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Welcome to our Fall 2017, Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Winter 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016, Spring 2016, Winter 2016, and oh so many more pages of Book Suggestions. For our Home Page, Please visit MyJewishBooks.com

SOME FALL 2018 BOOK READINGS


August 6, 2018: Scribblers on the Roof at Congregation Ansche Chesed: Authors Cherise Wolas (The Family Tabor) and Dawn Raffel ( The Strange Case of Dr. Couney). NYC UWS W 100th St 8PM.
August 08, 2018: Jason Kander reads from Outside the Wire: Ten Lessons I've Learned in Everyday Courage. Historic Sixth and I Synagogue, Washington DC.
September 01, 2018: National Book Festuval, Library of Congress, Mall, Washington, DC
September 06, 2018: Yuval Noah Harari reads from In 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. Sixth and I Synagogue, Washington, Dc
September 10-17, 2018: Brooklyn Book Festival
September 13, 2018: Jules Feiffer reads from The Ghost Script: A Graphic Novel. Barnes & Noble UWS NYC
September 26, 2018: Rose Levy Beranbaum on her Baking Basics. 92 St Y, NYC
September 28, 2018: Naz Deravian on her book on Persian cuisine, Bottom of the Pot. 92 St Y, NYC

October 03, 2018: From the journalist and bestselling author of All the Single Ladies comes Good and Mad, on Female Anger by Rebecca Traister. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 04, 2018: Ken Krimstein reads from The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth. B&N UWS NYC
October 04, 2018: Aan Evening with 98 year old Ben Ferencz, the last living prosecutor at the Nuremberg Trails at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 7:00 PM EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 09, 2018: Gary Shteyngart reads from Lake Success. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 09, 2018: An Evening with author Simon Schama – The Store of the Jews, Volume One and Volume Two. Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 7PM $25 EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 09, 2018: Nik Sharma on his cookbook, Season. 92 St Y, NYC
October 13, 2018: Boston Book Fair – readings and booths
October 13, 2018: Wisconsin Book Fair – readings and booths
October 15, 2018: Similarities and Differences in Semitic and Egyptian language groups. UCLA. Los Angeles. Aaron Rubin (PSU) 365 Kaplan Hall
October 16, 2018: Radicals in the Barrio. UCLA. Bunche Hall. Jews and Chicanos in Los Angeles
October 16, 2018: An evening with anti fascist and former US Sec. Of State Madeleine Albright and former CEO and heart transplant recipient Dick Cheney at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 8PM $125 Admission. Free book not included. EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 16, 2018: UJA hosts Michael Solomonov on his newest cookbook on Israeli soul foods and 5 minute hummus. Rabbi Buchdahl in conversation with the 2017 James Beard Foundation “Outstanding Chef” Michael Solomonov and award-winning restaurateur, Steve Cook. NYC Central Synagogue
October 19, 2018: A evening with author Ehud Barak, pianist, commando, and former PM of the State of Israel at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 6PM Free EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 21, 2018: Chef Yotam Ottolenghi reads from Ottolenghi Simple. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 21, 2018: Alan Dershowitz and Joe Lieberman argue The People Versus Noah, before Judge Michael Mukasey at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 1030 AM $45 EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 22, 2018: Dorie Greenspan on her latest cookbook. 92 St Y, NYC
October 23, 2018: An evening with author and Penn grad, Ms. Melissa Rivers, as she discusses her mother Joan Rivers and their books and projects at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 7PM $36 (includes book) EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 24, 2018: Yotam Ottolenghi on his latest cookbook with Deb Perelman of Smitten Kitchen. 92 St Y, NYC
October 25, 2018: Ina Garten with Frank Bruni. 92 St Y, NYC
October 25, 2018: Ambassador Ido Aharoni chats with Edwina Sandys, 79 year old granddaughter of Ir Winston Churchill, discussing Churchill and The Jews. Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 630PM Free EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
October 29, 2018: NPR Radio host Peter Sagal reads from his book on running. A reading at Sixth and I synagogue in Washington, DC
October 29, 2018: Translation as a Bridge. Hebrew Translations of American -Jewish Literature and English translations of Hebrew Lit and how it was influenced the encounters between these two major Jewish communities. UCLA. Bunche Hall.
October 30, 2018: Alex Gomberg (Brooklyn Seltzer), Barry Joseph (author, SELTZERTOPIA), Adeena Sussman (author, SABABA) discuss ALL ABOUT SELTZER: The Jewish Champagne with journalist Gabriella Gershenson at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC. 630 PM. Free (plus egg cream sample) EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG

November 14, 2018: AN evening with author and LGBTQA+ activist and extremely angry man, Larry Kramer at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 630PM EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
November 14, 2018: A Place in the Sun. Italian Jews and the Colonization of Africa. Shira Klein (Chapman Univ). Did Italy's policy in Ethiopia, Somalia, Libya and Eritrea pit Italian Jews as colonizers against African Jews as colonized? UCLA. Royce Hall 12 Noon.
November 15, 2018: The Foundation of the World. The Ecological Ideas of Post Expulsion Spanish Jews in Italy and the Ottoman Empire. Andrew Berns (USCarolina) UCLA. Royce Hall 4PM.
November 17-18, 2018: Miami Book Fair (main portion)
November 27, 2018: The Holocaust and North Africa. A Book reading featuring Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein. UCLA. Bunche Hall. Los Angeles

December 04, 2018: Jewish Lives: Jewish Voices. Join 8 authors on their 8 books for the Yale/Penguin series for the 8 mights (but just tonight). Featuring James Atlas as the editing moderator. Join Barry W Holtz (JTS Professor) on RABBI AKIVA; Neal Gabler on BARBRA STREISAND; Anita Shapira on DAVID BEN-GURION; Jeffrey Rosen on LOUIS D. BRANDEIS; Vivian Gornick on EMMA GOLDMAN; Mark Kurlansky on HANK GREENBERG, Francine Prose on PEGGY GUGGENHEIM; and Professor Itamar Rabinovich (Ambassador, friend of Scranton) on YITZHAK RABIN at Temple Emanu-El Steicker Center in NYC 630PM FREE (followed by 3rd night of Hanuka candle lighting) EmanuelStreickerNYC.ORG
December 05, 2018: Michael Solomonov on his new Israeli Soul cookbook, in conversation with Steven Cook, his co author. 92 St Y, NYC




[book] Walking Shadows:
A Peter Decker/Rina Lazarus Novel
by Faye Kellerman
August 28, 2018
William Morrow

Detective Peter Decker and his wife, Rina Lazarus, risk life and limb to solve a pair of brutal murders that may be tied to a crime from more than twenty years ago in this intense and addictive mystery from New York Times bestselling author Faye Kellerman.

On a quiet suburban street in upstate Greenbury, New York, the brutally beaten body of a young man is discovered in the woods adjacent to an empty vacation home. Twenty-six-year-old Brady Neil a resident of the neighboring town of Hamilton, had no criminal record, few friends, worked full-time, and attended community college. But as Detective Peter Decker learns, the clean-cut kid is linked to the criminal world. When Brady was a baby, his father, Brandon Gratz, was convicted of robbing and killing the owners of a local jewelry store. While Gratz and his partner, Kyle Masterson, admitted to the robbery, they swore they left the owners, Glen and Lydia Levine, very much alive.

The experienced detective knows there’s more to this homicide case than the records show. As he digs into Gratz’s past, Decker begins to suspect that the son’s murder may be connected to the father’s sins. Before he can put together the pieces, Decker finds out that one of Brady Neil’s friends, Joseph Boch—aka Boxer—has gone missing. Heading to Boch’s house with his temporary new partner, Hamilton PD cop Lenora Baccus, they discover a bloodbath.

Who would savagely kill two innocent men—and why? Finding the answers will require all of Decker’s skill and knowledge, the help of his fellow Greenbury detectives, Tyler McAdams and Kevin Butterfield, and information gleaned from his wife Rina’s behind the scenes investigation to put all the pieces of this deadly puzzle together . . . and see justice done.





















[book] Death in Shangri-La
(A Dotan Naor Thriller)
by Yigal Zur
August 7, 2018
Oceanview
Ex-Israeli operative turned private investigator, Dotan Naor-to settle a bet-agrees to locate the missing son of former acquaintance, now ruthless Israeli arms merchant, Willy Mizrachi. Willy, who does not hesitate to sell killing machines to the most heinous players in the world, is desperate to find his only son, Itiel, who has headed to an ashram in the Himalayas.

The Himalayas are also host to groups of young Israelis who have completed their mandatory military service-a sort of rite of passage. Now, those innocent kids are being hunted down by violent terrorists.

India and the disputed Kashmir region between India and Pakistan is familiar territory to Dotan, as he searches for Itiel and for the source of these heinous attacks on Israeli youth.

Unwilling to leave this quest in the hands of Dotan, Willy also travels to India, where he is murdered in Delhi, triggering international repercussions capable of ripping the world apart at one of its most dangerous flashpoints.

Nothing is as it seems in this region of the world. Betrayal reigns everywhere.

But love, in its purest form, does manage to shine through in this story of brutal international corruption.



















[book] Was Yosef on the Spectrum?:
A Contemporary Reading of the
Joseph Story in the Torah
by Samuel J. Levine
(Touro Law Center)
August 1,2018
Urim Publications
Yosef’s behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and personal development are often difficult to understand and seem to defy explanation. This book presents a coherent and cohesive reading of the well known Bible story that offers a plausible account of Yosef’s behaviors, specifically those of an individual on the autism spectrum. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder.





























[book] The Commentators' Bible:
Genesis:
The Rubin JPS Miqra’ot Gedolot
Edited by Michael Carasik
August 2018
JPS Jewish Publication Society


The biblical commentaries known as Miqra’ot Gedolot have inspired and educated generations of Hebrew readers. With the publication of this edition—the final volume of the acclaimed JPS English edition of Miqra’ot Gedolot—the voices of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Nachmanides, Rashbam, Abarbanel, Kimhi, and other medieval Bible commentators come alive once more, speaking in a contemporary English translation annotated for lay readers.

Each page in The Commentators’ Bible: Genesis: The Rubin JPS Miqra’ot Gedolot contains several verses from the book of Genesis, surrounded by both the 1917 and the 1985 JPS translations and by new contemporary English translations of the major commentators. The book also includes a glossary of terms, a list of names used in the text, notes on source texts, a special topics list, and resources for further study. This large-format volume is beautifully designed for easy navigation among the many elements on each page, including explanatory notes and selected additional comments from the works of Bekhor Shor, Sforno, Gersonides, and Hizkuni, among others.



























[book] The Arab of the Future 3:
The Circumcision Years:
A Childhood in the Middle East, 1985-1987
by Riad Sattouf
August 2018
Metropolitan
In the third installment of the acclaimed series, the Sattouf family begins to implode under the pressure of Hafez al-Assad's regime and the suffocation of their rural Syrian village.

The Arab of the Future is the widely acclaimed, internationally bestselling graphic memoir that tells the story of Riad Sattouf’s peripatetic childhood in the Middle East. In the first volume, which covers the years 1978–1984, his family moves between rural France, Libya, and Syria, where they eventually settle in his father’s native village of Ter Maaleh, near Homs. The second volume recounts young Riad’s first year attending school in Syria (1984–1985), where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of Hafez al-Assad. In this third volume, (1985–1987), Riad’s mother, fed up with the grinding reality of daily life in the village, decides she cannot take it any longer. When she resolves to move back to France, young Riad sees his father torn between his wife’s aspirations and the weight of family traditions.

























[book] Inside the Arab State
by Mehran Kamrava
August 15, 2018
Oxford University Press
The 2011 Arab uprisings and their subsequent aftermath have thrown into question some of our long-held assumptions about the foundational aspects of the Arab state. While the regional and international consequences of the uprisings continue to unfold with great unpredictability, their ramifications for the internal lives of the states in which they unfolded are just as dramatic and consequential. States historically viewed as models of strength and stability have been shaken to their foundations. Borders thought impenetrable have collapsed; sovereignty and territoriality have been in flux.

This book examines some of the central questions facing observers and scholars of the Middle East concerning the nature of power and politics before and after 2011 in the Arab world. The focus of the book revolves around the very nature of politics and the exercise of power in the Arab world, conceptions of the state, its functions and institutions, its sources of legitimacy, and basic notions underlying it such as sovereignty and nationalism.

Inside the Arab State adopts a multi-disciplinary approach, examining a broad range of political, economic, and social variables. It begins with an examination of politics, and more specifically political institutions, in the Arab world from the 1950s on, tracing the travail of states, and the wounds they inflicted on society and on themselves along the way, until the eruption of the 2011 uprisings. The uprisings, the states' responses to them, and efforts by political leaders to carve out for themselves means of legitimacy are also discussed, as are the reasons for the emergence and rise of Daesh and the Islamic State. Power, I argue, and increasingly narrow conceptions of it in terms of submission and conformity, remains at the heart of Arab politics, popular protests and yearnings for change notwithstanding. Much has changed in the Arab world over the last several decades. But even more has stayed the same.











































[book] In the Shadow of King Saul:
Essays on Silence and Song
(The Art of the Essay)
by Jerome Charyn
August 29, 2018
Bellevue Literary Press
In the New York Review of Books, Joyce Carol Oates expressed her admiration for an equally prolific contemporary: "Among Charyn's writerly gifts is a dazzling energy. . . . [He is] an exuberant chronicler of the mythos of American life"; the Los Angeles Times described him as "absolutely unique among American writers." In these ten essays, Charyn shares personal stories about places steeped in history and myth, including his beloved New York, and larger-than-life personalities from the Bible and from the worlds of film, literature, politics, sports, and the author's own family. Together, writes Charyn, these essays create "my own lyrical autobiography. Several of the selections are about other writers, some celebrated, some forgotten. . . . All of [whom] scalped me in some way, left their mark."

Jerome Charyn is the author of more than fifty works of fiction and nonfiction. Among other honors, Charyn has been named a Commander of Arts and Letters by the French Minister of Culture and received the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.



























[book] The Crusader Armies:
1099–1187
by Steve Tibble
(Univ of London)
August 2018
Yale University Press
A major new history of the Crusades that illuminates the strength and sophistication of the Western and Muslim armies

During the Crusades, the Western and Muslim armies developed various highly sophisticated strategies of both attack and defense, which evolved during the course of the battles. In this ambitious new work, Steve Tibble draws on a wide range of Muslim texts and archaeological evidence as well as more commonly cited Western sources to analyze the respective armies’ strategy, adaptation, evolution, and cultural diversity and show just how sophisticated the Crusader armies were even by today’s standards.

In the first comprehensive account of the subject in sixty years, Tibble takes a fresh approach to Templars, Hospitallers, and other key Orders and makes the controversial proposition that the Crusades were driven as much by sedentary versus nomadic tribal concerns as by religious conflict. This fluently written, broad-ranging narrative provides a crucial missing piece in the study of the West’s attempts to colonize the Middle East during the Middle Ages.



























[book] BLOOD PAPA
Rwanda's New Generation
by Jean Hatzfeld
(Liberation)
Joshua David Jordan (Translator)
August 2018
FS&G
The continuation of a groundbreaking study of the Rwandan genocide, and the story of the survivor generation

In Rwanda from April to June 1994, 800,000 Tutsis were slaughtered by their Hutu neighbors in the largest and swiftest genocide since World War II. In his previous books, Jean Hatzfeld has documented the lives of the killers and victims, but after twenty years he has found that the enormity of understanding doesn’t stop with one generation. In Blood Papa, Hatzfeld returns to the hills and marshes of Nyamata to ask what has become of the children-those who never saw the machetes yet have grown up in the shadow of tragedy.

Fabrice, Sandra, Jean-Pierre, and others share the genocide as a common inheritance. Some have known only their parents’ silence and lies, enduring the harassment of classmates or the stigma of a father jailed for unspeakable crimes. Others have enjoyed a loving home and the sympathies offered to survivor children, but do so without parents or an extended family.

The young Rwandans in Blood Papa see each other in the neighborhood-they dance and gossip, frequent the same cafés, and, like teenagers everywhere, love sports, music, and fashion; they surf the Web and dream of marriage. Yet Hutu and Tutsi children rarely speak of the ghosts that haunt their lives. Here their moving first-person accounts combined with Hatzfeld’s arresting chronicles of everyday life form a testament to survival in a country devastated by the terrible crimes and trauma of the past.



























[book] The Disordered Mind:
What Unusual Brains Tell
Us About Ourselves
by Eric R. Kandel
Summer 2018
FS&G
Eric R. Kandel, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts.

In his seminal new book, The Disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. As a result, the brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, resulting in diseases such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities-the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower.

By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, we will deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behavior, memory, and creativity. Only then can we grapple with the big question of how billions of neurons generate consciousness itself. .


























[book] Outside the Wire:
Ten Lessons I've Learned
in Everyday Courage
by Jason Kander
AUGUST 2018
Twelve

Yes, for those wondering... Jason was raised in a Jewish household.
A smart and revealing political memoir from a rising star of the Democratic Party.

"In life and in politics, the most important work is often that which happens outside the wire."

Going "outside the wire" -- military lingo for leaving the safety of a base -- has taught Jason Kander to take risks and make change rather than settling for the easy option. After you've volunteered to put your life on the line with and for your fellow Americans in Afghanistan, cynical politics and empty posturing back home just feel like an insult.

Kander understands that showing political courage really just means doing the right thing no matter what. He won a seat in the Missouri Legislature at age twenty-seven and then, at thirty-one, became the first millennial in the country elected to statewide office. An unapologetic progressive from the heartland, he rejected conventional political wisdom and stood up to the NRA in 2016 with a now-famous Senate campaign ad in which he argued for gun reform while assembling a rifle blindfolded.

That fearless commitment to service has placed him at the forefront of a new generation of American political leaders. In his final interview as President, Barack Obama pointed to Kander as the future of the Democratic Party.

"...do something rather than be something..."

In OUTSIDE THE WIRE, Jason Kander describes his journey from Midwestern suburban kid to soldier to politician and details what he's learned along the way: lessons imparted by his dad on the baseball diamond, wisdom gained outside the wire in Kabul, and cautionary tales witnessed under the Missouri Capitol dome. Kander faced down petty tyrants in Jefferson City -- no big deal after encountering real ones in Afghanistan. He put in 90,000 miles campaigning for statewide office in 2012 -- no sweat compared to the thirty-seven miles between Bagram Air Base and Camp Eggers. When confronted with a choice between what's easy and what's right, he's never hesitated.

OUTSIDE THE WIRE is a candid, practical guide for anyone thinking about public service and everyone wishing to make a difference. It's a call to action, an entertaining meditation on the demands and rewards of civic engagement, and, ultimately, a hopeful vision for America's future -- all seen through the eyes of one of its most dedicated servants.
























[book] We Regret to Inform You
by Ariel Kaplan
AUGUST 21, 2018
KNOPF
Ages 12 and up
When a high achiever is rejected by every Ivy League college--AND her safety school--her life is turned upside down. Fans of Becky Albertalli will appreciate this witty, heartfelt novel that puts college admissions in perspective.

Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she's rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly résumé-padding extracurriculars (read: Students for Sober Driving) ... all that for nothing.
As Mischa grapples with the prospect of an increasingly uncertain future, she questions how this could have happened in the first place. Is it possible that her transcript was hacked? With the help of her best friend and sometimes crush, Nate, and a group of eccentric techies known as "The Ophelia Syndicate," Mischa launches an investigation that will shake the quiet community of Blanchard Prep to its stately brick foundations.
In her sophomore novel, A. E. Kaplan cranks the humor to full blast, and takes a serious look at the extreme pressure of college admissions.
"A well-written, intricately plotted, and sympathetic portrayal of the pressures that some elite college-bound kids experience during senior year. "--Kirkus Reviews, starred review
A Junior Library Guild Selection














































[book] The Eyes of Isaac:
Medical and Halachic Perspectives
on Ophthalmologic Conditions
Edited by Norman Saffra, MD FACS
Foreword by Alan Kadish
SEPTEMBER 2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

A compilation of essays and studies from leading doctors, professors, and rabbis, The Eyes of Isaac endeavors to connect important medical and psychological issues of ophthalmology with Jewish law. Rabbis and physicians navigate the daily challenges that visual disability presents for themselves as well as for those under their care. Interspersed with personal anecdotes and stories, The Eyes of Isaac offers profound knowledge on the significant organ and diseases related to it, and how those diseases, such as glaucoma, can affect the practice of daily Jewish rituals. Included in this collection are explanations of eye diseases, considerations on how to treat them, along with the detailed process of medical surgeries in ophthalmology.
























[book] Beyond Routine:
Turning Ritual into Meaningful
Jewish Practice
by Rabbi Yehoshua C. Grunstein
2018
URIM PUBLICATIONS

Beyond Routine cleverly addresses the routine commandments and rituals in Judaism and explain show they can become more meaningful. Judaism is filled with many customs, such as shaking the four species on Sukkot or lighting candles to welcome the Sabbath. Rabbi Grunstein noticed that while many Jews know the ''how'' of performing these mitzvot, they do not understand how these mitzvot can elevate their own level of holiness. Looking at these rituals in this light, Beyond Routine: Turning Ritual into Meaningful Jewish Practice addresses questions such as: How is each custom significant? What emotions should one have while and after performing the commandment? How can a technical observance actually influence a person? It is the goal and hope that the reader will gain an understanding of the mitzvot themselves, and perform them with greater appreciation and personal meaning.
























[book] LAKE SUCCESS
A novel
by Jimmigrant, Gary Shteyngart
September 2018
Random House
“Barry Cohen, a man with $2.4 billion of assets under management, staggered into the Port Authority Bus Terminal”... a soul-less, heartless, dissatisfied, gambling hedge fund manager with a nice watch collection. The sparks of love and compassion do not exist. But there is nice real estate. Can Cohen find the dreams and love of his youth. Can he be like Jack Kerouac on the road on a bus?

When his dream of the perfect marriage, the perfect son, and the perfect life implodes, a Wall Street millionaire takes a cross-country bus trip in search of his college sweetheart and ideals of youth in the long-awaited novel, his first in seven years, from the acclaimed, bestselling author of Super Sad True Love Story.

Myopic, narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his 3 year-old-son’s diagnosis of non-verbal autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart, whom he hasn't seen or spoken to in years. (Barry himself grew up perhaps on the spectrum) Meanwhile, reeling from the fight that caused Barry's departure, his super-smart Indian-American wife Seema — a driven first-generation American who craved a picture-perfect life, with all the accoutrements of a huge bank account — has her own demons to face. Barry is a “socially liberal Republican.” But he isn't. When the woman he meets on a bus takes his watches to place in a safe, since she is brown skinned, he assumes she is stealing them. He thinks he has always been honorable and right, but he hasn't been. How these two imperfect characters navigate the Shteyngartian chaos of their own making is the heart of this biting, brilliant, emotionally resonant novel very much of our times.

Note: The Urban Watch Fund – a school for drug dealers to learn to operate expensive watches. Just because you bet well and make billions on the stock market does not mean you can run a city or a charter school.





























[book] 21 LESSONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
BY YUVAL NOAH HARARI
(Hebrew Univ)
September 4, 2018
Spiegel und Grau

In SAPIENS, he explored our past.
In HOME DEUS, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues.

How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human?
How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news?
Are nations and religions still relevant?
What should we teach our children? Does teaching our current school courses matter? Should we teach EQ Emotional Intelligence and resilience?
If AI changes the nature and value of work, will there be a class of people without economic value?
Should current 22 year old expect to change careers... how many times?
If identity is tied to economic value and job title... how will identity and politics change?
DO we have to meditate for two hours each day as the author does?

Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 LESSONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

In 21 accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in:
How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us?
What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it?
How should we deal with the threat of terrorism?
Why is liberal democracy in crisis?
Will more Jews abandon religion? Will they move to Orthodox Judaism as a shield from change or a source of greater meaning?


Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading. “If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: ‘What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?’ . . . Thoughtful readers will find 21 Lessons for the 21st Century to be a mind-expanding experience.”—BookPage (top pick) BR>





























[book] Living in the Presence:
A Jewish Mindfulness Guide
for Everyday Life
by Rabbi Benjamin Epstein, PsyD
September 2018
URIM
In our frantic, fast paced society, we need constant guidance to remind us that we can only find the peace of mind we sorely lack by looking inward. Judaism, like many other spiritual traditions, offers a unique path to cultivating fulfillment and presence of mind. In cultivating peace of mind, we do not aim to achieve transcendence. Rather, our goal is to enter fully into whatever is occurring in our lives and meet it with full presence. But being a better Jew and a happier person are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they are mutually interdependent. From the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep, biblical commandments provide us with guidelines that encourage us to be aware of the present moment. A Guide to Jewish Mindfulness provides concise and clear instructions on how to cultivate peace of mind in order to attain a life of greater commitment and inspiration for the present moment.


























[book] Zion's Fiction:
A Treasury of Israeli
Speculative Literature
Edited by Sheldon Teitelbaum,
and Emanuel Lottem
Illustrated by Avi Katz
SEPTEMBER 2018
Mandel Villar Press

This anthology showcases the best Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature published since the 1980s. The stories included come from Hebrew, Russian, and English-language sources, and include well-known authors such as
Shimon Adaf, Pesach (Pavel) Amnuel,
Gail Hareven, Savyon Liebrecht,
Nava Semel and Lavie Tidhar,
as well as a hot-list of newly translated Israeli writers.

The book features: an historical and contemporary survey of Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature by the editors; a foreword by revered SF/F writer Robert Silverberg,; an afterword by Dr. Aharon Hauptman, the founding editor of Fantasia 2000, Israel’s seminal SF/F magazine; an author biography for each story included in the volume; and illustrations for each story by award winning American-born Israeli artist, Avi Katz.

“Zion’s Fiction will supply a distinctive bright line to the spectrum of futuristic fiction, which stands in sore need of broadening, in the cause of promoting cross-cultural understanding as well as showcasing exciting new talent.”– Brian Stableford, author of over 70 novels and renowned SF historian

“Zion’s Fiction explores the unlimited dreams of a people who have learned to stand on shifting ground. To face a future filled with danger and hope, forging into territory that can only be surveyed with the lamp of imagination on our brows.”– David Brin, multiple Hugo and Nebula award-author of EARTH and Existence

“When my collection Wandering Stars: An Anthology of Jewish Fantasy and Science Fiction was published in 1974,[It] became a classic. And now…we have the first ever anthology in the entire universe of Israeli fantasy and science fiction: Zion’s Fiction…Go forth and read…and may you find Zion’s Fiction unexpected, delightful, and delirious!” –Jack Dann, award winning author and editor of over 75 books including The Memory Cathedral and The Silent

“The basic joy in science fiction and fantasy is the chance to look inside minds different from your own. Here’s your chance. Some bright minds in the nation of Israel have been exercising their imaginations, sharing their different dreams and nightmares, and the results are ours to enjoy.” – Larry Niven, a multiple Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of the Ringworld Series

Sheldon Teitelbaum, an award-winning Los Angeles-based Canadian/American/Israeli writer, and former member of the Editorial Board of Fantasia 2000, is a longtime commentator on Jewish and Israeli science fiction and fantasy literature who has published widely in the Los Angeles Times, Cinefantastique, The Jerusalem Report, Foundation: The Review of Science Fiction, and The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction

Emanuel Lottem, a central figure in Israeli science fiction and fantasy scene and former member of the Editorial Board of Fantasia 2000, is the translator and editor of some of the best SF/F books published in Hebrew, and a moving force in the creation of the Israeli Society for Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Avi Katz, an award-winning American-born Israeli illustrator, cartoonist, and painter, is the staff illustrator of Jerusalem Report magazine. He has illustrated over 170 books in Israel and the United States.
























[book] FEAR
TRUMP IN THE WHITE HOUSE
by BOB WOODWARD
Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 11, 2018
Simon and Schuster

To be published on Rosh Hashanah, the inside story on President Trump and the White House as only a Bob Woodward can tell it

Trump on War: You don't need a strategy to kill people. Just kill more people.
Trump on Power: Real power... is fear
John Kelly on Trump: He is an idiot.. off the rails... crazytown.

DO we learn anything we don't already know in Woodward's wooden, boring, severely fact checked stories? Not really. It is information already known or assumed, just given the STAMP of Woodward. It is the story of a leader who likes the smell of his own sulfur. It is a story of a bloody and violent White House where players with their own ambitions and agendas are pitted against each other. It is a story where Cohn and Porter conspire to keep information and document from a mercurial and unpredictable Trump. You can say that former advisor Gary Cohn is the center of the story.

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence.

Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president’s first years in office.





SEE ALSO: NIGHT OF CAMP DAVID BY FLETCHER KNEBEL (1965)
SEE ALSO: Richard Nixon: A Life by John A. Farrell
SEE ALSO: Line of Fire by Admiral William J. 8Crowe



















[book] Passing for Human:
A Graphic Memoir
by Liana Finck
Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 18, 2018
Random House

A visually arresting graphic memoir about a young artist struggling against what’s expected of her as a woman, and learning to accept her true self, from an acclaimed New Yorker cartoonist.

In this achingly beautiful graphic memoir, Liana Finck goes in search of that thing she has lost—her shadow, she calls it, but one might also think of it as the “otherness” or “strangeness” that has defined her since birth, that part of her that has always made her feel as though she is living in exile from the world. In Passing for Human, Finck is on a quest for self-understanding and self-acceptance, and along the way she seeks to answer some eternal questions: What makes us whole? What parts of ourselves do we hide or ignore or chase away—because they’re embarrassing, or inconvenient, or just plain weird—and at what cost?

Passing for Human is what Finck calls “a neurological coming-of-age story”—one in which, through her childhood, human connection proved elusive and her most enduring relationships were with plants and rocks and imaginary friends; in which her mother was an artist whose creative life had been stifled by an unhappy first marriage and a deeply sexist society that seemed expressly designed to snuff out creativity in women; in which her father was a doctor who struggled in secret with the guilt of having passed his own form of otherness on to his daughter; and in which, as an adult, Finck finally finds her shadow again—and, with it, her true self.

Melancholy and funny, personal and surreal, Passing for Human is a profound exploration of identity by one of the most talented young comic artists working today. Part magical odyssey, part feminist creation myth, this memoir is, most of all, an extraordinary, moving meditation on what it means to be an artist and a woman grappling with the desire to pass for human.

Advance praise for Passing for Human
“In its ambition, framing, and multiple layers, [Passing for Human] raises the bar for graphic narrative. Even fans of [Liana Finck’s] work in the New Yorker will be blindsided by this outstanding book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
“A sure hit for readers of graphic memoirs, this explores feeling different while recognizing sameness in others and making art while embracing being a work-in progress oneself.”—Annie Bostrom, Booklist
“This story is as tender as it is wry. . . . Becoming human is a lifelong task—but Finck illustrates it with humor and panache.”—Publishers Weekly



















[book] The Cut Out Girl:
A Story of War and Family,
Lost and Found
by Bart van Es
2018
Penguin Press

The extraordinary true story of a young Jewish girl in Holland during World War II, who hides from the Nazis in the homes of an underground network of foster families, one of them the author's grandparents

Bart van Es left Holland for England many years ago, but one story from his Dutch childhood never left him. It was a mystery of sorts: a young Jewish girl named Lientje had been taken in during the war by relatives and hidden from the Nazis, handed over by her parents, who understood the danger they were in all too well. The girl had been raised by her foster family as one of their own, but then, well after the war, there was a falling out, and they were no longer in touch. What was the girl's side of the story, Bart wondered? What really happened during the war, and after?

So began an investigation that would consume Bart van Es's life, and change it. After some sleuthing, he learned that Lientje was now in her 80s and living in Amsterdam. Somewhat reluctantly, she agreed to meet him, and eventually they struck up a remarkable friendship, even a partnership. The Cut Out Girl braids together a powerful recreation of that intensely harrowing childhood story of Lientje's with the present-day account of Bart's efforts to piece that story together, including bringing some old ghosts back into the light.

It is a story rich with contradictions. There is great bravery and generosity--first Lientje's parents, giving up their beloved daughter, and then the Dutch families who face great danger from the Nazi occupation for taking Lientje and other Jewish children in. And there are more mundane sacrifices a family under brutal occupation must make to provide for even the family they already have. But tidy Holland also must face a darker truth, namely that it was more cooperative in rounding up its Jews for the Nazis than any other Western European country; that is part of Lientje's story too. Her time in hiding was made much more terrifying by the energetic efforts of the local Dutch authorities, zealous accomplices in the mission of sending every Jew, man, woman and child, East to their extermination. And Lientje was not always particularly well treated, and sometimes, Bart learned, she was very badly treated indeed.

The Cut Out Girl is an astonishment, a deeply moving reckoning with a young girl's struggle for survival during war, a story about the powerful love of foster families but also the powerful challenges, and about the ways our most painful experiences define us but also can be redefined, on a more honest level, even many years after the fact. A triumph of subtlety, decency and unflinching observation, The Cut Out Girl is a triumphant marriage of many keys of writing, ultimately blending them into an extraordinary new harmony, and a deeper truth.


























[book] NOT FOR THE FAINT
OF HEART
Lessons in Courage,
power and Persistence
by Ambassador Wendy R. Sherman
SEPTEMBER 2018
PublicAFFAIRS
Ambassador Sherman is loved by many and despised by many. She is credited with much of the Obama/Kerry administration's nuclear deal with Iran.

Sherman combines personal storytelling and expert insight to show readers how they can put diplomatic values like courage, persistence, and empathy to work in their own lives.

The art of diplomacy requires courage, persistence, and above all, authenticity. In Not for the Faint of Heart, Ambassador Wendy Sherman argues that we can all learn to put these qualities to work in our lives.

In this book, Sherman shares stories of her time in the State Department negotiating the most sensitive issues of our time (often as the lone woman in the room), along with personal stories that show how our private experiences affect our professional lives. She argues that we negotiate best when we are our authentic selves, not reliant on stratagems or manipulation but on all of the skills we've gained through our experiences.

Not for the Faint of Heart brings readers inside the world of international diplomacy and into the mind of one of our most effective diplomatic negotiators, revealing that success takes courage, the ability to forge common ground, and an understanding of the nature and use of power.





























[book] The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt:
A Tyranny of Truth
by Ken Krimstein
SEPTEMBER 2018
Bloomsbury

One of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century and a hero of political thought, the largely unsung and often misunderstood Hannah Arendt is best known for her landmark 1951 book on openness in political life, The Origins of Totalitarianism, which, with its powerful and timely lessons for today, has become newly relevant.

She led an extraordinary life. This was a woman who endured Nazi persecution firsthand, survived harrowing "escapes" from country to country in Europe, and befriended such luminaries as Walter Benjamin and Mary McCarthy, in a world inhabited by everyone from Marc Chagall and Marlene Dietrich to Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. A woman who finally had to give up her unique genius for philosophy, and her love of a very compromised man--the philosopher and Nazi-sympathizer Martin Heidegger--for what she called "love of the world."

Compassionate and enlightening, playful and page-turning, New Yorker cartoonist Ken Krimstein's The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt is a strikingly illustrated portrait of a complex, controversial, deeply flawed, and irrefutably courageous woman whose intelligence and "virulent truth telling" led her to breathtaking insights into the human condition, and whose experience continues to shine a light on how to live as an individual and a public citizen in troubled times.
























[book] The Collected Plays of Chaim Potok
by the late Chaim Potok
Edited by Rena Potok with
David Bassuk, Carol Rocamora, Aaron Posner
September 2018
Adam Kadmon Books

While Chaim Potok is most famous for his novels, particularly his first book The Chosen (1967), which was listed on The New York Times’ best seller list for 39 weeks and sold more than 3,400,000 copies, he also wrote plays all of which are collected and published here for the first time. In the course of excavating his files and VHS tapes, David Bassuk discovered a video of the post-performance discussion on Out of the Depths featuring Chaim Potok and Prof. David Roskies. The transcript of that talk also appears for the first time in print, in this volume.

Includes:
Out of the Depths (Previously did not exist in written form—the last version was a 1992 video of a staged workshop performance; this play was reconstructed in this collection by Rena Polok and David Bassuk using that version.)

Sins of the Father (The Carnival and The Gallery) (Staged in Philadelphia in 1990. Few copies existed, and the plays would have been lost if not for electronic preservation and updating.)

The Play of Lights (Performed in Philadelphia in 1992. Few, if any, copies of the play were left, and it would have been lost if not for electronic preservation and updating.) The Chosen (Performed in 1999. Adapted from the novel of the same name into a play by Chaim Potok and Aaron Posner.)






















[book] Kafka's Last Trial:
The Case of a Literary Legacy
by Benjamin Balint
September 2018
The story of the international struggle to preserve Kafka’s literary legacy... or that is what the parties said their motivation was

Kafka’s Last Trial tells the extraordinary story of the international struggle to preserve Franz Kafka’s literary legacy. It begins with Kafka’s last instruction to his closest friend, Max Brod: to destroy all his remaining papers upon his death. But when the moment arrived in 1924, Brod could not bring himself to burn the unpublished works of the man he considered a literary genius-even a saint. Instead, Brod devoted his life to championing Kafka’s writing, rescuing his legacy from obscurity and physical destruction.

The story of Kafka’s posthumous life is itself Kafkaesque. By the time of Brod’s own death in Tel Aviv in 1968, Kafka’s major works had been published, transforming the once little-known writer into a pillar of literary modernism. Yet Brod left a wealth of still-unpublished papers to his secretary, who sold some, held on to the rest, and then passed the bulk of them on to her daughters, who in turn refused to release them. An international legal battle erupted to determine which country could claim ownership of Kafka’s work: Israel, where Kafka dreamed of living but never entered, or Germany, where Kafka’s three sisters perished in the Holocaust?

Benjamin Balint offers a gripping account of the controversial trial in Israeli courts-brimming with dilemmas legal, ethical, and political-that determined the fate of Kafka’s manuscripts. Deeply informed, with sharply drawn portraits and a remarkable ability to evoke a time and place, Kafka’s Last Trial is at once a brilliant biographical portrait of a literary genius, and the story of two countries whose national obsessions with overcoming the traumas of the past came to a head in a hotly contested trial for the right to claim the literary legacy of one of our modern masters.


























[book] Our American Israel:
The Story of an
Entangled Alliance
by Amy Kaplan
(Professor, Univ of Pennsylvania)
September 17, 2018
Harvard University Press

An essential account of America’s most controversial alliance that reveals how the United States came to see Israel as an extension of itself, and how that strong and divisive partnership plays out in our own time.

Our American Israel tells the story of how a Jewish state in the Middle East came to resonate profoundly with a broad range of Americans in the twentieth century. Beginning with debates about Zionism after World War II, Israel’s identity has been entangled with America’s belief in its own exceptional nature. Now, in the twenty-first century, Amy Kaplan challenges the associations underlying this special alliance.

Through popular narratives expressed in news media, fiction, and film, a shared sense of identity emerged from the two nations’ histories as settler societies. Americans projected their own origin myths onto Israel: the biblical promised land, the open frontier, the refuge for immigrants, the revolt against colonialism. Israel assumed a mantle of moral authority, based on its image as an “invincible victim,” a nation of intrepid warriors and concentration camp survivors. This paradox persisted long after the Six-Day War, when the United States rallied behind a story of the Israeli David subduing the Arab Goliath. The image of the underdog shattered when Israel invaded Lebanon and Palestinians rose up against the occupation. Israel’s military was strongly censured around the world, including notes of dissent in the United States. Rather than a symbol of justice, Israel became a model of military strength and technological ingenuity.

In America today, Israel’s political realities pose difficult challenges. Turning a critical eye on the turbulent history that bound the two nations together, Kaplan unearths the roots of present controversies that may well divide them in the future.
























[book] Then They Came for Me:
Martin Niemöller, the Pastor
Who Defied the Nazis
by Matthew D Hockenos
September 2018
"First they came for the Communists, and I did not speak out-Because I was not a Communist..."

Few today recognize the name Martin Niemöller, though many know his famous confession. In Then They Came for Me, Matthew Hockenos traces Niemöller's evolution from a Nazi supporter to a determined opponent of Hitler, revealing him to be a more complicated figure than previously understood.

Born into a traditionalist Prussian family, Niemöller welcomed Hitler's rise to power as an opportunity for national rebirth. Yet when the regime attempted to seize control of the Protestant Church, he helped lead the opposition and was soon arrested. After spending the war in concentration camps, Niemöller emerged a controversial figure: to his supporters he was a modern Luther, while his critics, including President Harry Truman, saw him as an unrepentant nationalist.

A nuanced portrait of courage in the face of evil, Then They Came for Me puts the question to us today: What would I have done?

























[book] God Is in the Crowd:
Twenty-First-Century Judaism
by Tal Keinan
September 25, 2018
Spiegel & Grau
Part call to action and part riveting personal story, an original proposal for discovering relevance in Judaism and ensuring its survival from a pioneering social activist and Harvard MBA business leader who served as a pilot in the Israel Air Force.

God Is in the Crowd is an original and provocative blueprint for Judaism in the 21st century, told through the lens of Keinan's unusual personal story. Keinan's analysis of the threat to Jewish continuity is sobering: as Jewry has become concentrated in just two parts of the world, America and Israel, the Jewish people has lost the subtle code of governance that made Judaism relevant in the Diaspora. This "code," as Keinan explains it, is a derivative of Francis Galton's wisdom of crowds (aka swarm intelligence or collective intelligence). Keinan argues forcefully that the science of crowd wisdom has played a key role in Jewish survival over the centuries and must be resurrected now, since the alternative is the extinction of the Jews. Born to a secular Jewish family in Florida, Keinan's interest in Judaism was piqued by a Christian minister at Exeter. That interest took him down an unlikely path to becoming a fighter pilot in the Israel Air Force. Through the prism of his own dramatic personal story and the lessons he learned from his professional life, Keinan embarks on an investigation of the core values of Judaism in the twenty-first century, and looks to the relationship between American and Israeli Jews to enrich world Jewry in a post-Diaspora age. God Is in the Crowd presents an innovative plan in which the wisdom of the Jewish crowd is harnessed to endow Judaism with new purpose and ensure its survival.

























ISRAEL'S NON FICTION BEST SELLER NOW IN ENGLISH
THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE ARE OCCUPIED, BUT THE LAND IS NOT?
[book] CATCH-67:
The Left, the Right, and the
Legacy of the Six-Day War
by Micah Goodman
(Shalom Hartman Inst, Jerusalem )
Eylon Levy (Translator)
September 2018
Yale University Press

Since the Six-Day War, Israelis have been entrenched in a national debate over whether to keep the land they conquered or to return some, if not all, of the territories to Palestinians. In a balanced and insightful analysis, Micah Goodman deftly sheds light on the ideas that have shaped Israelis' thinking on both sides of the debate, and among secular and religious Jews about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Contrary to opinions that dominate the discussion, he shows that the paradox of Israeli political discourse is that both sides are right in what they affirm—and wrong in what they deny. Although he concludes that the conflict cannot be solved, Goodman is far from a pessimist and explores how instead it can be reduced in scope and danger through limited, practical steps. Through philosophical critique and political analysis, Goodman builds a creative, compelling case for pragmatism in a dispute where a comprehensive solution seems impossible.



Goodman confidently and articulately addresses controversial topics including the demographic threat Israel's Arab population poses to the current Jewish majority; the arguments within Jewish law over how the valuing of human life impacts territorial concessions; the formation of a "Judeo-Muslim" narrative in place of a Judeo-Christian one; and the accusations that Israel’s treatment of Palestinians makes it an occupying, colonialist and apartheid state. Goodman separates fact from fiction, even-handedly presenting the case for reasonable arguments, and dismissing those which lack legal, political or historical justification. – Stu Halpern, Jewish Book Council






















[book] The Sisters of the Winter Wood
by Rena Rossner
September 2018
Redhook
Captivating and boldly imaginative, with a tale of sisterhood at its heart, Rena Rossner's debut fantasy invites you to enter a world filled with magic, folklore, and the dangers of the woods.

Raised in a remote village surrounded by vast forests on the border of Moldova and Ukraine, sisters Liba and Laya live a peaceful, sheltered life.

But when a troupe of mysterious men arrives, Laya falls under their spell-despite their mother's warning to be wary of strangers. And this is not the only danger lurking in the woods....

As dark forces close in on their small village, Liba and Laya discover a family secret passed down through generations. Faced with a magical heritage they never knew existed, the sisters realize the old fairy tales are true...and could save them all.


























[book] The Person You Mean to Be:
How Good People
Fight Bias
by Dolly Chugh
Laszlo Bock (Foreword)
September 2018
Harper Business
An inspiring guide from Dolly Chugh, an award-winning social psychologist at the New York University Stern School of Business, on how to confront difficult issues including sexism, racism, inequality, and injustice so that you can make the world (and yourself) better.

Many of us believe in equality, diversity, and inclusion. But how do we stand up for those values in our turbulent world? The Person You Mean to Be is the smart, "semi-bold" person’s guide to fighting for what you believe in.

Dolly reveals the surprising causes of inequality, grounded in the "psychology of good people". Using her research findings in unconscious bias as well as work across psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and other disciplines, she offers practical tools to respectfully and effectively talk politics with family, to be a better colleague to people who don’t look like you, and to avoid being a well-intentioned barrier to equality. Being the person we mean to be starts with a look at ourselves.

She argues that the only way to be on the right side of history is to be a good-ish— rather than good—person. Good-ish people are always growing. Second, she helps you find your "ordinary privilege"—the part of your everyday identity you take for granted, such as race for a white person, sexual orientation for a straight person, gender for a man, or education for a college graduate. This part of your identity may bring blind spots, but it is your best tool for influencing change. Third, Dolly introduces the psychological reasons that make it hard for us to see the bias in and around us. She leads you from willful ignorance to willful awareness. Finally, she guides you on how, when, and whom, to engage (and not engage) in your workplaces, homes, and communities. Her science-based approach is a method any of us can put to use in all parts of our life.

Whether you are a long-time activist or new to the fight, you can start from where you are. Through the compelling stories Dolly shares and the surprising science she reports, Dolly guides each of us closer to being the person we mean to be.

























[book] Button Man
a novel
by Andrew Gross
September 2018
Minotaur Books
Following up The One Man and The Saboteur, Gross's next historical thriller brings to life the drama of the birth of organized crime in 1930s New York City from the tale of one family.

After a string of New York Times bestselling suburban thrillers, Andrew Gross has reinvented himself as a writer of historical thrillers. In his latest novel, Button Man, he delivers a stirring story of a Jewish family brought together in the dawn of the women's garment business and torn apart by the birth of organized crime in New York City in the 1930s.

Morris, Sol, and Harry Rabishevsky grew up poor and rough in a tiny flat on the Lower East Side, until the death of their father thrust them into having to fend for themselves and support their large family. Morris, the youngest, dropped out of school at twelve years old and apprenticed himself to a garment cutter in a clothing factory; Sol headed to accounting school; but Harry, scarred by a family tragedy, fell in with a gang of thugs as a teenager. Morris steadily climbs through the ranks at the factory until at twenty-one he finally goes out on his own, convincing Sol to come work with him. But Harry can't be lured away from the glamour, the power, and the money that come from his association with Louis Buchalter, whom Morris has battled with since his youth and who has risen to become the most ruthless mobster in New York. And when Buchalter sets his sights on the unions that staff the garment makers' factories, a fatal showdown is inevitable, pitting brother against brother.

This new novel is equal parts historical thriller, rich with the detail of a vibrant New York City in the 1920s and 1930s, and family saga, based on Andrew Gross's own family story and on the history of the era, complete with appearances by real-life characters like mobsters Louis Lepke and Dutch Schultz and special prosecutor Thomas Dewey, and cements Gross's reputation as today's most atmospheric and original historical thriller writer.

























[book] THE PARTING GIFT
a novel
By Evan Fallenberg
(Bar Ilan University)
September 2018
Other Press
“An unabashed tale that does not pull punches and looks at love’s underside…This breathless story should only be read in one sitting. It hits hard and never lets up. Terse, brusque, etched on one’s inner thigh with an old serrated knife.” —André Aciman, author of Call Me by Your Name

This erotic tale of jealousy, obsession, and revenge is suffused with the rich flavors and intoxicating scents of Israel’s Mediterranean coast.

