edition of the Hebrew Bible. 3 maps.


























JANUARY 2019



[book] Lonely But Not Alone:
A Spiritual Autobiography
by Nathan Lopes Cardozo
JANUARY 2019
Urim Publications
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.




























[book] Armies of Sand:
The Past, Present, and Future
of Arab Military Effectiveness
by Kenneth M. Pollack
JANUARY 2019
Oxford University Press
Since the Second World War, Arab armed forces have consistently punched below their weight. They have lost many wars that by all rights they should have won, and in their best performances only ever achieved quite modest accomplishments. Over time, soldiers, scholars, and military experts have offered various explanations for this pattern. Reliance on Soviet military methods, the poor civil-military relations of the Arab world, the underdevelopment of the Arab states, and patterns of behavior derived from the wider Arab culture, have all been suggested as the ultimate source of Arab military difficulties.

Armies of Sand, Kenneth Pollack's powerful and riveting history of Arab armies from the end of World War Two to the present, assesses these differing explanations and isolates the most important causes. Over the course of the book, he examines the combat performance of fifteen Arab armies and air forces in virtually every Middle Eastern war, from the Jordanians and Syrians in 1948 to Hizballah in 2006 and the Iraqis and ISIS in 2014-2017. He then compares these experiences to the performance of the Argentine, Chadian, Chinese, Cuban, North Korean, and South Vietnamese armed forces in their own combat operations during the twentieth century. The book ultimately concludes that reliance on Soviet doctrine was more of a help than a hindrance to the Arabs. In contrast, politicization and underdevelopment were both important factors limiting Arab military effectiveness, but patterns of behavior derived from the dominant Arab culture was the most important factor of all. Pollack closes with a discussion of the rapid changes occurring across the Arab world--political, economic, and cultural--as well as the rapid evolution in warmaking as a result of the information revolution. He suggests that because both Arab society and warfare are changing, the problems that have bedeviled Arab armed forces in the past could dissipate or even vanish in the future, with potentially dramatic consequences for the Middle East military balance. Sweeping in its historical coverage and highly accessible, this will be the go-to reference for anyone interested in the history of warfare in the Middle East since 1945.




























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.





























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale Univ Press
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.





























[book] Prince of the Press:
How One Collector Built History’s
Most Enduring and Remarkable Jewish
by Joshua Teplitsky
JANUARY 2019
Yale Univ Press
The story of one of the largest collections of Jewish books, and the man who used his collection to cultivate power, prestige, and political influence

David Oppenheim (1664–1736), chief rabbi of Prague in the early eighteenth century, built an unparalleled collection of Jewish books, all of which have survived and are housed in the Bodleian Library of Oxford. His remarkable collection testifies to the myriad connections Jews maintained with each other across political borders. Oppenheim’s world reached the great courts of European nobility, and his family ties brought him into networks of power, prestige, and opportunity that extended from Amsterdam to the Ottoman Empire. His impressive library functioned as a unique source of personal authority that gained him fame throughout Jewish society and beyond. His story brings together culture, commerce, and politics, all filtered through this extraordinary collection. Based on the careful reconstruction of an archive that is still visited by scholars today, Joshua Teplitsky’s book offers a window into the social life of books in early modern Europe.




























[book] NOT ALL DEAD WHITE MEN
Classics and Misogyny
in the Digital Age
By Donna Zuckerberg
JANUARY 2019
Harvard University Press
A disturbing exposé of how today’s Alt-Right men’s groups use ancient sources to promote a new brand of toxic masculinity online.

A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online that treats women’s empowerment as a mortal threat to men and to the integrity of Western civilization. Its proponents cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims-arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege.

Donna Zuckerberg dives deep into the virtual communities of the far right, where men lament their loss of power and privilege and strategize about how to reclaim them. She finds, mixed in with weightlifting tips and misogynistic vitriol, the words of the Stoics deployed to support an ideal vision of masculine life. On other sites, pickup artists quote Ovid’s Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women’s boundaries. By appropriating the Classics, these men lend a veneer of intellectual authority and ancient wisdom to their project of patriarchal white supremacy. In defense or retaliation, feminists have also taken up the Classics online, to counter the sanctioning of violence against women.

Not All Dead White Men reveals that some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online.






























[book] Holy Lands
a novel
by Amanda Sthers
JANUARY 22, 2019
Bloomsbury

A witty epistolary novel, both heartwarming and heart-wrenching, about a dysfunctional family--led by a Jewish pig farmer in Israel--struggling to love and accept each other.

As comic as it is deeply moving, Holy Lands chronicles several months in the lives of an estranged family of colorful eccentrics. Harry Rosenmerck is an aging Jewish cardiologist who has left his thriving medical practice in New York--to raise pigs in Israel. His ex-wife, Monique, ruminates about their once happy marriage even as she quietly battles an aggressive illness. Their son, David, an earnest and successful playwright, has vowed to reconnect with his father since coming out. Annabelle, their daughter, finds herself unmoored in Paris in the aftermath of a breakup.

Harry eschews technology, so his family, spread out around the world, must communicate with him via snail mail. Even as they grapple with challenges, their correspondence sparkles with levity. They snipe at each other, volleying quips across the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and Europe, and find joy in unexpected sources.