An unnamed narrator writes a letter to an old college friend, Adam, with whom he has been staying since his abrupt return to the States from Israel. Now that the narrator is moving on to a new location, he finally reveals the events that led him to Adam’s door, set in motion by a chance encounter with Uzi, a spice merchant whose wares had developed a cult following.

From his first meeting with Uzi, the narrator is overwhelmed by an animal attraction that will lead him to derail his life, withdraw from friends and extend his stay in a small town north of Tel Aviv. As he becomes increasingly entangled in Uzi’s life—and by extension the lives of Uzi’s ex-wife and children—his passion turns sinister, ultimately threatening all around him.

Written in a circuitous style that keeps you guessing until the end, The Parting Gift is a page-turner and a shrewd exploration of the roles men assume, or are forced to assume, as lovers, as fathers, as Israelis, as Palestinians.

























[book] The Real Lolita:
The Kidnapping of Sally Horner
and the Novel That Scandalized the World
by Sarah Weinman
September 11, 2018
“The Real Lolita is a tour de force of literary detective work. Not only does it shed new light on the terrifying true saga that influenced Nabokov’s masterpiece, it restores the forgotten victim to our consciousness.” —David Grann, author of Killers of the Flower Moon

Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita is one of the most beloved and notorious novels of all time. And yet, very few of its readers know that the subject of the novel was inspired by a real-life case: the 1948 abduction of eleven-year-old Sally Horner.

Weaving together suspenseful crime narrative, cultural and social history, and literary investigation, The Real Lolita tells (Florence) Sally Horner’s full story for the very first time. Drawing upon extensive investigations, legal documents, public records, and interviews with remaining relatives, Sarah Weinman uncovers how much Nabokov knew of the Sally Horner case and the efforts he took to disguise that knowledge during the process of writing and publishing Lolita.

Sally Horner’s story echoes the stories of countless girls and women who never had the chance to speak for themselves. By diving deeper in the publication history of Lolita and restoring Sally to her rightful place in the lore of the novel’s creation, The Real Lolita casts a new light on the dark inspiration for a modern classic.






























[book] Words Are Weapons:
Inside ISIS’s Rhetoric of Terror
by Philippe-Joseph Salazar
Dorna Khazeni (Translator)
September 12, 2018
Yale University Press

The first book to offer a rigorous, sophisticated analysis of ISIS’s rhetoric and why it is so persuasive

ISIS wages war not only on the battlefield but also online and in the media. Through a close examination of the words and images ISIS uses, with particular attention to the “digital caliphate” on the web, Philippe-Joseph Salazar theorizes an aesthetic of ISIS and its self-presentation. As a philosopher and historian of ideas, well versed in both the Western and the Islamic traditions, Salazar posits an interpretation of Islam that places speech—the profession of faith—at the center of devotion and argues that evocation of the simple yet profound utterance of faith is what gives power to the rhetoric that ISIS and others employ. At the same time, Salazar contends that Western discourse has undergone a “rhetorical disarmament.” To win the fight against ISIS and Islamic extremism, Western democracies, their media, politicians, and counterterrorism agencies must consider radically changing their approach to Islamic extremism.



























[book] Ninth Street Women:
Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning,
Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell,
and Helen Frankenthaler:
Five Painters and the Movement
That Changed Modern Art
by Mary Gabriel
September 25, 2018
Little, Brown
The rich, revealing, and thrilling story of five women whose lives and painting propelled a revolution in modern art

Set amid the most turbulent social and political period of modern times, Ninth Street Women is the impassioned, wild, sometimes tragic, always exhilarating chronicle of five women who dared to enter the male-dominated world of twentieth-century abstract painting--not as muses but as artists. From their cold-water lofts, where they worked, drank, fought, and loved, these pioneers burst open the door to the art world for themselves and countless others to come.

Gutsy and indomitable, Lee Krasner was a hell-raising leader among artists long before she became part of the modern art world's first celebrity couple by marrying Jackson Pollock. Elaine de Kooning, whose brilliant mind and peerless charm made her the emotional center of the New York School, used her work and words to build a bridge between the avant-garde and a public that scorned abstract art as a hoax. Grace Hartigan fearlessly abandoned life as a New Jersey housewife and mother to achieve stardom as one of the boldest painters of her generation. Joan Mitchell, whose notoriously tough exterior shielded a vulnerable artist within, escaped a privileged but emotionally damaging Chicago childhood to translate her fierce vision into magnificent canvases. And Helen Frankenthaler, the beautiful daughter of a prominent New York family, chose the difficult path of the creative life. Her gamble paid off: At twenty-three she created a work so original it launched a new school of painting.

These women changed American art and society, tearing up the prevailing social code and replacing it with a doctrine of liberation. In Ninth Street Women, acclaimed author Mary Gabriel tells a remarkable and inspiring story of the power of art and artists in shaping not just postwar America but the future.



























[book] Making History / Making Blintzes:
How Two Red Diaper Babies
Found Each Other and
Discovered America
by Mickey Flacks and
Dick Flacks
Rutgers University Press
September 2018
Making History/Making Blintzes is a chronicle of the political and personal lives of progressive activists Richard (Dick) and Miriam (Mickey) Flacks, two of the founders of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). As active members of the Civil Rights movement and the anti-Vietnam War movement in the 1960s, and leaders in today’s social movements, their stories are a first-hand account of progressive American activism from the 1960s to the present.

Throughout this memoir, the couple demonstrates that their lifelong commitment to making history through social activism cannot be understood without returning to the deeply personal context of their family history—of growing up “Red Diaper babies” in 1950s New York City, using folk music as self-expression as adolescents in the 1960s, and of making blintzes for their own family through the 1970s and 1980s. As the children of immigrants and first generation Jews, Dick and Mickey crafted their own religious identity as secular Jews, created a critical space for American progressive activism through SDS, and ultimately, found themselves raising an “American” family.

























[book] The Astronaut's Son
a novel
by Tom Seigel
Woodhall Press
September 2018
On the eve of the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing comes a novel in which a Jewish astronaut must reassess his moral compass when forced to confront NASA's early collaboration with Nazis and the role it may have played in his father's death.

Jonathan Stein thinks only a bad heart can stop him from reaching the moon. But when he discovers his father may have been murdered to protect an appalling NASA secret, he must decide whether his moral compass still points towards the stars. Days before the Apollo 18 launch in 1974, Jonathan's father, an Israeli astronaut at NASA, died of an apparent heart attack. A year before his own launch, in 2005, Jonathan, a typically devout skeptic, becomes captivated by the tale of a mysterious online conspiracy theorist who claims that his father had been killed. Unable to keep long-buried suspicions from resurfacing, he reopens the case, digging into a past that becomes stranger and more compelling the deeper he goes.

To get to the truth he must confront Dale Lunden, his father's best friend and the last man on the moon, and his elusive childhood hero Neil Armstrong. When his relentless pursuit of the truth leads to disturbing revelations about the Nazis who worked for NASA, the hardest questions to answer are the ones he must ask himself.

The Astronaut's Son was inspired by the true story of Nazi scientists and engineers at NASA.



























[book] Not Our Kind:
A Novel
by Kitty Zeldis
Harper
September 4, 2018
With echoes of Rules of Civility and The Boston Girl, a compelling and thought-provoking novel set in postwar New York City, about two women—one Jewish, one a WASP—and the wholly unexpected consequences of their meeting.

One rainy morning in June, two years after the end of World War II, a minor traffic accident brings together Eleanor Moskowitz and Patricia Bellamy. Their encounter seems fated: Eleanor, a teacher and recent Vassar graduate, needs a job. Patricia’s difficult thirteen-year-old daughter Margaux, recovering from polio, needs a private tutor.

Though she feels out of place in the Bellamys’ rarefied and elegant Park Avenue milieu, Eleanor forms an instant bond with Margaux. Soon the idealistic young woman is filling the bright young girl’s mind with Shakespeare and Latin. Though her mother, a hat maker with a little shop on Second Avenue, disapproves, Eleanor takes pride in her work, even if she must use the name "Moss" to enter the Bellamys’ restricted doorman building each morning, and feels that Patricia’s husband, Wynn, may have a problem with her being Jewish.

Invited to keep Margaux company at the Bellamys’ country home in a small town in Connecticut, Eleanor meets Patricia’s unreliable, bohemian brother, Tom, recently returned from Europe. The spark between Eleanor and Tom is instant and intense. Flushed with new romance and increasingly attached to her young pupil, Eleanor begins to feel more comfortable with Patricia and much of the world she inhabits. As the summer wears on, the two women’s friendship grows—until one hot summer evening, a line is crossed, and both Eleanor and Patricia will have to make important decisions—choices that will reverberate through their lives.

Gripping and vividly told, Not Our Kind illuminates the lives of two women on the cusp of change—and asks how much our pasts can and should define our futures.

























[book] The Great Delusion:
Liberal Dreams and
International Realities
by John J. Mearsheimer
Yale University Press
September 2018
Mearsheimer is famous in the American Jewish community for co-authoring a book a decade ago accusing the “Israel Lobby” of excessive influence in America, and writing that the “lobby” would attempt to injure him for what he wrote.

Yale Press writes that this is a major theoretical statement on why a policy of liberal hegemony is doomed to fail. He asserts that Washington should adopt a more restrained foreign policy based on an understanding of the power of nationalism. The USA should not try to spread liberal democracy across the world. The author also asserts that the United States has ended up as a highly militarized state fighting wars that undermine peace, harm human rights, and threaten liberal values at home.





























[book] Flame in the Night:
A Novel of World War II France
by Heather Munn
Kregel
September 2018
In occupied France, a teen is torn between hate and love Julien Losier has just turned eighteen. But this is Vichy France in 1942, and his coming of age is marred by the Nazi occupation of his homeland. His father has always taught him that evil is resisted by the power of God, not by the gun. But when the roundups of Jews begin and both his best friend and the girl he's falling for become targets, Julien must question where real power lies. Can he be a man who protects the people he loves if he follows his father's ways of peace?

His hometown is a fragile fortress where hundreds of Jewish youth hide in plain sight, protected only by the goodwill of their neighbors. Julien takes part in the intricate system of sentries and alert codes that keep them safe, doing what he can to resist the Nazis. As the Germans close in, he can see the moment coming when all the town's careful defenses will fail. He's torn between the faith of his father and his increasing surety that fighting violence with violence is the only way to win. How can the meek inherit the earth when the strong hold all the cards?

Now the young Jewish woman who has captured his heart comes under deadly threat, and there are no good choices. But for Elise, there's nothing Julien won't risk.

Based on actual events in Vichy France, Flame in the Night is a powerful examination of the strength of faith and peaceful resistance in the face of overwhelming odds.

































[book] Open to God:
Open to the World
by Pope Francis
and Antonio Spadaro
Bloomsbury
September 2018

Pope Francis here presents his hopes and aspirations for the Church in the future. Over the course of 16 conversations with Father Antonio Spadaro from 2013 to 2017, Pope Francis engages in a valuable dialogue. His impact on the modern world is extraordinary. He has turned the Catholic Church upside-down, flung open the windows of the Vatican and purged the Augean stables of corruption, simony, nepotism and financial skulduggery. But above all he is engaged with the poor, the starving and the marginalized.

Unlike his predecessor, he does not sit down in a room in the Vatican and write learned books. He is in constant dialogue with the outside world and with the universal Catholic Church. He likes being asked questions and finds it easy to respond. In this new book are some of his most valuable engagements in dialogue form with people of all sorts and kinds. Several of the interviews in this volume were originally meant to remain as private conversations. Father Spadaro recorded these free, spontaneous conversations for his own use, but upon listening again, he was struck by “a vision of church and a vision of the world” and worked with Pope Francis to make “rich vision” available to a wider audience.

The Franciscan revolution is under way and in spite of his vehement critics the revolution will roll on and new horizons will be opened for the one and a half billion Catholics in the world today. Including a preface by Pope Francis himself, as well as thoughts on his recent trips to Colombia, Myanmar, Chile, and Peru, Open to God: Open to the World reveals a leader's vision for progress.

































[book] The Battle for Bonhoeffer
by Stephen R. Haynes
Eerdmans
September 2018
The figure of Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) has become a clay puppet in modern American politics. Secular, radical, liberal, and evangelical interpreters variously shape and mold the martyr’s legacy to suit their own pet agendas.

Stephen Haynes offers an incisive and clarifying perspective. A recognized Bonhoeffer expert, Haynes examines “populist” readings of Bonhoeffer, including the acclaimed biography by Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. In his analysis Haynes treats, among other things, the November 2016 election of Donald Trump and the “Bonhoeffer moment” announced by evangelicals in response to the US Supreme Court’s 2015 decision to legalize same-sex marriage.

The Battle for Bonhoeffer includes an open letter from Haynes pointedly addressing Christians who still support Trump. Bonhoeffer’s legacy matters. Haynes redeems the life and the man.




































[book] The Last Palace:
Europe's Turbulent Century in Five
Lives and One Legendary House
by Norman Eisen
Crown
September 2018
A sweeping yet intimate narrative about the last hundred years of turbulent European history, as seen through one of Mitteleuropa’s greatest houses—and the lives of its occupants

When Norman Eisen moved into the US ambassador’s residence in Prague, returning to the land his mother had fled after the Holocaust, he was startled to discover swastikas hidden beneath the furniture in his new home. These symbols of Nazi Germany were remnants of the residence’s forgotten history, and evidence that we never live far from the past.

From that discovery unspooled the twisting, captivating tale of four of the remarkable people who had called this palace home. Their story is Europe’s, and The Last Palace chronicles the upheavals that transformed the continent over the past century. There was the optimistic Jewish financial baron, Otto Petschek, who built the palace after World War I as a statement of his faith in democracy, only to have that faith shattered; Rudolf Toussaint, the cultured, compromised German general who occupied the palace during World War II, ultimately putting his life at risk to save the house and Prague itself from destruction; Laurence Steinhardt, the first postwar US ambassador whose quixotic struggle to keep the palace out of Communist hands was paired with his pitched efforts to rescue the country from Soviet domination; and Shirley Temple Black, an eyewitness to the crushing of the 1968 Prague Spring by Soviet tanks, who determined to return to Prague and help end totalitarianism—and did just that as US ambassador in 1989.

Weaving in the life of Eisen’s own mother to demonstrate how those without power and privilege moved through history, The Last Palace tells the dramatic and surprisingly cyclical tale of the triumph of liberal democracy.

























[book] AI Superpowers:
China, Silicon Valley, and
the New World Order
by Kai-Fu Lee
HMH
September 25, 2018
Here are two well-known facts:
Artificial Intelligence is reshaping the world as we know it.
The United States has long been, and remains, the global leader in AI.

That first fact is correct. But in his provocative new book, Dr. Kai-Fu Lee—one of the world’s most respected experts on AI—reveals that China has suddenly caught up to the US at an astonishingly rapid pace. As the US-Sino competition begins to heat up, Lee envisions China and the US forming a powerful duopoly in AI, but one that is based on each nation’s unique and traditional cultural inclinations.

Building upon his longstanding US-Sino technology career (working at Apple, Microsoft and Google) and his much-heralded New York Times Op-Ed from June 2017, Dr. Lee predicts that Chinese and American AI will have a stunning impact on not just traditional blue-collar industries but will also have a devastating effect on white-collar professions. Is the concept of universal basic income the solution? In Dr. Lee’s opinion, probably not.

In AI Superpowers, he outlines how millions of suddenly displaced workers must find new ways to make their lives meaningful, and how government policies will have to deal with the unprecedented inequality between the "haves" and the "have-nots." Even worse, Lee says the transformation to AI is already happening all around us, whether we are aware of it or not.

Dr. Lee—a native of China but educated in America —argues powerfully that these unprecedented developments will happen much sooner than we think. He cautions us about the truly dramatic upheaval that AI will unleash and how we need to start thinking now on how to address these profound changes that are coming to our world.

























[book] The Challenge Culture:
Why the Most Successful
Organizations Run on Pushback
by Nigel Travis
Past CEO, Dunkin' Brands; now Chairman
PublicAffairs
September 2018

What is on the cover? A donut? A Baskin Robbins ice cream cone? No. A coffee.

William Rosenberg started Dunkin Donuts franchise system in 1950.

Now, the charismatic CEO of Dunkin' Brands (Dunkin' Donuts, Baskin-Robbins) shows how positive pushback--the discipline of "questioning everything without trashing anyone"--provides a unique results-oriented way to lead an organization to prosperity.

We live in a world where the move from success to failure can happen in a flash. Customers, competition, changing societal mores, and technology can bring on existential crisis. But as Dunkin' Brands Chairman and CEO Nigel Travis shows in The Challenge Culture, businesses can cope with change and go on to thrive by instituting a culture that supports positive pushback: questioning everything without trashing anything or anyone.

The ability to get colleagues to break out of conformity--especially when it means upending a culture of fear and authoritarianism--is a rare skill, one Nigel (everyone calls him Nigel) has been developing for decades. In a distinct, authentic, and authoritative voice, Nigel draws from a wide range of personal experiences--including the way Blockbuster dawdled in the face of the Netflix challenge, his early days at Dunkin' Donuts, and his recent foray into owning a UK soccer team--to show how a challenge culture is necessary to provide a human-oriented, results-driven blueprint for building a prosperous future.

To keep up with the times and grow, people need to be allowed to speak up and question the status quo, talk in a civil way about difficult issues, debate across disciplines, disagree about strategies and tactics in order to successfully move forward together.

























[book] To Obama:
With Love, Joy,
Anger, and Hope
by Jeanne Marie Laskas
(Univ of Pbg)
Random House
September 2018
Every day, President Obama received ten thousand letters from constituents. Every night, he read ten of them before going to bed. This is the story of the profound ways in which they shaped his presidency.

Every evening for eight years, at his request, President Obama received ten handpicked letters written by ordinary American citizens—the unfiltered voice of a nation—from his Office of Presidential Correspondence. He was the first president to interact daily with constituent mail and to archive it in its entirety. The letters affected not only the president and his policies but also the deeply committed people who were tasked with opening and reading the millions of pleas, rants, thank-yous, and apologies that landed in the White House mailroom.

In To Obama, Jeanne Marie Laskas interviews President Obama, the letter writers themselves, and the White House staff who sifted through the powerful, moving, and incredibly intimate narrative of America during the Obama years: There is Kelli, who saw her grandfathers finally marry—legally—after thirty-five years together; Bill, a lifelong Republican whose attitude toward immigration reform was transformed when he met a boy escaping MS-13 gang leaders in El Salvador; Heba, a Syrian refugee who wants to forget the day the tanks rolled into her village; Marjorie, who grappled with disturbing feelings of racial bias lurking within her during the George Zimmerman trial; and Vicki, whose family was torn apart by those who voted for Trump and those who did not.

They wrote to Obama out of gratitude and desperation, in their darkest times of need, in search of connection. They wrote with anger, fear, and respect. And together, this chorus of voices achieves a kind of beautiful harmony. To Obama is an intimate look at one man’s relationship to the American people, and at a time when empathy intersected with politics in the White House.

























[book] RIVER
by Esther Kinsky
Translated by Iain Galbraith
Transit Books
September 4, 2018
A woman moves to a London suburb near the River Lea, without knowing quite why or for how long. Over a series of long, solitary walks she reminisces about the rivers she has encountered during her life, from the Rhine, her childhood river, to the Saint Lawrence, and a stream in Tel Aviv. Filled with poignancy and poetic observation, River cements Esther Kinsky as a leading European prose stylist.































[book] NOT BAD FOR DELANCEY STREET
The Rise of Billy Rose
America's Great Jewish Impresario
(Brandeis Series in American
Jewish History, Culture, and Life)
by Mark Cohen
Brandeis University Press
September 4, 2018
He was amazing. “A little man with a Napoleonic penchant for the colossal and magnificent, Billy Rose is the country’s No. 1 purveyor of mass entertainment,” Life magazine announced in 1936. The Times reported that with 1,400 people on his payroll, Rose ran a larger organization than any other producer in America. “He's clever, clever, clever,” said Rose's first wife, the legendary Fanny Brice. “He's a smart little goose.” Not Bad for Delancey Street: The Rise of Billy Rose is the first biography in fifty years of the producer, World’s Fair impresario, songwriter, nightclub and theater owner, syndicated columnist, art collector, tough guy, and philanthropist, and the first to tell the whole story of Rose’s life. He combined a love for his thrilling and lucrative American moment with sometimes grandiose plans to aid his fellow Jews. He was an exaggerated exemplar of the American Jewish experience that predominated after World War II: secular, intermarried, bent on financial success, in love with Israel, and wedded to America.

The life of Billy Rose was set against the great events of the twentieth century, including the Depression, when Rose became rich entertaining millions; the Nazi war on the Jews, which Rose combated through theatrical pageants that urged the American government to act; the postwar American boom, which Rose harnessed to attain extraordinary wealth; and the birth of Israel, where Rose staked his claim to immortality. Mark Cohen tells the unlikely but true story, based on exhaustive research, of Rose’s single-handed rescue in 1939 of an Austrian Jewish refugee stranded in Fascist Italy, an event about which Rose never spoke but which surfaced fifty years later as the nucleus of Saul Bellow’s short novel The Bellarosa Connection.































[book] The Autobiography of Solomon Maimon:
The Complete Translation
by Solomon Maimon
but Edited and Translated by
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Abraham Socher,
and Paul Reitter
Foreword by Gideon Freudenthal
September 2018
Princeton University Press
The first complete and annotated English translation of Maimon’s influential and delightfully entertaining memoir

Solomon Maimon's autobiography has delighted readers for more than two hundred years, from Goethe, Schiller, and George Eliot to Walter Benjamin and Hannah Arendt. The American poet and critic Adam Kirsch has named it one of the most crucial Jewish books of modern times. Here is the first complete and annotated English edition of this enduring and lively work.

Born into a down-on-its-luck provincial Jewish family in 1753, Maimon quickly distinguished himself as a prodigy in learning. Even as a young child, he chafed at the constraints of his Talmudic education and rabbinical training. He recounts how he sought stimulation in the Hasidic community and among students of the Kabbalah--and offers rare and often wickedly funny accounts of both. After a series of picaresque misadventures, Maimon reached Berlin, where he became part of the city's famed Jewish Enlightenment and achieved the philosophical education he so desperately wanted, winning acclaim for being the "sharpest" of Kant's critics, as Kant himself described him.

This new edition restores text cut from the abridged 1888 translation by J. Clark Murray, which has long been the only available English edition. Paul Reitter's translation is brilliantly sensitive to the subtleties of Maimon's prose while providing a fluid rendering that contemporary readers will enjoy, and is accompanied by an introduction and notes by Yitzhak Melamed and Abraham Socher that give invaluable insights into Maimon and his extraordinary life. The book also features an afterword by Gideon Freudenthal that provides an authoritative overview of Maimon's contribution to modern philosophy.































[book] UNDER MY WINDOW
by Ms. Michal Safdie
(with an Intro by Ari Shavit)
September 2018
powerHOUSE Books
Jews, Muslims, Christians, believers, nonbelievers, residents, tourists, and so many others have flocked for millenia to the cultural richness that has always been Jerusalem. It is one of the world's greatest crossroads showcasing the variety that is humanity. From her stunning viewpoint Michal Safdie invites you to see what she sees every day.

Perched up on a hill in the old city of Jerusalem, along the fragile border between the Jewish and Muslim Quarters, is the home of Michal Ronnen Safdie. Facing east, it overlooks the Western Wall precinct, the Dome of the Rock, and the Al-Aqsa mosque. To the north unfolds the Muslim Quarter with Mount Scopus in the skyline; to the west, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the Christian Quarter.

Directly under her window, is a narrow alley, through which thousands of people pass every day. The alley is a crossroads. It is the path of Jews residing in the Jewish Quarter and in the western part of the city, to the Western Wall. It is a passage for those entering the old city through Dung Gate on the south side, mostly Palestinians making their way to their workplaces, schools, markets, and holy mosques in the Old City. It is the route of Christians to the Holy Sepulcher.

The view from the window offers two contrasting perspectives.

Across toward the Western Wall precinct: vast ceremonial spaces, and the silhouette of the Old City quarters. Directly below, in the alley and terraces: a great variety of people seeking the sacred as well as the morning and evening cycles of life's routines.

The photographs capture private and personal moments, as well as ritual events side-by-side with seeming normality, hinting at the social and political forces that shape life in Jerusalem.





























[book] Cultural Journeys into
the Arab World:
A Literary Anthology
Dalya Cohen-Mor, PhD
September 2018
SUNY PRESS
A diverse collection of fiction and nonfiction literature from across the Arabic-speaking world.
Cultural Journeys into the Arab World provides a fascinating window into Arab culture and society through the voices of its own writers and poets. Organized thematically, the anthology features more than fifty texts, including poems, essays, stories, novels, memoirs, eyewitness accounts, and life histories, by leading male and female authors from across the Arabic-speaking world. Each theme is explored in several genres, both fiction and nonfiction, and framed by a wealth of contextual information that places the literary texts within the historical, political, cultural, and social background of the region. Spanning a century of Arab creative writing—from the “dean of Arabic letters” Taha Hussein to the Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz and the celebrated poet Adonis—the anthology offers unforgettable journeys into the rich and dynamic realm of Arab culture. Representing a wide range of settings, viewpoints, and socioeconomic backgrounds, the characters speak of their conditions, aspirations, struggles, and achievements living in complex societies marked by tensions arising from the persistence of older traditions and the impact of modernity. Their myriad voices paint a vivid and intimate portrait of contemporary Arab life in the Middle East, revealing the common humanity of a region of vital significance in world affairs.

Includes works by Ahmad Amin (Egypt); Layla al-Uthman (Kuwait); Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt); Taha Hussein (Egypt); Nayra Atiya (Egypt); Alifa Rifaat (Egypt); Abd al-Aziz al-Maqalih (Yemen); Hijab Yahya Musa al-Hazimi (Saudi Arabia); Hassan Daoud (Lebanon); Zakaria Tamer (Syria); Ramziya Abbas al-Iryani (Yemen); Mu’nis al-Razzaz (Jordan); Hamza Bogary (Saudi Arabia); and many more

























[book] UNDER MY WINDOW
by Ms. Michal Safdie
(with an Intro by Ari Shavit)
July 2018
powerHOUSE Books
Jews, Muslims, Christians, believers, nonbelievers, residents, tourists, and so many others have flocked for millenia to the cultural richness that has always been Jerusalem. It is one of the world's greatest crossroads showcasing the variety that is humanity. From her stunning viewpoint Michal Safdie invites you to see what she sees every day.

Perched up on a hill in the old city of Jerusalem, along the fragile border between the Jewish and Muslim Quarters, is the home of Michal Ronnen Safdie. Facing east, it overlooks the Western Wall precinct, the Dome of the Rock, and the Al-Aqsa mosque. To the north unfolds the Muslim Quarter with Mount Scopus in the skyline; to the west, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the Christian Quarter.

Directly under her window, is a narrow alley, through which thousands of people pass every day. The alley is a crossroads. It is the path of Jews residing in the Jewish Quarter and in the western part of the city, to the Western Wall. It is a passage for those entering the old city through Dung Gate on the south side, mostly Palestinians making their way to their workplaces, schools, markets, and holy mosques in the Old City. It is the route of Christians to the Holy Sepulcher.

The view from the window offers two contrasting perspectives.

Across toward the Western Wall precinct: vast ceremonial spaces, and the silhouette of the Old City quarters. Directly below, in the alley and terraces: a great variety of people seeking the sacred as well as the morning and evening cycles of life's routines.

The photographs capture private and personal moments, as well as ritual events side-by-side with seeming normality, hinting at the social and political forces that shape life in Jerusalem.





























[book] The Coddling of the American Mind:
How Good Intentions and Bad
Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure
by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt
September 2018
Penguin Random House
Something has been going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and are afraid to speak honestly. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising—on campus as well as nationally. How did this happen?

First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: What doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths contradict basic psychological principles about well-being and ancient wisdom from many cultures. Embracing these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—interferes with young people’s social, emotional, and intellectual development. It makes it harder for them to become autonomous adults who are able to navigate the bumpy road of life.

Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to promote the spread of these untruths. They explore changes in childhood such as the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised, child-directed play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. They examine changes on campus, including the corporatization of universities and the emergence of new ideas about identity and justice. They situate the conflicts on campus within the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization and dysfunction.

This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.

























[book] HALAKHAH
The Rabbinic Idea of Law
(Library of Jewish Ideas)
by Chaim N. Saiman
September 2018
Princeton University Press
How the rabbis of the Talmud transformed everything into a legal question-and Jewish law into a way of thinking and talking about everything

Though typically translated as “Jewish law,” the term halakhah is not an easy match for what is usually thought of as law. This is because the rabbinic legal system has rarely wielded the political power to enforce its many detailed rules, nor has it ever been the law of any state. Even more idiosyncratically, the talmudic rabbis claim that the study of halakhah is a holy endeavor that brings a person closer to God-a claim no country makes of its law.

In this panoramic book, Chaim Saiman traces how generations of rabbis have used concepts forged in talmudic disputation to do the work that other societies assign not only to philosophy, political theory, theology, and ethics but also to art, drama, and literature. In the multifaceted world of halakhah where everything is law, law is also everything, and even laws that serve no practical purpose can, when properly studied, provide surprising insights into timeless questions about the very nature of human existence.

What does it mean for legal analysis to connect humans to God? Can spiritual teachings remain meaningful and at the same time rigidly codified? Can a modern state be governed by such law? Guiding readers across two millennia of richly illuminating perspectives, this book shows how halakhah is not just “law” but an entire way of thinking, being, and knowing.

























[book] In the Land of Happy Tears:
Yiddish Tales for Modern Times:
collected and edited
by David Stromberg
September 2018
Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Ages 10 and up

You don't need to be Jewish to love Levy's rye bread, nor do you need to read Yiddish to appreciate these wise tales. This engaging collection offers access to modern works--translated for the first time into English--for anyone who appreciates a well-told story rich with timeless wisdom. A year-round book for families. Includes a comprehensive introduction on Yiddish culture.

These eighteen stories for a changing world, never before translated into English, by writers from Eastern European countries including Russia and Poland, focus on excellent storytelling, strong characters, and creative ideas. The stories express solid principles and open-minded attitudes, and a sense of both familiarity and adventure in the face of difficult times.

As the old Eastern European Yiddish-speaking world began to clash with modernity, Yiddish authors created new stories to capture the imaginations of children growing up in times of social and historical upheaval. These stories have largely been overlooked or forgotten, until now. These hidden treasures from the early- and mid-20th-century rich Yiddish literary tradition each provide a satisfying read, while the entire collection runs the gamut of storytelling modes used to bridge new and old worlds. Authors include some of the most respected Yiddish writers of their time, who were known in their homelands and then in America, such as Moyshe Nadir, Jacob Reisfeder, Sonya Kantor, and many others. The ethos binding the stories focuses on messages that continue to ring true today while reinvigorating the idea of values largely usurped from contemporary society.





























AS I HAVE WRITTEN BEFORE... I AM NOT A FAN OF HOLOCAUST AND DEATH CAMP FICTION. YOU DON'T NEED FICTION; IT CONFUSES AND MUDDIES THE HORROR. WORSE IS WHEN THE AUTHOR(S) GET IT WRONG... GET AUSCHWITZ WRONG.
But this is a best seller... so I will post it, but I recommend that you google some reviews from the Jewish press


[book] THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ
A NOVEL
BY HEATHER MORRIS
September 2018
Harper trade paperback

The #1 International Bestseller

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is BASED on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov — #32407 – deported in 1942 from Slovakia - an unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity.

“The Tattooist of Auschwitz is an extraordinary document, a story about the extremes of human behavior existing side by side: calculated brutality alongside impulsive and selfless acts of love. I find it hard to imagine anyone who would not be drawn in, confronted and moved. I would recommend it unreservedly to anyone, whether they’d read a hundred Holocaust stories or none.”—Graeme Simsion, internationally-bestselling author of The Rosie Project

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism—but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov's experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.




SEE ALSO:
[book] THE LIBRARIAN OF AUSCHWITZ
A NOVEL
BY ANTONIIO ITURBE
































[book] Twisting Fate:
My Journey with BRCA-from
Breast Cancer Doctor to Patient and Back
by Pamela Munster M.D.
September 2018
The Experiment

A practical yet personal guide to the medical and emotional facets of breast cancer, from a woman who’s made her living researching the disease—and lived through it herself

A leading oncologist at the University of California San Francisco, Dr. Pamela Munster has advised thousands of women on how to deal with the life-altering diagnosis of breast cancer. But when she got a call saying that her own mammogram showed “irregularities,” she found herself experiencing a whole new side of the disease she thought she was an expert in.

Weaving together her personal story with her team’s groundbreaking research on the BRCA gene—responsible for not only breast cancer but also for many other inherited cancers affecting both women and men—Twisting Fate is an inspiring guide to living with BRCA mutations. With authority, insight, and compassion, Dr. Munster uses her voice to create a safe space for genuine healing and honesty in a world otherwise dominated by fear.
































[book] THE WOMAN WHO SMASHED CODES
A TRUE STORY OF LOVE, SPIES,
AND THE UNLIKELY HEROINE WHO
OUTWITTED AMERICA'S ENEMIES
BY JASON FAGONE
September 2018
Dey Street Books
Now in Paperback
NATIONAL BESTSELLER
NPR Best Book of 2017
“Not all superheroes wear capes, and Elizebeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of a future Wonder Woman movie.” — The New York Times

Joining the ranks of Hidden Figures and In the Garden of Beasts, the incredible true story of the greatest codebreaking duo that ever lived, an American woman and her husband who invented the modern science of cryptology together and used it to confront the evils of their time, solving puzzles that unmasked Nazi spies and helped win World War II.

In 1916, at the height of World War I, brilliant Shakespeare expert Elizebeth Smith went to work for an eccentric tycoon on his estate outside Chicago. The tycoon had close ties to the U.S. government, and he soon asked Elizebeth to apply her language skills to an exciting new venture: code-breaking. There she met the man who would become her husband, groundbreaking cryptologist William Friedman. Though she and Friedman are in many ways the "Adam and Eve" of the NSA, Elizebeth’s story, incredibly, has never been told.

In The Woman Who Smashed Codes, Jason Fagone chronicles the life of this extraordinary woman, who played an integral role in our nation’s history for forty years. After World War I, Smith used her talents to catch gangsters and smugglers during Prohibition, then accepted a covert mission to discover and expose Nazi spy rings that were spreading like wildfire across South America, advancing ever closer to the United States. As World War II raged, Elizebeth fought a highly classified battle of wits against Hitler’s Reich, cracking multiple versions of the Enigma machine used by German spies. Meanwhile, inside an Army vault in Washington, William worked furiously to break Purple, the Japanese version of Enigma—and eventually succeeded, at a terrible cost to his personal life.

Fagone unveils America’s code-breaking history through the prism of Smith’s life, bringing into focus the unforgettable events and colorful personalities that would help shape modern intelligence. Blending the lively pace and compelling detail that are the hallmarks of Erik Larson’s bestsellers with the atmosphere and intensity of The Imitation Game, The Woman Who Smashed Codes is page-turning popular history at its finest.






















[book] Rush:
Revolution, Madness, and
Benjamin Rush, the Visionary
Doctor Who Became
a Founding Father
by Stephen Fried
(Penn, Columbia, Pinemere)
September 2018
CROWN

The monumental life of Benjamin Rush, medical pioneer and one of our most provocative and unsung Founding Fathers. He was also a friend of a prominent Jeish family, attended their simchas and holidays, and wrote about it

In the summer of 1776, fifty-six men put their quills to a dangerous document they called the Declaration of Independence. Among them was a thirty-year-old doctor named Benjamin Rush. One of the youngest signatories, he was also, among stiff competition, one of the most visionary.

From improbable beginnings as the son of a Philadelphia blacksmith, Rush grew into an internationally renowned writer, reformer, and medical pioneer who touched virtually every page in the story of the nation’s founding. He was Franklin’s protégé, the editor of Common Sense, and Washington’s surgeon general. He was a fierce progressive agitator—a vocal opponent of slavery and prejudice by race, religion or gender, a champion of public education—even as his convictions threatened his name and career, time and again. He was a confidante, and often the physician, of America’s first leaders; he brokered the twilight peace between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. As a doctor, he became “the American Hippocrates,” whose brilliant, humane insights and institutional reforms revolutionized the understanding and treatment of mental illness in ways that still reverberate.

Like the greatest Revolutionary minds, Dr. Benjamin Rush recognized that 1776 was only the beginning of the American experiment. Rush brings new drama to his singular life and towering legacy, finally installing him in the pantheon of our wisest and boldest Founding Fathers.






















[book] Surviving the Survivors:
A Memoir
by Ruth Klein
September 2018
She Writes Press
Ruth Klein’s story is about merchants and landowners-aristocratic Polish Jews. It’s about their lives in refugee and concentration camps. About parents who survived the Holocaust but could not overcome the tragedy they had experienced, and about their children, who became indirect victims of the atrocities endured by Holocaust victims.

After their liberation, Ruth’s parents were brought to the Displaced Person Camps in Germany, where they awaited departure to the United States. They were traumatized, starving, and impoverished-but they were among the survivors.

Once in America, however, their struggles didn’t end. Nearly penniless, Ruth’s family-and the close-knit group of Polish refugees they belonged to-were placed for settlement in Los Angeles, where they lived in poverty only a few miles away from the wealth and glamor of Hollywood and Beverly Hills in the early 1950s. Ruth tells how, time after time, her parents had their dreams broken, only to rebuild them again. She also shares what it was like to grow up with parents who were permanently damaged by the effects of the war. Theirs was a dysfunctional household; her parents found great joy and delight moving through life’s experiences in their new country, yet tumult and discord colored their world as well. As a young girl, Ruth developed a passionate relationship with the piano, which allowed her to express a wide range of feelings through her music-and survive the chaos at home. Full of both humor and unfathomable tragedy, Surviving the Survivors is Ruth’s story of growing up in an environment unique in time and place, and of how, ultimately, her upbringing gave her a keen appreciation for the value of life and made her, like her parents, a survivor.










































[book] The Red Ribbon
by Lucy Adlington
September 11, 2018
Candlewick Press
288 Pages

Shining a light on a little-known aspect of the Holocaust, Lucy Adlington weaves an unforgettable story of strength, survival, and a friendship that can endure anything.

Three weeks after being detained on her way home from school, fourteen-year-old Ella finds herself in the Upper Tailoring Studio, a sewing workshop inside a Nazi concentration camp. There, two dozen skeletal women toil over stolen sewing machines. They are the seamstresses of Birchwood, stitching couture dresses for a perilous client list: wives of the camp’s Nazi overseers and the female SS officers who make prisoners’ lives miserable. It is a workshop where stylish designs or careless stitches can mean life or death. And it is where Ella meets Rose. As thoughtful and resilient as the dressmakers themselves, Rose and Ella’s story is one of courage, desperation, and hope — hope as delicate and as strong as silk, as vibrant as a red ribbon in a sea of gray.
































[book] A Cage Without Bars
by Anne Dublin
September 10, 2018
Second Story Press
Ages 10-13
It is 1492, and Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain have signed the Edict of Expulsion, giving all Jews three months to leave the country. Joseph Belifonte, a twelve-year-old boy, escapes to Lisbon, Portugal, with his parents and younger sister, Gracia. However, after eight months there, Joseph and Gracia, along with hundreds of other Jewish children, are kidnapped. They are put on a ship and taken to the island of São Tomé, off the coast of West Africa. Now slaves, they are forcibly baptized and made to work on a sugar plantation. Joseph holds to the hope that one day he will be free.
































[book] Mort Ziff Is Not Dead
by Cary Fagan
September 4, 2018
Puffin Canada
Ages 8-12
A humorous coming-of-age middle-grade novel set in 1960s Florida. Battling obxious siblings, sunburns, and a corporate millionaire, Norman is determined to help an old comedian save his career.

It's the winter of 1965. Norman Fishbein is enduring not only a cold winter but also the usual torments and annoyances from his two older brothers. When Norman wins a thousand dollars in the "Count-the-Doozy-Dots Contest" his parents let him choose how to spend it, strongly suggesting a new car is what the family needs. But Norman decides what his family really needs is their first vacation that doesn't mean camping in a tent--a trip to Miami Beach.

A snowstorm almost wrecks their plans, but in the end Norman gets his first plane ride (with both brothers air-sick on either side of him). Miami strikes him as a paradise--warm weather, palm trees, beaches, and ocean. They stay in luxury at the Royal Palm Hotel, owned by the mysterious millionaire Herbert Spitzer.

One day at the pool Norman spots an old man in a black suit, who his father tells him is a once-famous comedian named Mort Ziff. (Norman's father thought that Mort Ziff had died years ago.) Holding onto the remains of his career, Mort Ziff is performing every night in the hotel dining room. A chance meeting begins an unusual friendship between Norman and the old comedian. But after hearing that Mort Ziff has been fired, to be replaced by "The Centipedes," a pop group imitating the Beatles, Norman takes matters into his own hands, resolving to save Mort's job and in the process, coming to realize an innner strength he didn't know he had.






















[book] Rose's Baking Basics:
100 Essential Recipes, with
More Than 600 Step-by-Step
by Rose Levy Beranbaum
September 25, 2018
HMH

The ultimate baking book for everyone from best-sellingauthor and "diva of desserts" Rose Levy Beranbaum

In this book of no-fuss recipes everyone should know, trusted baking expert Rose Levy Beranbaum guides you through every recipe for can’t-fail results—with a streamlined, simplified approach and more than 600 mouthwatering and instructive photos. Whether you're a baking enthusiast or just want to whip up the occasional treat, you will be able to easily make perfect brownies, banana bread, holiday pies, birthday cakes, homemade bread, and more, with recipes including: Chocolate Sheet Cake with Ganache Frosting, Peanut Butter and Jelly Thumbprints, Beer Bread, Apple Walnut Muffins, Peach Cobbler, Milk Chocolate Caramel Tart, and more. Throughout, Rose shares her unique tips and methods for unlocking the secrets to the best flavors and foolproof results, for a treasury of essential recipes you'll use forever.

























[book] Queen Solomon
a novel
by Tamara Faith Berger
September 11, 2018
Coach House

It's just another boring summer for our teenaged narrator — until Barbra arrives. An Ethiopian Jew, Barbra was brought to Israel at age five, a part of Operation Solomon, and now our narrator's well-intentioned father has brought her, as a teen, to their home for the summer. But Barbra isn't the docile and grateful orphan they expect, and soon our narrator, terrified of her and drawn to her in equal measure, finds himself immersed in compulsive psychosexual games with her, as she binge-drinks and lies to his family. Things go terribly wrong, and Barbra flees. But seven years later, as our narrator is getting his life back on track, with a new girlfriend and a master's degree in Holocaust Studies underway, Barbra shows up at our narrator's house once again, her "spiritual teacher" in tow, and our narrator finds his politics, and his sanity, back in question.

Queen Solomon is another masterful take on the politics of sex, race, and power from the author of the Believer Book Award–winning Maidenhead.





























[book] FASHION CLIMBING
A MEMOIR WITH PHOTOGRAPHS
Hardcover – September 4, 2018 by the late Bill Cunningham
Hilton Als (Preface)
September 4, 2018
Penguin Press
The untold story of a New York City legend's education in creativity and style
As he said to me, “Hello Young Fellah,” fashion is a mirror. It reflects the culture.
I would have loved to have a conversation with him over the decades, but he appeared so hearing impaired, that I did not want to shout at him.

For Bill Cunningham, New York City was the land of freedom, glamour, and, above all, style. Growing up in a lace-curtain Irish suburb of Boston, secretly trying on his sister's dresses (at age 4)and spending his evenings after school in the city's chic boutiques, Bill dreamed of a life dedicated to fashion.

But his desires were a source of shame for his puritanical family, and after dropping out of Harvard, he had to fight them tooth-and-nail to pursue his loveL fashion.

When he arrived in New York, he reveled in people-watching. He spent his nights at opera openings and gate-crashing extravagant balls, where he would take note of the styles, new and old, watching how the gowns moved, how the jewels hung, how the hair laid on each head. This was his education, and the birth of the democratic and exuberant taste that he came to be famous for as a photographer for The New York Times.

After two style mavens took Bill under their wing, his creativity thrived and he made a name for himself as a hat designer. Taking on the alias William J.--because designing under his family's name would have been a disgrace to his parents--Bill became one of the era's most outlandish and celebrated hat designers, catering to movie stars, heiresses, and artists alike. Bill's mission was to bring happiness to the world by making women an inspiration to themselves and everyone who saw them. These were halcyon days when fashion was all he ate and drank. When he was broke and hungry he'd stroll past the store windows on Fifth Avenue and feed himself on beautiful things.

Fashion Climbing is the story of a young man striving to be the person he was born to be: a true original.

But although he was one of the city's most recognized and treasured figures, Bill was also one of its most guarded. Written with his infectious joy and one-of-a-kind voice, this memoir was polished, neatly typewritten, and safely stored away in his lifetime. He held off on sharing it – and himself – until his passing in 2016. Between these covers, is an education in style, an effervescent tale of a bohemian world as it once was, and a final gift to the readers of one of New York's great characters.

For those looking to apply some sort of Freudian insights into his choices... don't. A Bostonian, he is committed to never complain, never explain; to deprivation, to austerity. Money is the cheapest thing. Independence is the most expensive.
























[book] In Good Faith:
Questioning Religion and Atheism
by Scott A. Shay
September 4, 2018
Post Hill Press
Religion can be both inspiring and distressing. And many critiques of it are simultaneously compelling and dubious. Shay examines atheist arguments with a refreshing modern eye in this comprehensive look at our most fundamental questions about faith and reason.

Prominent atheists claim the Bible is a racist text. Yet Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. read it daily. Then again, so did many ardent segregationists. Some atheists claim religion serves to oppress the masses. Yet the classic text of the French Revolution, What is the Third Estate?, was written by a priest. On the other hand, the revolutionaries ended up banning religion. What do we make of religion’s confusing role in history?

And what of religion’s relationship to science? Some scientists claim that we have no free will. Others argue that advances in neurobiology and physics disprove determinism. As for whispering to the universe, an absurd habit say the skeptics. Yet prayer is a transformative practice for millions.

This book explores the most common atheist critiques of the Bible and religion, incorporating Jewish, Christian, and Muslim voices. The result is a fresh, modern re-evaluation of religion and of atheism.




























[book] NOT OUR KIND
A NOVEL
BY KITTY ZELDIS
September 4, 2018
HARPER
With echoes of Rules of Civility and The Boston Girl, a compelling and thought-provoking novel set in postwar New York City, about two women—one Jewish, one a WASP—and the wholly unexpected consequences of their meeting.

One rainy morning in June, two years after the end of World War II, a minor traffic accident brings together Eleanor Moskowitz and Patricia Bellamy. Their encounter seems fated: Eleanor, a teacher and recent Vassar graduate, needs a job. Patricia’s difficult thirteen-year-old daughter Margaux, recovering from polio, needs a private tutor.

Though she feels out of place in the Bellamys’ rarefied and elegant Park Avenue milieu, Eleanor forms an instant bond with Margaux. Soon the idealistic young woman is filling the bright young girl’s mind with Shakespeare and Latin. Though her mother, a hat maker with a little shop on Second Avenue, disapproves, Eleanor takes pride in her work, even if she must use the name "Moss" to enter the Bellamys’ restricted doorman building each morning, and feels that Patricia’s husband, Wynn, may have a problem with her being Jewish.

Invited to keep Margaux company at the Bellamys’ country home in a small town in Connecticut, Eleanor meets Patricia’s unreliable, bohemian brother, Tom, recently returned from Europe. The spark between Eleanor and Tom is instant and intense. Flushed with new romance and increasingly attached to her young pupil, Eleanor begins to feel more comfortable with Patricia and much of the world she inhabits. As the summer wears on, the two women’s friendship grows—until one hot summer evening, a line is crossed, and both Eleanor and Patricia will have to make important decisions—choices that will reverberate through their lives.

Gripping and vividly told, Not Our Kind illuminates the lives of two women on the cusp of change—and asks how much our pasts can and should define our futures.





























[book] An American Family:
A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice
Paperback issue
by Khizr Khan
September 4, 2018
Random House
This inspiring memoir by the Muslim American Gold Star father and captivating DNC speaker is the story of one family’s pursuit of the American dream.