Holy Lands captures the humor and poignancy of an adult family striving to remain connected across time, geography, and radically different perspectives on life.


























[book] A Woman First:
First Woman:
The Deeply Personal
Memoir by the Former President
by Selina Meyer
Former President of the United States
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Abrams Press
The long-awaited memoir of her tumultuous year in office, A Woman First: First Woman is an intimate first-person account of the public and private lives of Selina Meyer, America’s first woman president. Known and beloved throughout the world as a vocal and fearless advocate for adult literacy, fighting AIDS, our military families, and as a stalwart champion of the oppressed, especially the long-suffering people of Tibet, President Meyer is considered one of the world’s most notable people. In her own words, she reveals the innermost workings of the world’s most powerful office, sharing previous secret details along with her own personal feelings about the historic events of her time.

In A Woman First: First Woman, President Selina Meyer tells the story of her times the way that only she could, Readers will gain new insights not only into Meyer herself but also the mechanics of governing and the many colorful personalities in Meyer’s orbit, including world leaders and her devoted cadre of allies and aides, many of them already familiar to the American people.



























[book] Getting Good at Getting Older:
A New Jewish Catalog
by the late Richard Siegel (Jewish Catalog)
and his widow Rabbi Laura Geller
March 2019
Behrman House

We came of age in the '60s and '70s, through civil rights, anti-war protests, and the rise of feminism. We've raised families and had careers. We've been around the world, figuratively if not literally. We've done a lot.

And we're getting older. So we might as well get good at it.

Getting Good at Getting Older: A Jewish Catalog for a New Age is a tour for all of us "of a certain age" through the resources and skills we need to navigate the years between maturity and old age. Getting Good at Getting Older brings humor, warmth, and 4,000 years of Jewish experience to the question of how to shape this new stage of life.
























[book] Giraffes on Horseback Salad:
Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers,
and the Strangest Movie Never Made
by Josh Frank and Tim Heidecker
Manuela Pertega (Illustrator)
March 2019
Quirk
Surrealism meets Hollywood meets film history in this graphic novel, which turns an unproduced script by Salvador Dali into a fantastic comedy starring Groucho, Chico, and Harpo Marx.

Grab some popcorn and take a seat...The curtain is about to rise on a film like no other! But first, the real-life backstory: Giraffes on Horseback Salad was a Marx Brothers film written by modern art icon Salvador Dali, who’d befriended Harpo. Rejected by MGM, the script was thought lost forever. But author Josh Frank found it, and with comedian Tim Heidecker and Spanish comics creator Manuela Pertega, he’s re-created the film as a graphic novel in all its gorgeous full-color, cinematic, surreal glory. In the story, a businessman named Jimmy (played by Harpo) is drawn to the mysterious Surrealist Woman, whose very presence changes humdrum reality into Dali-esque fantasy. With the help of Groucho and Chico, Jimmy seeks to join her fantastical world—but forces of normalcy threaten to end their romance. Includes new Marx Brothers songs and antics, plus the real-world story behind the historic collaboration.























The Jewish Founding Father:
Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life
by Andrew Porwancher, Phd.
(Univ of Oklahoma School of Law)
Harvard University Press
forthcoming 2019
Jewish …? most say no. Yes, he studied in a Jewish school... but he was Christian? Wasn't he? Porwancher seeks to prove otherwise. Why? Hamilton’s mother, Rachel Faucette, was married to Jewish merchant Johann Michael Lavien (aka Levine) in St. Croix in 1745, at a time that Danish law would have required her conversion to Judaism. She left him within a decade, a lived with James Hamilton in Nevis (BWI). She bore Alexander around 1755, and having been born out of wedlock, attended a Jewish school... either out of necessity since he was not baptised or because his mother was considered Jewish...













[book] The Post-Widget Society:
Economic Possibilities for
Our Children
by Lawrence H. Summers
May 2019
FS&G Books
From Professors Anita and Bob Summers son, former U.S. Sec of Treasury Lawrence H. Summers, a presentation of a new paradigm for thinking about the current economic and technological revolution

We are buffeted by the sense that everything is accelerating: Digital technology is changing the way we work, shop, and socialize. And yet for all the talk about disruptive innovations, economic growth is largely stagnant. We are told that with new technologies average citizens are empowered as never before, and yet wide swaths of the population feel powerless and can no longer count on stable careers and a better life for their children. As Lawrence H. Summers shows in The Post-Widget Society, these are the paradoxes that define the economic revolution that is transforming our world.

At the heart of this revolution are two dramatic developments in Western economies: the declining significance of widgets (mass-produced goods) and the rise of design goods (products that cost a lot to design but little to produce); and the controversial prospect of secular stagnation, the long-term phenomenon of negligible economic growth and depressed employment in a dynamic market economy. Summers’s trenchant analysis of these trends reveals that they have profound implications not only for the future of jobs and widening income inequality but also for the nature of the state and the very stability of society.

A bold, pathbreaking book by one of our most important economists, The Post-Widget Society is necessary reading for every American concerned about our economic and political future.
















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