NAMED ONE OF THE FIVE BEST MEMOIRS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST

“Moving . . . a story about family and faith, told with a poet’s sensibility . . . Khizr Khan’s book can teach all of us what real American patriotism looks like.” —The New York Times Book Review

In fewer than three hundred words, Khizr Khan electrified viewers around the world when he took the stage at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. And when he offered to lend Donald Trump his own much-read and dog-eared pocket Constitution, his gesture perfectly encapsulated the feelings of millions. But who was that man, standing beside his wife, extolling the promises and virtues of the U.S. Constitution?

In this urgent and timeless immigrant story, we learn that Khizr Khan has been many things. He was the oldest of ten children born to farmers in Pakistan, and a curious and thoughtful boy who listened rapt as his grandfather recited Rumi beneath the moonlight. He was a university student who read the Declaration of Independence and was awestruck by what might be possible in life. He was a hopeful suitor, awkwardly but earnestly trying to win the heart of a woman far out of his league. He was a brilliant and diligent young family man who worked two jobs to save enough money to put himself through Harvard Law School. He was a loving father who, having instilled in his children the ideals that brought him and his wife to America—the sense of shared dignity and mutual responsibility—tragically lost his son, an Army captain killed while protecting his base camp in Iraq. He was and is a patriot, and a fierce advocate for the rights, dignities, and values enshrined in the American system.

An American Family shows us who Khizr Khan and millions of other American immigrants are, and why—especially in these tumultuous times—we must not be afraid to step forward for what we believe in when it matters most.

“An American Family is a small but lovely immigrant’s journey, full of carefully observed details from the order in which Ghazala served tea at a university event, to the schedule of the police patrols in the Boston Public Garden where Khan briefly slept while he was in between apartments, to the description of Humayun’s headstone as a ‘slab of white marble with soft streaks the color of wood smoke.’”—Alyssa Rosenberg, The Washington Post















[book] Rising Out of Hatred:
The Awakening of a
Former White Nationalist
by Eli Saslow
September 18, 2018
Doubleday
From a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, the powerful story of how a prominent white supremacist changed his heart and mind

Derek Black grew up at the epicenter of white nationalism. His father founded Stormfront, the largest racist community on the Internet. His godfather, David Duke, was a KKK Grand Wizard. By the time Derek turned nineteen, he had become an elected politician with his own daily radio show - already regarded as the "the leading light" of the burgeoning white nationalist movement. "We can infiltrate," Derek once told a crowd of white nationalists. "We can take the country back."

Then he went to college. Derek had been home-schooled by his parents, steeped in the culture of white supremacy, and he had rarely encountered diverse perspectives or direct outrage against his beliefs. At New College of Florida, he continued to broadcast his radio show in secret each morning, living a double life until a classmate uncovered his identity and sent an email to the entire school. "Derek Black...white supremacist, radio host...New College student???"

The ensuing uproar overtook one of the most liberal colleges in the country. Some students protested Derek's presence on campus, forcing him to reconcile for the first time with the ugliness his beliefs. Other students found the courage to reach out to him, including an Orthodox Jew who invited Derek to attend weekly Shabbat dinners. It was because of those dinners--and the wide-ranging relationships formed at that table--that Derek started to question the science, history and prejudices behind his worldview. As white nationalism infiltrated the political mainstream, Derek decided to confront the damage he had done.

Rising Out of Hatred tells the story of how white-supremacist ideas migrated from the far-right fringe to the White House through the intensely personal saga of one man who eventually disavowed everything he was taught to believe, at tremendous personal cost. With great empathy and narrative verve, Eli Saslow asks what Derek's story can tell us about America's increasingly divided nature. This is a book to help us understand the American moment and to help us better understand one another.





















[book] My Real Name is Hanna
Paperback
by Tara Lynn Masih
September 18, 2018
Mandel Vilar Press

Inspired by real Holocaust events, this poignant debut novel is a powerful coming-of-age story that will resonate with fans of The Book Thief and Between Shades of Gray.
A 2018 Skipping Stones Honor Award Book

Hanna Slivka is on the cusp of fourteen when Hitler's army crosses the border into Soviet-occupied Ukraine. Soon, the Gestapo closes in, determined to make the shtetele she lives in "free of Jews." Until the German occupation, Hanna spent her time exploring Kwasova with her younger siblings, admiring the drawings of the handsome Leon Stadnick, and helping her neighbor dye decorative pysanky eggs. But now she, Leon, and their families are forced to flee and hide in the forest outside their shtetele--and then in the dark caves beneath the rolling meadows, rumored to harbor evil spirits.

Underground, they battle sickness and starvation, while the hunt continues above. When Hanna's father disappears, suddenly it's up to Hanna to find him--and to find a way to keep the rest of her family, and friends, alive.

Sparse, resonant, and lyrical, weaving in tales of Jewish and Ukrainian folklore, My Real Name Is Hanna celebrates the sustaining bonds of family, the beauty of a helping hand, and the tenacity of the human spirit.


























[book] Promised Land:
A Novel of Israel
by Martin Fletcher
September 4, 2018
Thomas Dunne Books

"Martin Fletcher, who headed up NBC TV’s Tel Aviv News Bureau, knows his territory and it shows on every page. Promised Land is a great sweeping epic, reminiscent of Leon Uris’ Exodus; a moving story of triumph and tragedy, new love and historic hate, expertly told by a cast of unforgettable characters. Fletcher’s writing is superb and rises to the level of importance that this story demands and deserves. Historical novels don’t get much better than Promised Land." -Nelson DeMille

Promised Land is the sweeping saga of two brothers and the woman they love, a devastating love triangle set against the tumultuous founding of Israel.

The story begins when fourteen-year-old Peter is sent west to America to escape the growing horror of Nazi Germany. But his younger brother Arie and their entire family are sent east to the death camps. Only Arie survives.

The brothers reunite in the nascent Jewish state, where Arie becomes a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel while Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. One brother builds Israel, the other protects it.

But they also fall in love with the same woman, Tamara, a lonely Jewish refugee from Cairo. And over the next two decades, as their new homeland faces extraordinary obstacles that could destroy it, the brothers’ intrigues and jealousies threaten to tear their new lives apart.

Promised Land is at once the gripping tale of a struggling family and an epic about a struggling nation.


























[book] On the Landing:
Stories by Yenta Mash
by Yenta Mash
Ellen Cassedy (Translator, Afterword)
Jessica Kirzane (Afterword)
September 2018
Northern Illinois University Press
A Yiddish Book Center Translation

In these sixteen stories, available in English for the first time, prize-winning author Yenta Mash traces an arc across continents, across upheavals and regime changes, and across the phases of a woman’s life. Mash’s protagonists are often in transit, poised “on the landing” on their way to or from somewhere else. In imaginative, poignant, and relentlessly honest prose, translated from the Yiddish by Ellen Cassedy, Mash documents the lost world of Jewish Bessarabia, the texture of daily life behind the Iron Curtain in Soviet Moldova, and the challenges of assimilation in Israel.

On the Landing opens by inviting us to join a woman making her way through her ruined hometown, recalling the colorful customs of yesteryear—and the night when everything changed. We then travel into the Soviet gulag, accompanying women prisoners into the fearsome forests of Siberia. In postwar Soviet Moldova, we see how the Jewish community rebuilds itself. On the move once more, we join refugees struggling to find their place in Israel. Finally, a late-life romance brings a blossoming of joy.

Drawing on a lifetime of repeated uprooting, Mash offers an intimate perch from which to explore little-known corners of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. A master chronicler of exile, she makes a major contribution to the literature of immigration and resilience, adding her voice to those of Jhumpa Lahiri, W. G. Sebald, André Aciman, and Viet Thanh Nguyen. Mash’s literary oeuvre is a brave achievement, and her work is urgently relevant today as displaced people seek refuge across the globe.


























[book] Returning
by Yael Shahar
September 2018
Kasva Press

Alex was only seventeen when he was torn from his home and deported to Auschwitz from Greece. There, he saw things that no one should ever see, and did things he would give anything to forget. Decades later, he still can't speak of his past - or even reveal his identity to those closest to him.

Now he's decided to put himself on trial for treason against his people. Approaching a local rabbi to serve as judge, he sets in motion a process that may let him rejoin the world of the living - if it doesn't destroy him first.

Returning is a haunting and compelling exploration of the choices we make in a choiceless time, the terrifying strength and burden of the will to survive, and the power of the human spirit to transcend even its own destruction. It will leave you changed forever.


Returning is a story of recovery from trauma, of guilt and atonement, of the preservation of memory.... But most of all, it's a story of God-wrestling in the timeless tradition of Ya'akov's wrestling match with an un-named and un-namable entity on the banks of the Yabbok river. We've all crossed that river at one time or another, and most of us have wished we had some way to name what we faced there. But, like Ya'akov's opponent, the apparition vanishes in the light of reason, leaving us both wounded and blessed . . . and forever changed.

For Ovadya, this God-wrestling involved taking his case to a rabbi to judge, and the story of what happened as a result forms the bulk of the book. That search for justice and atonement was his path to healing. Telling his story was mine.























[book] Deviation:
A Novel
by Luce D'Eramo
Anne Milano Appel (Translator from Italian)
September 2018
FS&G

A devoted fascist changes her mind and her life after witnessing the horrors of the Holocaust

First published in Italy in 1979, Luce D’Eramo’s Deviation is a seminal work in Holocaust literature. It is a book that not only confronts evil head-on but expands that confrontation into a complex and intricately structured work of fiction, which has claims to standing among the greatest Italian novels of the twentieth century.

Lucia is a young Italian girl from a bourgeois fascist family. In the early 1940s, when she first hears about the atrocities being perpetrated in the Nazi concentration camps, she is doubtful and confused, unable to reconcile such stories with the ideology in which she’s been raised. Wanting to disprove these “slanders” on Hitler’s Reich, she decides to see for herself, running away from home and heading for Germany, where she intends to volunteer as camp labor. The journey is a harrowing, surreal descent into hell, which finds Lucia confronting the stark and brutal realities of life under Nazi rule, a life in which continual violence and fear are simply the norm. Soon it becomes clear that she must get away, but how can she possibly go back to her old life knowing what she now knows? Besides, getting out may not be as simple as getting in.

Finally available in English translation, Deviation is at once a personal testament, a work of the imagination, an investigation into the limits of memory, a warning to future generations, and a visceral scream at the horrors of the world.























[book] LONE WOLF IN JERUSALEM:
A Novel
by EHUD DISKIN

2018
Greenleaf

An Israeli Best Seller Amazon Best Seller in Jewish Literature 2018 Dr. Hirsch and Devorah Rosenfeld Award for Yiddish and Hebrew Literature A Thrilling Tale of Love, Loss, and Revenge
Set primarily in post-WWII Israel, Lone Wolf in Jerusalem is a suspenseful, action-packed novel that is a worthy contribution to Jewish historical fiction. Using drama, adventure, and romance, Diskin has created a colorful and captivating story that entertains and educates through the exploits of main protagonist, David Gabinsky.

During the war, after losing his family to Hitler's ''final solution,'' young David leads a courageous group of Jewish resistance fighters against the Nazis. When Germany is defeated, he journeys to Jerusalem, to find a new battle brewing. British occupation forces are entrenched in Israel, blocking Holocaust survivors from immigrating to their Jewish homeland.

Determined to help his people find freedom, David uses his guerilla skills to single-handedly wreak havoc on the British. As he begins his dangerous quest, David meets and falls in love with the beautiful Shoshana, a young Holocaust survivor whose spirit may have gotten damaged beyond repair.

Recounting the tragic losses and heroic triumphs of the Jewish people during this critical stage in their history, Lone Wolf in Jerusalem brings these events to life in a new and inspirational way, making them accessible to a new generation. Originally written in Hebrew, this book quickly became a best seller in Israel.























[book] Through the Window:
Views of Marc Chagall's
Life and Art
by Barb Rosenstock
Mary GrandPre (Illustrator)
September 2018
Knopf Young Readers
AGES 4 - 8

A gorgeous, expressive picture-book biography of Marc Chagall by the Caldecott Honor team behind The Noisy Paint Box.

Through the window, the student sees . . .
His future--butcher, baker, blacksmith, but turns away.
A classmate sketching a face from a book. His mind blossoms.
The power of pictures. He draws and erases, dreams in color while Papa worries.
A folder of pages laid on an art teacher's desk. Mama asks, Does this boy have talent?
Pursed lips, a shrug, then a nod, and a new artist is welcomed.
His brave heart flying through the streets, on a journey unknowable.

Known for both his paintings and stained-glass windows, Marc Chagall rose from humble beginnings to become one of the world's most renowned artists. Admired for his use of color and the powerful emotion in his work, Chagall led a career that spanned decades and continents, and he never stopped growing. This lyrical narrative shows readers, through many different windows, the pre-WWI childhood and wartime experiences that shaped Chagall's path.

From the same team behind the Caldecott Honor Book The Noisy Paint Box, which was about the artist Kandinksy, Through the Window is a stunning book that, through Chagall's life and work, demonstrates how art has the power to be revolutionary.
























[book] Palestine:
A Four Thousand Year History
by Nur Masahla
2018
Zed Books

Is it history or polemic??
It has great reviews from the Palestinian Authority, and people who believe that Zionists are evil and ethnically cleaned the region.
Starting with the earliest references in Egyptian and Assyrian texts, Nur Masalha explores how Palestine and its Palestinian identity have evolved over thousands of years, from the Bronze Age to the present day.
The author attempts to give evidence for his belief that Israel has created a myth and distorted Palestine’s greatness and welcoming, multicultural past.
One can call it an alternate myth

























[book] Preventing Palestine:
A Political History from
Camp David to Oslo
by Seth Anziska
2018
Princeton University Press

On the fortieth anniversary of the Camp David Accords, a groundbreaking new history that shows how Egyptian-Israeli peace ensured lasting Palestinian statelessness

For seventy years Israel has existed as a state, and for forty years it has honored a peace treaty with Egypt that is widely viewed as a triumph of U.S. diplomacy in the Middle East. Yet the Palestinians-the would-be beneficiaries of a vision for a comprehensive regional settlement that led to the Camp David Accords in 1978-remain stateless to this day. How and why Palestinian statelessness persists are the central questions of Seth Anziska’s groundbreaking book, which explores the complex legacy of the agreement brokered by President Jimmy Carter.

Based on newly declassified international sources, Preventing Palestine charts the emergence of the Middle East peace process, including the establishment of a separate track to deal with the issue of Palestine. At the very start of this process, Anziska argues, Egyptian-Israeli peace came at the expense of the sovereignty of the Palestinians, whose aspirations for a homeland alongside Israel faced crippling challenges. With the introduction of the idea of restrictive autonomy, Israeli settlement expansion, and Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon, the chances for Palestinian statehood narrowed even further. The first Intifada in 1987 and the end of the Cold War brought new opportunities for a Palestinian state, but many players, refusing to see Palestinians as a nation or a people, continued to steer international diplomacy away from their cause.

Combining astute political analysis, extensive original research, and interviews with diplomats, military veterans, and communal leaders, Preventing Palestine offers a bold new interpretation of a highly charged struggle for self-determination.
























[book] A Weekend in New York
a novel
by Benjamin Markovits
2018
Faber and Faber

Over four days, an extended family descends on New York City to watch one of their own, Paul Essinger – nominally the protagonist, but this novel may not have one – play his first-round match at the US Open. Ranked No 82, nearing the end of his career, Paul hardly expects to win the Open (betting shops rank the odds at 1,200:1).

Essinger is scheduled on Court 12 against Borisov, a hard-charging Bulgarian ranked a few places above him. If he loses, it’s over; he’ll announce his retirement. Once off the tour, he plans to plough his winnings into a parcel of land out in Texas. This unnerves his ex-model wife, who figured he’d stay in the city and maybe move into TV. “It sounds to me like you’re going off the rails a little bit,” she says.























[book] The Order of the Day
by Eric Vuillard
Mark Polizzotti (Translator)
Fall 2018
OTHER PRESS

Winner of the 2017 Prix Goncourt, this behind-the-scenes account of the manipulation, hubris, and greed that together led to Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria brilliantly dismantles THE MYTH of an effortless victory and offers a dire warning for our current political crisis.

February 20, 1933, an unremarkable day during a harsh Berlin winter: A meeting of 24 German captains of industry and senior Nazi officials is being held in secret in the plush lounge of the Reichstag. They are there to extract funds for the accession to power of the National Socialist Party and its Chancellor. This opening scene sets a tone of consent that will lead to the worst possible repercussions.

Five Years Later
March 12, 1938, the annexation of Austria is on the agenda: A grotesque day intended to make history — the newsreels capture a motorized army on the move, a terrible, inexorable power. But behind Goebbels’s splendid propaganda, an ersatz Blitzkrieg unfolds, the Panzers breaking down en masse on the roads into Austria. The true behind-the-scenes account of the Anschluss — a patchwork of minor flourishes of strength and fine words, fevered telephone calls, and vulgar threats—all reveal a starkly different picture. It is not strength of character or the determination of a people that wins the day, but rather a combination of intimidation and bluff.

With this vivid, compelling history, Éric Vuillard warns against the peril of willfully blind acquiescence, and offers a reminder that, ultimately, the worst is not inescapable.






















[book] Hebrew Illuminations 2019
Wall Calendar:
A 16-Month Jewish Calendar
by Adam Rhine
Fall 2018
Amber Lotus, the carbon negative publisher
in Portland Oregon

The spirit of Jewish tradition comes alive in the Hebrew Illuminations 2018–2019 Jewish calendar, featuring images inspired by the Torah. Jewish artist Adam Rhine's stunning Judaic paintings combine modern aesthetics with the influence of medieval illuminated manuscripts and lettering.
12" x 12" wall calendar (12" x 24" open).
September 2018 through December 2019.
Each month features candle lighting times for Shabbat and holidays and biblical quotes.
16 months of stunning Judaic artwork by top-selling Hebrew artist Adam Rhine on our wall. For Judaica lovers and sacred art aficionados. Each painting is accompanied by text from the Torah that brings meaning and context to the artwork. Features both the Hebrew and Western calendars. Frameable artbook-quality printing. Printed on paper sourced from a combination of sustainably managed forests and recycled materials. Published by Amber Lotus, an independent carbon-negative US company that has planted more than half a million trees since 2008. This calendar features US and Canadian legal holidays, phases of the moon, and important Jewish holidays making it popular among Jewish calendars. This unique calendar features sixteen original paintings that recall its earliest chapter with Gan Eden (Garden of Eden) and Etz Chayim (Tree of Life), the Exodus with the Parting of the Waters and Mishkan (the Tabernacle), as well as the core beliefs of Emet (Truth) and Emunah (Faith). Jewish artist Adam Rhine uses watercolor, colored pencil, and acrylic to create the ornate, highly detailed Judaic paintings featured here.


SEE ALSO:

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[book] Ariel Samson:
Freelance Rabbi
a novel by
by MaNishtana
September 2018
MultiKosherAl Press
Ariel Samson is just your run of the mill anomaly: a 20-something black Orthodox Jewish rabbi looking for love, figuring out life, and floating between at least two worlds.

Luckily, it gets worse.

Finding himself the spiritual leader of a dying synagogue, and accidentally falling into viral internet fame, Ariel is suddenly catapulted into a series of increasingly ridiculous conflicts with belligerent college students, estranged families, corrupt politicians, hippophilic coworkers, vindictive clergymen, and even attempted murder. (And also Christian hegemony, racism, anti-Semitism, toxic Hotepism, and white Jewish privilege. Because today ends in “y.”)

But all that’s the easy part.

Because whether Ariel knows it or not, he’s due for a breakthrough. Several, in fact. And he’s about to find out whether or not he’s strong enough to re-evaluate everything he thought he knew about himself, and own up to the things he didn’t.

Thought leader and provocateur MaNishtana turns his eye to fiction in this imaginative, semi-autobiographical novel, making Ariel Samson, Freelance Rabbi the most dazzling debut of an Orthodox black Jew born on a Sunday at 2:24AM in a Brooklyn hospital in 1982 that you will ever have the privilege of reading.




















[book] THE CHOICE
Embrace the Possible
by Dr. Edith Eva Eger
September 2018
Simon and Schuster – paperback edition

Winner of the 2017 National Jewish Book Award
and 2018 Christopher Award

“Edith’s strength and courage are remarkable…her life and work are an incredible example of forgiveness, resilience, and generosity.”—Sheryl Sandberg

It’s 1944 and sixteen-year-old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz. Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.

The horrors of the Holocaust didn’t break Edith. In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life-affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience. The Choice is her unforgettable story.


















[book] The Storm over Paris
by William Ian Grubman
September 2018
Dupapier Press – paperback

Fans of Daniel Silva will enjoy Grubman’s The Storm over ParisIt’s 1942 in Nazi-occupied Paris. Mori Rothstein, an art dealer and expert in master paintings from Rococo to Realism, has been sought after by every major museum in the world. Also seeking his expertise is Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering. As his friends and fellow Jews disappear one by one, Mori struggles to protect himself and his family by cooperating with the Germans to catalogue stolen paintings for the Fuhrer’s museum. Mori is neither a prisoner nor a free man as he forges a questionable relationship with one of the most notorious Nazis in Europe—his fidelity and morals tested daily. His once-charmed life transforms into a web of intrigue, kidnapping, and murder, against the backdrop of the world’s most treasured art. How does he get himself and his family out the other side of the war, while also attempting to rescue some of the greatest paintings of all time?




















OCTOBER 2018 BOOKS




[book] ISRAELI SOUL:
Easy, Essential, Delicious
by Chef Michael Solomonov and
Steven Cook
October 16, 2018
Rux Martin/HMH
A second cookbook from the duo who created the James Beard award-winning ZAHAV cookbook/memoir, and who founded several restaurants and projects including Dizengoff NYC, Zahav, Federal Donuts, Abe Fisher, and The Rooster. You may also be familiar with Solomonov from his starring role in Roger Sherman's 2016 documentary, “In Search of Israeli Cuisine.” What I enjoyed about this new pride-filled book is that it helps you understand Israel and its diversity and people through its amalgamated cuisine, plus it helps develop your biceps, since it is quite large. It also, remarkably, makes you feel a connection to the country and the dozens of cooks and restaurateurs the authors meet.

In addition to the photos, the first thing that impressed me was the Table of contents... four pages worth. Section One is “IN THE HAND,” followed by “AT THE TABLE,” “FROM THE BAKERY,” and “FROM THE ICEBOX.” On Page 14, there is a map of the country and a list of the locations visited: from Tel Aviv's Carmel Market to Umm al-Fahm's El Babour, from Tzfat, Akko and Ein al-Assad in the North to Jerusalem and Ramla in the center (with additional pages numbers for specific restaurant recipes).

SECTION ONE: Chapter 1 begins with Falafel – 30 pages of it. It includes five Tehina variations, and over 5 types of falafel (Goldie style, Fresh Green Garbanzo, English Pea), as well as Goldie French Fries. In Chapter 2: Pita Bread, we learn that it creates epiphanies. Chapter 3 on Sabich creates a foodstuff which is quintessentially Israeli: brought by Iraqi Jews to Israel, adapted for Shabbat rules, modified with Amba from the Jews of India. They write that Sabich is all about the eggplant and teach the reader the secrets of HaKosem-style fried eggplant; baked eggplant; fire-roasted eggplant; Haminados; and variations of Amba. Chapter 4 concerns Shawarma (lamb, chicken, turkey, cauliflower, yes, cauliflower), caramelized fennel, and Opera-style chopped salad. I was not familiar with Drize Mountain Bread prior to reading Chapter 5. Chapter 6 and 7 focus on Jerusalem (Mixed) Grill and Schnitzel (chicken and zucchini). The authors introduce readers to twelve spice blends.

SECTION TWO begins with over 35 pages on Hummus and its complements. Most important is page 145 and the release of the secret 5-minute hummus recipe with quick tehina sauce. This is followed by countless hummus toppings, from chicken salad to saffron-braised chicken, to black eyed peas, oyster mushrooms, and charred asparagus with hazelnut dukkah. In Chapter 9, Salads, we are introduced to eight quick essential salads: including Moroccan Matbucha, Turkish, Chopped, and Abe Fisher's coveted Beet Salad. Others include Chirishi (Libyan Squash), Pickled Watermelon, Pickled Lemons, Mshawashe (Arabic Bean Salad), and even Mofarket Al Abed: Egg Salad from Akko). Chapter 10 is titled ”Ashkenazi.” It includes recipes for rye bread, smoked whitefish dip, cured trout, quick pickled cucumbers, chicken liver mousse and more. Chapter 11 features over 15 Soups, Stews and Stuffed items including couscous, spicy tomato sauce, chard-wrapped chicken, Mafroum, and Yemenite Style Veal Osso Buco with Yellow Rice. Chapter 12 is about Grilling. In addition to kebabs, they discuss the “three stages of coal” and why gray is the colour of choice.

In SECTION THREE, the authors have recipes for savory items, and sweet. Savory recipes include those for Khachapuri, Kubaneh, Jachnun, Malawach, Borekas (laminated or phyllo), and more, as well as fillings, even including a kale filling. Did I mention the recipe for Jerusalem Bagels? Speaking of bourekas... in ZAHAV, the recipe process took three days. This recipe takes just two hours. Sweet recipes include challah sufganiyot, ma-amoul cookies, yeasted rugelach, malabi and more.

SECTION FOUR ends with Drinks, from fruit sodas to lemonnana (lemon-mint), as well as Tehina Shakes, two pages on Artikim (Israeli Ice Pops), and Mike Ran's Mom's Detroit style Coffee Cake (which is better than Entenmann's outlet store recipe)

In addition to the recipes and stories, the book really imparts joy. Plus page 275 has a ground veal on cinnamon sticks which is quite unique. And P 248 shares a Brisket Stewed with Black Eyed Peas, dried lime and kale recipe shared from “Gohar,” a restaurant in a Kfar Saba industrial area strip mall.


Solomonov made aliyah with his family as a child and returned to the USA, attended culinary school and settled in PA. A chef, author, speaker, and philanthropist, he is not shy about his history of addiction and recovery, and his help to others pursuing recovery. Cook is the son, nephew, and brother of several rabbis, and has been cooking since childhood (when your name is Cook, you can cook). A grad of Penn/Wharton and former Inv. Banker, he left Wall Street to pursue a food service and hospitality career in Philly.

For their first major book since the trailblazing ZAHAV, Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook go straight to the food of the people—the great dishes that are the soul of Israeli cuisine. Usually served from tiny eateries, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or market stalls, these specialties have passed from father to son or mother to daughter for generations. To find the best versions, the authors scoured bustling cities like Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and Haifa, and sleepy towns on mountaintops. They visited bakeries, juice carts, beaches, even weddings. And even the Druze eatery on the Northern border where there are no menus.

While his first book focused on a restaurant, this one focuses on Israel and its people and food.

Their finds include meals in the hand like falafel and pita; juicy, grilled and roasted spice-rubbed meats; stuffed vegetables; a wealth of chopped vegetable salads; a five-minute fluffy hummus from a can of chickpeas with more than two dozen toppings; pastries, ice creams, and shakes. Solomonov has perfected and adapted every recipe for the home kitchen.

Each chapter weaves history with contemporary portrayals of the food. Striking photographs capture all its flavor and vitality, while step-by-step how-tos and closeups of finished dishes make everything simple and accessible.

PW WRITES: In the follow-up to their 2016 James Beard Award–winning Zahav, chef Solomonov and his business partner Cook (together they have a string of restaurants in Philadelphia) mine the melting pot of Israel for the 70-year-old country’s classic meals. Dishes are examined with quasi-Talmudic love...[and] temptingly presented. Whether cracking a joke about hummus (“After almost 1,000 years, people are pretty much okay with where hummus is at. It doesn’t need to be deconstructed”) or offering thorough guidance for crafting pita dough, this duo strikes a heartwarming, enthusiastic tone. Expect this offering to be as successful as Zahav."

Also in PW: Solomonov replies, “If you go from the Second Temple period to right now, there’s a lot of content. There are 100 or so cultures and gastronomies that have made their way back to Israel from medieval Spain, North Africa, all over the world. There’s the Ottoman influence, the Persian influence, the Palestinian influence, Druze and Levant, every major holiday celebrated by every monotheistic religion, the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Galilee—not to mention ancient and modern agriculture and winemaking, the convergence of the Silk Road. These have all combined to make Israeli cuisine a living and breathing thing. The influx of Ehiopian and Georgian immigrants is continuing to change it.... People have started to do some great Israeli cuisine. They’re not embarrassed by the food they grew up with. Rather than going to Europe or the States and coming back and opening fancy restaurants, they’re saying, “My safta [grandmother] used to make this.” And Israel is an island from a trade perspective. Nothing comes from more than 100 miles outside the country. The cucumbers have been grown in the desert 10 miles or 20 miles away. Why not celebrate those things?

See also:
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[book] OTTOLENGHI SIMPLE
A COOKBOOK
By YOTAM OTTOLENGHI
With Tara Wigley and
Esme Howarth (Esme, not Hannah)
October 2018
TEN SPEED PRESS

A collection of 130 easy, flavor-forward recipes from beloved chef Yotam Ottolenghi.

In Ottolenghi Simple, powerhouse author and chef Yotam Ottolenghi presents 130 streamlined recipes packed with his signature Middle Eastern–inspired flavors. Each dish can be made in 30 minutes or less, with 10 or fewer ingredients, in a single pot, using pantry staples, or prepared ahead of time for brilliantly, deliciously simple meals. Brunch gets a make-over with Braised Eggs with Leeks and Za’atar; Cauliflower, Pomegranate, and Pistachio Salad refreshes the side-dish rotation; Lamb and Feta Meatballs bring ease to the weeknight table; and every sweet tooth is sure to be satisfied by the spectacular Fig and Thyme Clafoutis. With more than 130 photographs, this is elemental Ottolenghi for everyone.
































[book] Cook Like a Pro:
Recipes and Tips for Home Cooks
by Ina Garten
October 23, 2018
Clarkson Potter Books

In her new cookbook, Cook Like a Pro, East Hampton-based Ina Garten shares a brand-new collection of recipes, tips, and techniques, so readers can cook with confidence no matter how much experience they have in the kitchen.

As America's most trusted and beloved cookbook author, Ina Garten--the Barefoot Contessa, Cooking for Jeffrey--has taught millions of people how to cook. A home cook at heart, Ina knows that cooking and entertaining can be difficult, so to make her recipes simple and streamlined, she tests and retests each recipe until it's as straightforward and delicious as possible. Although Ina is completely self-taught and doesn't consider herself to be a "professional" cook, she has spent decades working with chefs and learning the techniques that take their cooking to the next level. In Cook Like a Pro, Ina shares some of her most irresistible recipes and very best "pro tips," from the secret to making her custardy, slow-cooked Truffled Scrambled Eggs to the key to the crispiest and juiciest Fried Chicken Sandwiches. Ina will even show you how to make an easy yet showstopping pattern for her Chocolate Chevron Cake--your friends won't believe you decorated it yourself!

For Ina, cooking like a pro also means hosting like a pro, and along with know-how like how to tell when a filet of beef is perfectly cooked, you'll find dozens of other great ideas to boost your cooking and entertaining skills such as how to set up an elegant home bar and how to make an impressive Raspberry Baked Alaska that can be completely prepared ahead of time so all you need to do is finish it for your guests before serving. Beginner and advanced cooks alike will love Ina's delectable recipes, and if you have questions along the way, don't worry--Ina's practical cooking advice talks you through every detail, as though she were right there by your side.

With beautiful photos and a treasury of pro tips that span prepping, making, and serving, as Ina says, "You don't have to be a pro to cook like one!"


































[book] SEASON:
Big Flavors, Beautiful Food
By Hardcover – October 2, 2018 by Nik Sharma with
a foreword by John Birdsall
October 2, 2018
Chronicle Books

There are few books that offer home cooks a new way to cook and to think about flavor—and fewer that do it with the clarity and warmth of Nik Sharma's Season. Season features 100 of the most delicious and intriguing recipes you've ever tasted, plus 270 of the most beautiful photographs ever seen in a cookbook. Here Nik, beloved curator of the award-winning food blog A Brown Table, shares a treasury of ingredients, techniques, and flavors that combine in a way that's both familiar and completely unexpected.

These are recipes that take a journey all the way from India by way of the American South to California. It's a personal journey that opens new vistas in the kitchen, including new methods and integrated by a marvelous use of spices. Even though these are dishes that will take home cooks and their guests by surprise, rest assured there's nothing intimidating here. Season, like Nik, welcomes everyone to the table!



Nik Sharma is the curator of the food blog, A BROWN TABLE, which he started in 2011 while working in DC as a medical researcher. He was inspired by David Lebovitz and Deb Perelman of Smitten Kitchen. He now is a food columnist for The SF Chronicle and resides in the Bay Area. His book features 100 recipes and techniques with nearly triple the number of photos, based on his personal journeys in Mumbai, the American South, and California, and relying on cumin, coriander, curry leaves, Kashmiri chile powder, cardamom, asafetida, and nigella seeds. There are NO curry recipes in the book, so don’t automatically think that since he is an immigrant from India, that it is all about curry Most alluring is Apple Masala Chai Cake; spicy and sweet Chile-Sumac-Pomegranate Nuts; crispy roasted cauliflower salad with spiced lentils; sweet potato fries with a basil-yogurt dipping sauce; Goan-style mashed potato fried pancake “chops” with lamb; and curry leaf popcorn chicken. And sweet potato bebinca based on his maternal grandmother’s Goan-style recipe.

























[book] NOW & AGAIN
A Cookbook
by Julia Turshen
2018
Chronicle Books
Julia grew up in a Jewish family on the secular side of observance, but now living up in rural High Falls, NY, she and her partner have a weekly Shabbat dinner with friends. I became familiar with Turshen from her eaarlier cookbook on feeding lots of people who attend protest rallies and resistance movement meetings (Feed the Resistance). In Now & Again, she shares over 125 (thrifty, leftover-based) recipes and twenty menu for shared meals and social gatherings. One of her menus is for a Rosh Hashanah dinner, another is for Passover. For Rosh Hashana, try her applesauce cake with honey cream cheese.

She uses leaves of leftover herbs to make salsa for Herb Stem Salsa Verde: thinly minced herb stems, garlic cloves, Dijon mustard, red or white wine vinegar, olive oil. Her Shaved Celery + Parmesan Salad gets rid of leftover celery. Get rid of berries and fruit with pancakes. Make your own chile sauce with water, chiles, and distilled white vinegar. Peel and freeze overripe bananas. Add them to a blender for banana bread milkshakes.

Small Victories, one of the most beloved cookbooks of 2016, introduced us to the lovely Julia Turshen and her mastery of show-stopping home cooking, and her second book, Feed the Resistance, moved a nation, winning Eater Cookbook of the Year in 2017. In Now & Again, the follow-up to what Real Simple called "an inspiring addition to any kitchen bookshelf," more than 125 delicious and doable recipes and 20 creative menu ideas help cooks of any skill level to gather friends and family around the table to share a meal (or many!) together. This cookbook comes to life with Julia's funny and encouraging voice and is brimming with good stuff, including:

• can't-get-enough-of-it recipes
• inspiring menus for social gatherings, holidays and more
• helpful timelines for flawlessly throwing a party
• oh-so-helpful "It's Me Again" recipes, which show how to use leftovers in new and delicious ways
• tips on how to be smartly thrifty with food choices

Now & Again will change the way we gather, eat, and think about leftovers, and, like the name suggests, you'll find yourself reaching for its pages time and time again.

Julia grew up in a Jewish family on the secular side of observance, but now living up in rural High Falls, NY, she and her partner have a weekly Shabbat dinner with friends. I became familiar with Turshen from her eaarlier cookbook on feeding lots of people who attend protest rallies and resistance movement meetings (Feed the Resistance). In Now & Again, she shares over 125 (thrifty, leftover-based) recipes and twenty menu for shared meals and social gatherings. One of her menus is for a Rosh Hashanah dinner, another is for Passover. For Rosh Hashana, try her applesauce cake with honey cream cheese. She uses leaves of leftover herbs to make salsa for Herb Stem Salsa Verde: thinly minced herb stems, garlic cloves, Dijon mustard, red or white wine vinegar, olive oil. Her Shaved Celery + Parmesan Salad gets rid of leftover celery. Get rid of berries and fruit with pancakes. Make your own chile sauce with water, chiles, and distilled white vinegar. Peel and freeze overripe bananas. Add them to a blender for banana bread milkshakes.































[book] CRAVINGS:
HUNGRY FOR MORE
A Cookbook
by Chrissy Teigen and
Adeena Sussman
2018
Clarkson Potter Books

Adeena Sussman, a newlywed, a new step-grandmother, and new Tel Aviv resident (she lived in Yerushalyim for half a decade in the 1990s), as well as the author of over ten cookbooks, got a call from fashion model Chrissy Teigen. Sussman had just finished up a book with chef David Burtka (husband of actor Neil Patrick-Harris) and was close to signing a deal for a project with an Israeli chef.
But…
Could Sussman live with Chrissy for a few months.. and cook?
Yes, for sure.
And so they cooked, they tested, they cooked and they wrote a new cookbook together.

There are blueberry pie pancakes; onion dips; a banana bread that broke the internet; and a Pad Thai Carbonara. Check page 38 for Jalapeño Parmesan-Crusted Grilled Cheese on buttered sourdough bread. Also look for Tom Yum Noodles; Sweet Miso-Butter Cod with Snap Peas and Garlicky Cauliflower “Rice;” Fluffy Corn Dogs; Skillet Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Blondies; Everything Bagel Cream Cheese Breakfast Bakes; and Hollowed-Out Sandwiches (Sussman will publish her own cookbook in 2019 called Sababa)

Back to Chrissy... her's is a life of pancakes that remind you of blueberry pie, eating onion dip with your glam squad, banana bread that breaks the internet, and a little something called Pad Thai Carbonara. After two years of parenthood, falling in love with different flavors, and relearning the healing power of comfort food, this book is like Chrissy’s new edible diary: recipes for quick-as-a-snap meals; recipes for lighter, brighter, healthier-ish living; and recipes that, well, are gonna put you to bed, holding your belly. And it will have you hungry for more.






























[book] ROSE'S BAKING BASICS
a cookbook
By Rose Levy Barenbaum
2018
HMH Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The ultimate baking book for everyone from best-sellingauthor and "diva of desserts" Rose Levy Beranbaum

In this book of no-fuss recipes everyone should know, trusted baking expert Rose Levy Beranbaum guides you through every recipe for can’t-fail results—with a streamlined, simplified approach and more than 600 mouthwatering and instructive photos. Whether you're a baking enthusiast or just want to whip up the occasional treat, you will be able to easily make perfect brownies, banana bread, holiday pies, birthday cakes, homemade bread, and more, with recipes including: Chocolate Sheet Cake with Ganache Frosting, Peanut Butter and Jelly Thumbprints, Beer Bread, Apple Walnut Muffins, Peach Cobbler, Milk Chocolate Caramel Tart, and more. Throughout, Rose shares her unique tips and methods for unlocking the secrets to the best flavors and foolproof results, for a treasury of essential recipes you'll use forever.






























[book] The Margaret Palca Bakes Cookbook:
Cakes, Cookies, Muffins,
and Memories from a Famous
Brooklyn Baker
by Margaret Palca and
Michael Harlan Turkell (Photographer)
2018
Skyhorse Publishing

Currently located on Columbia Street in Brooklyn, Margaret Palca Bakes has been supplying baked goods to the New York City community for more than thirty years. In this beautiful and lavishly illustrated cookbook, The Margaret Palca Bakes Cookbook, Margaret Palca shares practical baking tips and step-by-step techniques to make eighty of her bakery’s most popular recipes. Butter, eggs, and sugar (she accepts no substitutes) help make her delicious recipes foolproof. Recipes include Margaret’s famous rugelach, blueberry muffins, incredible carrot cake, and much more.






























[book] The Mezze Cookbook:
Sharing Plates from
the Middle East
by Salma Hage
2018
Phaidon
The third cookbook from Salma Hage, from Mazarat Tiffah (Apple Hamlet) in the mountains of the Kadisha Valley in north Lebanon; she has more than 50 years of experience of family cooking. This is a vibrant collection of exciting, exotic, and sharing-plate recipes from across the Middle East. (BR>
More than 135 home-cooking recipes in this book explore the regional diversity of Middle Eastern sharing dishes, from Lebanon and Iran to Turkey and Syria. Divided by style of dish, the book features both meat-based and vegetarian dishes, along with suggested mezze-style menus and a glossary of ingredients. From Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini and Smoked Paprika to Pistachio and Pomegranate Cakes, The Mezze Cookbook is packed with both traditional and modern takes on this age-old way to share food.

This cookbook is filled with vegetarian, meat-based, and fish recipes for everyone to enjoy.

From the author of the acclaimed The Lebanese Kitchen and the James Beard Award-winning The Middle Eastern Vegetarian Cookbook, also published by Phaidon.
Will it mention Israel? Let's see...

































[book] LITTLE BOOK OF JEWISH FEAST
A cookbook
by Leah Koenig
2018
Chronicle Books
The second elegant little book of Jewish culinary traditions, the Little Book of Jewish Feasts offers the perfect dishes to feature at the center of the table. Leah Koenig shares 25 globally inspired Jewish holiday main dishes that will satisfy and delight, from Balsamic and Brown Sugar Brisket to Poppy Seed Chicken Schnitzel to Wild Greens Pie. Building on traditional flavors with the innovative and modern interpretations that Leah is known for, the book features vibrant photographs of each of the showstopping recipes that embody the flavors of Jewish cuisine. With its charming package and delicious takes on the classics, as well as helpful tips for wine pairing and a primer on what to serve for each holiday in the Jewish calendar, this book is sure to bring joy to any celebration.

SEE ALSO [book]










































[book] EVERYDAY DORIE
THE WAY I COOK
BY DORIE GREENSPAN
October 2018
HMH Rux Martin
To the hundreds of thousands who follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, Dorie Greenspan’s food is powerfully cookable—her recipes instant classics. In Everyday Dorie, she invites readers into her kitchen to savor the dishes that she makes all the time, from Miso-Glazed Salmon to Lemon Goop.

What makes a “Dorie recipe”?

Each one has a small surprise that makes it special. Mustard and walnuts in the cheese puffs. Cherry tomatoes stuffed into red bell peppers and oven-charred. Cannellini beans in cod en papillote. The dishes are practical, made with common ingredients from the supermarket, farmers’ market, or pantry, like Sweet Chili Chicken Thighs, which is both weeknight simple and fine enough for company, and Eton Mess, a beautifully casual dessert of crumbled meringue, fruit, and whipped cream. They are easygoing, providing swaps and substitutions. They invite mixing and matching. Many can be served as dinner, or as a side dish, or as an appetizer, or hot, cold, or room temperature. And every single one is like a best friend in the kitchen, full of Dorie’s infectious love of cooking and her trademark hand-holding directions.




























[book] THE GREAT GRILLED
CHEESE BOOK
Grown-Up Recipes for a
Childhood Classic
BY ERIC GREENSPAN
2018
Penguin Random House

Fifty chef-created recipes—some classic, some boundary pushing—for America's favorite sandwich, the grilled cheese.

Eric Greenspan is a famed chef and restaurant owner in Los Angeles who has had ups and downs, like any entrepreneur. The father of two boys (Max and Meyer), Eric is a graduate of culinary school in Paris and the Haas B School in Berkeley. For Scottsdale readers, he is married to the granddaughter of Joy Molever. Eric started The Foundry on Melrose in 2007, is the star of The Roof on Wilshire, started the Jewish / Latinx EL NOSH food truck, and the concepts including Melrose Umbrella, Chino, The B.E.C., and Brekkie Breakfast Burritos. … as well as Fleishik’s Sandwiches, Nosh & Whiskey, a kosher Jewish restaurant along Beverly Boulevard with Avi Heyman and Daniel Uretsky (home of the The Zaydec, with Grilled salami, house made pickles, caramelized onion, deli mustard).

But nationwide, he is most famous for his CHAMP grilled cheese.

A fresh take on the beloved (usually unkosher) American classic, from the classic white bread with American cheese to "The Champ" (a taleggio and short rib extravaganza); the "Johnny Pastrami," which combines pastrami with the bite and freshness of apple chutney; and "The Tomater" with creamy mozzarella and a sun-dried tomato spread. Featuring both common and elevated ingredients like brie cheese, poppy seed bread, olive tapenade, fig marmalade, smoked salmon, candied bacon, bourbon-glazed ham, and raisin walnut bread, these are recipes that invite you into new and uncharted grilled cheese territory. With notes on the best cheese and breads and pro tips for the best cooking techniques, this book has something for every taste and is guaranteed up your grilled cheese game.






























[book] LEVANT
NEW MIDDLE EASTERN COOKING
FROM TANOREEN
By Rawia Bishara
(Lives, Lemons and Za'atar
2018
KYLE BOOKS

Well.. I have both her cookbooks, but every time I am in Brooklyn near her restaurant, I have never scored a seat or reservation. But I will keep hope alive while reading her newest book

You eat with your eyes first

Rawia Bishara, a native of Nazareth, believes one of the greatest assets of Middle Eastern cuisine is its inherent fluidity, its remarkable capacity to adapt and transform over time. In Levant, she offers more than 100 recipes that represent a NEW MODERN style. These are the very best of the dishes she has developed over the last twenty years in her New York City restaurant for the contemporary palate. Relying on a traditional pantry (including olive oil, tahini, za'atar, sumac), she updates classic flavor profiles to dazzling effect.

And then there are eggplants for dessert... stuffed with walnuts and dunked in honey, orange juice, ginger, and spices. This showstopper is adapted from a Turkish treat her mother learned. The dish is both sweet and savory and can be served atop cottage cheese, ricotta cheese, or vanilla ice cream.

Mediterranean diet has always been a healthy one, with so many of what we now call `superfoods' at its base. But here Rawia takes it a step further by focusing on dishes that are naturally vegetarian or vegan and gluten-free, as well as meat dishes where vegetables take the leading role. These savvy recipes represent the way more and more people eat and cook today.

Among them are Cauliflower `Steak' with Pomegranate Molasses, Roasted Beetroot Hummus, Jerusalem Artichoke and Beef Stew, Peppers with Walnut Stuffing and Freekeh and Butternut Squash Salad. Also Halloumi Bites with Hot Tomato Jam; Fennel, Pomegrantate and Sage Salad; Sauteed Hearts of Zucchini )did you even know a zucchini has a heart?); Fava Beans in Yogurt Sauce; Cauliflower Steaks with Tahini; Chickpea Soup with Pearl Onions; Beef Stew with QUINCE/Safarjal; Spiced Cornish Hens Tanoreen Style (sage, garlic, rosemary, cilantro, pesto, cumin, pepper, allspice, nutmeg); and Tangy Roasted Root Vegetables with Goat Cheese. Consider Stuffed Potatoes in Tamarind Sauce; Oil-Cured Chiles with Walnut Stuffing; and Sweet and Sour Beef Rolls.

Levant explores the sensational cross-cultural inventive possibilities of culinary exchange; it sets the path for the future of Middle Eastern cooking.


























[book] A Taste of Naples:
Neapolitan Culture, Cuisine,
and Cooking
by Marlena Spieler
2018
Roman and Littlefield

From the award winning author of Jewish Heritage cooking (2004) comes a book on Naples.
In other places, it might seem trite or cliché to say that love is an essential component of cooking, food, and dining. But in the shadow of a still-fuming Vesuvio, the love of everyday life is palpable in Naples: that passion for life is the spirit that guides Neapolitan cuisine. You can taste it in everything.

To truly know Napoli and Neapolitan food, you must not stay within its city limits. The entire region may be called Campania, but it is also: Napoli. The entire region shares similar characteristics, especially in its cuisine, and its surrounding areas also grow so much of what feeds the city, bringing pleasure and sustenance to the table and to life.

In this tantalizing tour of the culture and cuisine of Napoli, Marlena Spieler reveals the tastes, sights, and sounds of the city and surrounding area (including its islands) in gorgeous detail. Using her own experiences and conversations with others, both tourists and residents alike, she offers us the rich history of this unique culture and cuisine, telling the story through recipes, history, and traditions, especially the special dishes and celebrations that follow every Neapolitan throughout the year. Open its pages and step into a sensory tour of this unique city.






























[book] BOTTOM OF THE POT:
Persian Recipes and Stories
by Naz Deravian
2018
Flatiron Books

TAH(Bottom), DIG (POT)... Tahdig, the dish craved by anyone who has ever tried Persian food. Home for the resident and the exile can be found in a pot with the comforting scents and tastes of family, culture, and familiarity. Ms Deravian fled Iran with her family as a child, and grew up in Europe and Canada in new cities but with familiar flavors of Persia, Tabriz, and the Caspian coast in the kitchen. As an adult, Naz moved to Los Angeles, also know as Tehran-geles with its over 700,000 residents of Persian heritage, where the smell of cheros (Persian steamed rice) and herbs is everpresent. What surprised me about the recipes were the amount of lemon juice and centrality of various herbs in Persian cooking.

In MAZEH: APPETIZERS AND CONDIMENTS there are nearly 20 recipes, including ones for Zeytoon Parvardeh (pomegranate marinated (castelvetrano/sicilian) olives), Borani-yeh Kadoo (Summer Squash Yogurt Dip) or Borani-yeh Laboo (Yogurt Beet Dip); Tomato-Persian-Cucumber Salad; Eggplant and Herb Pickles; and Nazkhatoun (Smokey Eggplant Pomegranate Dip). In the chapter on SOUPS, there are eight, including those for lentil and barley soup, lentil and beet soup, and Aabgoosht (a broth of meat, turmeric, chickpeas, beans, dried limes, lemons, and potatoes). There are over twelve RICE/TAHDIG recipes in the center of the book. It begins with Chelo ba Tahdig (Steamed Persian/Basmati Rice with Tahdig), which takes up 8 pages and 11 pictures. Loobia Polo (Green bean rice) is beautiful to look at and simply, rice, green beans, onion, chicken breast, turmeric, cinnamon, lemon juice, pepper, and tomato paste. Shaveed Polo updates plain rice with dill. Bahgali Polo adds fava beans.

There are nine stews in the chapter KHORESH, which begins with the author's sharing of her family's life in Italy after the Iranian Revolution as they waited in a tiny apartment, hoping to gain entry to Canada. Included are spicy tamarind fish and herb stew, celery stew, eggplant stew, vegetarian apple carrot stew, vegetarian mint and parsley stew, and the monarch of all stews: Koresh Ghormeh Sabzi (fresh herb stew with fenugreek and meat). The Chapter on NAAN (Bread) begins in Vancouver where the family lands when Naz in ten in 1982. There are five recipes, including one for turmeric ginger bread, and one for over-baked pirashki (meat donuts). And the chapter on KOOKOO, or eggs, begins with memories of her first years in Vancouver, where the Iranian immigrants said it rained six months a year, and for the other 6 months, it REALLY rained. Kookoo omelettes are more about the fillings and less about the eggs. For example, for fresh herb kookoo, there are five bunches of herbs and five teaspoons of spices for every 8 eggs. Among the over half a dozen recipes are ones for potato kookoo, green bean kookoo, and Yeralma Yumurta, the smooshed potato and eggs of her maternal grandmother in Tabriz. There are fifteen items in the chapter for MEAT, FISH, AND VEGETABLE, featuring Saffron Chicken, Roasted Dill Salmon (half Persian, half Japanese mother-in-law style), everyday Turmeric Chicken, Roasted Okra (Bamiyeh), Balal (Grilled Corn on the Cob) and Roasted Squash and Grapes (which balances sour and sweet, maple syrup with pomegranate molasses, cinnamon and allspice). Among the eight recipes and stories in STUFFED AND ROLLED are recipes for Everyday Meatballs (with allspice, cinnamon, turmeric, onion, garlic), Stuffed “split belly” Eggplant, and Oven-Baked Meat and Potato Kotlets. Finally, I think the highlight of the DRINKS and the SWEETS chapters were the recipes for Honey and Vinegar Sharbet, which is akin to a Persian Lemonade, and Roulette Cake.

Like Madhur Jaffrey and Marcella Hazan before her, Naz Deravian will introduce the pleasures and secrets of her mother culture's cooking to a broad audience that has no idea what it's been missing. America will not only fall in love with Persian cooking, it'll fall in love with Naz.” - Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: The Four Elements of Good Cooking

Naz Deravian lays out the multi-hued canvas of a Persian meal, with 100+ recipes adapted to an American home kitchen and interspersed with Naz's celebrated essays exploring the idea of home.

At eight years old, Naz Deravian left Iran with her family during the height of the 1979 Iranian Revolution and hostage crisis. Over the following ten years, they emigrated from Iran to Rome to Vancouver, carrying with them books of Persian poetry, tiny jars of saffron threads, and always, the knowledge that home can be found in a simple, perfect pot of rice. As they traverse the world in search of a place to land, Naz's family finds comfort and familiarity in pots of hearty aash, steaming pomegranate and walnut chicken, and of course, tahdig: the crispy, golden jewels of rice that form a crust at the bottom of the pot. The best part, saved for last.

In Bottom of the Pot, Naz, now an award-winning writer and passionate home cook based in LA, opens up to us a world of fragrant rose petals and tart dried limes, music and poetry, and the bittersweet twin pulls of assimilation and nostalgia. In over 100 recipes, Naz introduces us to Persian food made from a global perspective, at home in an American kitchen.






























[book] Bread and Butter:
History, Culture, Recipes
by Richard Snapes
Grant Harrington and Eve Hemingway
October 2018
Quadrille Books

Gin and Tonic, Fred and Ginger, Peas and Carrots, and Bread and Butter. The great pairings. An expansive book on a foodstuff we take for granted, a staple that was given to children waiting for the main meal. The first third of the book covers the history and cultures of bread and butter. The rest of the book is recipes: bread, butter, bread and butter, and leftovers. For over six pages, the authors list various bread from baguettes and crumpets to khubz, kanelbullar, naan, challah, mantou, lavash, puff puff, kisra, frybread, tortillas, injera, and yufka. There are also pages of butters from drawn butter and whey butter to yak butter, gibde, and shea butter. The recipes section begins with THE FIELD LOAF, featuring polenta, cheddar & jalapeno; sunflower, flax & honey; olive & rosemary, followed by THE NEW YORK DELI LOAD, THE HERITAGE LOAF, and and BUTTERMILK RYE BREAD. BEER BREAD mixes sourdough starter with beer and white flour. NORDIC FJELLBROD mixes rye, barley malt, spelt, and pumpkin seeds. Flat Scandinavian KNACKERBROD dates to 500CE, and was made famous in America by Ryvita; the author's BRIOCHE recipe purposely increases the butter and sugar content. Other recipes include those for Kanelbullar, Hot Cross Buns, and more. In section on BUTTER, we learn about the science of butter, as well as Tibetan Butter Tea, Danish Daal, Ghee, (Butter Chicken Curry), Moroccan Fermented Butter, Hollandaise, Bearnaise, Beurre Noisette, Beurre Blanc, creams, and cultured butters. As for BREAD AND BUTTER, recipes include those for butter slathered sandwiches (Grilled Cheese, etc.), Charred Broccoli and Stracciatella, treacle tart, brown butter ice cream, b&b pickles, “bread sauce,” and brioche & butter pudding. Panzanella is found under LEFTOVERS, as is Ribollita Fritters, Bread Pudding, stuffing, buttermilk scones, buttermilk dressing, and spelt buttermilk pancakes.

Bread and butter were first recorded as being eaten together in 1492, and the marriage has been solid and loving ever since.

Bread & Butter: History, Culture, Recipes is a celebration of a divine partnership and a love letter to two glorious, artisanal products that have graced our tables for centuries. The book delves deeply into the history and culture behind the bread and butter partnership, taking a global overview that brings us to the present day. It also shares 40 outstanding recipes that celebrate the best of both bread and butter.
































[book] I Am a Filipino:
And This Is How We Cook
by Nicole Ponseca
and Miguel Trinidad
Fall 2018
Artisan

Every five years, someone write sthat Filipino food is having its moment and is becoming popular. And it fizzles out and is forgotten. Forget the pundits and just try it yourself with this book. Especially if you are in Isral and have friendships with Filipino-Israelis and guest workers. Or if you are in North Amreica and you have friends of Filipino heritage… the second-largest Asian population in America after Chinese Americans. Featured are recipes based on braising, boiling, and grilling; with sour, sweet and spicy flavors.. .it isnt just Jollibee. Highlights for the Jewish tongue are… Hiligaynon style Adobong Pula Achuete (Red Adobo with Lamb Shanks); Turmeric rich Adobong Manok Dilaw (Yellow Adobo with Chicken); Binakol, which is chicken soup made with Coconut Water and thawed pepper leaves; Isabela style Sinampalukang Manok (Tamarind Chicken Stew); Rocos Norte style Puqui-Puqui (Charred Eggplant with Eggs and Tomatoes; Pinasugbo Banana Fritters; and Mindanau style Baka Tula-Sog (Beef in Cocoa powder and Bananas)

Filipino food is having its moment. Sour, sweet, funky, fatty, bright, rich, tangy, bold—no wonder adventurous eaters consider Filipino food the next big thing (Vogue declares it “the next great American cuisine”). Filipinos are the second-largest Asian population in America, and finally, after enjoying Chinese, Japanese, Thai, and Vietnamese food, we’re ready to embrace Filipino food, too. Written by trailblazing restaurateurs Nicole Ponseca and Miguel Trinidad, I Am a Filipino is a cookbook of modern Filipino recipes that captures the unexpected and addictive flavors of this vibrant and diverse cuisine.

The techniques (including braising, boiling, and grilling) are simple, the ingredients are readily available, and the results are extraordinary. T There are Chinese-influenced pansit (noodle dishes) and lumpia (spring rolls); Arab-inflected cuisine, with its layered spicy curries; and dishes that reflect the tastes and ingredients of the Spaniards, Mexicans, and Americans who came to the Philippines and stayed. Included are beloved fried street snacks like ukoy (fritters), and an array of sweets and treats called meryenda. Filled with suitably bold and bright photographs, I Am a Filipino is like a classic kamayan dinner—one long, festive table piled high with food. Just dig in!






























[book] Matters of Vital Interest:
A Forty-Year Friendship
with Leonard Cohen
by Eric Lerner
Da Capo Press
October 2018

A memoir of the author's decades-long friendship and spiritual journey with the late singer, songwriter, novelist, and poet Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen passed away in late 2016, leaving behind many who cared for and admired him, but perhaps few knew him better than longtime friend Eric Lerner. Lerner, a screenwriter and novelist, first met Cohen at a Zen retreat forty years ago. Their friendship helped guide one another through life's myriad obstacles, a journey told from a new perspective for the first time.

Funny, revealing, self-aware, and deeply moving, Matters of Vital Interest is an insightful memoir about Lerner's relationship with his friend, whose idiosyncratic style and dignified life was deeply informed by his spiritual practices. Lerner invites readers to step into the room with them and listen in on a lifetime's ongoing dialogue, considerations of matters of vital interest, spiritual, mundane, and profane. In telling their story, Lerner depicts Leonard Cohen as a captivating persona the likes of which we may never see again.
























[book] DELISH
Eat Like Every Day’s the Weekend
by Editors of Delish
and Joanna Saltz
October 16, 2018
HMH Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Although the recipes use a lot of kosher salt, a lot of the recipes are based on bacon, shrimp, and cheese on meet. But I got several ideas from the book nevertheless. Their motto at DELISH is, "You don't have to know how to cook—you just have to love to eat." That’s why Delish is the fastest-growing food media brand on the Internet: It speaks to a new generation of food lovers who don’t fancy themselves chefs. New employees gain 15 pounds at Delish. But if you have greater restraint, you can pick and choose among the recipes

Most cookbooks start with appetizers and entrees. This one starts with.. DRINKS. Recipes for Giggle Juice (Moscato, Pink Lemonade, Vodka); Prosecco soaked grapes; Mermaid Lemonade (rum, curacao); and more. In APPS AND BITES, The Grilled Cheese Dippers use vegetable broth and heavy cream in the grilled cheese prep. Another innovation is the Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Pretzels, as well as the caprese garlic bread that adds tomatoes to the bread to add sweetness. A highlight in DIPS is the eggplant parm dip. They suggest over thirty toppings for burgers. Most not kosher, but you can pick out a few as ideas. I was especially intrigued by Egg in a Hole Burgers. Their Crack Chicken dinner entree adds brown sugar to chicken tenders, limes, and bbq sauce. Their Firecracker Salmon also adds in brown sugar and fresh lime juice. The book introduced me to hasselback style stuffing, such as in primavera stuffed chicken breasts, and spatchcock style splitting for chicken roasting. I was used to making coca cola beef or brisket. DELISH uses Dr. Pepper for more flavor. There is a chapter just for PIZZA, featuring Pizza Rigatoni Pie, Pizza Pinwheels, Pizza Pot Pie, Pizza Waffles, Cauliflower Veggie Pizza Supreme, and more. There are over 30 hacks for Mac and Cheese... the boxed type; and over 14 pasta based entrees. Taco Tomatoes were innovative – tomatoes replaced the taco shell. Oven-Fried Pickles and Chicken Fried Cauliflower are hits.

The Delish editors want their audience to know it's okay to make a mess—food is meant to be shared, not perfected—and all of their content is "accidentally educational," featuring step-by-step photography that’s packaged in such a way that you don’t even realize you’re learning something. The fun-packed Delish cookbook brings the same message to the page, and features more than 275 recipes and ideas that are meant to be devoured: including an everything-bagel dip
































[book] Torah of the Mind,
Torah of the Heart:
Divrei Torah of the Talner Rebbe
by Rabbi Yitzhak Twersky
Edited by Rabbi David Shapiro
Foreword by Meyer Twersky
October 2018
Torah of the Heart, Torah of the Mind includes various shiurim from the late Rav Yitzhak (Isadore) Twersky on the weekly Torah portions.
Rabbi Twersky’s teachings represent a rare synthesis of three intellectual approaches within the Torah world: the Chassidic tradition on which he was nurtured from childhood at home; the scholarly/academic approach which he mastered in Harvard University and Hebrew University; and the Lithuanian yeshivah approach which he internalized by studying weekly for decades with his father-in-law, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik.

Rabbi Dr Yitzhak (Isadore) Twersky (1930–1997) zt"l was the Talner Rebbe of Boston. He also held the Littauer Chair in Hebrew Literature and Jewish Philosophy at Harvard University. He was a unique person in that his religious sensitivity, Chassidic roots, Maimonidean philosophical temperament, and personal piety were nourished and augmented by his unusual, wide-ranging, inter-disciplinary Torah erudition and creativity.


























[book] Jews Make the Best Demons:
'Palestine' and the Jewish Question
by Eric Rozenman
October 22, 2018
New English Review Press
Is it time for Jews to leave Europe? cover stories in Atlantic and Commentary magazines have asked.

Hitler didn't finish the job! a mob at San Francisco State University screamed at pro-Israel students.
Agitators at the University of Texas forced a visiting Israeli professor to go about in disguise.
Progressive students at Oberlin College dismissed the Holocaust as merely white-on-white crime.
Such examples proliferate as an anti-Zionist/antisemitic indoctrination intensifies.

Israel is the only Western-style democracy in the greater Middle East, a world-leader despite its small size in medicine, science and technology and is the effective first-responder in many global humanitarian relief efforts. Yet international public opinion surveys find it ranked as one of the chief threats to world peace; 20 percent of Europeans wish their countries were free of Jews.

What happened to the post-1945 world of Never Again! ? In Jews Make the Best Demons: Palestine and the Jewish Question, to be published this October by New English Review Press, Eric Rozenman examines how we got here, the danger posed not only for the Jewish state and Jews everywhere but also for the United States and the rest of the self-doubting liberal West. He outlines what must be done to halt the post-modern propagation of pre-modern beliefs.

Theodore Herzl and the other founders of political Zionism expected their Altneuland, the old-new Jewish state, to at long last normalize the status of the Jewish people, so often in their 2,000-year statelessness marginalized and massacred. Instead, Rozenman shows, antisemitism resurrected through anti-Zionism has made Israel the Neualtjude, the new-old Jew, in the process indicting the Jewish people not as demonic Christ-killer but rather as demonic nation-killer of the Palestinian Arabs.

The new blood libel, cloaked in the Palestinian narrative, is as false as the original and no more likely to be defeated primarily by facts. Jews Make the Best Demons concludes that what is required first of all is a psychological transformation, the one pointed to by psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl. It is a rejection of George Orwell s streamlined men who think in slogans and talk in bullets and embrace of Frankl s race of the decent, shunning all the indecent who seek a final answer to the question of Palestine, which in reality is the question of Israel, the age-old Jewish question.

























[book] The Novel of Ferrara
a novel
by the late Giorgio Bassani
Jamie McKendrick (Translator)
Foreword by André Aciman
WW NORTON & CO
October 2018
Giorgio Bassani’s six classic books, collected for the first time in English as the epic masterwork they were intended to be.

Among the masters of twentieth-century literature, Giorgio Bassani and his Northern Italian hometown of Ferrara “are as inseparable as James Joyce and Dublin or Italo Svevo and Trieste” (from the Introduction).

Now published in English for the first time as the unified masterwork Bassani intended, The Novel of Ferrara brings together Bassani’s six classics, fully revised by the author at the end of his life:
Within the Walls,
The Gold-Rimmed Spectacles,
The Garden of the Finzi-Continis,
Behind the Door,
The Heron, and
The Smell of Hay.

Set in the northern Italian town of Ferrara before, during, and after the Second World War, these interlocking stories present a fully rounded world of unforgettable characters: the respected doctor whose homosexuality is tolerated until he is humiliatingly exposed by an exploitative youth; a survivor of the Nazi death camps whose neighbors’ celebration of his return gradually turns to ostracism; a young man discovering the ugly, treacherous price that people will pay for a sense of belonging; the Jewish aristocrat whose social position has been erased; the indomitable schoolteacher, Celia Trotti, whose Communist idealism disturbs and challenges a postwar generation.

The Novel of Ferrara memorializes not only the Ferrarese people, but the city itself, which assumes a character and a voice deeply inflected by the Jewish community to which the narrator belongs. Suffused with new life by acclaimed translator and poet Jamie McKendrick, this seminal work seals Bassani’s reputation as “a quietly insistent chronicler of our age’s various menaces to liberty” (Jonathan Keates).

























[book] Prius or Pickup?:
How the Answers to Four Simple
Questions Explain America’s Great Divide
by Marc Hetherington and
Jonathan Weiler
(Univ of North Carolina)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
October 2018
Two award-winning political scientists provide the psychological key to America’s deadlocked politics, showing that we are divided not by ideologies but something deeper: personality differences that appear in everything from politics to parenting to the workplace to TV preferences, and which would be innocuous if only we could decouple them from our noxious political debate.

What’s in your garage: a Prius or a pickup?
What’s in your coffee cup: Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts?
What about your pet: cat or dog?
As award-winning political scholars Marc Hetherington and Jonathan Weiler explain, even our smallest choices speak volumes about us—especially when it comes to our personalities and our politics. Liberals and conservatives seem to occupy different worlds because we have fundamentally different worldviews: systems of values that can be quickly diagnosed with a handful of simple parenting questions, but which shape our lives and decisions in the most elemental ways. If we're to overcome our seemingly intractable differences, Hetherington and Weiler show, we must first learn to master the psychological impulses that give rise to them, and to understand how politicians manipulate our mindsets for their own benefit.

Drawing on groundbreaking original research, Prius or Pickup? is an incisive, illuminating study of the fracturing of the American mind.

























[book] The Girl from Berlin:
A Novel
by Ronald H. Balson
October 2018
St. Martin's Press
In the newest novel from internationally-bestselling author Ronald. H. Balson, Liam and Catherine come to the aid of an old friend and are drawn into a property dispute in Tuscany that unearths long-buried secrets

An old friend calls Catherine Lockhart and Liam Taggart to his famous Italian restaurant to enlist their help. His aunt is being evicted from her home in the Tuscan hills by a powerful corporation claiming they own the deeds, even though she can produce her own set of deeds to her land. Catherine and Liam’s only clue is a bound handwritten manuscript, entirely in German, and hidden in its pages is a story long-forgotten…

Ada Baumgarten was born in Berlin in 1918, at the end of the war. The daughter of an accomplished first-chair violinist in the prestigious Berlin Philharmonic, and herself a violin prodigy, Ada’s life was full of the rich culture of Berlin’s interwar society. She formed a deep attachment to her childhood friend Kurt, but they were torn apart by the growing unrest as her Jewish family came under suspicion. As the tides of history turned, it was her extraordinary talent that would carry her through an unraveling society turned to war, and make her a target even as it saved her, allowing her to move to Bologna-though Italy was not the haven her family had hoped, and further heartache awaited.

What became of Ada? How is she connected to the conflicting land deeds of a small Italian villa? As they dig through the layers of lies, corruption, and human evil, Catherine and Liam uncover an unfinished story of heart, redemption, and hope-the ending of which is yet to be written.

Don't miss Liam and Catherine's lastest adventures in The Girl from Berlin!



























[book] THE FORGOTTEN
How the People of One Pennsylvania County
Elected Donald Trump and
Changed America
by Ben Bradlee. JR
Little, Brown & Company
October 2018

In September 2016, I was driving throughout Luzerne County in search of a headstone in one of several Jewish cemeteries, many of them in the rural back mountain areas. And I was struck by the number of TRUMP signs and posters that dotted the lawns. More than struck. I was shocked. And so when this county pushed Trump over the top for PA by a few tens of thousands votes, and delivered Trump the national victory... I was not that surprised. I mean, let's not forget that an area mayor – now Congressman – based his campaign on a very vocal white supremacist hate for newly arriving and growing Hispanic immigrants in the area.

Luzerne County (Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton) in Northeastern Pennsylvania, in the Wyoming Valley of the Susquehanna River, is an area of closed coal mines, a new casino, some dwindling synagogues, many churches, a yeshiva for struggling young men, a newly opened kosher pizza shop housed in a defunct church, a decentralized centralized un-visited downtown area, struggling malls, and a lot of Trump signs on lawns. This was the area in 2016.

This is an up-close look at the voters of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, who decisively swung the state for Donald J. Trump, a gave DJ Trump his national Electoral College win; and an examination of the role of the President's base as the midterm elections loom.

Luzerne County Pennsylvania, as Ben Bradlee describes it, is a microcosm of the nation. While it boasts its own police, firemen, schools and municipal services, Luzerne has few urban centers and is fundamentally rural in character. And like so many of the 3,000 other counties that resemble it across America, Donald J. Trump won Luzerne County in 2016.

But President Obama had carried Luzerne County in both 2008 and 2012, what happened?
What changed? And what does this mean for America?

THE FORGOTTEN tells this story, revealing how Trump voters came to feel like STRANGERS in their own land, MARGINALIZED by flat or falling wages, rapid demographic change, and a liberal culture that mocks their faith and patriotism.

As they explain it, residents of Luzerne felt like others were 'cutting in line' and that the federal government was taking too much money from the employed and giving it to the idle. They felt a loss of breadwinner status, and more importantly, a loss of dignity.

Bradlee interviews sample residents. The veteran of three tours in the Middle East. The hairdresser. The avowed truck driving white supremacist KKK leader who won a write-in campaign to be a leader of the area GOP. The retired. The anti-Hispanic. The unemployed and underemployed. There is Congressman Lou Barletta, the former mayor of Hazleton, who co-chaired Trumps campaign for PA. There is Vita DeLuca, an attorney and Trump lover. Bar owner Marty Beccone. Ed Harry, a lifelong Democrat and union-member who voted for Trump even though his union leadership wanted Hillary. Retired Detective Brian Langan who went with Trump. Lynette Villano, a clerk and widow was enamored by Trump from the day he announced. Kim Woodrosky, a real estate investor, and Tiffany Cloud, a regional ad exec, supported Trump. And Jessica Harker, RN, who works for the V.A., who is a Christian in the the heavily Catholic area. She overlooks Trumps words since she believes God has selected him to lead the USA.

Drawing an unforgettable portrait of disillusioned Americans caught in a fraught political moment that doesn't seem to end, The Forgotten not only expresses the growing divide between the two political parties, but also the immense forces that powered the election of Donald Trump. America is changing, and the men and women of The Forgotten are the ones who are changing it.


















[book] A Rosenberg by Any Other Name:
A History of Jewish Name
Changing in America
by Kirsten Fermaglich
(Michigan State Univ, Jewish Studies)
NYU Press
October 2018

A groundbreaking history of the practice of Jewish name changing in the 20th century, showcasing just how much is in a name

Our thinking about Jewish name changing tends to focus on clichés: ambitious movie stars who adopted glamorous new names or insensitive Ellis Island officials who changed immigrants’ names for them. But as Kirsten Fermaglich elegantly reveals, the real story is much more profound. Scratching below the surface, Fermaglich examines previously unexplored name change petitions to upend the clichés, revealing that in twentieth-century New York City, Jewish name changing was actually a broad-based and voluntary behavior: thousands of ordinary Jewish men, women, and children legally changed their names in order to respond to an upsurge of antisemitism. Rather than trying to escape their heritage or “pass” as non-Jewish, most name-changers remained active members of the Jewish community. While name changing allowed Jewish families to avoid antisemitism and achieve white middle-class status, the practice also created pain within families and became a stigmatized, forgotten aspect of American Jewish culture.

This first history of name changing in the United States offers a previously unexplored window into American Jewish life throughout the twentieth century. A Rosenberg by Any Other Name demonstrates how historical debates about immigration, antisemitism and race, class mobility, gender and family, the boundaries of the Jewish community, and the power of government are reshaped when name changing becomes part of the conversation.

Mining court documents, oral histories, archival records, and contemporary literature, Fermaglich argues convincingly that name changing had a lasting impact on American Jewish culture. Ordinary Jews were forced to consider changing their names as they saw their friends, family, classmates, co-workers, and neighbors do so. Jewish communal leaders and civil rights activists needed to consider name changers as part of the Jewish community, making name changing a pivotal part of early civil rights legislation. And Jewish artists created critical portraits of name changers that lasted for decades in American Jewish culture. This book ends with the disturbing realization that the prosperity Jews found by changing their names is not as accessible for the Chinese, Latino, and Muslim immigrants who wish to exercise that right today.






















[book] Bitter and Sweet
by Sandra V. Feder
Kyrsten Brooker (Illustrator)
October 2018
Groundwood Press
Ages 5-12
When Hannah’s family has to move, her grandmother tells her how she felt leaving the old country - it was both bitter and sweet. As Hannah leaves her friends behind and tries to get used to a new house, she only feels bitterness. Was her grandmother wrong about the sweetness?

Hannah starts to feel better about the move when she sees her new house in the soft light of the Shabbat candles. When a new friend reaches out with a special gift, Hannah realizes that sweetness can come from unexpected places and that she can even create some herself.

Featuring art by acclaimed illustrator Kyrsten Brooker, this story subtly conveys a universal message - while life can be full of challenging moments, sweeter ones can be found and created. An author’s note is included on the concept of bitter and sweet in Jewish culture.
































[book] ANNE FRANK'S DIARY
THE GRAPHIC ADAPTATION
By Ari Folman and David Polonsky
and Anne Frank
October 2018
Pantheon
A timeless story rediscovered by each new generation, The Diary of a Young Girl stands without peer. For both young readers and adults it continues to capture the remarkable spirit of Anne Frank, who for a time survived the worst horror the modern world has seen—and who remained triumphantly and heartbreakingly human throughout her ordeal.

Adapted by Ari Folman, illustrated by David Polonsky, and authorized by the Anne Frank Foundation in Basel, this is the first graphic edition of The Diary and includes extensive quotation directly from the definitive edition. It remains faithful to the original, while the stunning illustrations interpret and add layers of visual meaning and immediacy to this classic work of Holocaust literature.

































[book] Superman isn't Jewish
by Jimmy Bemon
Emilie Boudet (Artist)
October 2018
Humanoids

Benjamin would always proudly say, "I'm Jewish. Like Superman!" Assuming that Judaism is some kind of super power and Hebrew is akin to the Kryptonian language, Benjamin believes each of his family members is a superhero.

Until, like Krypton, his world is shattered. After learning of the link between being circumcised and his religion, Ben decides to hide his heritage from everyone. Caught between the desire to avoid disappointing his Jewish father and his desire to understand his Catholic mother, Ben has to find a way to abandon his secret identity for a very public one.

Humorous, timeless and universal, this personal and poignant story of acceptance and understanding shows how we all must learn to love the hero within ourselves.
































[book] Hitler's American Friends:
The Third Reich's Supporters
in the United States
by Bradley W. Hart
October 2, 2018

A book examining the strange terrain of Nazi sympathizers, nonintervention campaigners and other voices in America who advocated on behalf of Nazi Germany in the years before World War II.

Americans who remember World War II reminisce about how it brought the country together. The less popular truth behind this warm nostalgia: until the attack on Pearl Harbor, America was deeply, dangerously divided.

Bradley W. Hart's Hitler's American Friends exposes the homegrown antagonists who sought to protect and promote Hitler, leave Europeans (and especially European Jews) to fend for themselves, and elevate the Nazi regime.

Some of these friends were Americans of German heritage who joined the Bund, whose leadership dreamed of installing a stateside Führer. Some were as bizarre and hair-raising as the Silver Shirt Legion, run by an eccentric who claimed that Hitler fulfilled a religious prophesy. Some were Midwestern Catholics like Father Charles Coughlin, an early right-wing radio star who broadcast anti-Semitic tirades. They were even members of Congress who used their franking privilege-sending mail at cost to American taxpayers-to distribute German propaganda. And celebrity pilot Charles Lindbergh ended up speaking for them all at the America First Committee.

We try to tell ourselves it couldn't happen here, but Americans are not immune to the lure of fascism. Hitler's American Friends is a powerful look at how the forces of evil manipulate ordinary people, how we stepped back from the ledge, and the disturbing ease with which we could return to it.


























[book] Appealing for Liberty:
Freedom Suits in
the South
by Loren Schweninger
October 2018
Oxford University Press
Dred Scott and his landmark Supreme Court case are ingrained in the national memory, but he was just one of multitudes who appealed for their freedom in courtrooms across the country. Appealing for Liberty is the most comprehensive study to give voice to these African Americans, drawing from more than 2,000 suits and from the testimony of more than 4,000 plaintiffs from the Revolutionary era to the Civil War. Through the petitions, evidence, and testimony introduced in these court proceedings, the lives of the enslaved come sharply and poignantly into focus, as do many other aspects of southern society such as the efforts to preserve and re-unite black families. This book depicts in graphic terms, the pain, suffering, fears, and trepidations of the plaintiffs while discussing the legal systemlawyers, judges, juries, and testimonythat made judgments on their "causes," as the suits were often called.

Arguments for freedom were diverse: slaves brought suits claiming they had been freed in wills and deeds, were born of free mothers, were descendants of free white women or Indian women; they charged that they were illegally imported to some states or were residents of the free states and territories. Those who testified on their behalf, usually against leaders of their communities, were generally white. So too were the lawyers who took these cases, many of them men of prominence, such as Francis Scott Key. More often than not, these men were slave owners themselves-- complicating our understanding of race relations in the antebellum period.

A majority of the cases examined here were not appealed, nor did they create important judicial precedent. Indeed, most of the cases ended at the county, circuit, or district court level of various southern states. Yet the narratives of both those who gained their freedom and those who failed to do so, and the issues their suits raised, shed a bold and timely light on the history of race and liberty in the "land of the free."

























[book] When Christians Were Jews:
The First Generation
by Paula Fredriksen
October 23, 2018
Yale University Press
How did a group of charismatic, apocalyptic Jewish missionaries, working to prepare their world for the impending realization of God's promises to Israel, end up inaugurating a movement that would grow into the gentile church? Committed to Jesus’s prophecy—“The Kingdom of God is at hand!”—they were, in their own eyes, history's last generation. But in history's eyes, they became the first Christians.

In this electrifying social and intellectual history, Paula Fredriksen answers this question by reconstructing the life of the earliest Jerusalem community. As her account arcs from this group’s hopeful celebration of Passover with Jesus, through their bitter controversies that fragmented the movement’s midcentury missions, to the city’s fiery end in the Roman destruction of Jerusalem, she brings this vibrant apostolic community to life. Fredriksen offers a vivid portrait both of this temple-centered messianic movement and of the bedrock convictions that animated and sustained it.


























[book] God's Country:
Christian Zionism in America
by Samuel Goldman
(GWU, George Washington Univ)
2018
University of Pennsylvania Press

The United States is Israel's closest ally in the world. The fact is undeniable, and undeniably controversial, not least because it so often inspires conspiracy theorizing among those who refuse to believe that the special relationship serves America's strategic interests or places the United States on the right side of Israel's enduring conflict with the Palestinians. Some point to the nefarious influence of a powerful "Israel lobby" within the halls of Congress. Others detect the hand of evangelical Protestants who fervently support Israel for their own theological reasons. The underlying assumption of all such accounts is that America's support for Israel must flow from a mixture of collusion, manipulation, and ideologically driven foolishness.

Samuel Goldman proposes another explanation. The political culture of the United States, he argues, has been marked from the very beginning by a Christian theology that views the American nation as deeply implicated in the historical fate of biblical Israel. God's Country is the first book to tell the complete story of Christian Zionism in American political and religious thought from the Puritans to 9/11. It identifies three sources of American Christian support for a Jewish state: covenant, or the idea of an ongoing relationship between God and the Jewish people; prophecy, or biblical predictions of return to The Promised Land; and cultural affinity, based on shared values and similar institutions. Combining original research with insights from the work of historians of American religion, Goldman crafts a provocative narrative that chronicles Americans' attachment to the State of Israel.

























[book] How New Is the New Testament?
by Donald A. Hagner
(Fullerton)
October 2018
Baker Academic Christian Press

The author tries to show that early Christianity was separate from Judaism
What is so new about the New Testament? Senior scholar Donald Hagner tackles the issue of how distinct early Christianity was from the first-century Judaism from which it emerged. He surveys newness in the entire New Testament canon, examining the evidence for points of continuity and discontinuity between formative Judaism and early Christianity. Hagner's accessible analysis of the New Testament text shows that despite Christianity's thorough Jewishness, from the beginning dramatic newness was an essential aspect of this early literature.

























[book] Seltzertopia:
The Extraordinary Story
of an Ordinary Drink
by Barry Joseph
October 2018
Behrman House

What makes a person develop a loyalty and passion so intense, so unexpected, that it can turn their lives upside down?

Seltzertopia is the story of the modern pioneers of seltzer, loyal to and passionate about the crisply carbonated, who wrangle centuries-old machines to fill siphons with sparkling water, keeping alive a craft that is centuries old.

Using their stories to consider the social, cultural, and economic impacts of seltzer, Seltzertopia tackles the question: What is it about this simplest of concoctions that has allowed it to make a difference to so many people, in such different ways?

Based on more than fourteen years of original research and interviews, the extraordinary story of this ordinary drink can finally be told.

In Part One, "The World According to Seltzer," readers will learn the untold history of seltzer and about the people across America who have found themselves building a path to Seltzertopia. They will discover where seltzer comes from, the science of seltzer, and how people can become SO passionate about something SO ordinary. More specifically, readers will meet John Seekings, a public relations executive in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and join him on his unexpected journey into the modern world of old-fashioned seltzer bottling.

In Part Two, "Give Me Seltzer (and the People Who Crave It),” readers will learn how, during the blizzard of 2010, John Seekings saw for the first time how much seltzer meant to his new customers. They will discover how that meaning can change over time and place, and how it is most often associated with one of four categories: health, refreshment, identity, and comedy. And it will begin with a visit not too far into the past, to a time when seltzer found itself pitted in a battle against another popular drink: Coca-Cola.

In Part Three, “Seltzertopia,” readers will enter the effervescent age. Widely available in plastic bottles, in supermarkets and corner stores, in a wide range of flavors, readers will discover seltzer’s global appeal, then revisit John Seekings, now a seltzer master in an emerging generation of new seltzer professionals.

Get your own copy of Seltzertopia and feel the fizz!
























[book] The Burn (Cook) Book:
An Unofficial, Unauthorized
Mean Girls Guide
by Jonathan Bennett,
Nikki Martin, and Fwd by Lacey Chabert
October 2, 2018
Grand Central L&S
The ultimate, unofficial and unauthorized Mean Girls cookbook. Gretchen's Wieners. Fetch-uccine Alfredo. You Go Glenn (Hot) Cocoa. Ms. Norberry Pie. Just Stab Caesar Salad. Are Buttermilk Pancakes a Carb? Face Smells Like a Foot Peppermint Bark.

With these recipes and more, you too can eat like Regina George and The Plastics. Part hilarious cookbook with real recipes, part ultimate insider guide, THE BURN (COOK)BOOK is the first fanbook to celebrate the film that is required viewing for mean girls everywhere.

Cook your way through recipes for all the important food groups (um carbs, duh), and then feast on the behind-the-scenes stories and trivia from the making of the film, as only Jonathan Bennett--yes Aaron Samuels himself--can tell them. (Does he even go here?) Perfect for happy hour (4:00-6:00 PM), Wednesdays, or when sweatpants are the only thing that fit, THE BURN (COOK)BOOK is the must-own book for the legions of Mean Girls fans still making "fetch" happen today.



















[book] How to Tell Fate from Destiny:
And Other Skillful Word Distinctions
by Charles Harrington Elster
October 23, 2018
HMH
If you have trouble distinguishing the verbs imitate and emulate, the relative pronouns that and which, or the adjectives pliant, pliable, and supple, never fear—How to Tell Fate from Destiny is here to help! With more than 500 headwords, the book is replete with advice on how to differentiate commonly confused words and steer clear of verbal trouble.

Whether you’re a boomer, a Gen-Xer, or a millennial, if you peruse, browse, or even skim these spindrift pages you will (not shall) become versed in the fine art of differentiation. You will learn, for example,

how to tell whether you suffer from pride, vanity, or hubris
how to tell whether you’re contagious or infectious
how to tell if you’re pitiful or pitiable
how to tell if you’re self-centered or self-absorbed
how to live an ethical life in a moral universe






















[book] Professor at Large:
The Cornell Years
by John Cleese
October 2018
Cornell University Press
And now for something completely different. Professor at Large features beloved English comedian and actor John Cleese in the role of ivy league professor at Cornell University. His almost twenty years as professor-at-large has led to many talks, essays, and lectures on campus. This collection of the very best moments from Cleese under his mortarboard provides a unique view of his endless pursuit of intellectual discovery across a range of topics. Since 1999, Cleese has provided Cornell students and local citizens with his ideas on everything from scriptwriting to psychology, religion to hotel management, and wine to medicine.

His incredibly popular events and classes-including talks, workshops, and an analysis of A Fish Called Wanda and The Life of Brian-draw hundreds of people. He has given a sermon at Sage Chapel, narrated Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf with the Cornell Chamber Orchestra, conducted a class on script writing, and lectured on psychology and human development. Each time Cleese has visited the campus in Ithaca, NY, he held a public presentation, attended and or lectured in classes, and met privately with researchers. From the archives of these visits, Professor at Large includes an interview with screenwriter William Goldman, a lecture about creativity entitled, "Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind," talks about Professor at Large and The Life of Brian, a discussion of facial recognition, and Cleese’s musings on group dynamics with business students and faculty.

Professor at Large provides a window into the workings of John Cleese’s scholarly mind, showcasing the wit and intelligence that have driven his career as a comedian, while demonstrating his knack of pinpointing the essence of humans and human problems. His genius on the screen has long been lauded; now his academic chops get their moment in the spotlight, too.

























[book] FAME
THE HIJACKING OF REALITY
by Justine Bateman
October 2018
AkASHIC
"Justine Bateman was famous before selfies replaced autographs, and bags of fan mail gave way to Twitter shitstorms. And here's the good news: she took notes along the way. Justine steps through the looking glass of her own celebrity, shatters it, and pieces together, beyond the shards and splinters, a reflection of her true self. The transformation is breathtaking. Revelatory and raucous, fascinating and frightening, Fame is a hell of a ride." --Michael J. Fox, actor, author of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future



Entertainment shows, magazines, websites, and other channels continuously report the latest sightings, heartbreaks, and triumphs of the famous to a seemingly insatiable public. Millions of people go to enormous lengths to achieve Fame. Fame is woven into our lives in ways that may have been unimaginable in years past.

And yet, is Fame even real? Contrary to tangible realities, Fame is one of those "realities" that we, as a society, have made. Why? What is it about Fame that drives us to spend so much time, money, and focus to create the framework that maintains its health?

Mining decades of experience, writer, director, producer, and actress Justine Bateman writes a visceral, intimate look at the experience of Fame. Combining the internal reality-shift of the famous, theories on the public's behavior at each stage of a famous person's career, and the experiences of other famous performers, Bateman takes the reader inside and outside the emotions of Fame. The book includes twenty-four color photographs to highlight her analysis.
























[book] Minding the Store:
A Big Story about
a Small Business
by Julie Gaines and
Ben Lenovitz (Illustrator)
October 2018
Algonquin
In this charming graphic memoir, the founder of the iconic housewares shop Fishs Eddy recounts the ups and downs—and ups again—of starting a family business, starting a family, and staying true to one’s path while trying to make it in the Big City.

Whether it’s a set of vintage plates from a 1920s steamship, a mug with a New Yorker cartoon on it, a tin of sprinkles designed by Amy Sedaris, or a juice glass from a Jazz Age hotel, Fishs Eddy products are distinctly recognizable. A New York institution, Fishs Eddy also remains a family business whose owners endured the same challenges as many family businesses—and lived to write about it in this tale filled with humorous characterizations of opinionated relatives, nosy neighbors, quirky employees, and above all the eccentric foibles of the founders themselves. Readers come to know author Julie Gaines and her husband, with whom she founded the store, and because this is a family business, the illustrations are all in the family, too: their son Ben Lenovitz’s drawings bring Fishs Eddy to life with a witty style a la Roz Chast and Ben Katchor.

Over the years the store has collaborated with artists and celebrities such as Charley Harper and Todd Oldham, Alan Cumming, and many others to produce original designs that are now found in thousands of stores throughout the country, and Fishs Eddy has garnered a huge amount of media coverage. A great gift for anyone who has ever dreamed of opening a little business—or anyone with any kind of dream—Minding the Store offers wisdom, inspiration, and an exceedingly entertaining story.
























[book] Regina Persisted:
An Untold Story
by (Rabbi) Sandy Eisenberg Sasso
Margeaux Lucas (Illustrator)
October 2018
Apples and Honey Press
(7-12)

From a young age, Regina Jonas loved to read stories from the Bible. She loved to read Hebrew. She wanted to be a rabbi. There had never been a woman rabbi before, and some people said, 'You should learn to cook and sew like the other girls.' But Regina persisted.
They said, 'Don't make trouble.' But Regina persisted.
They said, 'Women are not smart enough.' Regina heard, but still she persisted.
Finally, in 1935, Regina Jonas became the first woman ever ordained as a rabbi. Her story inspires us to pursue our dreams and to persist even in the face of great challenges.

'Evocative, inspiring, and uplifting' --Kirkus Starred Review
'Rabbi Sandy Eisenberg Sasso s beautiful and motivating book shows, why it is so necessary to tell young Jewish girls and boys the amazing story of the first female rabbi.' --Rabbi Elisa Klapheck, author of Fräulein Rabbiner Jonas. The Story of the First Woman Rabbi (2004)
Regina Jonas had a dream, to become a rabbi. Hard work and persistence made that that dream come true. Regina Persisted: The Untold Story will inspire children everywhere who also dream 'I will be what I will be.' --Pamela S. Nadell, author of Women Who Would Be Rabbis: A History of Women s Ordination, 1889-1985

























[book] The Day I Met Father Isaac
at the Supermarket:
Lessons in How to
Live from the Jewish Tradition
by Rabbi Jack Riemer
2018
KTAV / URIM
256 pages, softcover

From the author of so many contemporary prayers in our machzorim, is a book of lessons. What would you say to our forefather Isaac, if you happened to bump into him in a parking lot, and he asked you: ''What's new?''

One of Rabbi Riemer's congregants wants to take his girlfriend away to a hotel for a weekend to see if they click or not and Rabbi Riemer seizes the moment to discuss this counseling problem with Father Isaac. What should he advise the young man to do? The answer he gets from our biblical patriarch is both hilarious and wise.

Throughout the chapters of this book, Rabbi Riemer relates stories found in the Bible to the world in which we live today, with humor, imagination and wisdom. After reading these entertaining and meaningful accounts you will understand why Rabbi Riemer is known as ''the rabbi's rabbi,'' and why people like Elie Wiesel, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and Harold Kushner have praised his writings

You will never write a dvar torah the same again. The description fails to mention that the chapters follow the torah parshat. Lech Lecha, Chayei Sarah, Bo, Mishpatim, Ki Tavo (Keeping DOWN With The Joneses), Ki Tavo (A Sermon about authenticity), Massei (What will I do When I finish With This Job), Korach (Can Too Much Rightness Kill You), Shelackh (The Abilene Paradox) and so many more. You

























[book] American Golem:
The New World Adventures
of an Old World Mud Monster
by Marc Lumer
October 2018
Apples and Honey Press
(7-11)

One day, a kid arrives in America.
Everything here is big,
and crowded,
and strange,
and scary!

He creates a golem, an old-country mud monster, to protect him from the kids next door. But the golem was meant for old-world fears, and things are different here in the New World.

Now what will his golem do, with no one to protect?

























[book] JEROME ROBBINS
A Life in Dance
(Jewish Lives)
by Wendy Lesser
October 2018
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Jerome Robbins (1918–1998) was born Jerome Wilson Rabinowitz and grew up in Weehawken, New Jersey, where his Russian-Jewish immigrant parents owned the Comfort Corset Company. Robbins, who was drawn to dance at a young age, resisted the idea of joining the family business. In 1936 he began working with Gluck Sandor, who ran a dance group and convinced him to change his name to Jerome Robbins. He went on to become a choreographer and director who worked in ballet, on Broadway, and in film. His stage productions include West Side Story, Peter Pan, and Fiddler on the Roof. In this deft biography, Wendy Lesser presents Jerome Robbins’s life through his major dances, providing a sympathetic, detailed portrait of her subject.


























[book] Reckonings:
Legacies of Nazi Persecution
and the Quest for Justice
by Mary Fulbrook
October 2018
A single word--"Auschwitz"--is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes.

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using "reckoning" in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time, from early brutality through programs to euthanize the sick and infirm in the 1930s to the full functioning of the death camps in the early 1940s, and across the post-war decades of selective confrontation with perpetrators and ever-expanding commemoration of victims, Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past" and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility.

In the successor states to the Third Reich -- East Germany, West Germany, and Austria -- prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

Following the various phases of trials and testimonies, from those immediately after the war to those that stretched into the decades following, Reckonings illuminates shifting public attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, and recalibrates anew the scales of justice.


























[book] THE RABBI'S BRAIN
Mystics, Moderns and the Science
of Jewish Thinking
by Dr. Andrew Newberg
and Dr. David Halpern
(Thomas Jeffferson Univ Hospital)
Turner
October 2018

The topic of “Neurotheology” has garnered increasing attention in the academic, religious, scientific, and popular worlds. However, there have been no attempts at exploring more specifically how Jewish religious thought and experience may intersect with neurotheology. The Rabbi’s Brain engages this groundbreaking area. Topics included relate to a neurotheological approach to the foundational beliefs that arise from the Torah and associated scriptures, Jewish learning, an exploration of the different elements of Judaism (i.e. reform, conservative, and orthodox), an exploration of specifically Jewish practices (i.e. Davening, Sabbath, Kosher), and a review of Jewish mysticism. The Rabbi’s Brain engages these topics in an easy to read style and integrates the scientific, religious, philosophical, and theological aspects of the emerging field of neurotheology. By reviewing the concepts in a stepwise, simple, yet thorough discussion, readers regardless of their background, will be able to understand the complexities and breadth of neurotheology from the Jewish perspective. More broadly, issues will include a review of the neurosciences and neuroscientific techniques; religious and spiritual experiences; theological development and analysis; liturgy and ritual; epistemology, philosophy, and ethics; and social implications, all from the Jewish perspective.


























[book] One Million Followers:
How I Built a Massive
Social Following in 30 Days
by Brendan Kane
BenBella
October 2018
You and your organization have the ability, talent, and desire to change the world as we know it. The first crucial step is getting your brand’s message in front of the right people.

But that’s not an easy feat. More than 60 billion online messages are sent into the world every day, and only a select few companies can succeed in the mad scramble for customer attention.

This means that the question for anyone who wants to gain mass exposure for their transformative content, business, or brand or connect with audiences around the globe is no longer if they should use social media but how to best take advantage of the numerous different platforms.

How can you make a significant impact in the digital world and stand out among all the noise?

Digital strategist and “growth hacker” Brendan Kane has the answer and will show you how—in 30 days or less. A wizard of the social media sphere, Kane has built online platforms for A-listers including Taylor Swift and Rihanna. He’s advised brands such as MTV, Skechers, Vice and IKEA on how to establish and grow their digital audience and engagement. Kane has spent his career discovering the best tools to turn any no-name into a top influencer simply by speaking into a camera or publishing a popular blog—and now he’ll share his secrets with you.

In One Million Followers, Kane gives readers a gimmick-free step-by-step checklist that will teach you how to:

Gain an authentic, dedicated, and diverse online following from scratch Create personal, unique, and valuable content that will engage your core audience Build a multi-media brand through platforms like Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, and LinkedIn

Featuring in-depth interviews with celebrities, influencers, and marketing experts, One Million Followers is the ultimate guide to building your worldwide brand and unlocking all the benefits social media has to offer. It’s time to stop being a follower and start being a leader.


























[book] Greenhorns:
stories
by Richard Slotkin
October 2018
Leapfrog Press
The people of Greenhorns reflect the different ways Jewish immigrants took to America in the early 20th century, and how America affected them. A kosher butcher with a gambling problem. A Jewish Pygmalion. A woman whose elegant persona conceals the memory of an unspeakable horror. A boy who struggles to maintain his father’s old-world code of honor on the mean streets of Brooklyn. The “little man who wasn’t there,” whose absence reflects his family’s inability to deal with its painful memories. An immigrant’s son who “discovers America” — its promise and its dark side — as a soldier on leave in WW2. These tales recover the violent circumstances, the emotional and psychological costs of uprooting, which left the immigrant uncertain of his place in America, and show how that uncertainty shaped the lives of their American descendants.


























[book] RECKONINGS
Legacies of Nazi Persecution
and the Quest for Justice
by Mary Fulbrook
October 2018
Oxford University Press

A single word--"Auschwitz"--is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes.

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using "reckoning" in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time, from early brutality through programs to euthanize the sick and infirm in the 1930s to the full functioning of the death camps in the early 1940s, and across the post-war decades of selective confrontation with perpetrators and ever-expanding commemoration of victims, Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past" and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility. In the successor states to the Third Reich -- East Germany, West Germany, and Austria -- prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

Following the various phases of trials and testimonies, from those immediately after the war to those that stretched into the decades following, Reckonings illuminates shifting public attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, and recalibrates anew the scales of justice.

























[book] Cold War Monks:
Buddhism and America's
Secret Strategy in Southeast Asia
by Eugene Ford
October 24, 2018
Yale University Press

A groundbreaking account of U.S. clandestine efforts to use Southeast Asian Buddhism to advance Washington’s anticommunist goals during the Cold War

How did the U.S. government make use of a “Buddhist policy” in Southeast Asia during the Cold War despite the American principle that the state should not meddle with religion? To answer this question, Eugene Ford delved deep into an unprecedented range of U.S. and Thai sources and conducted numerous oral history interviews with key informants. Ford uncovers a riveting story filled with U.S. national security officials, diplomats, and scholars seeking to understand and build relationships within the Buddhist monasteries of Southeast Asia.

This fascinating narrative provides a new look at how the Buddhist leaderships of Thailand and its neighbors became enmeshed in Cold War politics and in the U.S. government’s clandestine efforts to use a predominant religion of Southeast Asia as an instrument of national stability to counter communist revolution.




























[book] Beastie Boys Book
By Michael Diamond, and Adam Horovitz
October 2018
Spiegel & Grau
592 PAGES
The story of the Beastie Boys written by two of the surviving band members, a book as unique as the band itself — by band members ADROCK and Mike D, with contributions from Amy Poehler, Colson Whitehead, Spike Jonze, Wes Anderson, Luc Sante, and more.

Formed as a New York City hardcore band in 1981, Beastie Boys struck an unlikely path to global hip hop superstardom. Here is their story, told for the first time in the words of the band. Adam “ADROCK” Horovitz and Michael “Mike D” Diamond offer revealing and very funny accounts of their transition from teenage punks to budding rappers;
the dropout of one of their members;
the move from the Chinatown apartment;
their early collaboration with Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin;
the debut album that became the first hip hop record ever to hit #1, Licensed to Ill — and the album’s messy fallout as the band broke with Def Jam;
their move to Los Angeles and rebirth with the genre-defying masterpiece Paul’s Boutique;
their evolution as musicians and social activists over the course of the classic albums Check Your Head, Ill Communication, and Hello Nasty and the Tibetan Freedom Concert benefits conceived by the late Adam “MCA” Yauch (1964-2012); and more.

For more than thirty years, this band has had an inescapable and indelible influence on popular culture. With a style as distinctive and eclectic as a Beastie Boys album, Beastie Boys Book upends the typical music memoir. Alongside the band narrative you will find rare photos, original illustrations, a cookbook by chef Roy Choi, a graphic cartoon novelization of scenes, a map of Beastie Boys’ New York, mixtape playlists, pieces by guest contributors, and many more surprises.


























[book] A MIND UNRAVELED
A Memoir
by Kurt Eichenwald
Ballantine Books
October 16, 2018
The compelling story of an acclaimed journalist and New York Times bestselling author’s ongoing struggle with epilepsy — his torturous decision to keep his condition a SECRET to avoid discrimination, and his ensuing decades-long battle to not only survive, but to thrive.

As a college freshman at Swarthmore, Kurt Eichenwald awoke one night on the floor of his dorm room, confused and in pain. In the aftermath of that critical moment, his once-carefree life would be consumed by confrontations with medical incompetence, discrimination that almost cost him his education and employment, physical abuse, and dark moments when he contemplated suicide.

This is the story of one man’s battle to pursue his dreams despite an often incapacitating brain disorder. From his early experiences of fear and denial to his exasperating search for treatment, Eichenwald provides a deeply candid account of his years facing this misunderstood and often stigmatized condition. He details his encounters with the doctors whose negligence could have killed him, but for the heroic actions of a brilliant neurologist and the family and friends who fought for him.

Many of Eichenwald’s recollections are drawn from his diaries, vivid and painstakingly kept records that helped sharpen his skills as a journalist. Some are taken from actual cassette tape recordings he took at the time after he was expelled. I admit that at one point, when he was raging against Swarthmore's dean after he was forced to leave campus, I questioned whether he was telling the truth or even deranged. Even his parents sat him down and asked if he was imagining conversations. But when he secretly recorded his dean on a phone call, showing that she was lying and contradicting herself... it restored his credibility. Decades later, the former dean replies to Eichenwald's inquiry and explains what happened from her perspective. I also enjoyed the scene where a Swarthmore student calls Eichenwald for a donation, and he explains, at her request, why he won't donate. This leads to a call from the head of Alumni Giving and a meeting with the school's current President who is.. (surprise)...

Eichenwad raises important questions about the nature of memory, the revelations of brain science, and the profound mysteries of human perception.

Ultimately, A Mind Unraveled is an inspirational story, one that chronicles how Eichenwald, faced often with his own mortality, transformed trauma into a guide for reaching the future he desired. Defying relentless threats to his emotional and physical well-being, he affirmed his decision to never give up, and in the process learned how to rise from the depths of despair to the heights of unimagined success.



























[book] Levi-Strauss:
A Biography
by Emmanuelle Loyer
POLITY
October 2018
Academic, writer, figure of melancholy, aesthete – Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) not only transformed his academic discipline, he also profoundly changed the way that we view ourselves and the world around us.

In this award-winning biography, historian Emmanuelle Loyer recounts Lévi-Strauss’s childhood in an assimilated Jewish household, his promising student years as well as his first forays into political and intellectual movements. As a young professor in 1935 Lévi-Strauss left Paris for São Paulo to teach sociology. His rugged expeditions into the Brazilian hinterland, where he discovered the Amerindian Other, made him into an anthropologist. The racial laws of the Vichy regime would force him to leave France yet again, this time for the US in 1941, where he became Professor Claude L. Strauss, to avoid confusion with the jeans manufacturer.

His return to France, after the war, ushered in the period during which he produced his greatest works: several decades of intense labour in which Lévi-Strauss reinvented anthropology, establishing it as a discipline that offered a new view on the world. In 1955, Tristes Tropiques offered indisputable proof of this the world over. During those years, Lévi-Strauss became something of a national monument, a celebrity intellectual in France. But he always claimed his perspective was a “view from afar,” enabling him to deliver incisive and subversive diagnoses of our waning modernity.

Loyer’s outstanding biography tells the story of a true intellectual adventurer whose unforgettable voice invites us to rethink questions of the human and the meaning of progress. Lévi-Strauss was less of a modern than he was our own great and disquieted contemporary.


























[book] The Steinsaltz Humash
(Hebrew Edition) (Hebrew and English Edition)
by Rabbi Adin Eden Steinsaltz
October 3, 2018
Koren

The long-awaited English version of Rabbi Adin Even-Israel Steinsaltz's pioneering translation and commentary on the Torah. Like his monumental translation and commentary of the entire Talmud, the new Steinsaltz Humash includes a treasure trove of information to make the text clear, fascinating, and relevant to users of all backgrounds. Here, Rabbi Steinsaltz's commentary seeks to connect the reader directly to the peshat, the plain reading of the text. He includes references to many commentaries, while he aims to remove any 'barriers' to the text, connecting us directly to the 'voice of the Torah'.

This brand-new volume features several innovative elements including: -Hebrew verses in clear Koren font, with vowels and punctuation -Accessible English translation that reflects Rabbi Steinsaltz's understanding of the text -Parshiyot divided thematically with introductory explanations -Color photos that identify biblical objects and illustrate complicated concepts -Notes and photos of modern archaeological and scientific findings -Maps, illustrations, and charts to clarify locations and concepts -Supplemental background materials, cross-references to the Torah

The long-awaited English version of Rabbi Adin Even-Israel Steinsaltz's pioneering translation and commentary on the Torah. Like his monumental translation and commentary of the entire Talmud, the new Steinsaltz Humash includes a treasure trove of information to make the text clear, fascinating, and relevant to users of all backgrounds.

Here, Rabbi Steinsaltz's commentary seeks to connect the reader directly to the peshat, the plain reading of the text. He includes references to many commentaries, while he aims to remove any 'barriers' to the text, connecting us directly to the 'voice of the Torah'.

This brand-new volume features several innovative elements including:
-Hebrew verses in clear Koren font, with vowels and punctuation
-Accessible English translation that reflects Rabbi Steinsaltz's understanding of the text
-Parshiyot divided thematically with introductory explanations
-Color photos that identify biblical objects and illustrate complicated concepts
-Notes and photos of modern archaeological and scientific findings
-Maps, illustrations, and charts to clarify locations and concepts
-Supplemental background materials, cross-references to the Torah





















[book] Coming of Age:
My Journey to the Eighties
by Governor Madeleine May Kunin
October 2, 2018
Green Writers' Press

Not since Governor Milton Shapp's (PA) book have we had such a good book by a governor.

Many readers are already familiar with Madeleine Kunin, the former three-term governor of Vermont, who served as the deputy secretary of education and ambassador to Switzerland under President Bill Clinton. In her newest book, a memoir entitled Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties, the topic is aging, but she looks well beyond the physical tolls and explores the emotional ones as well. And she has had an extraordinary life: governor, ambassador, feminist, wife, mother, professor, poet, and much, much more.

As recently reported in the New York Times, a girl born today can expect to live to the age of ninety, on average (boys, on the other hand, can expect to live until age eighty-five). Life expectancy, for many, is increasing, yet people rarely contemplate the emotional changes that come alongside the physical changes of aging. Madeleine wants to change that. Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties takes a close and incisive look at what it is like to grow old. The book is a memoir, yet most important of all, it is an honest and positive look at aging and how it has affected her life.

































[book] GENDER
Your Guide:
A Gender-Friendly Primer
on What to Know, What to Say,
and What to Do in the
New Gender Culture
by Lee Airton PhD
Adams Media
October 16, 2018

An authentic and accessible guide to understanding—and engaging in—today’s gender conversation. The days of two genders—male, female; boy, girl; blue, pink—are over, if they ever existed at all. Gender is now a global conversation, and one that is constantly evolving. More people than ever before are openly living their lives as transgender men or women, and many transgender people are coming out as neither men or women, instead living outside of the binary. Gender is changing, and this change is gaining momentum.

We all want to do and say the right things in relation to gender diversity—whether at a job interview, at parent/teacher night, and around the table at family dinners. But where do we begin?

From the differences among gender identity, gender expression, and sex, to the use of gender-neutral pronouns like singular they/them, to thinking about your own participation in gender, Gender: Your Guide serves as a complete primer to all things gender. Guided by professor and gender diversity advocate Lee Airton, PhD, you will learn how gender works in everyday life, how to use accurate terminology to refer to transgender, non-binary, and/or gender non-conforming individuals, and how to ask when you aren’t sure what to do or say. It provides you with the information you need to talk confidently and compassionately about gender diversity, whether simply having a conversation or going to bat as an advocate.

Just like gender itself, being gender-friendly is a process for all of us. As revolutionary a resource as Our Bodies, Ourselves, Gender: Your Guide invites everyone on board to make gender more flexible and less constricting: a source of more joy, and less harm, for everyone. Let’s get started.


























[book] The Lake on Fire
A Novel
by Rosellen Brown
Sarabande
October 16, 2018
The Lake on Fire is an epic narrative that begins among 19th century Jewish immigrants on a failing Wisconsin farm. Dazzled by lore of the American dream, Chaya and her strange, brilliant, young brother Asher stow away to Chicago; what they discover there, however, is a Gilded Age as empty a façade as the beautiful Columbian Exposition luring thousands to Lake Michigan’s shore. The pair scrapes together a meager living-Chaya in a cigar factory; Asher, roaming the city and stealing books and jewelry to share with the poor, until they find different paths of escape. An examination of family, love, and revolution, this profound tale resonates eerily with today’s current events and tumultuous social landscape. The Lake on Fire is robust, gleaming, and grimy all at once, proving that celebrated author Rosellen Brown is back with a story as luminous as ever.



























[book] BESTIA
Italian Recipes Created
in the Heart of L.A.
by Ori Menashe,
Genevieve Gergis, Lesley Suter
Ten Speed Press
October 2018
This debut cookbook from LA's phenomenally popular Bestia restaurant features 140 recipes for rustic Italian food with Middle Eastern influences that are driven by intense flavors, including house-made charcuterie, pizza and pasta from scratch, and innovative desserts inspired by home-baked classics.

This accessible and far-reaching debut cookbook showcases all of the satisfying and flavor-forward food that has made Bestia one of the most talked-about restaurants in the country. Bestia is known for direct and bold flavors, typified by dishes like meatballs with tomato... and preserved lemon; spinach gnocchi; and tomato and burrata salad; capped off with homey and whimsical desserts like rainbow sherbet, apple cider donuts, and butterscotch coconut tart.

Worth the price of the book.... how to make your pizza at home with a stone... YOU USE THE BROILER FOR THE FINAL PORTION

Chef Ori Menashe marries his training in Italian restaurants with the Israeli and Middle Eastern food that he grew up eating, to create a delicious hybrid of two of the most popular cuisines.

The most important thing I learned was that if you are making a pizza at home with a stone, you should use your broiler as a final step Also, when making Butter-Topped Banana Bread, do not open the oven for 55 minutes, or they will deflate. The authors, a married couple and business partners, Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis, were both born in Southern California, but Ori moved to Israel with his family as a child. His parents, of Moroccan, Georgian and Turkish heritage sold their two clothing stores and moved to Israel. Ori, like many Israeli youth, visited South America for his post-Army walkabout, and – cooking for his buddies in Argentina – he realized his passion for all things culinary. At 21, he returned to LA from his sojourn in South America and enrolled in culinary school – for a month – and found his first food-related job at an Israeli cafe, and then went to La Terza (after begging the chef for 8 months to work near him, even as a dishwasher), where Gergis was hired as a hostess. Things got off to a rocky start when he yelled “Hey,” to her, “Are you Jewish?” as his intro pickup line. Genevieve, a musician and daughter or a rocket scientist, ignored him for at least six months, but nevertheless, lives changed, and in 2010, the two opened Bestia (Beast in Italian, what Chef Gino Angelini called Ori) together (in an awful disgusting location, even Ori's mother said so) – but within three years they received great praise from the late reviewer, Jonathan Gold. This is a collection of their top recipes and advice. In addition to recipes, Ori is a good source for lessons in creativity management: namely one should Embrace Creativity. Be Willing to Adapt when circumstances change. Challenge yourself, feel INsecure, and feel frustration. He believes that mistakes will happen... if you take risks. So accept mistakes and learn from them... Also... add cinnamon to a tomato salad.

With regard to book structure and some recipe highlights, it flows through Pantry (Sauces, Vinaigrettes (7), Pickles, Bottargas, concentrated Soffritos, Aiolis, Black (or dark amber) Butter, Preserves, Stocks (use grapeseed oil for mushroom stock)); Cocktails (with the secret “Bestia Cola” recipe), Charcuterie (about 20 pages on salamis and pork); Salads (adding salt wilts your lettuce quicker); Starters; Breads; Pizzas; Pastas; Main Dishes; and over two dozen Desserts. Some recipes extend for three or more pages, inluding pictures on techniques. Pickles? They pickle sunchokes, chilies, smoked shiitake mushrooms and more (using a Japanese mandolin knife from Amazon). Mostarda Italian candied fruit? He uses mustard seeds and red pepper flakes. Salads: The Persian Cucumber, Plum and Gorgonzola Salad with Turmeric Vinaigrette; Farro Salad with Pomegranate and Walnuts; Coraline and Citrus Salad. Starters: Chicken Liver Pate with Date Vinegar, Tarragon and Preserved Lemon; Sunchoke Soup with Pickled Fresno Chilies and Oregano (and fried capers for intensity); Housemade Ricotta with Basil, Dried Zucchini, and Lemon Zest (a deconstructed fried zucchini blossom). Pasta: Spinach Gnocchetti with Roasted Marrow Bones. Pici (or Polenta) with Lamb Ragu with fig leaf (or cinnamon stick). Main/Desserts: Whole Grilled Branzino (butterflied from the spine) with Fried Herbs. Whole (dry aged refrigerated) Roasted Duck with Citrus and Dill. Butterscotch-Coconut Tart. Maple-Ricotta Fritters. Chestnut Zeppolis

























[book] The Noma Guide to Fermentation:
Including koji, kombuchas, shoyus,
misos, vinegars, garums,
lacto-ferments, and black fruits
and vegetables
by Chef René Redzepi (NOMA, Denmark)
and Photographer David Zilber
Artisan
October 2018

At Noma—four times named the world’s best restaurant—every dish includes some form of fermentation, whether it’s a bright hit of vinegar, a deeply savory miso, an electrifying drop of garum, or the sweet intensity of black garlic. Fermentation is one of the foundations behind Noma’s extraordinary flavor profiles.

Now René Redzepi, chef and co-owner of Noma, and David Zilber, the chef who runs the restaurant’s acclaimed fermentation lab, share never-before-revealed techniques to creating Noma’s extensive pantry of ferments. And they do so with a book conceived specifically to share their knowledge and techniques with home cooks. With more than 500 step-by-step photographs and illustrations, and with every recipe approachably written and meticulously tested, The Noma Guide to Fermentation takes readers far beyond the typical kimchi and sauerkraut to include koji, kombuchas, shoyus, misos, lacto-ferments, vinegars, garums, and black fruits and vegetables. And—perhaps even more important—it shows how to use these game-changing pantry ingredients in more than 100 original recipes.

Fermentation is already building as the most significant new direction in food (and health). With The Noma Guide to Fermentation, it’s about to be taken to a whole new level.

























[book] Beyond the Nation-State:
The Zionist Political Imagination
from Pinsker to Ben-Gurion
by Dmitry Shumsky
Yale
October 2018
A revisionist account of Zionist history, challenging the inevitability of a one-state solution, from a bold, path-breaking young scholar

The Jewish nation-state has often been thought of as Zionism’s end goal. In this bracing history of the idea of the Jewish state in modern Zionism, from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of the state of Israel, Dmitry Shumsky challenges this deeply rooted assumption. In doing so, he complicates the narrative of the Zionist quest for full sovereignty, provocatively showing how and why the leaders of the pre-state Zionist movement imagined, articulated and promoted theories of self-determination in Palestine either as part of a multinational Ottoman state (1882-1917), or in the framework of multinational democracy.

In particular, Shumsky focuses on the writings and policies of five key Zionist leaders from the Habsburg and Russian empires in central and eastern Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: Leon Pinsker, Theodor Herzl, Ahad Ha’am, Ze’ev Jabotinsky, and David Ben-Gurion to offer a very pointed critique of Zionist historiography.


























[book] Bedouin Culture in the Bible
by Clinton Bailey
Yale
October 2018
The first contemporary analysis of Bedouin and biblical cultures sheds new light on biblical laws, practices, and Bedouin history

Written by one of the world’s leading scholars of Bedouin culture, this groundbreaking book sheds new light on significant points of convergence between Bedouin and early Israelite cultures, as manifested in the Hebrew Bible. Bailey compares Bedouin and biblical sources, identifying overlaps in economic activity, material culture, social values, social organization, laws, religious practices, and oral traditions. He examines the question of whether some early Israelites were indeed nomads as the Bible presents them, offering a new angle on the controversy over the identity of the early Israelites and a new cultural perspective to scholars of the Bible and the Bedouin alike.


























[book] Heidegger and the Jews:
The Black Notebooks
by Donatella Di Cesare
Polity
October 2018
Philosophers have long struggled to reconcile Martin Heidegger’s involvement in Nazism with his status as one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century. The recent publication of his Black Notebooks has reignited fierce debate on the subject. These thousand-odd pages of jotted observations profoundly challenge our image of the quiet philosopher’s exile in the Black Forest, revealing the shocking extent of his anti-Semitism for the first time.

For much of the philosophical community, the Black Notebooks have been either used to discredit Heidegger or seen as a bibliographical detail irrelevant to his thought. Yet, in this new book, renowned philosopher Donatella Di Cesare argues that Heidegger’s “metaphysical anti-Semitism” was a central part of his philosophical project. Within the context of the Nuremberg race laws, Heidegger felt compelled to define Jewishness and its relationship to his concept of Being. Di Cesare shows that Heidegger saw the Jews as the agents of a modernity that had disfigured the spirit of the West. In a deeply disturbing extrapolation, he presented the Holocaust as both a means for the purification of Being and the Jews’ own “self-destruction”: a process of death on an industrialized scale that was the logical conclusion of the acceleration in technology they themselves had brought about.

Situating Heidegger’s anti-Semitism firmly within the context of his thought, this groundbreaking work will be essential reading for students and scholars of philosophy and history as well as the many readers interested in Heidegger’s life, work, and legacy.


























[book] The Post-Truth Business:
How to Rebuild Brand Authenticity
in a Distrusting World
by Sean Pillot de Chenecey
October 2018
Kogan Oage
Brands are built on trust but, in a post-truth world, they're faced with a serious challenge when so much of modern life is defined by mistrust. A shattering of the vital connection between brands and consumers, combined with the evaporation of authenticity as a core brand pillar, is causing enormous problems for businesses on a global scale. If a brand isn't seen as trustworthy, then when choice is available, it will be rejected in favour of one that is.

The Post-Truth Business provides a way forward for any organization (WHETHER IT BE COMPANY, OR A PHILANTHROPY, OR DEFENSE ORGANIZATION) wishing to rebuild brand authenticity in a distrusting world. Written by a consumer insights and brand strategy expert, the book explains why numerous interconnected issues are causing problems for businesses. From the safeguarding of privacy and the impact of fake news in media and society, via ways to create communication with meaning, what we can learn about authenticity from artisans and innovators and guidelines on cultural marketing activity through to one of the most successful advertising campaigns of all time, Sean Pillot de Chenecey explores how business can prevent their brand being eroded by distrust and restore their reputation capital.

The Post-Truth Business shows brands and business how to strengthen their consumer engagement and gain future loyalty. It's packed with case studies and example of inspiring people and dynamic brands including Patagonia, Harley Davidson, Lego, Vans, Telsa, Beauty Pie, Truth.Org, Sezane, BrewDog and TOMS. These actionable stories will ensure that any company can become a successful post-truth business.

































[book] Fast Asleep in a Little
Village in Israel
by Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod
and Tiphanie Beeke (Illustrator)
October 2018

Ages 2-5
Apples and Honey
Kukurikuuu!
squawks the rooster.
Meowwwww!
yowls the cat.
ZZZZZZzzzzzzz
buzzes the mosquito...
It is the end of a hot, dry summer, and Mrs. Strauss just can't fall asleep.
"SHEKET! QUIET!"
But when at last she falls asleep, something wakes her up again...something her little village in Israel has been waiting for all summer long.
'A lovely peak into life in Israel' One noise after another wakes Mrs. Strauss from a sound sleep in her small Israeli village. The rooster's loud crow wakes her, and then the cat's meow disturbs her as she tries to fall back to sleep. A mosquito buzzes, while the rooster and cat keep up their calls. "Sheket," she yells out her window, "Quiet." Music from the grocer's radio, the toot-toot of the train whistle, even the swish of the street sweeper all add to the cacophony. Mrs. Strauss pulls her pillow over her head, creating a cool spot to block the harsh sunlight. She falls asleep and dreams of coolness and shade. A different sound awakens her, and this one is heartily welcome; it is the geshem, the heavy rain that will reawaken the parched land. It's a much longed-for wet day. Readers might wonder why the title is so specific in naming the setting of the tale. But Israel's climate is really the main character, with long scorching dry spells and that first heavy rain everyone hopes and prays for, and MacLeod weaves hints about the theme in the distress of the animals and the hot, strong sunlight that shines in the window. Beeke's very bright paintings show the village in the sun's glare and the rain's softer light and Mrs. Strauss' every reaction (and her immovable blue hair, which sits atop her tan face). A lovely peek into life in Israel. -Kirkus Reviews
























[book] Hannah's Hanukkah Hiccups
by Shanna Silva
October 2018

Ages 4-8
Apples and Honey

It s Hanukkah, and Hannah Hartman can't stop Hiccuping!

Her neighbors try to help by sharing their sometimes silly, always fun, remedies: "Drink pickle juice backwards," says Mr. Brown, while Señora River gives Hannah a wet, red string to place on her forehead. Hannah tries ginger ale, breathing into a paper bag, and even slathering peanut butter on her latkes! But nothing works.

How will she be able to perform her solo at the Hebrew school play if her hiccups don't go away?






























[book] The Book of Beautiful Questions:
The Powerful Questions That
Will Help You Decide, Create,
Connect, and Lead
by Warren Berger
October 30, 2018
From the bestselling author of A More Beautiful Question, hundreds of big and small questions that harness the magic of inquiry to tackle challenges we all face--at work, in our relationships, and beyond.

When confronted with almost any demanding situation, the act of questioning can help guide us to smart decisions. By asking questions, we can analyze, learn, and move forward in the face of uncertainty. But "questionologist" Warren Berger says that the questions must be the right ones; the ones that cut to the heart of complexity or enable us to see an old problem in a fresh way.

In The Book of Beautiful Questions, Berger shares illuminating stories and compelling research on the power of inquiry. Drawn from the insights and expertise of psychologists, innovators, effective leaders, and some of the world’s foremost creative thinkers, he presents the essential questions readers need to make the best choices when it truly counts, with a particular focus in four key areas: decision-making, creativity, leadership, and relationships.

The powerful questions in this book can help you:

- Identify opportunities in your career or industry
- Generate fresh ideas in business or in your own creative pursuits
- Check your biases so you can make better judgments and decisions
- Do a better job of communicating and connecting with the people around you

Thoughtful, provocative, and actionable, these beautiful questions can be applied immediately to bring about change in your work or your everyday life.























[book] The Talmud of Relationships,
VOLUME ONE / Volume 1:
God, Self, and Family
by Rabbi Amy Scheinerman
The Jewish Publication Society
October 2018
How can I tame my ego?
How might I control my anger?
How might I experience the spirituality of sexual intimacy?
How can I bestow appropriate honor on a difficult parent?
How might I accept my own suffering and the suffering of those whom I love?


Enter the Talmudic study house with innovative teacher Rabbi Amy Scheinerman and continue the Jewish values–based conversations that began two thousand years ago. The Talmud of Relationships, Volume 1 shows how the ancient Jewish texts of Talmud can facilitate modern relationship-building—with parents, children, spouses, family members, friends, and ourselves.

Finding Our Place: Bab. Tractate Menachot 29b
Controlling Our Anger: Bab. Tractate Berakhot 7a
Understanding Our Suffering: Bab. Tractate Berakhot 5a-b
Approaching Prayer: Mishnah Berakhot 4:2 and more Gemara
Honoring Our Parents: Jerus. Talmud Tractate Pe'ah 1a, 5b-6b
Affirming Our Sexuaity: Bab. Tractate Nedarim 20a-b
Ba;ancing Family and Study. Bab Tractate Ketubot 6ab, 62b-63a

Scheinerman devotes each chapter to a different Talmud text exploring relationships—and many of the selections are fresh, largely unknown passages. Overcoming the roadblocks of language and style that can keep even the curious from diving into Talmud, she walks readers through the logic of each passage, offering full textual translations and expanding on these richly complex conversations so that each of us can weigh multiple perspectives and draw our own conclusions. Scheinerman provides grounding in why the selected passage matters, its historical background, a gripping narrative of the rabbis’ evolving commentary, insightful anecdotes and questions for thought and discussion, and a cogent synopsis.

Through this firsthand encounter with the core text of Judaism, readers of all levels—Jews and non-Jews, newcomers and veterans, students and teachers, individuals and chevruta partners and families alike—will discover the treasure of the oral Torah.


Amy Scheinerman is a teacher, writer, and hospice rabbi. She is a former trustee on the Board of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), former president of the Baltimore Board of Rabbis, and a current member of the CCAR Responsa Committee (not to be confused with the CCAR RAPID RESPONSA Committee.

































[book] The Talmud of Relationships,


VOLUME 2:


THE JEWISH COMMUNITY AND BEYOND
by Rabbi Amy Scheinerman
The Jewish Publication Society
October 1, 2018

How can I lead others with authority and kindness?
How can I strengthen my self-control?
How can I balance work and family?
How can I get along with difficult coworkers?
How can I best relate to people in need?

Note: The pages are NOT arranged like the Talmud

Enter the Talmudic study house with innovative teacher Rabbi Amy Scheinerman and continue the Jewish values–based conversations that began two thousand years ago. The Talmud of Relationships, Volume 2 shows how the ancient Jewish texts of Talmud can facilitate modern relationship building—with family members, colleagues, strangers, the broader Jewish community, and ourselves.

Rabbi Scheinerman devotes each chapter to a different Talmud text exploring relationships—and many of the selections are fresh, largely unknown passages. Overcoming the roadblocks of language and style that can keep even the curious from diving into Talmud, she walks readers through the logic of each passage, offering full textual translations and expanding on these richly complex conversations so that each of us can weigh multiple perspectives and draw our own conclusions. Scheinerman provides grounding in why the selected passage matters, its historical background, a gripping narrative of the rabbis’ evolving commentary, insightful anecdotes and questions for thought and discussion, and a cogent synopsis.

Through this firsthand encounter with the core text of Judaism, readers of all levels—Jews and non-Jews, newcomers and veterans, students and teachers, individuals and chevruta partners and families alike—will discover the treasure of the oral Torah.

































[book] Enemies and Neighbors:
Arabs and Jews in Palestine
and Israel, 1917-2017
by Ian Black
(LSE, London)
Now in Paperback
October 2018
Grove Press
In Enemies and Neighbors, Ian Black, who has spent four decades studying and covering the Middle East, offers a major new history of the Arab-Zionist conflict, told from both sides.

Setting the scene at the end of the 19th century, when the first Zionist settlers arrived in the Ottoman-ruled Holy Land, Black draws on a wide range of sources-from declassified documents to oral testimonies to his own vivid-on-the-ground reporting-to illuminate the most polarizing conflict of modern times. Taking the 1917 Balfour Declaration, the British government’s fateful promise to favor the establishment of “a national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine, as its first major milestone, the story proceeds through the Arab Rebellion of the late 1930s, the Nazi Holocaust, Israel’s independence and the Palestinian Nakba (catastrophe), the watershed of 1967 followed by the Palestinian re-awakening, Israel’s settlement project, two Intifadas, the Oslo Accords, and continued negotiations and violence up to today. Combining engaging narrative with political analysis and social and cultural insights, Enemies and Neighbors is both an accessible overview and a fascinating investigation into the deeper truths of a furiously contested history that has preserved Palestinians and Israelis as unequal enemies and neighbors.

































[book] THE FLAME:
Poems Notebooks
Lyrics Drawings
by Leonard Cohen
October 2018
The final collection of the seminal musician and poet, which he was determined to complete before his death

Just weeks before his death in late 2016, Leonard Cohen told The New Yorker that he was ready for the end to come. He just wanted enough time to put his last book in order. Fortunately, that time was granted. The Flame is Cohen’s eloquent farewell, a valedictory collection of lyrics, poems, notebook sketches, and self-portraits that maps his singular creative journey. As noted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s citation, “For six decades, Leonard Cohen revealed his soul to the world through poetry and song-his deep and timeless humanity touching our very core.”

In addition to new poems about war, desire, regrets, lamb chops, and hummingbirds, and lyrics from his last three albums, including the chart-topping “You Want It Darker,” The Flame includes carefully selected excerpts from Cohen’s voluminous notebooks, which he kept faithfully over the years. Readers will find in these pages the subjects that have always preoccupied Cohen: the dimensions of love, the secret code of existence, and the hope for transcendence in a broken world.

In the words of Cohen’s longtime manager and friend, Robert Kory, The Flame “reveals to all the intensity of his inner fire” to the end.



I was selling holy trinkets
I was dressing kind of sharp
Had a pussy in the kitchen
And a panther in the yard
In the prison of the gifted
I was friendly with the guard
So I never had to witness
What happens to the heart

I should have seen it coming
You could say I wrote the chart
Just to look at her was trouble
It was trouble from the start
Sure we played a stunning couple
But I never liked the part
It ain’t pretty, it ain’t subtle
What happens to the heart


June 24, 2016

Flying Over Iceland
over Reykjavik, the “smokey bay”
where W.H. Auden went
to discover the background
of all our songs,
where I myself was received
by the Mayor and the President
(600 miles an hour
30,000 feet
599 miles an hour
my old street number on Belmont Ave)
where I, a second-rater
by any estimation,
was honoured by the noblest
and handsomest people of the West
served with lobster
and strong drink,
and I never cared about eyes
but the eyes of the waitress
were so alarmingly mauve
that I fell into a trance
and ate the forbidden shellfish


I Pray for Courage
I pray for courage
Now I’m old
To greet the sickness
And the cold

I pray for courage
In the night
To bear the burden
Make it light

I pray for courage
In the time
When suffering comes and
Starts to climb

I pray for courage
At the end
To see death coming
As a friend

























[book] On Desperate Ground:
The Marines at The Reservoir,
the Korean War's Greatest Battle
by Hampton Sides
October 2018
From the New York Times bestselling author of Ghost Soldiers and In the Kingdom of Ice, a chronicle of the extraordinary feats of heroism by Marines called on to do the impossible during the greatest battle of the Korean War

On October 15, 1950, General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of UN troops in Korea, convinced President Harry Truman that the Communist forces of Kim Il-sung would be utterly defeated by Thanksgiving. The Chinese, he said with near certainty, would not intervene in the war. As he was speaking, 300,000 Red Chinese soldiers began secretly crossing the Manchurian border. Led by some 20,000 men of the First Marine Division, the Americans moved deep into the snowy mountains of North Korea, toward the trap Mao had set for the vainglorious MacArthur along the frozen shores of the Chosin Reservoir. What followed was one of the most heroic--and harrowing--operations in American military history, and one of the classic battles of all time. Faced with probable annihilation, and temperatures plunging to 20 degrees below zero, the surrounded, and hugely outnumbered, Marines fought through the enemy forces with ferocity, ingenuity, and nearly unimaginable courage as they marched their way to the sea.

Hampton Sides' superb account of this epic clash relies on years of archival research, unpublished letters, declassified documents, and interviews with scores of Marines and Koreans who survived the siege. While expertly detailing the follies of the American leaders, On Desperate Ground is an immediate, grunt's-eye view of history, enthralling in its narrative pace and powerful in its portrayal of what ordinary men are capable of in the most extreme circumstances. Hampton Sides has been hailed by critics as one of the best nonfiction writers of his generation. As the Miami Herald wrote, "Sides has a novelist's eye for the propulsive elements that lend momentum and dramatic pace to the best nonfiction narratives."





































[book] MOTHER INDIA
a novel
by TOVA REICH
October 15, 2018
Syracuse University Press

Literary, lyrical, and cuttingly satiric, Mother India is a brilliantly original novel about Jews who go to India to find transformation and eternal release from the sufferings of life. Narrated in luminous prose by Meena, a Jewish American lesbian who has claimed India as her home, the novel is vividly populated by the darkly comic universe of three generations of women along with other family members, as well as by the Indians whose world they seek to penetrate. There is Meena’s religiously observant mother, Ma, whose desire to remove herself from the wheel of life plays out in a Faulknerian funeral procession and cremation on the banks of the holy river Ganges; Meena’s daughter, Maya, a misunderstood child coming of age in an emotionally treacherous household; her ex-wife, Geeta, a privileged and hedonistic Indian woman who enters their world with devastating consequences; Meena's twin brother, Shmelke, a charismatic rabbi turned guru and international fugitive; and the Indian servant, Manika, whose loyalty to the family both sustains and shackles them.

Identifying with the humanity of its characters, the reader is drawn into a vast, tragicomic, and fascinating epic, Homeric in scope, drama, discovery, and surprise. Universal yet intimate, brutal yet tender, satiric yet sympathetic, Mother India evokes reactions-intellectual, emotional, visceral-that are complex, even contradictory, containing the might and bite that our current cultural hubris and self-involvement deserve. In Mother India, Reich offers us her most poignant and astonishing novel to date.



































[book] Trumponomics:
Inside the America First
Plan to Revive Our Economy
by Stephen Moore (not MOT)
and Arthur B. Laffer (not MOT)
with some words from Larry Kudlow (not MOT)
October 2018
St. Martin's Books
Donald Trump promised the American people a transformative change in economic policy after eight years of stagnation under Obama. But he didn’t adopt a conventional left or right economic agenda. His is a new economic populism that combines some conventional Republican ideas–tax cuts, deregulation, more power to the states–with more traditional Democratic issues such as trade protectionism and infrastructure spending. It also mixes in important populist issues such as immigration reform, pressuring the Europeans to pay for more of their own defense, and keeping America first.

In Trumponomics, conservative economists Stephen Moore and Arthur B. Laffer offer a well-informed defense of the president's approach to trade, taxes, employment, infrastructure, and other economic policies. Moore and Laffer worked as senior economic advisors to Donald Trump in 2016. They traveled with him, frequently met with his political and economic teams, worked on his speeches, and represented him as surrogates. They are currently members of the Trump Advisory Council and still meet with him regularly. In Trumponomics, they offer an insider’s view on how Trump operates in public and behind closed doors, his priorities and passions, and his greatest attributes and liabilities.

Trump is betting his presidency that he can create an economic revival in America’s industrial heartland. Can he really bring jobs back to the rust belt? Can he cut taxes and bring the debt down? Above all, does he have the personal discipline, the vision, the right team, and the right strategy to pull off his ambitious economic goals? Moore and Laffer believe that he can pull it off and that Trumponomics will usher in a new era of prosperity for all Americans.






















[book] MOTHER INDIA
a novel
by TOVA REICH
October 15, 2018
Syracuse University Press

Literary, lyrical, and cuttingly satiric, Mother India is a brilliantly original novel about Jews who go to India to find transformation and eternal release from the sufferings of life. Narrated in luminous prose by Meena, a Jewish American lesbian who has claimed India as her home, the novel is vividly populated by the darkly comic universe of three generations of women along with other family members, as well as by the Indians whose world they seek to penetrate. There is Meena’s religiously observant mother, Ma, whose desire to remove herself from the wheel of life plays out in a Faulknerian funeral procession and cremation on the banks of the holy river Ganges; Meena’s daughter, Maya, a misunderstood child coming of age in an emotionally treacherous household; her ex-wife, Geeta, a privileged and hedonistic Indian woman who enters their world with devastating consequences; Meena's twin brother, Shmelke, a charismatic rabbi turned guru and international fugitive; and the Indian servant, Manika, whose loyalty to the family both sustains and shackles them.

Identifying with the humanity of its characters, the reader is drawn into a vast, tragicomic, and fascinating epic, Homeric in scope, drama, discovery, and surprise. Universal yet intimate, brutal yet tender, satiric yet sympathetic, Mother India evokes reactions-intellectual, emotional, visceral-that are complex, even contradictory, containing the might and bite that our current cultural hubris and self-involvement deserve. In Mother India, Reich offers us her most poignant and astonishing novel to date.



































[book] The Rites of Passage
by Jonathan A. Taylor
Arnoland Press
October 2018
The First Installment of the Goldberg Variations Series
Jamie Goldberg suspects his homosexuality at an early age and manages to hide it from his homophobic ’70s Detroit Community, his Jewish political activist parents, and even from himself until his rape, at the hands of a male prostitute, at the age of 16. Profoundly ashamed, he hides in two worlds.

One world is an intellectual cocoon spun from music, art, theater, and literature. The other is a darker world where sadomasochistic desires attempt to obliterate his sexuality. His elaborate fantasies are no match for real life or his true affections, which blossom in spite of his constant attempts to thwart them. When his carefully constructed imaginary world begins to crumble, Jamie must face his demons, both real and invented, then the emotional sparks fly. Although this book stands alone, this volume comprises the first installment inThe Goldberg Variations Series.

This series follows its main character on a journey of self-discovery through an odyssey of trials, errors, and the occasional moment of grace leading the main character Jamie Goldberg on his elusive journey to forgiveness and redemption. This journey takes him to many places around the world while meeting a quirky cast of characters along the path to his own surprising quirky self-discoveries



















[book] Power Button:
A History of Pleasure,
Panic, and the Politics
of Pushing
by Rachel Plotnick
MIT Press
October 2018

Push a button and turn on the television; tap a button and get a ride; click a button and “like” something. The touch of a finger can set an appliance, a car, or a system in motion, even if the user doesn't understand the underlying mechanisms or algorithms. How did buttons become so ubiquitous? Why do people love them, loathe them, and fear them? In Power Button, Rachel Plotnick traces the origins of today's push-button society by examining how buttons have been made, distributed, used, rejected, and refashioned throughout history. Focusing on the period between 1880 and 1925, when “technologies of the hand” proliferated (including typewriters, telegraphs, and fingerprinting), Plotnick describes the ways that button pushing became a means for digital command, which promised effortless, discreet, and fool-proof control. Emphasizing the doubly digital nature of button pushing-as an act of the finger and a binary activity (on/off, up/down)-Plotnick suggests that the tenets of precomputational digital command anticipate contemporary ideas of computer users.

Plotnick discusses the uses of early push buttons to call servants, and the growing tensions between those who work with their hands and those who command with their fingers; automation as “automagic,” enabling command at a distance; instant gratification, and the victory of light over darkness; and early twentieth-century imaginings of a future push-button culture. Push buttons, Plotnick tells us, have demonstrated remarkable staying power, despite efforts to cast button pushers as lazy, privileged, and even dangerous.

























[book] Freedom and Despair:
Notes from the South Hebron Hills
by David Shulman
October 1, 2018
University of Chicago Press
Lately, it seems as if we wake up to a new atrocity each day. Every morning is now a ritual of scrolling through our Twitter feeds or scanning our newspapers for the latest updates on fresh horrors around the globe. Despite the countless protests we attend, the phone calls we make, or the streets we march, it sometimes feels like no matter how hard we fight, the relentless crush of injustice will never abate.

David Shulman knows intimately what it takes to live your beliefs, to return, day after day, to the struggle, despite knowing you are often more likely to lose than win. Interweaving powerful stories and deep meditations, Freedom and Despair offers vivid firsthand reports from the occupied West Bank in Palestine as seen through the eyes of an experienced Israeli peace activist who has seen the Israeli occupation close up as it impacts on the lives of all Palestinian civilians.

Alongside a handful of beautifully written and often shocking tales from the field, Shulman meditates deeply on how to understand the evils around him, what it means to persevere as an activist decade after decade, and what it truly means to be free. The violent realities of the occupation are on full display. We get to know and understand the Palestinian shepherds and farmers and Israeli volunteers who face this situation head-on with nonviolent resistance. Shulman does not hold back on acknowledging the daily struggles that often leave him and his fellow activists full of despair. Inspired by these committed individuals who are not prepared to be silent or passive, Shulman suggests a model for ordinary people everywhere. Anyone prepared to take a risk and fight their oppressive political systems, he argues, can make a difference—if they strive to act with compassion and to keep hope alive.

This is the moving story of a man who continues to fight for good in the midst of despair. An indispensable book in our era of reactionary politics and refugee crises, political violence and ecological devastation, Freedom and Despair is a gripping memoir of struggle, activism, and hope for peace.






















[book] Beirut Rules:
The Murder of a CIA Station
Chief and Hezbollah's War
Against America
by Fred Burton and Samuel Katz
October 23, 2018
Berkley
From the New York Times bestselling coauthors of Under Fire--the riveting story of the kidnapping and murder of CIA Station Chief William Buckley.

After a deadly terrorist bombing at the American embassy in Lebanon in 1983, only one man inside the CIA possessed the courage and skills to rebuild the networks destroyed in the blast: William Buckley. But the new Beirut station chief quickly became the target of a young terrorist named Imad Mughniyeh.

Beirut Rules is the pulse-by-pulse account of Buckley's abduction, torture, and murder at the hands of Hezbollah terrorists. Drawing on never-before-seen government documents as well as interviews with Buckley's co-workers, friends and family, Burton and Katz reveal how the relentless search for Buckley in the wake of his kidnapping ignited a war against terror that continues to shape the Middle East to this day.






















[book] Riding High:
How I Kissed SoulCycle
Goodbye, Co-Founded Flywheel,
and Built the Life I Always Wanted
by Ruth Zukerman
October 2, 2018
St. Martin's Press
From the co-founder of Flywheel and SoulCycle comes a story of perseverance and success. “Ruth Zukerman is an inspiration. She somehow had a keen sense that indoor cycling was going to be a huge trend and she wasted no time turning it into a lucrative business. I'm among the legions of Flywheel fans who make Ruth's class part of our regular routine. Her energy, enthusiasm and great playlist keeps us spinning and coming back for more." -KATIE COURIC

Ruth Zukerman is the Queen of Spinning: she put the Soul in SoulCycle and the Fly in Flywheel.

Recounting the pivotal moments that helped launch Zukerman as the breakout star of the boutique fitness world, Riding High is a reminder that the greatest success stories often start in the unlikeliest of places.

Ruth Zukerman used her heartache–at the death of her father, the end of her marriage, and the dissolution of her first business partnership with SoulCycle, as the inspiration to reinvent herself. At 51, she co-founded a new business, the highly successful Flywheel, and built the life she’d always dreamed of. And she did it all while navigating through single motherhood and a business world that is often unkind to women, especially those who wear their hearts on their sleeves.

Riding High is a prescriptive, warts-and-all journey through Ruth’s evolution, offering fresh, unexpected business and life lessons to help readers recognize their own potential and channel their passion into success. Part confidante, part mentor, Ruth pulls no punches and holds nothing back.






















[book] The Pendulum:
A Granddaughter's Search
for Her Family's Forbidden Nazi Past
by Julie Lindahl
October 2018
Rowman and Littlefield
A powerful memoir traces Brazilian-born American Julie Lindahl’s journey to uncover her grandparents’ roles in the Third Reich as she is driven to understand how and why they became members of Hitler’s elite, the SS. Out of the unbearable heart of the story—the unclaimed guilt that devours a family through the generations—emerges an unflinching will to learn the truth. In a remarkable six-year journey through Germany, Poland, Paraguay, and Brazil, Julie uncovers, among many other discoveries, that her grandfather had been a fanatic member of the SS since 1934. During World War II, he was responsible for enslavement and torture and was complicit in the murder of the local population on the large estates he oversaw in occupied Poland. He eventually fled to South America to evade a new wave of war-crimes trials.

The pendulum used by Julie’s grandmother to divine good from bad and true from false becomes a symbol for the elusiveness of truth and morality, but also for the false securities we cling to when we become unmoored. As Julie delves deeper into the abyss of her family’s secret, discovering history anew, one precarious step at a time, the compassion of strangers is a growing force that transforms her world and the way that she sees her family—and herself.






















[book] Ruth Bader Ginsburg:
A Life
by Jane Sherron de Hart
October 2018
KNOPF
The first full life—private, public, legal, philosophical—of the 107th Supreme Court Justice, one of the most profound and profoundly transformative legal minds of our time; a book fifteen years in work, written with the cooperation of Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself and based on many interviews with the justice, her husband, her children, her friends, and her associates.

In this large, comprehensive, revelatory biography, Jane De Hart explores the central experiences that crucially shaped Ginsburg’s passion for justice, her advocacy for gender equality, her meticulous jurisprudence: her desire to make We the People more united and our union more perfect. At the heart of her story and abiding beliefs—her Jewish background. Tikkun olam, the Hebrew injunction to “repair the world,” with its profound meaning for a young girl who grew up during the Holocaust and World War II. We see the influence of her mother, Celia Amster Bader, whose intellect inspired her daughter’s feminism, insisting that Ruth become independent, as she witnessed her mother coping with terminal cervical cancer (Celia died the day before Ruth, at seventeen, graduated from high school).

From Ruth’s days as a baton twirler at Brooklyn’s James Madison High School, to Cornell University, Harvard and Columbia Law Schools (first in her class), to being a law professor at Rutgers University (one of the few women in the field and fighting pay discrimination), hiding her second pregnancy so as not to risk losing her job; founding the Women's Rights Law Reporter, writing the brief for the first case that persuaded the Supreme Court to strike down a sex-discriminatory state law, then at Columbia (the law school’s first tenured female professor); becoming the director of the women’s rights project of the ACLU, persuading the Supreme Court in a series of decisions to ban laws that denied women full citizenship status with men.

Her years on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, deciding cases the way she played golf, as she, left-handed, played with right-handed clubs—aiming left, swinging right, hitting down the middle. Her years on the Supreme Court . . .

A pioneering life and legal career whose profound mark on American jurisprudence, on American society, on our American character and spirit, will reverberate deep into the twenty-first century and beyond.






















[book] The Martin Luther King Mitzvah
by Mathew Tekulsky
October 2018
FITZROY BOOKS
Ages 10 - 12
Adam Jacobs, a seventh grader at Beachmont Middle and the son of a Holocaust survivor, is tired of Hebrew School and tired of being bullied because he is Jewish. The bright spot in Adam's day is when he follows Sally Fletcher--and her irresistible blonde ponytail--home from school. But it is 1966, and Sally is Catholic. Jews and Catholics don't mix in the suburban town of Beachmont, New York.

Inspired by the reclusive writer and activist, Gladys McKinley, and horrified by the religious and racial divisions of their suburban town, Adam and Sally organize a kids' march to protest the Vietnam War. In the heady weeks that follow, the two are featured in a local newspaper, interviewed on the radio, and meet the charismatic Martin Luther King who is shaping the civil rights movement of their day.

As his bar mitzvah approaches, Adam must grapple with newfound notions of race and religion, of division and unity, of peace and war. The Martin Luther King Mitzvah tells the timeless story of two kids who defy the odds, unite a town, and make a brave stand against discrimination.






















[book] The Girl They Left Behind:
A Novel
by Roxanne Veletzos
October 2018
Atria Books

A sweeping family saga and love story that offers a vivid and unique portrayal of life in war-torn 1941 Bucharest and life behind the Iron Curtain during the Soviet Union occupation—perfect for fans of Lilac Girls and Sarah’s Key.

On a freezing night in January 1941, a little Jewish girl is found on the steps of an apartment building in Bucharest. With Romania recently allied with the Nazis, the Jewish population is in grave danger, undergoing increasingly violent persecution. The girl is placed in an orphanage and eventually adopted by a wealthy childless couple who name her Natalia. As she assimilates into her new life, she all but forgets the parents who were forced to leave her behind. They are even further from her mind when Romania falls under Soviet occupation.

Yet, as Natalia comes of age in a bleak and hopeless world, traces of her identity pierce the surface of her everyday life, leading gradually to a discovery that will change her destiny. She has a secret crush on Victor, an intense young man who as an impoverished student befriended her family long ago. Years later, when Natalia is in her early twenties and working at a warehouse packing fruit, she and Victor, now an important official in the Communist regime, cross paths again. This time they are fatefully drawn into a passionate affair despite the obstacles swirling around them and Victor’s dark secrets.

When Natalia is suddenly offered a one-time chance at freedom, Victor is determined to help her escape, even if it means losing her. Natalia must make an agonizing decision: remain in Bucharest with her beloved adoptive parents and the man she has come to love, or seize the chance to finally live life on her own terms, and to confront the painful enigma of her past.





















[book] The Pendulum:
A Granddaughter's Search for
Her Family's Forbidden Nazi Past
by Julie Lindahl
October 10, 2018
Rowman and Littlefield
This powerful memoir traces Brazilian-born American Julie Lindahl’s journey to uncover her grandparents’ roles in the Third Reich as she is driven to understand how and why they became members of Hitler’s elite, the SS. Out of the unbearable heart of the story—the unclaimed guilt that devours a family through the generations—emerges an unflinching will to learn the truth. In a remarkable six-year journey through Germany, Poland, Paraguay, and Brazil, Julie uncovers, among many other discoveries, that her grandfather had been a fanatic member of the SS since 1934.

During World War II, he was responsible for enslavement and torture and was complicit in the murder of the local population on the large estates he oversaw in occupied Poland. He eventually fled to South America to evade a new wave of war-crimes trials. The pendulum used by Julie’s grandmother to divine good from bad and true from false becomes a symbol for the elusiveness of truth and morality, but also for the false securities we cling to when we become unmoored. As Julie delves deeper into the abyss of her family’s secret, discovering history anew, one precarious step at a time, the compassion of strangers is a growing force that transforms her world and the way that she sees her family—and herself.

Julie Lindahl is an author and educator living in Sweden. She is a contributor to WBUR Cognoscenti and has been featured on National Public Radio. Julie holds a BA from Wellesley College, an MPhil in international relations from Oxford University, and was a Fulbright Scholar in Frankfurt.





















[book] WHAT IF
IT'S US
by Becky Albertalli and
Adam Silvera
October 9, 2018
HARPER TEEN

WHAT IF IT'S US? Hey. Isn't that the lyric from a show-stopping song in the musical DEAR EVAN HANSEN? Well this YA novel does refer to Broadway musicals and it mentions Evan Hansen in the first few pages...and elsewhere... so if the title resonates with you, then you will enjoy the read.

Critically acclaimed and bestselling authors Becky Albertalli (Love Simon; Leah on the Offbeat) and Adam Silvera (The Both Die at The End) combine their talents in this smart, funny, heartfelt collaboration about two very different young men who can’t decide if the universe is pushing them together — or pulling them apart.

ARTHUR SEUSS (@ArthurSeuss) from suburban Atlanta is only in New York City for the summer. Senior year starts in early August, and NYC is as hot as Atlanta but super humid. But if Broadway has taught Arthur anything, it’s that the universe can deliver a show-stopping romance when you least expect it. Slightly shorter than average, with unreal blue eyes, this gay teen at the cusp of 17 is working as an intern for his mother's law firm as she (and his laid off father) stay on Manhattan's Upper West Side near Fairway while working on a legal case. His parents appear to be having a rocky period of arguing each day and night. Arthur helps two of the law firm's Summer Associates, and misses his two best friends in Milton, Georgia: Ethan and Jesse If it wasn't for this summer job, Arthur would be a camp counselor at the JCC and helping to direct the camp production of Fiddler on the Roof.

BEN ALEJO (@TheBenAlejo)is a gay teen of Puerto Rican heritage living on Manhattan's Lower East Side with his close, loving parents. He has to attend summer school for Chemistry (you know... ionic bonding, chemical attractions, Na+Cl-), and is secretly writing a fantasy novel as his hobby. (Sims is a major hobby, too.) He thinks the universe needs to mind its business. If the universe had his back, he wouldn’t be on his way to the post office carrying a box of his ex-boyfriend’s (@HudsonLikeRiver) things. He wants to get rid of the stuff since Hudson did not show up at the first day of Summer School.

But when Arthur and Ben “meet-cute” at the post office, what exactly does the universe have in store for them ... ?

Maybe nothing. After all, they get separated.
(Maybe they can find each other on Missed Connections on Craigslist)
Maybe everything. After all, they get reunited.
But what if they can’t nail a first date even after three do-overs?
What if a slightly neurotic, slightly self-absorbed Arthur tries too hard to make it work and Ben doesn’t try hard enough?
What if life really isn’t like a Broadway play?
What if this isn't Noah Galvin meets Jake Austin?, or Joshua Rush meets David Archuletta?
But what if it is?
And What if it’s us?

It is a teen novel of the moment, since it is filled heavily with current, very temporal, slang and references to snapchat, Twitter, Craigslist, Sugar FTW at Starbucks, social media, IG, and more.




SEE ALSO:
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[book] The Specter of the Jews:
Emperor Julian and the Rhetoric
of Ethnicity in Syrian Antioch
by Ari Finkelstein (Univ of Cincinnati)
October 23, 2018
University of California Press
S. Mark Taper Foundation Imprint in Jewish Studies
In the generation after Constantine the Great elevated Christianity to a dominant position in the Roman Empire, his nephew, the Emperor Julian, sought to reinstate the old gods to their former place of prominence—in the face of intense opposition from the newly powerful Christian church.

In early 363 c.e., while living in Syrian Antioch, Julian redoubled his efforts to hellenize the Roman Empire by turning to an unlikely source: the Jews. With a war against Persia on the horizon, Julian thought it crucial that all Romans propitiate the true gods and gain their favor through proper practice. To convince his people, he drew on Jews, whom he characterized as Judeans, using their scriptures, institutions, practices, and heroes sometimes as sources for his program and often as models to emulate. In The Specter of the Jews, Ari Finkelstein examines Julian’s writings and views on Jews as Judeans, a venerable group whose religious practices and values would help delegitimize Christianity and, surprisingly, shape a new imperial Hellenic pagan identity.





















[book] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Values:
Between Man and Man
by Rabbi Nachum Amsel
October 4, 2018
URIM Publications
A continuation to his widely praised Encyclopedia of Jewish Values, Rabbi Nachum Amsel presents as organized compendium of Jewish values and ethics that deal with human interaction.

The topics addressed in this work include Jewish attitudes to leadership, business ethics, modesty with dress, self-defense, peer pressure, family, friendships, and more. Gleaning from the Bible and classic Jewish texts, as well as later authorities such as Maimonides, Nachmanides, Rashi, and the Code of Jewish Law, this work is accessible to readers of many backgrounds.





















[book] Arguing with Aseneth:
Gentile Access to Israel's
Living God in Jewish Antiquity
by Jill Hicks-Keeton
October 12, 2018
Oxford University Press

Arguing with Aseneth shows how the ancient Jewish romance known as Joseph and Aseneth moves a minor character in Genesis from obscurity to renown, weaving a new story whose main purpose was to intervene in ancient Jewish debates surrounding gentile access to Israel's God.

Written in Greco-Roman Egypt around the turn of the era, Joseph and Aseneth combines the genre of the ancient Greek novel with scriptural characters from the story of Joseph as it retells Israel's mythic past to negotiate communal boundaries in its own present. With attention to the ways in which Aseneth's tale "remixes" Genesis, wrestles with Deuteronomic theology, and adopts prophetic visions of the future, Arguing with Aseneth demonstrates that this ancient novel inscribes into Israel's sacred narrative a precedent for gentile inclusion in the people belonging to Israel's God.

Aseneth is transformed from material mother of the sons of Joseph to a mediator of God's mercy and life to future penitents, Jew and gentile alike. Yet not all Jewish thinkers in antiquity drew boundary lines the same way or in the same place. Arguing with Aseneth traces, then, not only the way in which Joseph and Aseneth affirms the possibility of gentile incorporation but also ways in which other ancient Jewish thinkers, including the apostle Paul, would have argued back, contesting Joseph and Aseneth's very conclusions or offering alternative, competing strategies of inclusion.

With its use of a female protagonist, Joseph and Aseneth offers a distinctive model of gentile incorporation--one that eschews lines of patrilineal descent and undermines ethnicity and genealogy as necessary markers of belonging. Such a reading of this narrative shows us that we need to rethink our accounts of how ancient Jewish thinkers, including our earliest example from the Jesus Movement, negotiated who was in and who was out when it came to the people of Israel's God.
















[book] Big Debt Crises
by Ray Dalio
October 15, 2018
Bridgewater Associates

Every Jewish college grad who wants a financial career would like to either go to the UJA Hanukkah dinner for the calling of the cards OR to work for this man... OR BOTH.

Here is his newest book.
You can download the first 50 pages for free online

On the 10th anniversary of the 2008 financial crisis, one of the world's most successful investors, Ray Dalio, shares his unique template for how debt crises work and principles for dealing with them well. This template allowed his firm, Bridgewater Associates, to anticipate events and navigate them well while others struggled badly.

As he explained in his #1 New York Times Bestseller, Principles: Life & Work, Dalio believes that most everything happens over and over again through time so that by studying their patterns one can understand the cause-effect relationships behind them and develop principles for dealing with them well. In this 3-part research series, he does that for big debt crises and shares his template in the hopes reducing the chances of big debt crises happening and helping them be better managed in the future.

The template comes in three parts provided in three books: 1) The Archetypal Big Debt Cycle (which explains the template), 2) 3 Detailed Cases (which examines in depth the 2008 financial crisis, the 1930's Great Depression, and the 1920's inflationary depression of Germany's Weimar Republic), and 3) Compendium of 48 Cases (which is a compendium of charts and brief descriptions of the worst debt crises of the last 100 years). Whether you're an investor, a policy maker, or are simply interested, the unconventional perspective of one of the few people who navigated the crises successfully, A Template for Understanding Big Debt Crises will help you understand the economy and markets in revealing new ways.





























[book] THE INCOMPLETE BOOK OF RUNNING
by PETER SAGAL
October 30, 2018
Simon and Schuster
Peter Sagal, the host of NPR’s Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me! and a popular columnist for Runner’s World, shares lessons, stories, advice, and warnings gleaned from running the equivalent of once around the earth.

At the verge of turning forty, Peter Sagal—brainiac Harvard grad, short bald Jew with a disposition towards heft, and a sedentary star of public radio—started running seriously. And much to his own surprise, he kept going, faster and further, running fourteen marathons and logging tens of thousands of miles on roads, sidewalks, paths, and trails all over the United States and the world, including the 2013 Boston Marathon, where he crossed the finish line moments before the bombings.

In this new book, Sagal reflects on the trails, tracks, and routes he’s traveled, from the humorous absurdity of running charity races in his underwear—in St. Louis, in February—or attempting to “quiet his colon” on runs around his neighborhood—to the experience of running as a guide to visually impaired runners, and the triumphant post-bombing running of the Boston Marathon in 2014. With humor and humanity, Sagal also writes about the emotional experience of running, body image, the similarities between endurance sports and sadomasochism, the legacy of running as passed down from parent to child, and the odd but extraordinary bonds created between strangers and friends. The result is a funny, wise, and powerful meditation about running and life that will appeal to readers everywhere.






















[book] Unholy Land
by Lavie Tidhar
October 16, 2018
Tachyon
Lior Tirosh is a semi-successful author of pulp fiction, an inadvertent time traveler, and an ongoing source of disappointment to his father.

Tirosh has returned to his homeland in East Africa. But Palestina-a Jewish state founded in the early 20th century-has grown dangerous. The government is building a vast border wall to keep out African refugees. Unrest in Ararat City is growing. And Tirosh’s childhood friend, trying to deliver a warning, has turned up dead in his hotel room.

A state security officer has now identified Tirosh as a suspect in a string of murders. A rogue agent is stalking Tirosh through transdimensional rifts-possible futures that can only be prevented by avoiding the mistakes of the past.

From the bestselling author of Central Station comes an extraordinary new novel recalling China Miéville and Michael Chabon, entertaining and subversive in equal measures.






















[book] The Post-Truth Business:
How to Rebuild Brand Authenticity
in a Distrusting World
by Sean Pillot de Chenecey
October 28, 2018
Kogan Page

Brands are built on trust, but in a post-truth world they're faced with a serious challenge: so much of modern life is defined by mistrust. A shattering of the vital trust connection between brands and consumers, together with the evaporation of authenticity as a core brand pillar, is causing enormous problems for businesses on a global scale. If a brand isn't seen as trustworthy, then when choice is available it will be rejected in favour of one that is.

The Post-Truth Business provides a way forward for any organization wishing to rebuild brand authenticity in a distrustful world. It explains the interconnected problems facing businesses, with important topics including:

- The impact of fake news, disinformation and the weaponizing of lies
- The safeguarding of privacy, alongside privacy as a tradable asset
- Why and how brands must create communication with meaning
- The dangers of inauthentic cultural marketing activities
- Examples of conscious capitalism and brand activism
- Lessons in authenticity from artisans and innovators
- National branding and reputation capital
- Leveraging the power of 'brand trust'

The Post-Truth Business shows how to strengthen consumer engagement by closing the 'brand credibility gap'. It's packed with examples of inspiring people, brands and international campaigns from the fashion, beauty, outdoor, motor, drinks, finance, media, technology, entertainment and health sectors. Each of them demonstrates a dynamic and positive way forward.





















[book] She Wants It:
Desire, Power, and Toppling
the Patriarchy
A Memoir
by Jill Soloway
October 16, 2018
Crown
In this poignant memoir of personal transformation, Jill Soloway takes us on a patriarchy-toppling emotional and professional journey. When Jill’s parent came out as transgender, Jill pushed through the male-dominated landscape of Hollywood to create the groundbreaking and award-winning Amazon TV series Transparent. Exploring identity, love, sexuality, and the blurring of boundaries through the dynamics of a complicated and profoundly resonant American family, Transparent gave birth to a new cultural consciousness. While working on the show and exploding mainstream ideas about gender, Jill began to erase the lines on their own map, finding their voice as a director, show creator, and activist.

She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy moves with urgent rhythms, wild candor, and razor-edged humor to chart Jill’s evolution from straight, married mother of two to identifying as queer and nonbinary. This intense and revelatory metamorphosis challenges the status quo and reflects the shifting power dynamics that continue to shape our collective worldview. With unbridled insight that offers a rare front seat to the inner workings of the #metoo movement and its aftermath, Jill captures the zeitgeist of a generation with thoughtful and revolutionary ideas about gender, inclusion, desire, and consent.


















[book] PRESIDENTS OF WAR
From 1807 to the Present
by Michael Beschloss
October 9, 2018
ESSENTIAL READING
LEARNING FROM HISTORY WITH A MASTERSUL WORK
The story of presidents who not only waged war... but some who sought war
The lives and deaths of millions can be in the hands of a single President in the White House.

From a preeminent presidential historian (and Harvard B School and Andover grad) comes a groundbreaking and often surprising saga of America’s wartime chief executives

Ten years in the research and writing, Presidents of War is a fresh, magisterial, intimate look at a procession of American leaders as they took the nation into conflict and mobilized their country for victory. It brings us into the room as they make the most difficult decisions that face any President, at times sending hundreds of thousands of American men and women to their deaths.

From James Madison and the War of 1812 to recent times, we see them struggling with Congress, the courts, the press, their own advisors and antiwar protesters; seeking comfort from their spouses, families and friends; and dropping to their knees in prayer. We come to understand how these Presidents were able to withstand the pressures of war—both physically and emotionally—or were broken by them.

We see LBJ asking Arthur Goldberg to leave the Supreme Court in favor of Abe Fortas so he can “send that Jew” to the UN in order to end the Vietnam War without losing face. There is Eleanor Roosevelt with FDRs ear after Kristallnacht; he wishes he had the power to send thousands of planes to Europe and feels Hitler would not have done the actions against Jews had America been able to supply air power to Europe. Rabbi Steven Wise implores FDR in 1942 to publicize the atrocities against Jews; FDR says that war crimes trials will have to wait til after the war and the best strategy is to win the war.

Beschloss’s interviews with surviving participants in the drama and his findings in original letters, diaries, once-classified national security documents, and other sources help him to tell this story in a way it has not been told before. Presidents of War combines the sense of being there with the overarching context of two centuries of American history. This important book shows how far we have traveled from the time of our Founders, who tried to constrain presidential power, to our modern day, when a single leader has the potential to launch nuclear weapons that can destroy much of the human race.



















[book] Little Black Stretchy Pants
The UNAUTHORIZED Story of Lululemon
By its founder
Chip Wilson
October 16, 2018
Rosettabooks

Canadian entrepreneur and philanthropist Chip Wilson, founder of Lululemon and Kit and Ace, hates “Jewish Standard Time” (and Coconut Time). He hates lateness. He admires punctuality, the sign of integrity. He is quite fond of Landmark, the EST like “leadership” seminar. He founded lululemon, and is sort of estranged from it. He has said things many find insulting, but some say let chip be chip and let the chips fall where they will.

This is the “unauthorized” story of lululemon. This is a book about ordinary people who took an opportunity to be creative, to be innovative, and to maximize their potential. Chip Wilson's part in this story comes from the learnings of thousands of mistakes. He writes that he set the company culture, business model, quality platform, people development program and then.. he got out of the way. Lululemon's exponential growth, culture, and brand strength – he feels - because of the employees who choose to be great. He writes that this book is also about missed opportunity--five years of missed opportunity, because Chip was “playing to win,” while the directors of the company he founded were playing not to lose.


















[book] The Autobiography of a Transgender Scientist
by Ben Barres
Nancy Hopkins (Foreword)
October 30, 2018
The MIT Press

A leading scientist describes his life, his gender transition, his scientific work, and his advocacy for gender equality in science.

Ben Barres was known for his groundbreaking scientific work and for his groundbreaking advocacy for gender equality in science. In this book, completed shortly before his death from pancreatic cancer in December 2017, Barres (born Barbara Barres in 1954) describes a life full of remarkable accomplishments-from his childhood as a precocious math and science whiz to his experiences as a female student at MIT in the 1970s to his female-to-male transition in his forties, to his scientific work and role as teacher and mentor at Stanford.

Barres recounts his early life-his interest in science, first manifested as a fascination with the mad scientist in Superman; his academic successes; and his gender confusion. Barres felt even as a very young child that he was assigned the wrong gender. After years of being acutely uncomfortable in his own skin, Barres transitioned from female to male. He reports he felt nothing but relief on becoming his true self. He was proud to be a role model for transgender scientists.

As an undergraduate at MIT, Barres experienced discrimination, but it was after transitioning that he realized how differently male and female scientists are treated. He became an advocate for gender equality in science, and later in life responded pointedly to Larry Summers's speculation that women were innately unsuited to be scientists. Privileged white men, Barres writes, “miss the basic point that in the face of negative stereotyping, talented women will not be recognized.” At Stanford, Barres made important discoveries about glia, the most numerous cells in the brain, and he describes some of his work. “The most rewarding part of his job,” however, was mentoring young scientists. That, and his advocacy for women and transgender scientists, ensures his legacy


















[book] Dictionary of Gestures:
Expressive Comportments and Movements
in Use around the World
by François Caradec
Philippe Cousin (Illustrator)
Chris Clarke (Translator)
2018
The MIT Press

HOS DO U ALPHABETIZE A GESTURE?

An illustrated guide to more than 850 gestures and their meanings around the world, from a nod of the head to a click of the heels. Gestures convey meaning with a flourish. A vigorous nod of the head, a bold jut of the chin, an enthusiastic thumbs-up: all speak louder than words. Yet the same gesture may have different meanings in different parts of the world. What Americans understand as the “A-OK gesture,” for example, is an obscene insult in the Arab world. This volume is the reference book we didn't know we needed-an illustrated dictionary of 850 gestures and their meanings around the world. It catalogs voluntary gestures made to communicate openly-as distinct from sign language, dance moves, involuntary “tells,” or secret handshakes-and explains what the gesture conveys in a variety of locations. It is organized by body part, from top to bottom, from head (nodding, shaking, turning) to foot (scraping, kicking, playing footsie).

We learn that “to oscillate the head while gently throwing it back” communicates approval in some countries even though it resembles the headshake of disapproval used in other countries; that “to tap a slightly inflated cheek” constitutes an erotic invitation when accompanied by a wink; that the middle finger pointed in the air signifies approval in South America. We may already know that it is a grave insult in the Middle East and Asia to display the sole of one's shoe, but perhaps not that motorcyclists sometimes greet each other by raising a foot. Illustrated with clever line drawings and documented with quotations from literature (the author, François Caradec, was a distinguished and prolific historian of literature, culture, and humorous oddities, as well as a novelist and poet), this dictionary offers readers unique lessons in polylingual meaning.


















[book] Mismatch:
How Inclusion Shapes Design
by Kat Holmes
John Maeda ( Foreword)
2018
The MIT Press

From Kat Holmes, named one of the best American product designers

Sometimes designed objects reject their users: a computer mouse that doesn't work for left-handed people, for example, or a touchscreen payment system that only works for people who read English phrases, have 20/20 vision, and use a credit card. Something as simple as color choices can render a product unusable for millions. These mismatches are the building blocks of exclusion. In Mismatch, Kat Holmes describes how design can lead to exclusion, and how design can also remedy exclusion. Inclusive design methods-designing objects with rather than for excluded users-can create elegant solutions that work well and benefit all.

Holmes tells stories of pioneers of inclusive design, many of whom were drawn to work on inclusion because of their own experiences of exclusion. A gamer and designer who depends on voice recognition shows Holmes his “Wall of Exclusion,” which displays dozens of game controllers that require two hands to operate; an architect shares her firsthand knowledge of how design can fail communities, gleaned from growing up in Detroit's housing projects; an astronomer who began to lose her eyesight adapts a technique called “sonification” so she can “listen” to the stars.

Designing for inclusion is not a feel-good sideline. Holmes shows how inclusion can be a source of innovation and growth, especially for digital technologies. It can be a catalyst for creativity and a boost for the bottom line as a customer base expands. And each time we remedy a mismatched interaction, we create an opportunity for more people to contribute to society in meaningful ways.
















And now for something completely different
[book] Always Look on the
Bright Side of Life:
A Sortabiography
by Eric Idle
October 2018
Crown Archetype

From the ingenious comic performer, founding member of Monty Python, and creator of Spamalot, comes an absurdly funny memoir of unparalleled wit and heartfelt candor

We know him best for his unforgettable roles on Monty Python—from the Flying Circus to The Meaning of Life. Now, Eric Idle reflects on the meaning of his own life in this entertaining memoir that takes us on a remarkable journey from his childhood in an austere boarding school through his successful career in comedy, television, theater, and film. Coming of age as a writer and comedian during the Sixties and Seventies, Eric stumbled into the crossroads of the cultural revolution and found himself rubbing shoulders with the likes of George Harrison, David Bowie, and Robin Williams, all of whom became dear lifelong friends. With anecdotes sprinkled throughout involving other close friends and luminaries such as Mike Nichols, Mick Jagger, Steve Martin, Paul Simon, Lorne Michaels, and many more, as well as John Cleese and the Pythons themselves, Eric captures a time of tremendous creative output with equal parts hilarity and heart. In Always Look on the Bright Side of Life, named for the song he wrote for Life of Brian and which has since become the number one song played at funerals in the UK, he shares the highlights of his life and career with the kind of offbeat humor that has delighted audiences for five decades.

The year 2019 marks the fiftieth anniversary of The Pythons, and Eric is marking the occasion with this hilarious memoir chock full of behind-the-scenes stories from a high-flying life featuring everyone from Princess Leia to Queen Elizabeth.


As for whether Idle mentions the legal case brought by the Philadelphia Jewish producer of the Holy Grail film, Mark Forstater, who sued for 1/7th of proceeds from Spamalot, and not 1/14th, and his calling the producer a Twat.... I am not sure, I did not see it.

Idle does describe his extremely close friendship with Robin Williams and the pain of his loss





















[book] YEARS I WALKED
AT YOUR SIDE
SELECTED POEMS
By Mordechai Geldman
Translated by Tsipi Keller
October 2018
SUNY PRESS

The first book-length collection in English of this major Israeli poet.

Years I walked at your side like our prophet Isaiah barefoot naked and bare I will put on no cover until you see me until you recognize an other one person at least and so know yourself as well

Mordechai Geldman came of age as a poet in the seventies, an auspicious and transformative time in the development of modern Hebrew literature, as poets and writers rejected the flowery, the hyperbolic, and the sentimental and opted instead for a more direct and intimate speech. While his early poems tended to rely on linguistic exploration, his vision soon turned inward, as he came to favor the simple, the true, the authentic. Geldman’s poems are direct and accessible, touching on and revealing the divine and the sacred in the so-called mundane.

“One of the best poets writing in Hebrew today . . . [Geldman’s poems are] multifaceted and multidimensional . . . a compelling intellectual challenge that blends existential sorrow with humorous charm.” — Haaretz

Praise for the Hebrew Edition of Years I Walked at Your Side
“[Geldman’s] reach is perhaps not surprising for a psychoanalyst confronted professionally and temperamentally with the inner as well as outer manifestations of human experience. Readers come away with an impression of the poet as uomo universale, a genuinely Renaissance personality, conversant with Greek mythology, world and Jewish history, Chinese culture, the fine arts, flora and fauna, and the expanses of literary imagination.” — Stanley F. Chyet and Warren Bargad, No Sign of Ceasefire: An Anthology of Contemporary Israeli Poetry
“These are the poems of a wise man, incessantly plagued by epistemological questions.” — Yedioth Ahronoth
“Mordechai Geldman’s Years I Walked at Your Side . . . reveals a poet at the height of his creative powers, and places him among the great poets of Hebrew poetry. His poems are meditative, sensual, autobiographical; and always the sudden splash of color, surprising in its simplicity, and affecting us deeply.” — Maariv
“Geldman is one of the very few Hebrew poets who have so boldly embraced the sensual while dealing with the materialistic notions of self and universe.” — TimeOut
“Linguistically and rhythmically reserved, Geldman’s poems achieve a fine balance between the emotional and experiencing self, and the philosophical/metaphysical meanings they invoke.” — Moznaim
“Reading Geldman’s Years I Walked at Your Side allows the reader to follow the great transformations in the work of one of our most important poets.” — Israel Today
“Geldman creates a complete and coherent poetic universe, a kind of laboratory where the self investigates itself, its consciousness, and its dialectical relationship with the world. Geldman’s poems are direct and uncompromising, taking on the large themes that have been central to philosophy and art from time immemorial.” — Davar
“Geldman possesses remarkable linguistic and creative abilities. His poems exhibit beauty and depth, investigating the private self as well as the universal, while devoid of all prejudice or preconception. The clarity and virtuosity of his language, its musicality, grant a classicist dimension to his natural nonconformism, as he engages the darker corners of human existence.” — Uzi Shavit










[book] The Unstoppable Ruth Bader Ginsburg:
American Icon
by Antonia Felix
Mimi Leder (Foreword)
October 2018
Sterling

On the 25th anniversary of her appointment to the Supreme Court, this unofficial pictorial retrospective celebrates and honors the barrier-breaking achievements of Ruth Bader Ginsburg—the “Notorious RBG.”

Featuring a foreword by Mimi Leder, award-winning filmmaker and director of the upcoming major motion picture about RBG, On the Basis of Sex, starring Felicity Jones, Armie Hammer, Kathy Bates, Justin Theroux, and Sam Waterston (set to release December 2018).

Not only does Ruth Bader Ginsburg possess one of the greatest legal minds of our time, she has become an admired pop culture icon. In 2018, Ginsburg celebrates her 25th anniversary as a justice of the Supreme Court. With 130 photographs, inspiring quotes, highlights from notable speeches and judicial opinions, and insightful commentary—plus a foreword by Mimi Leder—this gorgeously illustrated book pays tribute to RBG, whose work on behalf of gender equality, and whose unprecedented career itself, indelibly changed American society.

The Unstoppable Ruth Bader Ginsburg covers her formative years growing up in Brooklyn; her time at Cornell University and at Harvard and Columbia Law Schools; her marriage and partnership with husband, Marty; her landmark cases; and the prejudice she overcame to reach the pinnacle of her field as the second woman to ascend to the country’s highest court. It also highlights the many “firsts” she achieved—including her becoming the first female tenured professor at Columbia Law School and cofounding the first Women’s Rights Project for the ACLU—while becoming a true American icon and pop culture sensation celebrated in the award-winning documentary RBG and the 2018 feature film about her origins, On the Basis of Sex.






















[book] Alef Is for Allah:
Childhood, Emotion, and Visual
Culture in Islamic Societies
by Jamal J. Elias
Univ of Pennsylvania
2018
Univ of California Press

Children are multipliers
They multiply the emotional content of any message, and in that way we socially invest children with a symbolic value that is greater than the value we assign to adults. The reflect, construct, and reinforce the culture's values. It is the adult hand in creating images of children regardless of the intended audience or purpose. The books are based in what adults want children to know and in what adults feel that children can emotionally and intellectually process.

Alef Is for Allah is the first groundbreaking study of the emotional space occupied by children in modern Islamic societies. Focusing primarily on visual representations of children from modern Turkey, Iran, and Pakistan, the book examines these materials to investigate concepts such as innocence, cuteness, gender, virtue, and devotion, as well as community, nationhood, violence, and sacrifice. In addition to exploring a subject that has never been studied comparatively before, Alef Is for Allah extends the boundaries of scholarship on emotion, religion, and visual culture and provides unique insight into Islam as it is lived and experienced in the modern world.

This beautifully written and tightly argued book marks an entirely new departure in the study of Islam. Jamal Elias advances theoretical work in multiple fields through a focus on material culture directed at children. The analysis highlights emotional forces that bind human beings to each other from the level of family intimacy to local identity, the nation, and the worldwide Islamic community. The book is indispensable for a sophisticated understanding of Islamic visual cultures, childhood as the crucial locus for articulating gender, and contemporary society in Iran, Pakistan, and Turkey.”—Shahzad Bashir, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Humanities, Brown University













[book] ON SUNSET
A MEMOIR
by Kathryn Harrison
October 2, 2018
Doubleday

In the tradition of The Hare with Amber Eyes and Running in the Family, a memoir of the author's upbringing by her grandparents in a fading mansion above Sunset Boulevard -- a childhood at once privileged and unusual, filled with the mementos and echoes of their impossibly exotic and peripatetic lives.

From the author who ignited the genre of memoirs based on childhood abuse., Kathryn Harrison, an heiress to the Sassoon family fortunes, who was Jewish and raised in Shanghai, always understood that her family was BEYOND ECCENTRIC -- they'd breached the bounds of the unconventional – I mean, her aunt was in a lesbian threesome years before it was in vogue to discuss.

Kathryn was largely raised by her grandparents in an outsized Tudor confection of a house on the periphery of Bel Air, which she thought of as "Sunset," her kingdom of the imagination, inhabited by the past and its numberless artifacts. True wandering Jews, her grandparents had arrived in Los Angeles in the forties after dramatic, globetrotting lives. Harry Jacobs had been a fur trapper in Alaska, a soldier in the trenches of the Great War, a traveling salesman in a Model T. Margaret Sassoon had lived a privileged life as a member of a Jewish merchant family in Shanghai, turning down offers of marriage from Russian princes exiled by the Revolution. Kathryn Harrison grew up in an almost mythical realm of their letters and artifacts and stories -- until declining finances forced to sell the house on Sunset in 1971, and night fell fast. On Sunset seeks to recover that childhood, that place, those lives -- and does so with piercing poignancy.



















[book] Tenants and Cobwebs
a novel
by Samir Naqqash
Sadok Masliyah (Translator)
October 15, 2018
Syracuse Univ Press

Samir Naqqash’s stirring novel Tenants and Cobwebs nostalgically commemorates the lost culture of an ancient Iraqi Jewish minority living amidst a majority Muslim population in 1940s Baghdad. The plot unfolds during a time of great turmoil: the rise of Iraqi nationalism and anti-Jewish sentiment fueled by Nazi propaganda; the Farûd, a bloody pogrom carried out against Jewish residents of Baghdad in 1941; and the founding of Israel in 1948. These pivotal events profoundly affected Muslim-Jewish relationships, forever changing the nature of the Jewish experience in Iraq and eventually leading to a mass exodus of Iraqi Jews to Israel in 1951.

Tenants and Cobwebs deftly narrates the lives of Jewish characters who refuse to leave Baghdad despite these tumultuous times as well as those who are compelled to leave but nonetheless cling to the life they know. While the Jewish residents appear to live peacefully and harmoniously in the same Baghdadapartment complex as their Muslim neighbors, Naqqash gives voice to their conflicting thoughts and feelings, revealing the deepening tensions between the two groups. His innovative use of Baghdadi Jewish and Muslim dialects captures the complex and nuanced emotions of his characters. Masliyah’s skillful translation gives English-language readers access to one of the most imaginativeand ambitious Middle Eastern authors of the twentieth century.



















[book] Why I Am a Hindu
by Shashi Tharoor
October 2, 2018
Scribe

Not Jewish... but a fascinating profile of a major world religion. It was so absorbing.

India’s leading public intellectual, Shashi Tharoor, lays out Hinduism's origins and its key philosophical concepts, major texts and everyday Hindu beliefs and practices, from worship to pilgrimage to caste. He is unsparing in his criticism of extremism and unequivocal in his belief that what makes India a distinctive nation with a unique culture will be imperiled if Hindu “fundamentalists”-the proponents of “Hindutva," or politicized Hinduism-seize the high ground. In his view, it is precisely because Hindus form the majority that India has survived as a plural, secular democracy.

A book that will be read and debated now and in the future, Why I Am a Hindu, written in Tharoor's captivating prose, is a profound re-examination of Hinduism, one of the world's oldest and greatest religious traditions.



















[book] A UNIVERSE MADE FOR TWO
The Genesis of Creation Through
The Lens of Torah and Nature
by JACK M. DANIEL
Fall 2018
Mosaica Press/Feldheim

G-d is one. The first two days of creation witness the unfolding of the concept of the number two. This unique work emerges from the convergence of Torah exegesis, Chinese medicine theory, geometry, biology, chemistry, quantum mechanics, particle physics, string theory, astrophysics, cosmology and Kabbalah. Our understanding of the unity of G-d is reinforced through the Chinese concepts of duality, yin and yang, in the created world. Deep Torah mysteries are revealed through the dual lens of Torah and nature.






















[book] Accounting for Slavery:
Masters and Management
by Caitlin Rosenthal, PhD
2018
Harvard University Press

Techniques that were used to account for slaves as assets were developed in the American South and are still used today

Accounting for Slavery is a unique contribution to the decades-long effort to understand New World slavery’s complex relationship with capitalism. Through careful analysis of plantation records, Caitlin Rosenthal explores the development of quantitative management practices on West Indian and Southern plantations. She shows how planter-capitalists built sophisticated organizational structures and even practiced an early form of scientific management. They subjected enslaved people to experiments, such as allocating and reallocating labor from crop to crop, planning meals and lodging, and carefully recording daily productivity. The incentive strategies they crafted offered rewards but also threatened brutal punishment.

The traditional story of modern management focuses on the factories of England and New England, but Rosenthal demonstrates that investors in West Indian and Southern plantations used complex accounting practices, sometimes before their Northern counterparts. For example, some planters depreciated their human capital decades before the practice was a widely used accounting technique. Contrary to narratives that depict slavery as a barrier to innovation, Accounting for Slavery explains how elite planters turned their power over enslaved people into a productivity advantage. The brutality of slavery was readily compatible with the development of new quantitative techniques for workforce organization.

By showing the many ways that business innovation can be a byproduct of bondage, Rosenthal further erodes the false boundary between capitalism and slavery and illuminates deep parallels between the outlooks of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century slaveholders and the ethical dilemmas facing twenty-first-century businesses.
















[book] Belonging:
A German Reckons with
History and Home
by Nora Krug
2018
Scribner

A revelatory, visually stunning graphic memoir by award-winning artist Nora Krug, telling the story of her attempt to confront the hidden truths of her family’s wartime past in Nazi Germany and to comprehend the forces that have shaped her life, her generation, and history.

Nora Krug was born decades after the fall of the Nazi regime, but the Second World War cast a long shadow throughout her childhood and youth in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany. For Nora, the simple fact of her German citizenship bound her to the Holocaust and its unspeakable atrocities and left her without a sense of cultural belonging. Yet Nora knew little about her own family’s involvement in the war: though all four grandparents lived through the war, they never spoke of it.

In her late thirties, after twelve years in the US, Krug realizes that living abroad has only intensified her need to ask the questions she didn’t dare to as a child and young adult. Returning to Germany, she visits archives, conducts research, and interviews family members, uncovering in the process the stories of her maternal grandfather, a driving teacher in Karlsruhe during the war, and her father’s brother Franz-Karl, who died as a teenage SS soldier in Italy. Her extraordinary quest, spanning continents and generations, pieces together her family’s troubling story and reflects on what it means to be a German of her generation.

Belonging wrestles with the idea of Heimat, the German word for the place that first forms us, where the sensibilities and identity of one generation pass on to the next. In this highly inventive visual memoir—equal parts graphic novel, family scrapbook, and investigative narrative—Nora Krug draws on letters, archival material, flea market finds, and photographs to attempt to understand what it means to belong to one’s country and one’s family. A wholly original record of a German woman’s struggle with the weight of catastrophic history, Belonging is also a reflection on the responsibility that we all have as inheritors of our countries’ pasts.




















NOVEMBER 2018 BOOKS



[book] I Might Regret This:
Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities,
and Other Stuff
by Abbi Jacobson
(Broad City, Executive Producer)
Fall 2018
Grand Central Publishing

From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series BROAD CITY, a "poignant, funny, and beautifully unabashed" (Cheryl Strayed) bestselling essay collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew.

When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions:
Why wasn't she going with friends?
Wouldn't it be incredibly lonely?
The North route is better! Was it safe for a woman?
The Southern route is the way to go! You should bring mace!
And a common one... why?

But Abbi had always found comfort in solitude, and needed space to step back and hit the reset button. As she spent time in each city and town on her way to Los Angeles, she mulled over the big questions-- What do I really want? What is the worst possible scenario in which I could run into my ex? How has the decision to wear my shirts tucked in been pivotal in my adulthood?

In this collection of anecdotes, observations and reflections--all told in the sharp, wildly funny, and relatable voice that has endeared Abbi to critics and fans alike--readers will feel like they're in the passenger seat on a fun and, ultimately, inspiring journey. With some original illustrations by the author.





















[book] Behind the Scenes of the Old Testament:
Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts
Edited by
Jon S. Greer,
John W. Hilber, and
John H. Walton
(Penn State, Cambridge, Hebrew Union Coll.)
November 2018
Baker Academic Press
This authoritative volume brings together a team of world-class scholars to cover the full range of Old Testament backgrounds studies in a concise, up-to-date, and comprehensive manner. With expertise in various subdisciplines of Old Testament backgrounds, the authors illuminate the cultural, social, and historical contexts of the world behind the Old Testament. They introduce readers to a wide range of background materials, covering history, geography, archaeology, and ancient Near Eastern textual and iconographic studies.

Meant to be used alongside traditional literature-based canonical surveys, this one-stop introduction to Old Testament backgrounds fills a gap in typical introduction to the Bible courses. It contains over 100 illustrations, including photographs, line drawings, maps, charts, and tables, which will facilitate its use in the classroom.


























[book] Metropolitan Jewish Cemeteries
of the 19th and 20th Centuries
in Central and Eastern Europe
By Rudolf Klein
2018
Nationalkomitee der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

This is the first comprehensive work on metropolitan Jewish cemeteries in Central and Eastern Europe on an international level. Based on a comparative analysis of numerous examples, from the Baltic to the Balkans, and from Russia to Germany, it touches upon art history, architecture and planning, landscaping, Jewish studies, and on general and modern Jewish history.

An important aspect of this work is the cultural background of Jewish funerary art: Christian-Jewish dialogue, the inter-Jewish influence between different European regions, including the impact of the Reform Movement that started in Germany and spread across the whole continent, and the Ashkenazi-Sephardi dialogue in some parts of the old continent.

It is also the first work which touches upon the entirety of issues related to Jewish burial places of the 19th and 20th centuries: urban level, morphology of cemeteries, gavestone typology, stylistic analysis, symbols and inscriptions – language, content, typography – tahara and ceremonial halls, wells, benches, pergolas, row-and section-markers and gravel holders.

The book presents cemeteries that have survived until today in their substantial parts, as well as slightly or markedly ruined cemeteries representing a special value in artistic, landscaping or historic aspects, or from the point of view of memorising strategies of the lost Jewish population and its tangible heritage.

This book is intended for a wide variety of readers: municipal decision makers, urban planners, architects and restorers, cemetery management and maintenance, art historians, scholars of Jewish studies, and the wider public interested in Jewish heritage and funerary culture of the 19th and 20th centuries

“Unlike many other studies that concentrate mainly on the gravestones, this book intends to look at the entirety of the cemetery, starting with its ‘urban’ and gardening aspects, morphology, and general image, touching upon the social sphere, discussing all types of segregation — gender, religious, and financial — as a mirror of the structure and hierarchy of Jewish communities in the disapora,” writes Klein in his Introduction.

“[…] Metropolitan Jewish cemeteries go beyond the fences of a minority; they portray a larger picture of modern societies, including interfaith relationship, general artistic and historic significance, thus testifying to the fruitful coexistence and cultural cross-fertilization of European culture and the Jewish heritage from the Gründerzeit to the Holocaust,” he writes.

Klein, a professor of modern architectural history at Szent Istvan University in Budapest, has researched and written widely on synagogue architecture and other aspects related to Jewish built heritage. His massive book Synagogues in Hungary 1782-1918 has recently been published in an English language edition.


The first includes 19 chapters devoted to general topics and issues: from the history of Jewish urban cemeteries in Europe, to specific topics regarding how they look, were arranged, and were used. The second section includes a general overview of cemeteries that Klein researched, as well as comparative case studies on 21 urban cemeteries in the cities of Belgrade, Berlin, Bratislava, Bucharest, Budapest, Krakow, Lodz, Prague, St. Petersburg, Sarajevo, Sofia, Vienna, Vilnius, Warsaw, Wroclaw, and Zagreb. The 451-page book is richly illustrated with hundreds of photographs, most taken by Klein himself, and enhanced by maps, charts, and other images. There is also a detailed glossary of terms. The concluding chapter summarizes the data and analyzes challenges and possibilities in maintaining and preserving metropolitan Jewish cemeteries, as well as their use as both religious sites and for education and tourism.






















[book] Those Who Knew
by Idra Novey
November 2018
Vintage
On an unnamed island country ten years after the collapse of a brutal regime, Lena suspects the powerful senator she was involved with back in her student activist days may be guilty of murder. She says nothing, assuming no one will believe her, given her family's shameful support of the former regime and her lack of evidence. They are the same reasons she told no one, a decade earlier, what happened with the senator while they were dating.

But now a college student is dead. And Lena is haunted.

Those Who Knew is a propulsive, suspenseful novel about what powerful men think they can get away with and the emotional cost of resigning oneself to silence. Moving between the island and New York City, this novel confirms Novey's place as one of the most inventive and prescient writers at work today.



























[book] WITNESS
Lessons from Elie Wiesel’s Classroom
by Ariel Burger
(Rabbi Ariel Burger)
November 13, 2018
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HMH
I recall when a childhood neighbor went off to Boston University and how she got to take a class with Eli Wiesel and it influenced her life. So I was excited to read this new book.

Rabbi Burger, a devoted protégé and friend of the late Elie Wiesel shows us the Nobel Peace Prize recipientas a master teacher.

Ariel Burger first met Elie Wiesel at age fifteen. They studied together and taught together. Witness chronicles the intimate conversations between these two men over decades, as Burger sought counsel on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while navigating his own personal journey from boyhood to manhood, from student and assistant to rabbi and, in time, teacher.

In this profoundly hopeful, thought-provoking, and inspiring book, Burger takes us into Elie Wiesel’s classroom, where the art of listening and storytelling conspire to keep memory alive. As Wiesel’s teaching assistant, Burger gives us a front-row seat witnessing these remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom. The act of listening, of sharing these stories, makes of us, the readers, witnesses.





























[book] The Museum of Modern Love
a novel
by Heather Rose
Algonquin Books
November 2018

Our hero, Arky Levin, has reached a creative dead end. An unexpected separation from his wife was meant to leave him with the space he needs to work composing film scores, but it has provided none of the peace of mind he needs to create. Guilty and restless, almost by chance he stumbles upon an art exhibit that will change his life.

Based on a real piece of performance art that took place in 2010, the installation that the fictional Arky Levin discovers is inexplicably powerful. Visitors to the Museum of Modern Art sit across a table from the performance artist Marina Abramovi?, for as short or long a period of time as they choose. Although some go in skeptical, almost all leave moved. And the participants are not the only ones to find themselves changed by this unusual experience: Arky finds himself returning daily to watch others with Abramovi?. As the performance unfolds over the course of 75 days, so too does Arky. As he bonds with other people drawn to the exhibit, he slowly starts to understand what might be missing in his life and what he must do.

This is a book about art, but it is also about success and failure, illness and happiness. It’s about what it means to find connection in a modern world. And most of all, it is about love, with its limitations and its transcendence.


























[book] God in the Qur'an
(God in Three Classic Scriptures)
by Jack Miles
(Harvard, Phd; Hebrew Univ)
November 13, 2018
KNKOPF

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of God: A Biography, an erudite, hugely informative portrait of the God of Islam, the world's second largest, fastest-growing, and perhaps most tragically misunderstood religion.

Who is Allah?
What makes Him unique?
And what does He ask of those who submit to His teachings?

In the spirit of his Pulitzer Prize-winning God, a trailblazing "biography" of the protagonist of the Old Testament, and Christ, his brilliant portrait of biblical Jesus, acclaimed religious scholar Jack Miles undertakes to answer these questions with his characteristic perspicacity, intelligence, and command of the subject. Miles depicts a "character" less mercurial than Yahweh, less ready to forgive than Christ, and yet emphatically part of their traditions. The God of the Qur'an revises and perfects: His purpose is to make whole what had been corrupted or lost from the practices and scriptures of the earlier Abrahamic religions. Setting passages from the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Qur'an side by side, Miles illuminates what is unique about Allah, His teachings and His temperament, and in doing so revises that which is false, distorted, or simply absent from our conception of the heart of Islam. Miles writes, "I hope [that by reading this book] you may find it a little easier to trust the Muslim next door, thinking of him as someone whose religion, after all, may not be so wildly unreasonable that someone holding to it could not be a trusted friend."

The book is an adequate start but it just scratches the surface and leaves out a truckload of information on Allah with regard to prayer, charity, and other themes
























[book] BECOMING
by Michelle Obama
Former First Lady of the United States
Crown Books
November 13, 2018
An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States >BR> In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address.

She tells of her reaction to Trump's win and policies, and his “stalking” of Hillary Clinton during a presidential debate, trying to overshadow and overpower her with his heft. She discusses her reaction to Trump's history of sexual harassment or assaults, and her feelings during the Trump inauguration. She discusses Freshman year at Princeton University and adapting to white wealth and privilege; and life at Harvard Law. She discusses lust and the early years of marriage to Barack and his frequent trips, their need of couples therapy, and her realization that she was responsible to her OWN happiness in a high achieving couple. There is information on a miscarriage, loss, and fertility.

With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, BECOMING is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.































[book] The Holocaust and North Africa
Edited by Aomar Boum (UCLA),and Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Stanford University Press
November 2018
The Holocaust is usually understood as a European story. Yet, this pivotal episode unfolded across North Africa and reverberated through politics, literature, memoir, and memory-Muslim as well as Jewish-in the post-war years. The Holocaust and North Africa offers the first English-language study of the unfolding events in North Africa, pushing at the boundaries of Holocaust Studies and North African Studies, and suggesting, powerfully, that neither is complete without the other.

The essays in this volume reconstruct the implementation of race laws and forced labor across the Maghreb during World War II and consider the Holocaust as a North African local affair, which took diverse form from town to town and city to city. They explore how the Holocaust ruptured Muslim–Jewish relations, setting the stage for an entirely new post-war reality. Commentaries by leading scholars of Holocaust history complete the picture, reflecting on why the history of the Holocaust and North Africa has been so widely ignored-and what we have to gain by understanding it in all its nuances.


























[book] THE SOUL OF THE STRANGER:
READING GOD AND TORAH FROM
A TRANSGENDER PERSPECTIVE
by Joy Ladin
(Stern College of Yeshiva University)
Brandeis University Press
November 6, 2018

God does not conform to human habits.
Humans are more than their assigned roles in the Torah and in life
The players in the Torah appear to always be leaving their assigned roles or places and changing, transitioning.. Lech Lecha, Noah, Moshe. Yakov/Yisroel, Hagar...

Reading some of the best-known Torah stories through the lens of transgender experience, Joy Ladin explores fundamental questions about how religious texts, traditions, and the understanding of God can be enriched by transgender perspectives, and how the Torah and trans lives can illuminate one another.

Drawing on her own experience and lifelong reading practice, Ladin shows how the Torah, a collection of ancient texts that assume human beings are either male or female, speaks both to practical transgender concerns, such as marginalization, and to the challenges of living without a body or social role that renders one intelligible to others—challenges that can help us understand a God who defies all human categories. (I believe that reading the Torah before, during, and after transition showed Ladin how she wasn't set apart from others). These creative, evocative readings transform our understanding of the Torah’s portrayals of God, humanity, and relationships between them.



























[book] Under a Darkening Sky:
The American Experience in
Nazi Europe: 1939-1941
by Robert Lyman
November 6, 2018
Pegasus
A vivid social history of the American expatriate experience in Europe between 1939 and 1941, as the Nazi menace brings a shadow over the continent, heralding the storms of war.

A poignant and powerful portrait of Europe in the years between 1939 and 1941-as the Nazi menace marches toward the greatest man-made catastrophe the world has ever experienced-Under A Darkening Sky focuses on a diverse group of expatriate Americans. Told through the eyes and observations of these characters caught up in these seismic events, the story unfolds alongside a war that slowly drags a reluctant United States into its violent embrace.

This vibrant narrative takes these dramatic personalities and evokes the engagement between Europe and a reluctant America from the September 3rd, 1939-when Britain declares war-through the tragedy of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. In a distinctively energetic storyline, Robert Lyman brings together a wide range of encounters, conversations, and memories. It includes individuals from across the social spectrum, from Josephine Baker to the young Americans who volunteered to fight in the RAF, as part of the famous “Eagle Squadrons.”

Hundreds of young Americans-like the aces James Goodison, Art Donahue, and the wealthy playboy Billy Fiske, who was the first American volunteer in the RAF to die in action during the Battle of Britain-smuggled themselves into Canada so that they could volunteer for the cockpits of Spitfires and Hurricanes, as they flew against the deadly Luftwaffe over ever-darkening skies in London.



























[book] Emergent Hasidism:
Spontaneity and Institutionalization
by Ada Rapoport-Albert
November 2018
Littman
Ada Rapoport-Albert is Professor of Jewish Studies and former Head of the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London. She is the author of a number of studies on the history of hasidism.

Actual synopsis forthcoming... Ada Rapoport-Albert has been a key player in the profound transformation of the history of hasidism that has taken shape since the 1970s. She has never lacked the courage to question conventional wisdom, but neither has she overturned it lightly. The essays in this volume show the erudition and creativity of her contribution to rewriting the master-narrative of hasidic history. Thanks to her we now know that eighteenth-century hasidism evolved in a context of intense spirituality rather than political, social, economic, or religious crisis. It did not represent the movement’s ‘classic period’ and was not a project of democratization, ameliorating the hierarchical structuring of religion and spirituality. Eighteenth-century hasidism is more accurately described as the formative and creative prelude to the mature movement of the nineteenth century: initially neither institutionalized nor centralized, it developed through a process of differentiation from traditional ascetic-mystical hasidism. Its elite leaders only became conscious of a distinctive group identity after the Ba’al Shem Tov’s death, and they subsequently spent the period from the late eighteenth to the early nineteenth century experimenting with various forms of doctrine, literature, organization, leadership, and transfer of authority. Somewhat surprisingly there was no attempt to introduce any revision of women’s status and role; in the examination of this area of hasidism Rapoport-Albert’s contribution has been singularly revealing. Her work has emphasized that, contrary to hasidism’s thrust towards spiritualization of the physical, the movement persisted in identifying women with an irredeemable materiality: women could never escape their inherent sexuality and attain the spiritual heights. Gender hierarchy therefore persisted and, formally speaking, for the first 150 years or so of hasidism’s existence women were not counted as members of the group. Twentieth-century Habad hasidim responded to modernist feminism by re-evaluating the role of women, but just as Habad appropriated modern rhetorical strategies to defend tradition, so it adopted certain feminist postulates in order to create a counter-feminism that would empower women without destabilizing traditional gender roles. T





























[book] Ezekiel 38-48:
A New Translation with
Introduction and Commentary
by Stephen L. Cook
Yale / ANCHOR
November 2018
A new interpretation of the final major sections of the Hebrew book of Ezekiel, chapters 38-48

Stephen L. Cook offers an accessible translation and interpretation of the final sections of Ezekiel. These chapters, the most challenging texts of scripture, describe the end-time assault of Gog of Magog on Israel and provide an incredible visionary tour of God’s utopian temple. Following the approach of Moshe Greenberg, the author of the preceding Anchor Yale Bible commentaries on Ezekiel, this volume grounds interpretation of the book in an intimate acquaintance with Ezekiel’s source materials, its particular patterns of composition and rhetoric, and the general learned, priestly workings of the Ezekiel school. The commentary honors Greenberg’s legacy by including insights from traditional Jewish commentators, such as Rashi, Kimhi, and Eliezer of Beaugency. In contrast to preceding commentaries, the book devotes special attention to the Zadokite idea of an indwelling, anthropomorphic “body” of God, and the enlivening effect on people and land of that indwelling.


























[book] A Specter Haunting Europe:
The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism
by Paul Hanebrink
November 2018
Harvard University Press
The first comprehensive account of the evolution and exploitation of the Judeo-Bolshevik myth, from its origins to the present day.

For much of the twentieth century, Europe was haunted by a threat of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. This myth-that Communism was a Jewish plot to destroy the nations of Europe-was a paranoid fantasy, and yet fears of a Jewish Bolshevik conspiracy took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across Europe. During World War II, these fears sparked genocide.

Paul Hanebrink’s history begins with the counterrevolutionary movements that roiled Europe at the end of World War I. Fascists, Nazis, conservative Christians, and other Europeans, terrified by Communism, imagined Jewish Bolsheviks as enemies who crossed borders to subvert order from within and bring destructive ideas from abroad. In the years that followed, Judeo-Bolshevism was an accessible and potent political weapon.

After the Holocaust, the specter of Judeo-Bolshevism did not die. Instead, it adapted to, and became a part of, the Cold War world. Transformed yet again, it persists today on both sides of the Atlantic in the toxic politics of revitalized right-wing nationalism. Drawing a worrisome parallel across one hundred years, Hanebrink argues that Europeans and Americans continue to imagine a transnational ethno-religious threat to national ways of life, this time from Muslims rather than Jews.




























[book] How Old Is the Hebrew Bible?:
A Linguistic, Textual, and
Historical Study
by Ronald Hendel and Jan Joosten
Yale / ANCHOR
November 2018
From two expert scholars comes a comprehensive study of the dating of the Hebrew Bible

The age of the Hebrew Bible is a topic that has sparked controversy and debate in recent years. The scarcity of clear evidence allows for the possibility of many views, though these are often clouded by theological and political biases. This impressive, broad-ranging book synthesizes recent linguistic, textual, and historical research to clarify the history of biblical literature, from its oldest texts and literary layers to its youngest. In clear, concise language, the authors provide a comprehensive overview that cuts across scholarly specialties to create a new standard for the historical study of the Bible. This much-needed work paves the path forward to dating the Hebrew Bible and understanding crucial aspects of its historical and contemporary significance.


























[book] Discovering Second Temple Literature:
The Scriptures and Stories
That Shaped Early Judaism
by Malka Z. Simkovich
The Jewish Publication Society JPS
November 2018
Exploring the world of the Second Temple period (539 BCE–70 CE), in particular the vastly diverse stories, commentaries, and other documents written by Jews during the last three centuries of this period, Malka Z. Simkovich takes us to Jerusalem, Alexandria, and Antioch, to the Jewish sectarians and the Roman-Jewish historian Josephus, to the Cairo genizah, and to the ancient caves that kept the secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls. As she recounts Jewish history during this vibrant, formative era, Simkovich analyzes some of the period’s most important works for both familiar and possible meanings.

This volume interweaves past and present in four parts. Part 1 tells modern stories of discovery of Second Temple literature. Part 2 describes the Jewish communities that flourished both in the land of Israel and in the Diaspora. Part 3 explores the lives, worldviews, and significant writings of Second Temple authors. Part 4 examines how authors of the time introduced novel, rewritten, and/or expanded versions of Bible stories in hopes of imparting messages to the people.

Simkovich’s popular style will engage readers in understanding the sometimes surprisingly creative ways Jews at this time chose to practice their religion and interpret its scriptures in light of a cultural setting so unlike that of their Israelite forefathers. Like many modern Jews today, they made an ancient religion meaningful in an ever-changing world.


























[book] Baladi Palestine
A Celebration of Food from Land and Sea
by Joudie Kalla amd Jamie Orlando Smith
IPG
Fall 2018
Joudie Kalla, author of the Palestine on a Plate, introduces readers to more of the Middle Easts' best kept secret Palestinian cuisine.

Summarized from the Back Cover: Baladi means my home, my land, my country, and Joudie pays homage to Palestine by showcasing its wide ranging, vibrant and truly delicious dishes. … Baladi features recipes according to the area that they hail from, such as the land, the sea, the fields, the orchard … Daoud Basha (lamb meatballs cooked in a tamarind and tomato sauce), khubzet za'atar (za'atar brioche twists), samak makli bil camun (fried fish selection with zucchini, mint and yogurt dip), atayef (soft pancakes filled with cream in an orange blossom sugar syrup), and many more flavor combinations.


































[book] MUCK
a Novel
by Dror Burstein
Gabriel Levin (Translator from Hebrew)
FS&G
November 2018
“Those who lament that the novel has lost its prophecy should pay heed and cover-price: Muck is the future, both of Jerusalem and of literature. God is showing some rare good taste, by choosing to speak to us through Dror Burstein.” -Joshua Cohen, author of Moving Kings and Book of Numbers

In a Jerusalem both ancient and modern, where the First Temple squats over the populace like a Trump casino, where the streets are literally crawling with prophets and heathen helicopters buzz over Old Testament sovereigns, two young poets are about to have their lives turned upside down.

Struggling Jeremiah is worried that he might be wasting his time trying to be a writer; the great critic Broch just beat him over the head with his own computer keyboard. Mattaniah, on the other hand, is a real up-and-comer-but he has a secret he wouldn’t want anyone in the literary world to know: his late father was king of Judah.

Jeremiah begins to despair, and in that despair has a vision: that Jerusalem is doomed, and that Mattaniah will not only be forced to ascend to the throne but will thereafter witness his people slaughtered and exiled. But what does it mean to tell a friend and rival that his future is bleak? What sort of grudges and biases turn true vision into false prophecy? Can the very act of speaking a prediction aloud make it come true? And, if so, does that make you a seer, or just a schmuck?

Dramatizing the eternal dispute between poetry and power, between faith and practicality, between haves and have-nots, Dror Burstein’s Muck is a brilliant and subversive modern-dress retelling of the book of Jeremiah: a comedy with apocalyptic stakes by a star of Israeli fiction.

























[book] How It Happened:
Documenting the Tragedy
of Hungarian Jewry
3rd Edition
by Erno Munkácsi
November 2018
McGill University Press

A gripping first-hand account of the devastating "last chapter" of the Holocaust, written by a privileged eyewitness, the secretary of the Hungarian Judenrat, and a member of Budapest's Jewish elite, How It Happened is a unique testament to the senseless brutality that, in a matter of months, decimated what was Europe’s largest and last-surviving Jewish community. Writing immediately after the war and examining only those critical months of 1944 when Hitler's Germany occupied its ally Hungary, Erno Munkácsi describes the Judenrat's desperation and fear as it attempted to prevent the looming catastrophe, agonized over decisions not made, and struggled to grasp the immensity of a tragedy that would take the lives of 427,000 Hungarian Jews in the very last year of the Second World War. This long-overdue translation makes available Munkácsi's profound and unparalleled insight into the Holocaust in Hungary, revealing the "choiceless choices" that confronted members of the Judenrat forced to execute the Nazis' orders. With an in-depth introduction, a brief biography of Erno Munkácsi, ample annotations by László Csosz and Ferenc Laczó, two dozen archival photographs, and detailed maps, How It Happened is an essential resource for historians and students of the Holocaust, the Second World War, and Central Europe.

























[book] The Life of Saul Bellow:
Love and Strife, 1965-2005
by Zachary Leader
November 2018
Knopf
When this second volume of The Life of Saul Bellow opens, Bellow, at forty-nine, is at the pinnacle of American letters - rich, famous, critically acclaimed. The expected trajectory is one of decline: volume 1, rise; volume 2, fall. Bellow never fell, producing some of his greatest fiction (Mr Sammler's Planet, Humboldt's Gift, all his best stories), winning two more National Book Awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Nobel Prize. At eighty, he wrote his last story; at eighty-five, he wrote Ravelstein. In this volume, his life away from the desk, including his love life, is if anything more dramatic than in volume 1. In the public sphere, he is embroiled in controversy over foreign affairs, race, religion, education, social policy, the state of culture, the fate of the novel.

Bellow's relations with women were often fraught. In the 1960s he was compulsively promiscuous (even as he inveighed against sexual liberation). The women he pursued, the ones he married and those with whom he had affairs, were intelligent, attractive and strong-willed. At eighty-five he fathered his fourth child, a daughter, with his fifth wife. His three sons, whom he loved, could be as volatile as he was, and their relations with their father were often troubled.

Although an early and engaged supporter of civil rights, in the second half of his life Bellow was angered by the excesses of Black Power. An opponent of cultural relativism, he exercised great influence in literary and intellectual circles, advising a host of institutes and foundations, helping those he approved of, hindering those of whom he disapproved. In making his case, he could be cutting and rude; he could also be charming, loyal, and funny. Bellow's heroic energy and will are clear to the very end of his life. His immense achievement and its cost, to himself and others, are also clear.

































A BULLSHIT BOOK for those who enjoy CIA conspiracies
[book] Blood in the Water:
How the US and Israel Conspired
to Ambush the USS Liberty
by Joan Mellen
November 2018
Prometheus Books

Temple University professor of English Joan Mellen has received multiple teaching awards for her classes in creative writing, the novel, and magical realism, and has written nearly two dozens books, some about the CIA, Castro, the Kennedy Assassination, JFK, Haiti, etc. Now she writes that there is evidence that SUGGESTS that the US and Israel colluded to have Israel attack a US surveillance ship during the Six-Day War. And then they covered it up for five decades.
On June 8, 1967, the USS Liberty, an intelligence gathering vessel reporting to the Joint Chiefs of Staff under the auspices of the National Security Agency, was positioned in international waters off the coast of Egypt when it was attacked by Israel from the air and from a sub. Thirty-four U.S. sailors were killed and 174 wounded. Israel said the attack was an accident and mistake

The author interviewed over three dozen survivors, political insiders, and reviewed Soviet documents in her attempt to show there was collusion, and if it was a false flag covert operation.. what was the ultimate purpose.






















[book] A River Could Be a Tree:
A Memoir
by Angela Himsel
With a Foreword by Shulem Deen
November 13, 2018
Fig Tree Books

How does a woman who grew up in rural Indiana as a fundamentalist Christian end up a practicing Jew in New York?

Angela Himsel was raised in a German-American family, one of eleven children who shared a single bathroom in their rented ramshackle farmhouse in Indiana. The Himsels followed an evangelical branch of Christianity—the Worldwide Church of God—which espoused a doomsday philosophy. Only faith in Jesus, the Bible, significant tithing, and the church's leader could save them from the evils of American culture—divorce, television, makeup, and even medicine.

From the time she was a young girl, Himsel believed that the Bible was the guidebook to being saved, and only strict adherence to the church's tenets could allow her to escape a certain, gruesome death, receive the Holy Spirit, and live forever in the Kingdom of God.

With self-preservation in mind, she decided, at nineteen, to study at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

But instead of strengthening her faith, Himsel was introduced to a whole new world—one with different people and perspectives. Her eyes were slowly opened to the church's shortcomings, even dangers, and fueled her natural tendency to question everything she had been taught, including the guiding principles of the church and the words of the Bible itself.

Ultimately, the connection to God she so relentlessly pursued was found in the most unexpected place: a mikvah on Manhattan's Upper West Side. This devout Christian Midwesterner found her own form of salvation—as a practicing Jewish woman.

Himsel's seemingly impossible road from childhood cult to a committed Jewish life is traced in and around the major events of the 1970s and 80s with warmth, humor, and a multitude of religious and philosophical insights. A River Could Be a Tree: A Memoir is a fascinating story of struggle, doubt, and finally, personal fulfillment.




























[book] Who's Got the Etrog?
Paperback
by Jane Kohuth and
Illustrated by Elissambura
August 2018
Kar Ben
Auntie Sanyu builds a sukkah in her Ugandan garden. Curious wildlife--the Warthog, the Lion, the Giraffe, the Elephant, and other animals--come to celebrate the Sukkot holiday. They all want to shake the lulav and smell the etrog, but will selfish Warthog learn to share?























[book] When God Gave Us Words
by Sandy Eisenberg Sasso
and Darcy Day Zoells (Illustrator)
2018
Flyaway Books
Ages 4 – 7
Words.
There are long words and short words, nice words and mean words.
There are silly words, scary words, and hard-to-spell words.
There are so many words in our world! But where did they all come from?
Award-winning children's book author Sandy Eisenberg Sasso tells a creative tale about the origin of words, and the power of language, in When God Gave Us Words. Inside this innovative children's book, God gives the power of words to humankind. At first God and the angels are pleased with how people use words, but over time they start to use words to make curses, lies, and threats. The angels beg God to take back the gift of language, and just as God is about to take it back, new beautiful words begin to fill the air.

When God Gave Us Words features imaginative illustrations by Darcy Day Zoells and it is ideal for children ages 3-8.























[book] Hanukkah Hamster
by Michelle Markel
André Ceolin (Illustrator)
2018
Sleeping Bear Press
The holiday season is a busy time, with people bustling about. And it's a busy time for Edgar, a cabdriver who conveys passengers around the city. All day long Edgar drives his cab; many people going to many different places. At the end of one busy day, Edgar is so tired he climbs into the backseat of his cab to take a nap. But he discovers he is not alone. A little hamster has somehow been left behind from one of the many fares Edgar has driven. Edgar dutifully reports the hamster to the cab company's Lost and Found department, but in the meantime the little creature needs to be taken care of. Edgar brings the hamster to his apartment, making it a bed, feeding it, and even giving it a name, Chickpea. As Edgar starts his Hanukah observance, with no family nearby to share in it, the little hamster becomes more than a casual companion to the lonely man. But what happens when Chickpea's owner is found?





























[book] Pickled Watermelon
by Esty Schachter
August 2018
Kar Ben
Ages 8-12
140 pages
It's the summer of 1986, and eleven-year-old Molly just wants to spend the summer with her friends at camp. Instead, she reluctantly heads to Israel to visit family she barely knows! With a less-than-basic knowledge of Hebrew that she picked up in Hebrew school, Molly wonders how she will be able to communicate and have fun in a country that is new and foreign to her. Luckily, surprises are in store.



























[book] ALL EYES ON ALEXANDRA
by Anna Levine
Chiara Pasqualotto (Illustrator)
August 2018
Kar Ben
Ages 3-8
Alexandra Crane is terrible at following her family in their flying Vee. She can't help it that the world is so full of interesting and distracting sights! When it's time for the Cranes to migrate to Israel's Hula Valley for the winter, Alexandra is excited but her family is worried. Will Alexandra stay with the group? And might Alexandra discover that a bad follower can make a great leader?
































[book] Light the Menorah!:
A Hanukkah Handbook
by Jacqueline Jules and
Kristina Swarner (Illustrator)
August 2018
Kar Ben
Ages 4-10
40 pages
In this Hanukkah manual for the contemporary Jewish family, holiday history, rituals, activities, songs, and recipes provide tools for creating meaningful family moments in the light of the menorah. The book includes brief reflections to read aloud before reciting the candle-lighting blessings on each of the eight nights of Hanukkah.



























[book] Pinky Bloom and the
Case of the Missing Kiddush Cup
by Judy Press (Author)
Erica-Jane Waters (Illustrator)
August 2018
Kar Ben
Ages 7-9

Fourth grader Penina?aka Pinky?is a Yankees fan, an older sister, and Brooklyn's greatest kid detective. With the help of her pet cat DJ, her best pal Lucy Chang, and her little brother Avi, Pinky unravels a vexing mystery?what happened to the ancient Jewish Kiddush cup that went missing from a museum exhibit? Pinky and her team get to the bottom of things through a series of exciting and intriguing adventures.






























[book] THE JEWISH GOD QUESTION:
What Jewish Thinkers Have Said
about God, the Book, the People,
and the Land
by Andrew Pessin
(Connecticut College)
Afterword by Samuel Lebens/Univ of Haifa
Rowman and Littlefield
November 15, 2018

If you identify as Jewish, it can't hurt (well maybe it can) to read what millenia of Jewish thinkers have written about god, the bible, and peoplehood.

The Jewish God Question explores what a diverse array of Jewish thinkers have said about the interrelated questions of God, the Book, the Jewish people, and the Land of Israel. Exploring topics such as the existence of God, God’s relationship to the world and to history, how to read the Bible, Jewish mysticism, the evolution of Judaism, and more, Andrew Pessin makes key insights from the Jewish philosophical tradition accessible and engaging.

Short chapters share fascinating insights from ancient times to today, from Philo (20 BCE-50CE) to JUDITH Plaskow, including the philosophical writings of
Philo, Saadia Ben Joseph Gaon, Isaac Israeli, Solomon Ibn Gabirol, Bachya Ibn Paquda (Do the Right Thing for the Right Reasons), Abraham Bar Chiyya (Immortality of the Soul), Yosef Ibn Tzaddik (the beginning of time), Judah Halevi, Abraham Ibn Ezra, Abraham Ibn Daud, Maimonides, Nachmanides, Hillel Ben Samuel, Moshe De Leon, Abraham Abulafia, Isaac Albalag, Abner of Burgos (Voluntary Actions in a Predetermined World), Isaac Pollegar (Human freedom vs causal predeterminism), Joseph Ibn Kaspi, Levi Ben Gerson (Gersonides), Aaron Ben Elijah of Nicomedia (written law vs oral), Moses Ben Joshua of Narbonne (Narboni), Chasdai Ben Judah Crescas, Joseph Albo, Yochanan Alemanno, Abraham Bivach (Bibago), Isaac Abravanel, Elijah Del Medigo, Leone Ebrea (Judah Abravanel), Moshe Ben Baruch Almosnino, Obadiah Sforno (moral perfection), Baruch Spinoza (Neither God nor Man acts freely), Moses Mendelssohn (being a full citizen of the world as a Jew), Solomon Maimon, Saul Ascher, Leopold Zunz, Solomon Steinheim, Abraham Geiger, Samuel Holdheim, Moses Sofer, Zacharias Frankel, Nachman Krochmal, Samson Rafael Hirsch, Israel Salanter, Zvi Hirch Kalischer, Leon Pinsker, Theodore Herzl (the only solution is a Jewish state), Ahad Ha'am (Asher Ginsberg), Micah Joseph Berdichevsky, Shalom Dov Baer Schneerson (redemption), Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzeig, Martin Buber (Ich und Du), Hayim Nahman Bialik (Hebrew U), Abraham Isaac Kook, Mordecai Kaplan, Joseph Soloveitchik, Leo Strauss, Emmanuel Levinas (moral obligations), Abraham Joshua Heschel (God in Search of Man), Eliezer Berkovits (Man in Search of God), HANNAH ARENDT, Emil Fackenheim (the 614th commandment), Yeshayahu Leibowitz (1967 occup), Hans Jonas, JUDITH PLASKOW, Michael Wyschogrod, Eugene Borowitz, RACHEL ADLER, TAMAR ROSS, Shimon Gershon Rosenberg (Shagar), and Samuel Leben.

The book emphasizes the more unusual or intriguing ideas and arguments, as well as the most influential. Pessin introduces readers to key themes and thinkers and shares suggestions for further reading. The Jewish God Question is an exciting and useful book for readers wrestling with some very big questions.
























[book] Unreasonable Doubts:
A Novel
by Reyna Marder Gentin
November 2018
She Writes Press
Jaded New York City Public Defender Liana Cohen would give anything to have one client in whom she can believe. Dozens of hardened criminals and repeat offenders have chipped away at her faith in both herself and the system. Her boyfriend Jakob’s high-powered law firm colleagues see her do-gooder job as a joke, which only adds to the increasing strain in their relationship.

Enter imprisoned felon Danny Shea, whose unforgivable crime would raise a moral conflict in an attorney at the height of her idealism-and that hasn't been Liana in quite a while. But Danny's astonishing blend of good looks, intelligence, and vulnerability intrigues Liana. Could he be the client she’s been longing for-the wrongly accused in need of a second chance? Is he innocent? As their attorney-client relationship transforms into something less than arm’s length, Liana is forced to confront fundamental questions of truth, faith, and love-and to decide who she wants to be.




















[book] The Jewish American Paradox:
Embracing Choice in a Changing World
by Robert H. Mnookin
(Harvard Law School)
November 27, 2018
PublicAffairs

Who should count as Jewish in America? What should be the relationship of American Jews to Israel? Can the American Jewish community collectively sustain and pass on to the next generation a sufficient sense of Jewish identity?

Jews in America are in a period of unprecedented status and impact, but for many their identity as Jews--religiously, historically, culturally--is increasingly complicated. Many are becoming Jews without Judaism. It appears success and acceptance will accomplish what even the most virulent anti-Semitism never could---if not the disappearance of Jews themselves, the undermining of what it means to be Jewish.

In this thoughtful, personal, deeply-reasoned book, Robert Mnookin explores the conundrums of Jewish identity, faith and community in America by delving deep into Jewish history, law, and custom. He talks to rabbis, scholars, and other Jews of many perspectives to explore the head, heart, and heritage of Judaism and confronts key challenges in the Jewish debate from the issue of intermarriage to the matter of Israeli policies.

Mnookin shares provocative stories of the ways American Jews have forged (or disavowed) their Jewish identity over the past half-century, including his own to answer the standing question: How can Jews who have different values, perspectives, and relationships with their faith, keep the community open, vibrant, and thriving?

























[book] A Writer of Our Time:
The Life and Writings
of John Berger
by Joshua Sperling
November 20, 2018
Verso
The first intellectual biography of the life and work of John Berger

John Berger was one of the most in?uential thinkers and writers of postwar Europe. As a novelist, he won the Booker prize in 1972, donating half his prize money to the Black Panthers. As a TV presenter, he changed the way we looked at art with Ways of Seeing. As a storyteller and political activist, he defended the rights and dignity of workers, migrants, and the oppressed around the world. ‘Far from dragging politics into art,’ he wrote in 1953, ‘art has dragged me into politics.’ He remained a revolutionary up to his death in January 2017.

Built around a series of watersheds, at once personal and historical, A Writer of Our Time traces Berger’s development from his roots as a postwar art student and polemicist in the Cold War battles of 1950s London, through the heady days of the 1960s—when the revolutions were not only political but sexual and artistic—to Berger’s reinvention as a rural storyteller and the long hangover that followed the rise and fall of the New Left.

Drawing on ?rst-hand, unpublished interviews and archival sources only recently made available, Joshua Sperling digs beneath the moments of controversy to reveal a ?gure of remarkable complexity and resilience. The portrait that emerges is of a cultural innovator as celebrated as he was often misunderstood, and a writer increasingly driven as much by what he loved as by what he opposed. A Writer of Our Time brings the many faces of John Berger together, repatriating one of our great minds to the intellectual dramas of his and our time.





















[book] Hitler and the Habsburgs:
The Fuhrer's Vendetta
Against the Austrian Royals
by James Longo
November 6, 2018
Diversion Books

One of the first things Hitler did after taking Austria was arrest two Hapsburgs, deport them to Germany and send them to Dachau.

Five youthful years in Vienna. It was then and there that Adolf Hitler's obsession with the Habsburg Imperial family became the catalyst for his vendetta against a vanished empire, a dead archduke, and his royal orphans. That hatred drove Hitler's rise to power and led directly to the tragedy of the Second World War and the Holocaust.

The royal orphans of Archduke Franz Ferdinand - offspring of an upstairs-downstairs marriage that scandalized the tradition-bound Habsburg Empire - came to personify to Adolf Hitler, and others, all that was wrong about modernity, the twentieth century, and the Habsburg's multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Austro-Hungarian Empire. They were outsiders in the greatest family of royal insiders in Europe, which put them on a collision course with Adolf Hitler.

As he rose to power Hitler's hatred toward the Habsburgs and their diverse empire fixated on Franz Ferdinand's sons, who became outspoken critics and opponents of the Nazi party and its racist ideology. When Germany seized Austria in 1938, they were the first two Austrians arrested by the Gestapo, deported to Germany, and sent to Dachau. Within hours they went from palace to prison. The women in the family, including the Archduke's only daughter Princess Sophie Hohenberg, declared their own war on Hitler. Their tenacity and personal courage in the face of betrayal, treachery, torture, and starvation sustained the family during the war and in the traumatic years that followed.

Through a decade of research and interviews with the descendants of the royal Habsburgs, scholar James Longo explores the roots of Hitler's determination to destroy the family of the dead Archduke. And he uncovers the family members' courageous fight against the Führer.

























[book] PROOF OF COLLUSION
HOW TRUMP BETRAYED AMERICA
BY SETH ABRAMSON

November 13, 2018
Simon & Schuster

Former D.A., Harvard Law grad, UNH teachers explains how a US president compromised American foreign policy in exchange for financial gain and covert election assistance. Looking back at this moment, historians will ask if Americans knew they were living through the first case of criminal conspiracy between an American presidential candidate turned commander in chief and a geopolitical enemy. The answer might be: it was hard to see the whole picture. The stories coming in from across the globe have often seemed fantastical: clandestine meetings in foreign capitals, secret recordings in a Moscow hotel, Kremlin agents infiltrating the Trump inner circle…

Seth Abramson has tracked every one of these far-flung reports, and now in, Proof of Collusion, he finally gives us a record of the unthinkable—a president compromising American foreign policy in exchange for financial gain and covert election assistance. The attorney, professor, and former criminal investigator has used his exacting legal mind and forensic acumen to compile, organize, and analyze every piece of the Trump-Russia story. His conclusion is clear: the case for collusion is staring us in the face. Drawing from American and European news outlets, he takes readers through the Trump-Russia scandal chronologically, putting the developments in context and showing how they connect. His extraordinary march through all the public evidence includes:

-How Trump worked for thirty years to expand his real estate empire into Russia even as he was rescued from bankruptcy by Putin’s oligarchs, Kremlin agents, and the Russian mafia.
-How Russian intelligence gathered compromising material on him over multiple trips.
-How Trump recruited Russian allies and business partners while running for president.
-How he surrounded himself with advisers who engaged in clandestine negotiations with Russia.
-How Trump aides and family members held secret meetings with foreign agents and lied about them.

By pulling every last thread of this complicated story together, Abramson argues that—even in the absence of a report from Special Counsel Mueller or a thorough Congressional investigation—the public record already confirms a quid pro quo between Trump and the Kremlin. The most extraordinary part of the case for collusion is that so much of it unfolded in plain sight.












[book] A Specter Haunting Europe:
The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism
by Paul Hanebrink
November 5, 2018
Belknap – Harvard Press

The first comprehensive account of the evolution and exploitation of the Judeo-Bolshevik myth, from its origins to the present day.

For much of the twentieth century, Europe was haunted by a threat of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. This myth-that Communism was a Jewish plot to destroy the nations of Europe-was a paranoid fantasy, and yet fears of a Jewish Bolshevik conspiracy took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across Europe. During World War II, these fears sparked genocide.

Paul Hanebrink’s history begins with the counterrevolutionary movements that roiled Europe at the end of World War I. Fascists, Nazis, conservative Christians, and other Europeans, terrified by Communism, imagined Jewish Bolsheviks as enemies who crossed borders to subvert order from within and bring destructive ideas from abroad. In the years that followed, Judeo-Bolshevism was an accessible and potent political weapon.

After the Holocaust, the specter of Judeo-Bolshevism did not die. Instead, it adapted to, and became a part of, the Cold War world. Transformed yet again, it persists today on both sides of the Atlantic in the toxic politics of revitalized right-wing nationalism. Drawing a worrisome parallel across one hundred years, Hanebrink argues that Europeans and Americans continue to imagine a transnational ethno-religious threat to national ways of life, this time from Muslims rather than Jews.






















[book] WINNER TAKES ALL
How Casino Mogul Steve Wynn
Won and Lost the High Stakes
Gamble to Own Las Vegas
by Christina Binkley
November 5, 2018
Hachette

From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and culture critic Christina Binkley comes an updated edition of her New York Times bestselling account of sex, drugs, and the rise of Las Vegas. With a new prologue on the rise and fall of Steve Wynn.

The Strip. Home to some of the world's grandest, flashiest, and most lucrative casino resorts, Las Vegas, with its multitude of attractions, draws millions of tourists from around the world every year. But Sin City hasn't always been booming: modern Vegas exists largely thanks to the extraordinary vision, and remarkable hubris, of three competing business moguls: Kirk Kerkorian, Dr. Gary Loveman, and Steve Wynn. And in the wake of #MeToo revelations, not all empires survive.

Having had personal access to all three tycoons, Binkley explains how their audacious efforts to reach the top-and to top one another-shaped the city as it stands. She takes us inside their grandest schemes, their riskiest deals, and the personalities that drove them to their greatest successes, and their most painful defeats. In this updated edition, she reveals the inside story of how Steve Wynn, the winner who took all, ultimately lost everything-twice.

Sharp, insightful, and revealing, Winner Takes All is the gripping story of how billions of dollars and the unparalleled drive for power turned dreams into larger-than-life reality.

"It's a great drama on the greatest stage. . . Wynn, Kerkorian, and Loveman represent three opposing business personalities, three styles of achieving success. On the Vegas Strip, they're pitted against one another like gladiators, and we've got front-row seats. Kapow!" - bestselling author Po Bronson






















[book] Conversations with Abner Mikva
Final Reflections on Chicago Politics
Democracy's Future, and a Life
of Public Service
with Sanford D. Horwitt
Fall 2018
University Press of Kansas

It was 1948 when Abner Mikva, fresh out of college, volunteered at the 8th Ward Democratic headquarters in Chicago. “Who sent you, kid?” the leery ward committeeman asked. “Nobody,” Mikva said, and the man informed him, “We don’t want nobody nobody sent.” That marked the beginning of Abner Mikva’s storied political career, which would take him to the Illinois Statehouse, the US House of Representatives, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, and the Clinton White House—culminating in a Presidential Medal of Freedom awarded by a young politician he had mentored, Barack Obama.

Around that time, eighty-seven years old and in declining health but as wise and wry as ever, Mikva sat down with his former speechwriter and longtime friend Sanford Horwitt for the first of the conversations recorded in this book. Separated by a generation, but with two lifetimes’ worth of experience between them, the friends met monthly to talk about life, politics, and the history that Mikva saw firsthand—and often had a hand in making.

Conversations with Abner Mikva lets us listen in as the veteran political reformer and unreconstructed liberal reflects on the world as it was, how it’s changed, what it means, and what really matters. Speaking in no uncertain terms, but with an unerring instinct for the comic, Mikva has something to say—and something well worth hearing—about his bouts with the Daley political machine, the NRA, and the Nazis who marched in Skokie. Whether recalling his work as a judge on civil rights, describing his days as White House counsel, decrying the most activist Supreme Court since the Civil War, expounding on our rigged political system, or assessing the Obama presidency, Mikva is eloquent, deeply informed, and endlessly interesting. And finally, in this intimate and unfiltered encounter, he remains an optimist, inspired and inspiring to the very end of a remarkable life of public service.

In 2016, at the age of ninety, Abner Mikva died on the Fourth of July.






















[book] SUCCESS IS THE ONLY OPTION
THE ART OF COACHING EXTREME TALENT
By John Calipari
and Michael Sokolove
Fall 2018
Harper

Kentucky’s charismatic coach shares the secrets of creating one of the premiere programs in college basketball, revealing how he transforms a group of former high school superstars into selfless, cohesive teams—including a remarkable squad last year that fell just one game short of a perfect season.

Kentucky basketball coach John Calipari is known for his unparalleled ability to recruit the nation’s best young players, some of whom will spend just one year with him before going to the NBA, and convincing them to commit to the team without sacrificing their personal goals. It is a promise he makes to them: "Fully invest in the present—and each other—and I guarantee it will serve your future."
Here, for the first time, he distills his team-building methods in ways that apply to CEOs, business owners, coaches, teachers and leaders of all kinds—lessons for anyone seeking to inspire talented individuals to reach for their best selves and contribute to a greater good.
A basketball team is an intimate workplace, in which blend is everything and character matters. As such, it is a window into the nature of successful leadership. Calipari views each new team like a startup business—one composed of new players, new relationships, and new challenges. Each season is a series of discoveries as he learns how to unleash the extreme talent in each of his players and mold them into championship material as college basketball comes to a crescendo every spring. While he can’t control everything, he is responsible for everything—just like a CEO.
An enlightening look at leadership, management, and team building, Success Is the Only Option offers the keys to winning, on and off the court.






















[book] Bold & Brave:
Ten Heroes Who Won Women
the Right to Vote
by U.S. Senator (D-NY) Kirsten Gillibrand
and Maira Kalman (Illustrator)
November 13, 2018
Knopf
Ages 5 – 9
From United States Senator Kirsten Gillibrand comes an inspiring picture book about ten suffragists who fought for women's right to vote.
Senator Kirsten Gillibrand was inspired by her own great-grandmother, grandmother, and mother to be bold and brave--to stand up and fight for what she believes in. But who inspired them? The long chain of women before them who spoke out for what's right--women who taught each generation that followed how to be bold and brave.
Here are the stories of ten leaders who strove to win the right to vote for American women--a journey that took more than seventy years of passionate commitment. From well-known figures, such as Susan B. Anthony and Sojourner Truth to lesser known women such as Alice Paul and Mary Church Terrell, these are heroes who dreamed big and never gave up. Senator Gillibrand highlights an important and pithy lesson from each woman's life--from "dare to be different" to "fight together."
On the eve of the one-hundredth anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women suffrage, Bold & Brave looks both backward and forward. It introduces children to strong women who have raised their voices on behalf of justice--and inspires them to raise their own voices to build our future.
With gorgeous illustrations by renowned Israeli-born artist Maira Kalman, this is a book that will inspire and uplift, a book to be cherished and shared.
The suffragists included are: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Jovita Idár, Alice Paul, Inez Milholland, Ida B. Wells, Lucy Burns, and Mary Church Terrell.
























[book] The Book of Shem:
On Genesis before Abraham
by David Kishik
(Emerson College)
Fall 2018
Stanford University Press

David Kishik, looks at the first few chapters of Genesis and meditates on it, specifically how to translate ORIGIN.

Can anyone say anything that has not already been said about the most scrutinized text in human history? In a rereading of the opening chapters of Genesis, David Kishik creates The Book of Shem, a philosophical meditation on the beginning of the Bible and the end of the world. He attempts to offer an inspiring interpretation. The six parts of the biblical origin story - God's creation, the Garden of Eden, Cain and Abel, Noah's Ark, the first covenant (the highpoint of the universal flood story, which makes it different from others), and the Tower of Babel - come together to address a single concern: How does one become the human being that one is?

By closely analyzing the founding text of the Abrahamic religions, this short treatise rethinks some of their deepest convictions. With a mixture of reverence and violence, Kishik's creative commentary demonstrates the post-secular implications of a pre-Abrahamic position. A translation of the Hebrew source, included as an appendix, helps to peel away the endless layers of presuppositions about its meaning.

Note: I sense the SHEM is not related to the son of NOAH... but Ha'SHEM... the early name of God that collects up all the masks and it most accessible to common – non priestly class – Semites.






















[book] The Case For Impeaching Trump
by Elizabeth Holtzman
(former member of Congress)
November 12, 2018
Hot Books Publishing

Elizabeth Holtzman has been a principled leader and a persistent voice for equality and accountability since she became the youngest woman ever elected to Congress in 1973, which she remained for forty-two years. But she sees American democratic ideals, and the rule of law in the United States, eroding under President Trump. And as a member of the House Judiciary Committee that voted to impeach Nixon, and one of the members of the Homeland Security advisory council who resigned in protest of President Donald Trump’s policy of separating families at the border, former Congresswoman Holtzman knows that of which she speaks:
“President Donald Trump threatens our democracy. He lies, attacks our constitution, assaults the press, and obstructs justice. He causes unfathomable damage. The Constitution has a remedy for presidents who commit ‘great and dangerous offenses’: impeachment.
A fair, lawful, bipartisan impeachment inquiry into President Trump means getting to the bottom of things. It means analyzing with a clear head and heart what President Trump has done and what the law requires.
Impeaching a president is a grave undertaking. The compassionate and diverse America I know demands we get ready to do it.”
The Case for Impeaching Trump establishes the requirements for impeachment as set out by the Constitution and proves that President Trump’s actions have already met those requirements. Holtzman makes the definitive, constitutional case that Trump can be impeached-and the process should start now.

Elizabeth Holtzman is a former four-term Democratic Congresswoman from New York. She served on the House Judiciary Committee that investigated the role of President Richard M. Nixon in the Watergate scandal and voted to impeach him. Her accomplishments in Congress include bringing Nazi war criminals in the US to justice, creating the bipartisan caucus of Congresswomen, and coauthoring the first special prosecutor legislation and the 1980 Refugee Act She was later elected Brooklyn District Attorney and comptroller of New York City, the first woman to hold either office. Holtzman is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Radcliffe College and practices law in New York. She is a frequent speaker about political affairs on MSNBC and CNN and other major news networks, a well-published author in the New York Times and other media outlets, and is the author of The Impeachment of George W. Bush, Who Said it Would be Easy?, and Cheating Justice.




















DECEMBER 2018





FINALLY – YEARS IN THE MAKING – VOLUME THREE HAS ARRIVED
[book] The Hebrew Bible:
A Translation with Commentary (Vol. 3)
by Robert Alter
Norton
December 2018

A LANDMARK EVENT: The Complete Hebrew Bible in the award-winning translation that delivers the stunning literary power of the original.

A masterpiece of deep learning and fine sensibility, Robert Alter’s translation of the Hebrew Bible, now complete, reanimates one of the formative works of our culture. Capturing its brilliantly compact poetry and finely wrought, purposeful prose, Alter renews the Old Testament as a source of literary power and spiritual inspiration. From the family frictions of Genesis and King David’s flawed humanity to the serene wisdom of Psalms and Job’s incendiary questioning of God’s ways, these magnificent works of world literature resonate with a startling immediacy. Featuring Alter’s generous commentary, which quietly alerts readers to the literary and historical dimensions of the text, this is the definitive edition of the Hebrew Bible. 3 maps.


Cathy Lynn Grossman, writing in PW, wrote, “Robert Alter, translator and literary critic, releases his translation of the full Hebrew Bible in December, with publisher Norton calling it the "capstone" of his renowned career. But it might be his next book, The Art of Bible Translation (Princeton Univ., Mar. 2019), that raises eyebrows among biblical scholars, with its line of fire about "the disastrous failures of modern English-language translations," Alter says. "Some people are going to get their backs up. They’re going to say, ‘Who is this twerp who doesn’t have a PhD in biblical studies to be criticizing us?’" The "twerp" is an 83-year-old professor emeritus of Hebrew and comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1967. In The Art of Bible Translation, Alter slams translators educated in elite academia, from Oxford to the Ivy League, as tone-deaf and prone to introducing a Christian theological spin that he says the ancient Hebrew text does not support. Common translations of the treasured Psalm 23 line read "I shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever," which Alter says implies the existence "heaven." But, he notes, "the Hebrew Bible spends no time talking about ‘heaven’ or an afterlife or ‘souls.’ Ancient Hebrew has no notion of these ideas. My translations scrupulously eliminate all souls."

Alter’s central argument is literary, however. "Not only do the modern translators lack a clear sense of what happens stylistically in the Bible, but also their notion of English style, its decorums and its expressive possibilities, tends to be rather shaky," he writes. "The essential point in all this is that the Hebrew Bible by and large exhibits consummate artistry in the language of its narratives and of its poetry, and there must be an answering art in the translation in order to convey what is remarkable about the original…. The literary style of the Bible in both the prose narratives and the poetry is not some sort of aesthetic embellishment of the ‘message’ of Scripture but the vital medium through which the biblical vision of God, human nature, history, politics, society, and moral value is conveyed." Look at the creation story in the King James Version, Alter says: "The priestly author of the creation story and the flood story offers beautifully choreographed cadences that convey his sense of the grandeur and the harmoniousness of creation. If you translate it in a way that destroys the cadences, you compromise the religious vision of the author." He adds: "My book offers an analogy. We are all enchanted by Moby-Dick. The prose is wonderfully rhythmic, with many lines that remind you of Shakespeare, Milton, and the King James psalms. If you remove those cadences, you just have a story about a whale and a crazy, one legged captain."













And coming in March 2019:
[book] THE ART OF BIBLE TRANSLATION
BY PROFESSOR ROBERT ALTER
(Berkeley)
March 19, 2019
Princeton University Press

An award-winning biblical translator reflects on the art of capturing the literary power of the Bible in English

In this brief book, award-winning biblical translator and acclaimed literary critic Robert Alter offers a personal and passionate account of what he learned about the art of Bible translation over the two decades he spent completing his own English version of the Hebrew Bible.

Alter’s literary training gave him the advantage of seeing that a translation of the Bible can convey the text’s meaning only by trying to capture the powerful and subtle literary style of the biblical Hebrew, something the modern English versions don’t do justice to. The Bible’s style, Alter writes, “is not some sort of aesthetic embellishment of the ‘message’ of Scripture but the vital medium through which the biblical vision of God, human nature, history, politics, society, and moral value is conveyed.” And, as the translators of the King James Version knew, the authority of the Bible is inseparable from its literary authority.

For these reasons, the Bible can be brought to life in English only by re-creating its literary virtuosity, and Alter discusses the principal aspects of style in the Hebrew Bible that any translator should try to reproduce: word choice, syntax, word play and sound play, rhythm, and dialogue. In the process, he provides an illuminating and accessible introduction to biblical style that also offers insights about the art of translation far beyond the Bible.



























[book] Ike's Mystery Man:
The Secret Lives of Robert Cutler
by PETER SHINKLE
Steerforth
December 4, 2018
The Cold War, The Lavender Scare and the Untold Story of Eisenhower's First National Security Advisor

This page-turning narrative – based on a decade of research - takes readers from top-secret Cabinet Room meetings to exclusive social clubs, and into the pages of a powerful man's intimate diary. Ike's Mystery Man shows that Eisenhower's National Security Advisor (NSA) Robert "Bobby" Cutler (Retired General)-- working alongside Ike and also the Dulles brothers at the CIA and State Department -- shaped US Cold War strategy in far more consequential ways than has been previously understood. He was influential in atomic and nuclear strategy, and the coup in Iran. Cutler created the role of the NSC as honest broker of competing policies. This was at a time when Executive Order 10450 investigated gays and Communists in government; and a time when Ike had to make a deal with Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1952 (Cutler hated McCarthy, but helped craft the deal to allow Ike to win in 1952). Also included is J. Edgar Hoover's investigation into Cutler, and why he dropped it.

Bobby also left behind a six-volume 725-page diary which reveals that he was in love with a man half his age, NSC staffer Skip Koons. More like obsessed. Their friend Steve Benedict, who also is gay, became Ike's White House Security Officer. Cutler was secretive but one of Ike's closest most trusted advisers. He was a writer, poet, Harvard College and Harvard Law grad, 1916 student commencement speaker at Harvard, attorney (Herrick, Smith), campaign chair for Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr, Army General, bank president (Old Colony Trust), corporate counsel for Boston's mayor (Maurice Tobin), CIA-consultant, Radio Free Europe mastermind, and lifelong member of the GOP. Cutler wrote many of Ike's speeches in his campaign against Taft. He was an effective fixer who knew how to work the levers of power in DC. In addition to Bobby's diary, Ike's Mystery Man relies on thousands of personal letters, interviews, and previously classified archives to tell a gripping story that has never before been told.

Ike's Mystery Man brings a new dimension to our understanding of the inner-workings of the Eisenhower White House. It also shines a bright light on the indispensable contributions and sacrifices made by patriotic gay Americans in an era when Executive Order 10450 banned anyone suspected of "sexual perversion", i.e. homosexuality, from any government job, and gays in the government were persecuted by the likes of Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn in the Senate, and J. Edgar Hoover and Clyde Tolson at the FBI.


























[book] Left to the Mercy of
a Rude Stream:
The Bargain That Broke Adolf Hitler
and Saved My Mother
by Stanley A. Goldman
(Loyola Law)
Potomac Books
December 2018

Seven years after the death of his mother, Malka, Stanley A. Goldman traveled to Israel to visit her best friend during the Holocaust. The best friend’s daughter showed Goldman a pamphlet she had acquired from the Israeli Holocaust Museum that documented activities of one man’s negotiations with the Nazi’s interior minister and SS head, Heinrich Himmler, for the release of the Jewish women from the concentration camp at Ravensbrück. While looking through the pamphlet, the two discovered a picture that could have been their mothers being released from the camp. Wanting to know the details of how they were saved, Goldman set out on a long and difficult path to unravel the mystery.

After years of researching the pamphlet, Goldman learned that a German Jew named Norbert Masur made a treacherous journey from the safety of Sweden back into the war zone in order to secure the release of the Jewish women imprisoned at the Ravensbrück concentration camp. Masur not only succeeded in his mission against all odds but he contributed to the downfall of the Nazi hierarchy itself. This amazing, little-known story uncovers a piece of history about the undermining of the Nazi regime, the women of the Holocaust, and the strained but loving relationship between a survivor and her son.



























[book] Portraits without Frames
(New York Review Books Classics)
by Lev Ozerov
Robert Chandler (Editor)

NYRB Books
December 4, 2018

Isaac Babel, Dmitry Shostakovich, and Anna Akhmatova star in this series of portraits of some of the greatest writers, artists, and composers of the twentieth century. "We stopped and Shklovsky told me / quietly, but clearly, / 'Remember, we are on our way out. / On our way out.' And I recalled / ... the wall of books, / all written by a man / who lived / in times that were hard to bear." Lev Ozerov’s Portraits Without Frames offers fifty shrewd and moving glimpses into the lives of Soviet writers, composers, and artists caught between the demands of art and politics. Some of the subjects—like Anna Akhmatova, Isaac Babel, Andrey Platonov, and Dmitry Shostakovich—are well-known, others less so. All are evoked with great subtlety and vividness, as is the fraught and dangerous time in which they lived. Composed in free verse of deceptively artless simplicity, Ozerov’s portraits are like nothing else in Russian poetry.




























[book] Katz or Cats:
or, How Jesus Became My Rival in Love
by Curt Leviant
Dzanc Books
December 4, 2018
Katz or Cats, or How Jesus Became My Rival in Love follows John, a book editor who meets an enigmatic man named Katz on his daily commute into New York. True to form, Katz has a book to pitch-not his own, but his brother’s, an identical twin also named Katz. The novel begins with another meeting on another train: brother Katz chances on a woman named Maria, who carries a pocket Bible and is missing the top digit of her ring finger.

The two embark on a whirlwind affair, alternately driven together and apart by their passion for each other and Maria’s religious fervor. But the story seems to change as soon as Katz tells it, and Katz himself has a great confession to make. As the lies that bind the tale together grow to new proportion, John comes to doubt the line between truth and fiction, as well as everything he thinks he knows about the man beside him on the train.

With the lyrical joy and lighthearted wordplay that have won him critical acclaim, Curt Leviant’s latest novel explores the very fabric of storytelling and whether life, like fiction, can be in constant flux.




























[book] Victory City:
A History of New York and
New Yorkers during World War II
by John Strausbaugh
Twelve
December 4, 2018

From John Strausbaugh, author of City of Sedition and The Village, comes the definitive history of Gotham during the World War II era.

New York City during World War II wasn't just a place of servicemen, politicians, heroes, G.I. Joes and Rosie the Riveters, but also of quislings and saboteurs; of Nazi, Fascist, and Communist sympathizers; of war protesters and conscientious objectors; of gangsters and hookers and profiteers; of latchkey kids and bobby-soxers, poets and painters, atomic scientists and atomic spies.

While the war launched and leveled nations, spurred economic growth, and saw the rise and fall of global Fascism, New York City would eventually emerge as the new capital of the world. From the Gilded Age to VJ-Day, an array of fascinating New Yorkers rose to fame, from Mayor Fiorello La Guardia to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Langston Hughes to Joe Louis, to Robert Moses and Joe DiMaggio. In VICTORY CITY, John Strausbaugh returns to tell the story of New York City's war years with the same richness, depth, and nuance he brought to his previous books, City of Sedition and The Village, providing readers with a groundbreaking new look into the greatest city on earth during the most transformative -- and costliest -- war in human history.



























[book] Hermann Cohen:
An Intellectual Biography
by Frederick C. Beiser
Oxford University Press
December 2018
This book is the first complete intellectual biography of Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) and the only work to cover all his major philosophical and Jewish writings. Frederick C. Beiser pays special attention to all phases of Cohen's intellectual development, its breaks and its continuities, throughout seven decades. The guiding goal behind Cohen's intellectual career, he argues, was the development of a radical rationalism, one committed to defending the rights of unending enquiry and unlimited criticism. Cohen's philosophy was therefore an attempt to defend and revive the Enlightenment belief in the authority of reason; his critical idealism an attempt to justify this belief and to establish a purely rational worldview. According to this interpretation, Cohen's thought is resolutely opposed to any form of irrationalism or mysticism because these would impose arbitrary and artificial limits on criticism and enquiry. It is therefore critical of those interpretations which see Cohen's philosophy as a species of proto-existentialism (Rosenzweig) or Jewish mysticism (Adelmann and Kohnke).

Hermann Cohen: An Intellectual Biography attempts to unify the two sides of Cohen's thought, his philosophy and his Judaism. Maintaining that Cohen's Judaism was not a limit to his radical rationalism but a consistent development of it, Beiser contends that his religion was one of reason. He concludes that most critical interpretations have failed to appreciate the philosophical depth and sophistication of his Judaism, a religion which committed the believer to the unending search for truth and the striving to achieve the cosmopolitan ideals of reason.



















[book] Preaching about Racism:
A Guide for Faith Leaders
by Carolyn B. Helsel
December 2018
Chalice Press

Equipping pastors to address racism faithfully from the pulpit.
Of all the activities that come with being a minister, sermon preparation can loom largest - especially when racism is the subject. You've got to address racism with your white congregation from the pulpit. But, truthfully, you can't wrap your head around how to preach about this topic thoughtfully and sensitively.

In Preaching about Racism, preaching professor and Christian pastor Carolyn Helsel speaks directly to other faith leaders about how to address racism from the pulpit. In her first book, Anxious to Talk about It: Helping White Christians Talk Faithfully about Racism, Helsel addressed the anxiety white Christians experience around conversations about race. In this follow-up, Helsel provides strategies and a theoretical framework for crafting biblical and theological sermons that incorporate insights from social sciences and psychology, gleaned from more than a decade of writing and teaching about racism.

Written for the busy pastor, several chapters are quick reads - helpful reminders as you prepare a thoughtful and sensitive sermon - while others dig deeper on the theory behind the crucial work of dismantling racism.































[book] Confronting Religious Violence:
A Counternarrative
Edited by Richard A. Burridge and
Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks and
Megan Warner
Fall 2018
Baylor University Press

Sunni and Shia in Iran, Iraq, or Syria. Protestants and Catholics in Northern Ireland. Afrikaners and black churches in South Africa. The rising tide of anti-Semitism and Islamophobia across Europe. Israelis and Palestinians in the Holy Land. The fear of immigrants and those who are different. The surge of nationalism. Violence, religious violence, violence done in the name of religion. Religious violence must be understood-its history, its relationship to sacred texts and communities, and its consequences. Religious violence must also be confronted. Another story must be told, a different story, a counternarrative other than the one that grips the world today.

In Confronting Religious Violence, twelve international experts from a variety of theological, philosophical, and scientific fields address the issue of religious violence in today’s world. The first part of the book focuses on the historical rise of religious conflict, beginning with the question of whether the New Testament leads to supersessionism, and looks at the growth of anti-Semitism in the later Roman Empire. The second part comprises field-report studies of xenophobia, radicalism, anti-Semitism, and Islamophobia surrounding the conflicts in the Middle East. The third part reflects on moral, philosophical, legal, and evolutionary influences on religious freedom and how they harm or help the advancement of peace. The final part of the volume turns to theological reflections, discussing monotheism, nationalism, the perpetuation of violence, the role of mercy laws and freedom in combating hate, and practical approaches to dealing with pluralism in theological education.

Edited by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks and Richard Burridge, Confronting Religious Violence contains insights from international experts that form essential reading for politicians, diplomats, business leaders, academics, theologians, church and faith leaders, commentators, and military strategists-anyone concerned with a harmonious future for human life together on this planet.

























JANUARY 2019



[book] Lonely But Not Alone:
A Spiritual Autobiography
by Nathan Lopes Cardozo
JANUARY 2019
Urim Publications
Lonely But Not Alone tells the highly unusual story of Dutch–Israeli Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo, a child of an intermarriage between a Christian woman and Jewish man who discovers Judaism in his teens and subsequently undergoes a ritual conversion. Weaving together his history and his novel approach to Judaism borne out of his unconventional experiences, Cardozo tackles the problems of religiosity, doubt, faith, and the holy land of Israel and offers his vision for an improved Judaism. This volume blends Cardozo’s personal account, testimony by his mother about concealing his father’s family during the Holocaust, seminal essays on Jewish thought, and an interview with the author.




























[book] Armies of Sand:
The Past, Present, and Future
of Arab Military Effectiveness
by Kenneth M. Pollack
JANUARY 2019
Oxford University Press
Since the Second World War, Arab armed forces have consistently punched below their weight. They have lost many wars that by all rights they should have won, and in their best performances only ever achieved quite modest accomplishments. Over time, soldiers, scholars, and military experts have offered various explanations for this pattern. Reliance on Soviet military methods, the poor civil-military relations of the Arab world, the underdevelopment of the Arab states, and patterns of behavior derived from the wider Arab culture, have all been suggested as the ultimate source of Arab military difficulties.

Armies of Sand, Kenneth Pollack's powerful and riveting history of Arab armies from the end of World War Two to the present, assesses these differing explanations and isolates the most important causes. Over the course of the book, he examines the combat performance of fifteen Arab armies and air forces in virtually every Middle Eastern war, from the Jordanians and Syrians in 1948 to Hizballah in 2006 and the Iraqis and ISIS in 2014-2017. He then compares these experiences to the performance of the Argentine, Chadian, Chinese, Cuban, North Korean, and South Vietnamese armed forces in their own combat operations during the twentieth century. The book ultimately concludes that reliance on Soviet doctrine was more of a help than a hindrance to the Arabs. In contrast, politicization and underdevelopment were both important factors limiting Arab military effectiveness, but patterns of behavior derived from the dominant Arab culture was the most important factor of all. Pollack closes with a discussion of the rapid changes occurring across the Arab world--political, economic, and cultural--as well as the rapid evolution in warmaking as a result of the information revolution. He suggests that because both Arab society and warfare are changing, the problems that have bedeviled Arab armed forces in the past could dissipate or even vanish in the future, with potentially dramatic consequences for the Middle East military balance. Sweeping in its historical coverage and highly accessible, this will be the go-to reference for anyone interested in the history of warfare in the Middle East since 1945.



























I PERSONALLY am not a fan of Holocaust fiction and leveraging a popular victim of the Shoah. But you might be:

[book] ANNELIES
A NOVEL
by DAVID GILLHAM
JANUARY 2019
VIKING

A powerful and deeply humane new novel that asks the question:
What if Anne Frank survived the Holocaust?

The year is 1945, and Anne (Annelies Marie Frank) Frank is sixteen years old. Having survived the concentration camps, but lost her mother and sister, she reunites with her father, Pim, in newly liberated Amsterdam. But it’s not as easy to fit the pieces of their life back together. Anne is adrift, haunted by the ghosts of the horrors they experienced, while Pim is fixated on returning to normalcy. They represent two paths of post trauma. Anne's beloved diary has been lost, and her dreams of becoming a writer seem distant and pointless now.

As Anne struggles to overcome the brutality of memory and build a new life for herself, she grapples with heartbreak, grief, and ultimately the freedom of forgiveness. A story of trauma and redemption, Annelies honors Anne Frank’s legacy as not only a symbol of hope and perseverance, but also a complex young woman of great ambition and heart.

Anne Frank is a cultural icon whose diary painted a vivid picture of the Holocaust and made her an image of humanity in one of history’s darkest moments. But she was also a person—a precocious young girl with a rich inner life and tremendous skill as a writer. In this masterful new novel, David R. Gillham explores with breathtaking empathy the woman—and the writer—she might have become.




























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.






























[book] Team Human
by Douglas Rushkoff
CUNY/Queens
JANUARY 2019
Norton
Team Human is a manifesto-a fiery distillation of preeminent digital theorist Douglas Rushkoff’s most urgent thoughts on civilization and human nature. In one hundred lean and incisive statements, he argues that we are essentially social creatures, and that we achieve our greatest aspirations when we work together-not as individuals. Yet today society is threatened by a vast antihuman infrastructure that undermines our ability to connect. Money, once a means of exchange, is now a means of exploitation; education, conceived as way to elevate the working class, has become another assembly line; and the internet has only further divided us into increasingly atomized and radicalized groups.

Team Human delivers a call to arms. If we are to resist and survive these destructive forces, we must recognize that being human is a team sport. In Rushkoff’s own words: “Being social may be the whole point.” Harnessing wide-ranging research on human evolution, biology, and psychology, Rushkoff shows that when we work together we realize greater happiness, productivity, and peace. If we can find the others who understand this fundamental truth and reassert our humanity-together-we can make the world a better place to be human.



























[book] Refugees or Migrants:
Pre-Modern Jewish Population Movement
by Robert Chazan
JANUARY 2019
Yale Univ Press
A leading historian argues that historically Jews were more often voluntary migrants than involuntary refugees

For millennia, Jews and non-Jews alike have viewed forced population movement as a core aspect of the Jewish experience. This involuntary Jewish wandering has been explained as the result of divine punishment, or as a response to maltreatment of Jews by majority populations, or as the result of Jews’ acceptance of their minority status perpetuating the maltreatment and forced migration. In this absorbing book, Robert Chazan explores these various accounts, and argues that Jewish population movement was in most cases voluntary, the result of a Jewish sense that there were alternatives available for making a better life.




























[book] Hitler's Pawn:
The Boy Assassin and
the Holocaust
by Stephen Koch
JANUARY 8, 2019
Counterpoint

A remarkable story of a forgotten seventeen-year-old Jew who was blamed by the Nazis for the anti-Semitic violence and terror known as the Kristallnacht, the pogrom still seen as an initiating event of the Holocaust

After learning about Nazi persecution of his family, Herschel Grynszpan (pronounced "Greenspan"), an impoverished seventeen-year-old Jew living in Paris, bought a small handgun and on November 7, 1938, went to the German embassy and shot the first German diplomat he saw. When the man died two days later, Hitler and Goebbels made the shooting their pretext for the great state-sponsored wave of anti-Semitic terror known as Kristallnacht, still seen by many as an initiating event of the Holocaust.

Overnight, Grynszpan, a bright but naive teenager-and a perfect political nobody-was front-page news and a pawn in a global power struggle. When France fell, the Nazis captured Grynszpan after a wild chase and flew him to Berlin. The boy became a privileged prisoner of the Gestapo while Hitler and Goebbels plotted a massive show trial to blame "the Jews" for starting World War II. A prisoner and alone, Grynszpan grasped Hitler’s intentions and waged a battle of wits to sabotage the trial, knowing that even if he succeeded, he would certainly be murdered. The battle of wits was close, but Grynszpan finally won. Based on the newest research, Hitler’s Pawn is the richest telling of Grynszpan’s story to date.


























[book] I Love Kosher:
Beautiful Recipes from My Kitchen
by Kim Kushner
Weldon Owen
January 2019
Kosher Salt & Black Pepper: Essential Recipes for Your Kosher Kitchen

Kosher food made cool, calm, and sexy—the essentials for cooking and entertaining with style. Author Kim Kushner shares 100+ essential recipes, techniques, tools, and tricks for preparing delicious kosher meals with ease.

This inspiring cookbook offers simple, straightforward, go-to kosher recipes—ranging from quick dinners to slow-simmered main dishes, party fare, and freezer-to-table specialities—for every meal and any occasion, with busy families in mind. Whether preparing a simple dinner for two, a full-family feast, or party menu for ten, Kim’s strategy is to draw on this essential collection of recipes, tips, and tricks to guarantee stellar results, please any crowd, and have fun along the way.

The author’s fantastic sensibility with flavor—and flair for entertaining—comes through the well-curated selection of dishes, which are organized by course and cooking time. Kim also includes her tried-and-true culinary essentials like fridge, freezer, and pantry staples, must-have tools and equipment, and signature homemade dressings and marinades for mix-and-match cooking ease. A special chapter on boards features step-by-step directions and images for how to compose a variety of visually compelling and bountiful boards for easy, elegant serving such as a crudité board with dips, a wine and cheese board, and a breakfast smorgasboard.

Sample Chapters
Board Entertaining
Appetizers & Drinks
Ready-to-go Dishes
Brunch
Quick Stovetop Mains (under 1 hour)
One Pot/Sheet Pan (1–2 hours)
Hot, Slow & Simmered (4–6 hours)
Freezer-to-Table Mains
Dishes for a Crowd
Sides
Desserts





















[book] Prince of the Press:
How One Collector Built History’s
Most Enduring and Remarkable Jewish
by Joshua Teplitsky
JANUARY 2019
Yale Univ Press
The story of one of the largest collections of Jewish books, and the man who used his collection to cultivate power, prestige, and political influence

David Oppenheim (1664–1736), chief rabbi of Prague in the early eighteenth century, built an unparalleled collection of Jewish books, all of which have survived and are housed in the Bodleian Library of Oxford. His remarkable collection testifies to the myriad connections Jews maintained with each other across political borders. Oppenheim’s world reached the great courts of European nobility, and his family ties brought him into networks of power, prestige, and opportunity that extended from Amsterdam to the Ottoman Empire. His impressive library functioned as a unique source of personal authority that gained him fame throughout Jewish society and beyond. His story brings together culture, commerce, and politics, all filtered through this extraordinary collection. Based on the careful reconstruction of an archive that is still visited by scholars today, Joshua Teplitsky’s book offers a window into the social life of books in early modern Europe.


































[book] The Rational Bible:
Genesis
by Dennis Prager
JUNE 2019
Regnery Faith publishing
The continuation of Dennis Prager's bestselling five-part commentary,The Rational Bible.

Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today’s issues, but completely consistent with rational thought.
































[book] BABEL
Around the World in
Twenty Languages
by Gaston Dorren
Atlantic Monthly Press
December 4, 2018
English is the world language, except that most of the world doesn’t speak it-only one in five people does. Dorren calculates that to speak fluently with half of the world’s 7.4 billion people in their mother tongues, you would need to know no fewer than twenty languages. He sets out to explore these top twenty world languages, which range from the familiar (French, Spanish) to the surprising (Malay, Swahili, Bengali). Babel whisks the reader on a delightful journey to every continent of the world, tracing how these world languages rose to greatness while others fell away and showing how speakers today handle the foibles of their mother tongues. Whether showcasing tongue-tying phonetics or elegant but complicated writing scripts, and mind-bending quirks of grammar, Babel vividly illustrates that mother tongues are like nations: each has its own customs and beliefs that seem as self-evident to those born into it as they are surprising to the outside world.

Among many other things, Babel will teach you why modern Turks can’t read books that are a mere 75 years old, what it means in practice for Russian and English to be relatives, and how Japanese developed separate “dialects” for men and women. Dorren lets you in on his personal trials and triumphs while studying Vietnamese in Hanoi, debunks ten widespread myths about the Chinese character script, and discovers that today’s Babel is inhabited most graciously by multilingual Africans. Witty, fascinating and utterly compelling, Babel will change the way you look at and listen to the world and how it speaks.
































[book] NOT ALL DEAD WHITE MEN
Classics and Misogyny
in the Digital Age
By Donna Zuckerberg
JANUARY 2019
Harvard University Press
A disturbing exposé of how today’s Alt-Right men’s groups use ancient sources to promote a new brand of toxic masculinity online.

A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online that treats women’s empowerment as a mortal threat to men and to the integrity of Western civilization. Its proponents cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims-arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege.

Donna Zuckerberg dives deep into the virtual communities of the far right, where men lament their loss of power and privilege and strategize about how to reclaim them. She finds, mixed in with weightlifting tips and misogynistic vitriol, the words of the Stoics deployed to support an ideal vision of masculine life. On other sites, pickup artists quote Ovid’s Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women’s boundaries. By appropriating the Classics, these men lend a veneer of intellectual authority and ancient wisdom to their project of patriarchal white supremacy. In defense or retaliation, feminists have also taken up the Classics online, to counter the sanctioning of violence against women.

Not All Dead White Men reveals that some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online.






























[book] Holy Lands
a novel
by Amanda Sthers
JANUARY 22, 2019
Bloomsbury

A witty epistolary novel, both heartwarming and heart-wrenching, about a dysfunctional family--led by a Jewish pig farmer in Israel--struggling to love and accept each other.

As comic as it is deeply moving, Holy Lands chronicles several months in the lives of an estranged family of colorful eccentrics. Harry Rosenmerck is an aging Jewish cardiologist who has left his thriving medical practice in New York--to raise pigs in Israel. His ex-wife, Monique, ruminates about their once happy marriage even as she quietly battles an aggressive illness. Their son, David, an earnest and successful playwright, has vowed to reconnect with his father since coming out. Annabelle, their daughter, finds herself unmoored in Paris in the aftermath of a breakup.

Harry eschews technology, so his family, spread out around the world, must communicate with him via snail mail. Even as they grapple with challenges, their correspondence sparkles with levity. They snipe at each other, volleying quips across the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and Europe, and find joy in unexpected sources.

Holy Lands captures the humor and poignancy of an adult family striving to remain connected across time, geography, and radically different perspectives on life.


























[book] ETERNAL LIFE
A NOVEL
BY DARA HORN
JANUARY 8, 2019
Norton Paperback

What would it really mean to live forever?

Rachel’s current troubles-a middle-aged son mining digital currency in her basement, a scientist granddaughter trying to peek into her genes-are only the latest in a litany spanning dozens of countries, scores of marriages, hundreds of children, and 2,000 years, going back to Roman-occupied Jerusalem. Only one person shares her immortality: an illicit lover who pursues her through the ages. But when her children develop technologies that could change her fate, Rachel must find a way out. From ancient religion to the scientific frontier, Dara Horn pits our efforts to make life last against the deeper challenge of making life worth living.



























[book] Inheritance:
A Memoir of Genealogy,
Paternity, and Love
by Dani Shapiro
January 2019
Knopf

The acclaimed and beloved author of Hourglass now gives us a new memoir about identity, paternity, and family secrets--a real-time exploration of the staggering discovery she recently made about her father, and her struggle to piece together the hidden story of her own life.

What makes us who we are?
What combination of memory, history, biology, experience, and that ineffable thing called the soul defines us?

In the spring of 2016, through a genealogy website to which she had whimsically submitted her DNA for analysis, Dani Shapiro received the stunning news that she wasn't 99 percent Jewish. WHAT? Well, it turns out that her biological father was different than the father who raised her. Her father was not her biological father. She woke up one morning and her entire history – the life she had lived – CRUMBLED beneath her.

Was this the reason she felt out of place with her dark haired Jewish family and community?

Inheritance is a book about secrets--secrets within families, kept out of shame or self-protectiveness; secrets we keep from one another in the name of love. It is the story of a woman's urgent quest to unlock the story of her own (biological) identity, a story that has been scrupulously hidden from her for more than fifty years, years she had spent writing brilliantly, and compulsively, on themes of identity and family history.

Her parents were no longer living, so her investigation was not as easy as asking her mother.

It is a book about the extraordinary moment we live in--a moment in which science and technology have outpaced not only medical ethics but also the capacities of the human heart to contend with the consequences of what we discover.

Timely and unforgettable, Dani Shapiro's memoir is a gripping, gut-wrenching exploration of genealogy, paternity, and love.


























[book] A Woman First:
First Woman:
The Deeply Personal
Memoir by the Former President
by Selina Meyer
Former President of the United States
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Abrams Press
The long-awaited memoir of her tumultuous year in office, A Woman First: First Woman is an intimate first-person account of the public and private lives of Selina Meyer, America’s first woman president. Known and beloved throughout the world as a vocal and fearless advocate for adult literacy, fighting AIDS, our military families, and as a stalwart champion of the oppressed, especially the long-suffering people of Tibet, President Meyer is considered one of the world’s most notable people. In her own words, she reveals the innermost workings of the world’s most powerful office, sharing previous secret details along with her own personal feelings about the historic events of her time.

In A Woman First: First Woman, President Selina Meyer tells the story of her times the way that only she could, Readers will gain new insights not only into Meyer herself but also the mechanics of governing and the many colorful personalities in Meyer’s orbit, including world leaders and her devoted cadre of allies and aides, many of them already familiar to the American people.




























[book] Zaitoun:
Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchen
by Yasmin Khan
Food52, Saffron
FEBRUARY 2019
Norton

A dazzling celebration of Palestinian cuisine, featuring more than 80 modern recipes, captivating stories and stunning travel photography.

"Yasmin Khan draws on her vast experience as a storyteller, cook, human rights activist, itinerant traveler and writer to create a moving, empathetic, hugely knowledgeable and utterly delicious book." -Anthony Bourdain

British cook Yasmin Khan unlocks the flavors and fragrances of modern Palestine, from the sun-kissed pomegranate stalls of Akka, on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, through evergreen oases of date plantations in the Jordan Valley, to the fading fish markets of Gaza City.

Palestinian food is winningly fresh and bright, centered around colorful mezze dishes that feature the region’s bountiful eggplants, peppers, artichokes, and green beans; slow-cooked stews of chicken and lamb flavored with Palestinian barahat spice blends; and the marriage of local olive oil with earthy za’atar, served in small bowls to accompany toasted breads. It has evolved over several millennia through the influences of Arabic, Jewish, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Bedouin cultures and civilizations that have ruled over, or lived in, the area known as ancient Palestine.

In each place she visits, Khan enters the kitchens of Palestinians of all ages and backgrounds, discovering the secrets of their cuisine and sharing heartlifting stories.


























[book] Willa & Hesper
by Amy Feltman
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Grand Central Publishing
For fans of What Belongs to You by Garth Greenwell and The Futures by Anna Pitoniak, a soul-piercing debut that explores the intertwining of past and present, queerness, and coming of age in uncertain times.

Willa's darkness enters Hesper's light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. She runs, following her fractured family back to her grandfather's hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia, looking for the origin story that he is no longer able to tell. But once in Tbilisi, cracks appear in her grandfather's history-and a massive flood is heading toward Georgia, threatening any hope for repair.

Meanwhile, heartbroken Willa is so desperate to leave New York that she joins a group trip for Jewish twentysomethings to visit Holocaust sites in Germany and Poland, hoping to override her emotional state. When it proves to be more fraught than home, she must come to terms with her past-the ancestral past, her romantic past, and the past that can lead her forward.

Told from alternating perspectives, and ending in the shadow of Trump's presidency, WILLA & HESPER is a deeply moving, cerebral, and timely debut



























[book] TOGETHER
A Memoir of a Marriage
and a Medical Mishap
by Judy Goldman
FEBRUARY 12, 2019
Nan A. Talese
A routine procedure left novelist, memoirist, and poet Judy Goldman's husband paralyzed. Together is her unforgettable account of the struggle to regain their "normal" life and a nuanced portrait of a marriage tested.

When Judy Goldman's husband of almost four decades reads a newspaper ad for an injection to alleviate back pain, the outpatient procedure sounds like the answer to his longtime backaches. But rather than restoring his tennis game, the procedure leaves him paralyzed from the waist down--a phenomenon none of the doctors the family consults can explain. Overnight, Goldman's world is turned upside down. Though she has always thought of herself as the polite, demure wife opposite her strong, brave husband, Goldman finds herself thrown into a new role as his advocate, navigating byzantine hospital policies, demanding and refusing treatments, seeking solutions to help him win back his independence.

Along the way, Goldman flashes back to her memories of their life together. As she tries envision her family's future, she discovers a new, more resilient version of herself. Together is a story of the life we imagine versus the life we lead--an elegant and empathetic meditation on partnership, aging, and, of course, love.



























[book] Savage Feast:
Three Generations, Two Continents,
and a Dinner Table
(a Memoir with Recipes)
by Boris Fishman
February 2019
Harper

The acclaimed author of A Replacement Life shifts between heartbreak and humor in this gorgeously told, recipe-filled memoir. A family story, an immigrant story, a love story, and an epic meal, Savage Feast explores the challenges of navigating two cultures from an unusual angle.

A revealing personal story and family memoir told through meals and recipes, Savage Feast begins with Boris’s childhood in Soviet Belarus, where good food was often worth more than money. He describes the unlikely dish that brought his parents together and how years of Holocaust hunger left his grandmother so obsessed with bread that she always kept five loaves on hand. She was the stove magician and Boris’ grandfather the master black marketer who supplied her, evading at least one firing squad on the way. These spoils kept Boris’ family—Jews who lived under threat of discrimination and violence—provided-for and protected.

Despite its abundance, food becomes even more important in America, which Boris’ family reaches after an emigration through Vienna and Rome filled with marvel, despair, and bratwurst. How to remain connected to one’s roots while shedding their trauma? The ambrosial cooking of Oksana, Boris’s grandfather’s Ukrainian home aide, begins to show him the way. His quest takes him to a farm in the Hudson River Valley, the kitchen of a Russian restaurant on the Lower East Side, a Native American reservation in South Dakota, and back to Oksana’s kitchen in Brooklyn. His relationships with women—troubled, he realizes, for reasons that go back many generations—unfold concurrently, finally bringing him, after many misadventures, to an American soulmate.

Savage Feast is Boris’ tribute to food, that secret passage to an intimate conversation about identity, belonging, family, displacement, and love.































[book] Willa & Hesper
A Novel
by Amy Feltman
FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Grand Central Publishing

For fans of What Belongs to You by Garth Greenwell and The Futures by Anna Pitoniak, a soul-piercing debut that explores the intertwining of past and present, queerness, and coming of age in uncertain times.

Willa's darkness enters Hesper's light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. She runs, following her fractured family back to her grandfather's hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia, looking for the origin story that he is no longer able to tell. But once in Tbilisi, cracks appear in her grandfather's history-and a massive flood is heading toward Georgia, threatening any hope for repair.

Meanwhile, heartbroken Willa is so desperate to leave New York that she joins a group trip for Jewish twentysomethings to visit Holocaust sites in Germany and Poland, hoping to override her emotional state. When it proves to be more fraught than home, she must come to terms with her past-the ancestral past, her romantic past, and the past that can lead her forward.

Told from alternating perspectives, and ending in the shadow of Trump's presidency, WILLA & HESPER is a deeply moving, cerebral, and timely debut


























[book] I.M.
A Memoir
by Isaac Mizrahi
February 2019
Flatiron Books

Isaac Mizrahi is a designer, cabaret performer, talk-show host, a TV celebrity. Yet ever since he shot to fame in the late 1980s, the private Isaac Mizrahi has remained under wraps. Until now.

In I.M., Isaac Mizrahi offers a poignant, candid, and touching look back on his life so far. Growing up gay in a sheltered Syrian Jewish Orthodox family, Isaac had unique talents that ultimately drew him into fashion and later into celebrity circles that read like a who’s who of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: Richard Avedon, Audrey Hepburn, Anna Wintour, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Meryl Streep, and Oprah Winfrey, to name only a few.

In his elegant memoir, Isaac delves into his lifelong battles with weight, insomnia, and depression. He tells what it was like to be an out gay man in a homophobic age and to witness the ravaging effects of the AIDS epidemic. Brimming with intimate details and inimitable wit, Isaac's narrative reveals not just the glamour of his years, but the grit beneath the glitz. Rich with memorable stories from in and out of the spotlight, I.M. illuminates deep emotional truths.
























[book] Brave New Work:
Are You Ready to
Reinvent Your Organization?
by Aaron Dignan
February 2019
Portfolio

Are you ready to eliminate red tape, kill bureaucracy, and do the best work of your life?

Nearly every client Aaron Dignan meets, from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, points to the same frustrations: lack of trust, bottlenecks in decision making, siloed functions and teams, meeting and email overload, tiresome budgeting, short-term thinking, and more.

Is there any hope for a solution? Haven't countless business gurus promised the answer, yet changed almost nothing about the way we work?

That's because we fail to recognize that organizations aren't machines to be predicted and controlled. They're complex human systems full of potential waiting to be released.

Dignan says you can't fix a team, department, or organization by tinkering around the edges. Over the years, he has helped his clients completely reinvent their operating systems--the fundamental principles and practices that shape their culture--with extraordinary success. And they're not alone.

Imagine a bank that abandoned traditional budgeting, only to outperform its competition for decades. An appliance manufacturer that divided itself into 2,000 autonomous teams, resulting not in chaos but rapid growth. A healthcare provider with a headquarters of just 50 people supporting over 14,000 in the field--named "best place to work" year after year. And even a team that saved $3 million per year by cancelling one monthly meeting.

Their stories may sound improbable, but in Brave New Work you'll learn exactly how they and other organizations are inventing a smarter, healthier, andmore effective way to work. Not through top-down mandates, but through a groundswell of autonomy, trust, and transparency.

Whether you lead a team of ten or ten thousand, improving your operating system is the single most powerful thing you can do. The only question is, are you ready?
























[book] Getting Good at Getting Older:
A New Jewish Catalog
by the late Richard Siegel (Jewish Catalog)
and his widow Rabbi Laura Geller
March 2019
Behrman House

We came of age in the '60s and '70s, through civil rights, anti-war protests, and the rise of feminism. We've raised families and had careers. We've been around the world, figuratively if not literally. We've done a lot.

And we're getting older. So we might as well get good at it.

Getting Good at Getting Older: A Jewish Catalog for a New Age is a tour for all of us "of a certain age" through the resources and skills we need to navigate the years between maturity and old age. Getting Good at Getting Older brings humor, warmth, and 4,000 years of Jewish experience to the question of how to shape this new stage of life.
























[book] How to Be a Capitalist
Without Any Capital:
The Four Rules You Must
Break To Get Rich
by Nathan Latka
March 5, 2019
Portfolio

I don;t agree with his advice or family's ideas. I just like the surname of this Loudoun County guy who started a firm in his Virginia dorm room and got funding for projects from a Virginia billionaire. The host of a popular ENTREPRENEUR podcast, here are his thoughts on how to succeed monetarily.

He writes, “At nineteen, I founded a software company with $119 in my bank account. Five years later, it was valued at $10.5 million. I don't consider myself exceptionally brilliant. I just realized something few people know: You don't need lots of money or an original idea to get really rich. Now, I make more than $100,000 in passive income every month, while also running my own private equity firm and hosting The Top Entrepreneurs podcast, which has more than 10 million downloads. This book will show you how I went from college dropout to member of the New Rich. And I'm holding nothing back. You'll see my tax returns, my profit and loss statements, my email negotiations when buying and selling companies. It's time to forget your grandfather's advice. I'll teach you how to be a modern opportunist--investor, entrepreneur, or side hustler--by breaking these four golden rules of the old guard:

1. Focus on one skill: Wrong. Don't cultivate one great skill to get ahead. In today's business world, success goes to the multitaskers.
2. Be unique: Wrong. The way to get rich is not by launching a new idea but by aggressively copying others and then adding your own twist.
3. Focus on one goal: Wrong. Focus instead on creating a system to produce the outcome you want, not just once, but over and over again.
4. Appeal to the masses: Wrong. The masses are broke ($4k average net worth in America?). Let others cut a trail through the jungle so you can peacefully walk in and capitalize on their hard work.
By rejecting these defunct rules and following my unconventional path, you can copy other people's ideas shamelessly, bootstrap a start-up with almost no funding, invest in small local businesses for huge payoffs, and reap all the benefits.






















[book] Giraffes on Horseback Salad:
Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers,
and the Strangest Movie Never Made
by Josh Frank and Tim Heidecker
Manuela Pertega (Illustrator)
March 2019
Quirk
Surrealism meets Hollywood meets film history in this graphic novel, which turns an unproduced script by Salvador Dali into a fantastic comedy starring Groucho, Chico, and Harpo Marx.

Grab some popcorn and take a seat...The curtain is about to rise on a film like no other! But first, the real-life backstory: Giraffes on Horseback Salad was a Marx Brothers film written by modern art icon Salvador Dali, who’d befriended Harpo. Rejected by MGM, the script was thought lost forever. But author Josh Frank found it, and with comedian Tim Heidecker and Spanish comics creator Manuela Pertega, he’s re-created the film as a graphic novel in all its gorgeous full-color, cinematic, surreal glory. In the story, a businessman named Jimmy (played by Harpo) is drawn to the mysterious Surrealist Woman, whose very presence changes humdrum reality into Dali-esque fantasy. With the help of Groucho and Chico, Jimmy seeks to join her fantastical world—but forces of normalcy threaten to end their romance. Includes new Marx Brothers songs and antics, plus the real-world story behind the historic collaboration.


















[book] A Woman Is No Man:
A Novel
by Etaf Rum
March 2019
HarperCollins

Three generations of Palestinian-American women living in Brooklyn are torn between individual desire and the strict mores of Arab culture in this powerful debut—a heart-wrenching story of love, intrigue, courage, and betrayal that will resonate with women from all backgrounds, giving voice to the silenced and agency to the oppressed.

"Where I come from, we’ve learned to silence ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence will save us. Where I come from, we keep these stories to ourselves. To tell them to the outside world is unheard of—dangerous, the ultimate shame.”

Palestine, 1990. Seventeen-year-old Isra prefers reading books to entertaining the suitors her father has chosen for her. Over the course of a week, the naïve and dreamy girl finds herself quickly betrothed and married, and is soon living in Brooklyn. There Isra struggles to adapt to the expectations of her oppressive mother-in-law Fareeda and strange new husband Adam, a pressure that intensifies as she begins to have children—four daughters instead of the sons Fareeda tells Isra she must bear.

Brooklyn, 2008. Eighteen-year-old Deya, Isra’s oldest daughter, must meet with potential husbands at her grandmother Fareeda’s insistence, though her only desire is to go to college. Deya can’t help but wonder if her options would have been different had her parents survived the car crash that killed them when Deya was only eight. But her grandmother is firm on the matter: the only way to secure a worthy future for Deya is through marriage to the right man.

But fate has a will of its own, and soon Deya will find herself on an unexpected path that leads her to shocking truths about her family—knowledge that will force her to question everything she thought she knew about her parents, the past, and her own future.

Set in an America at once foreign to many and staggeringly close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is a story of culture and honor, secrets and betrayals, love and violence. It is an intimate glimpse into a controlling and closed cultural world, and a universal tale about family and the ways silence and shame can destroy those we have sworn to protect.






























[book] AMERICA'S JEWISH WOMEN
A History from Colonial Times to Today
(or maybe til 2018)
By Pamela S. Nadell
American University
March 2019
Norton

A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women have maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history.

What does it mean to be a Jewish woman in America? In a gripping historical narrative, Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people-from the colonial era’s Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter Emma Lazarus to Bessie Hillman and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to scores of other activists, workers, wives, and mothers who helped carve out a Jewish American identity.

The twin threads binding these women together, she argues, are a strong sense of self and a resolute commitment to making the world a better place. Nadell recounts how Jewish women have been at the forefront of causes for centuries, fighting for suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, and feminism, and hoisting banners for Jewish rights around the world. Informed by shared values of America’s founding and Jewish identity, these women’s lives have left deep footprints in the history of the nation they call home.































[book] The Altruists:
A Novel
by Andrew Ridker
March 5, 2019
VIKING

A vibrant and perceptive novel about a father's plot to win back his children's inheritance

Arthur Alter is in trouble. A middling professor at a Midwestern college, he can't afford his mortgage, he's exasperated his much-younger girlfriend, and his kids won't speak to him. And then there's the money--the small fortune his late wife Francine kept secret, which she bequeathed directly to his children.

Those children are Ethan, an anxious recluse living off his mother's money on a choice plot of Brooklyn real estate; and Maggie, a would-be do-gooder trying to fashion herself a noble life of self-imposed poverty. On the verge of losing the family home, Arthur invites his children back to St. Louis under the guise of a reconciliation. But in doing so, he unwittingly unleashes a Pandora's box of age-old resentments and long-buried memories--memories that orbit Francine, the matriarch whose life may hold the key to keeping them together.

Spanning New York, Paris, Boston, St. Louis, and a small desert outpost in Zimbabwe, The Altruists is a darkly funny (and ultimately tender) family saga in the tradition of Jonathan Franzen and Jeffrey Eugenides, with shades of Philip Roth and Zadie Smith. It's a novel about money, privilege, politics, campus culture, dating, talk therapy, rural sanitation, infidelity, kink, the American beer industry, and what it means to be a "good person."






















The Jewish Founding Father:
Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life
by Andrew Porwancher, Phd.
(Univ of Oklahoma School of Law)
Harvard University Press
forthcoming 2019
Jewish …? most say no. Yes, he studied in a Jewish school... but he was Christian? Wasn't he? Porwancher seeks to prove otherwise. Why? Hamilton’s mother, Rachel Faucette, was married to Jewish merchant Johann Michael Lavien (aka Levine) in St. Croix in 1745, at a time that Danish law would have required her conversion to Judaism. She left him within a decade, a lived with James Hamilton in Nevis (BWI). She bore Alexander around 1755, and having been born out of wedlock, attended a Jewish school... either out of necessity since he was not baptised or because his mother was considered Jewish...













[book] The Post-Widget Society:
Economic Possibilities for
Our Children
by Lawrence H. Summers
May 2019
FS&G Books
From Professors Anita and Bob Summers son, former U.S. Sec of Treasury Lawrence H. Summers, a presentation of a new paradigm for thinking about the current economic and technological revolution

We are buffeted by the sense that everything is accelerating: Digital technology is changing the way we work, shop, and socialize. And yet for all the talk about disruptive innovations, economic growth is largely stagnant. We are told that with new technologies average citizens are empowered as never before, and yet wide swaths of the population feel powerless and can no longer count on stable careers and a better life for their children. As Lawrence H. Summers shows in The Post-Widget Society, these are the paradoxes that define the economic revolution that is transforming our world.

At the heart of this revolution are two dramatic developments in Western economies: the declining significance of widgets (mass-produced goods) and the rise of design goods (products that cost a lot to design but little to produce); and the controversial prospect of secular stagnation, the long-term phenomenon of negligible economic growth and depressed employment in a dynamic market economy. Summers’s trenchant analysis of these trends reveals that they have profound implications not only for the future of jobs and widening income inequality but also for the nature of the state and the very stability of society.

A bold, pathbreaking book by one of our most important economists, The Post-Widget Society is necessary reading for every American concerned about our economic and political future.
















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